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01-20-2000, 12:56 PM
...or a nurse, or a pharmacist.

I have a pill which I cannot identify.
It is:
a white tablet, stubby oblong shape, approx. 1/2 inch long.
blank on one side, scored across middle on other. on one side of the score it says MIA,
on the other: 110

Help, please.

frolix8
01-20-2000, 05:00 PM
Ah yes, the PDR. Any self-respecting druggie in the 70's had one. Handy book when you're buying pills from strangers. There are some smaller versions available now, but I can't recall the name. Not as complete but still covers most of the scheduled drugs. Enjoy.

cher3
01-20-2000, 05:44 PM
There is a site that lets you search by imprint codes:
http://www.rxlist.com/cgi/rxlistid.cgi

But your info. didn't return anything useful when I tried it. Maybe it's an over-the-counter thing?

Jinx
01-21-2000, 01:09 AM
Ask your local pharmacist for help. If in doubt, trash it!

Elmer J. Fudd
01-21-2000, 01:27 AM
I'm pretty sure that MIA is the initials of a major pharamceutical company. 110 means that the tablet weighs 110 miligrams. If you don't know what bottle it came out of, there is probably no way to visually identify it.

------------------
Elmer J. Fudd,
Millionaire.
I own a mansion and a yacht.

ignatiusjreilly
01-21-2000, 01:30 AM
Gramps, how about in the name of science you pop that pill and report back to us in an hour? The, if you (can) give us the effects, we might better be able to identify the agent at work! ;)

Anyone want to take bets?

torq
01-21-2000, 01:36 AM
Actually, believe it or not, there are entire books filled with pictures of various pills so that you can identify them based on shape, color, markings, etc.

The Physician's Desk Reference will have a "Visual Identification" section; you should be able to find this at your local library. Be aware that there are (or were, last time I checked) two distinct versions of the PDR, one for prescription and one for non-prescription drugs. You may need to check both of them, and it helps if you've already got SOME idea what it might be.

Or, as noted, you can ask a pharmacist. Pharmacists know pills the way some people know cars: "That's a 1973 Belchfire 8 made during the first half of the model year. You can tell because the rear wheels have 47 holes around the outer rim, not 48 like they did in '74 and the last half of '73."

01-21-2000, 02:01 PM
C'mon, somebody's gotta know what it is.

GasDr
01-21-2000, 08:12 PM
Couldn't find it in my 1994 PDR. So, either it was produced after '94 or it is a non-prescription med.

01-21-2000, 10:11 PM
Here's the info. The reason it wasn't in the PDR is because it's a generic. Only brand-name drugs are listed in the PDR.

The brand name for this combo is Fioricet, used for migraine or other severe headaches. This is a controlled substance; posession or use without a CURRENT valid prescription could cause legal difficulties. Also, any drug too old for you to remember what it's for should be discarded; while most drugs simply lose potency over time, others degrade into toxic substances. Throw it away.

MIA 110 (IMPRINT CODE): BUTALBITAL, ACETAMINOPHEN AND CAFFEINE from NOVARTIS
GENERICS
POISINDEX Toxicologic Managements
BARBITURATES-SHORT ACTING
ACETAMINOPHEN
CAFFEINE
IMPRINT CODE: MIA 110
COLOR: WHITE
SHAPE: CAPSULE-SHAPED, SCORED
FORM: TABLET
ACTIVE INGREDIENTS:
ACETAMINOPHEN 325 MG
BUTALBITAL 50 MG
CAFFEINE 40 MG
AVAILABLE CONTAINER:
BOTTLE OF 100; BOTTLE OF 500
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: GENEVA GENERICS




------------------
Sue from El Paso

Experience is what you get when you didn't get what you wanted.