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View Full Version : My daguerreotype obsession


Quintas
05-29-2002, 12:46 AM
I've been searching the net for old daguerreotype photos. This <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/daghtml/daghome.html> is one of the best sites I've found. The face you see when you go to that page was photographed in 1839. The quality on many of these old photos are quite good, especially when you download the large high quality images. I've found a couple of photos of people born in the 1780's. Of course they are middle aged in the photos.

Anyway,to get to my point, I was thinking Thomas Jefferson died just a little over a decade before the above mentioned photo was taken. Did any of the other founding fathers live a little longer than Jefferson to have their photo taken? If not,does anyone know who the earliest president to be photographed at some point in their life was? Maybe Monroe?Tyler? I've searched and all I can find are some photos of lincoln in the 1840s when he was a congressman.

Koxinga
05-29-2002, 01:17 AM
I've seen a photograph of Van Buren, but I'm sure it was taken long after he was President.

Eve
05-29-2002, 08:13 AM
I've seen a photograph of Andrew Jackson (17671845), seventh U.S. President, from 182937. He looked like hell, by the way.

Koxinga
05-29-2002, 08:33 AM
The site www.americanpresident.org states that John Quincy Adams--Jackson's predecessor--was the first president to sit for a photograph, in 1843. The site doesn't say so explicitly, but it looks as if this (http://www.americanpresident.org/KoTrain/Courses/autobios_images/Jqa6-034.jpg) is the photograph in question.

Olentzero
05-29-2002, 09:17 AM
Sorry to bust your chops, Doghouse, but that's an etching - note the printed text at the bottom of the picture. This (http://www.humanities-interactive.org/invasionyanqui/ex047_18g.html) is the daguerreotype of JQA.

This site (http://historyproject.ucdavis.edu/imageapplication/Images.cfm?Major=NP&Minor=B) has the daguerreotype of Jackson that Eve mentioned, as well as of Zachary Taylor and Daniel Webster. If these guys are any indication, the early nineteenth century wasn't a good time for anybody.