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View Full Version : Does Santa Claus arrive also in the southern hemisphere on the 25th dec.?


elisa
05-29-2002, 04:02 AM
Question to anyone living in Australia and so on: Does Santa Claus arrive also in the southern hemisphere on the 25th dec.?
Thank You. I hope you get a lot of gifts...
Elisa

jjimm
05-29-2002, 04:21 AM
Of course he does!

Tsubaki
05-29-2002, 05:17 AM
Well, technically he arrives on the night of Christmas Eve/the morning of Christmas Day.

And in Australia (well, in every Aussie household of Anglo-Saxon background that I know) we open our presents on Christmas morning. Christmas Eve isn't as big a deal as it is in Northern Hemisphere countries (although many people go to church services on Christmas Eve).

Mangetout
05-29-2002, 05:44 AM
It depends largely on whether you have been naughty or nice.

It's important not to overlook factors such as this.

Pommyaussie
05-29-2002, 05:48 AM
Not to mention being seen in our local shopping mall from approx early November!

Ice Wolf
05-29-2002, 05:57 AM
... and all the Santa Parades ...

Unless they're -- *gasp!* -- imposters!

elisa
05-29-2002, 06:02 AM
Thank You, but it comes dressed in his traditional red and white cloathing and driving a sledge with reindeers although in dicember it's very hot there?

Pommyaussie
05-29-2002, 06:10 AM
The red coat, the reindeer, the full works!

Rumour has it that Santa tried a gig in board shorts and sunnies one Christmas but he didn't quite cut it with the kids!

Ice Wolf
05-29-2002, 06:13 AM
Our Santa duplicates are extreme masochists here in NZ, elisa. They wear all the gear, including white gloves, beard, the whole she-bang. Very, very sweaty at the end of the shift! And, yes, we do have the reindeer thing -- only they're model reindeer mainly, and at times we replace reindeer for Clydesdale horses.

I hear elsewhere they've adapted to Santa Claus wearing shorts and jandals, but they're the exception rather than the rule.

Caught@Work
05-29-2002, 06:24 AM
But he doesn't use Reindeer. Too hot. He is pulled by 6 White Boomers. Snow White Boomers.

kambuckta
05-29-2002, 08:02 AM
'On the first day of Christmas, my true-love sent to me.....
An emu up a gum tree.'

And there's fewer chimneys for the jolly old fella to slide down in our neck of the woods. His girth is a bit too ample for your average Coonara flue.......

Mangetout
05-29-2002, 08:42 AM
Originally posted by kambuckta
And there's fewer chimneys for the jolly old fella to slide down in our neck of the woods. His girth is a bit too ample for your average Coonara flue....... Oh honestly; he's got a magic key, or something.

Ice Wolf
05-29-2002, 08:55 AM
Do you really think Old St. Nick would risk the chimney biz these days with Neighbourhood Watch, extra-sensitive alarm systems, attack pets etc. etc. ...?

Magic key? Oh, yes? Sounds a bit suss, that.

Olentzero
05-29-2002, 10:43 AM
elisa, benvenuto al SDMB!
elisa, welcome to the SDMB!

Ecco (http://www.santas.net/australianchristmas.htm) un po' di tradizioni di Natale in Australia.
Here is a little on Christmas traditions in Australia.

I wager this is the first ever post on the Boards that has subtitles. :D

rjung
05-29-2002, 02:21 PM
Magic key?

It's pixie dust, kids. :)

Tsubaki
05-29-2002, 06:36 PM
Originally posted by Caught@Work
But he doesn't use Reindeer. Too hot. He is pulled by 6 White Boomers. Snow White Boomers.

Racing Santa Claus through the blazing sun...

Mangetout
05-29-2002, 06:41 PM
Originally posted by rjung
Magic key?

It's pixie dust, kids. :) Of course! I do feel silly now.

Princhester
05-29-2002, 09:43 PM
Actually you can tell a True Santa Claustm by the fact that he remains cool despite Australian heat.

The ones that sweat are imposters.

I believe a True Santa Clausetm carries a little patch of arctic around with him, although I'll leave it to rjung to describe precisely how this is done.

TheLoadedDog
05-29-2002, 11:18 PM
The department stores in Australia cling to the old Christmas standards of fake snow and the like, but the rest of us will usually be found outdoors on Christmas day, drinking beer, watching the kids play in the pool with their new aquatic toys, and taking turns to tend the barbie.

The 2001 Christmas barbie at my place was particularly memorable because of the bushfires ringing Sydney. We were peering through the smoke haze, the sun was deep red, and blackened leaves were falling like rain.


"Aussie Jingle Bells"

1 . Dashing through the bush, in a rusty Holden1 Ute2,
Kicking up the dust, esky3 in the boot4,
Kelpie5 by my side, singing Christmas songs
It's summertime and I'm in my singlet, shorts and thongs6.

Chorus

Jingle Bells, Jingle Bells, Jingle all the way.
Christmas in Australia on scorching summer's day, HEY.
Jingle bells, Jingle bells, Christmas time is beaut,
Oh what fun it is to ride in a rusty Holden Ute


Copyright Colin Buchanan/Rondor Music (Aust.)
http://www.colinbuchanan.com.au/albums/ht.html
(post edited to include only first verse and chorus)

Glossary for Merkins
1. Holden: General Motors
2. Ute: Pickup (non-SUV type)
3. Esky: Insulated beer cooler
4. Boot: Trunk
5. Kelpie: Australian cattle dog
6. Thongs: Cheap plastic sandals (flip flops)

Zapper
05-30-2002, 01:09 AM
Originally posted by TheLoadedDog
...but the rest of us will usually be found outdoors on Christmas day, drinking beer, watching the kids play in the pool with their new aquatic toys, and taking turns to tend the barbie.



The typical scene on Christmas Eve in my city (in Argentina) would be a long table in the garage full of relatives, "a la italiana"; then, when fireworks starts at 0:00 someone sneaks with the presents, places them under the tree and, this done, whispers to the kids: "I think I heard sounds near the tree..."

Jodi
05-30-2002, 01:20 AM
TLD -- Nice subtitles for us English-speakers (obligatory winkie smiley omitted, I'm not gonna do it, darn it), but what, pray tell, is a "singlet?"

hawthorne
05-30-2002, 03:20 AM
A "singlet" is an undershirt, what the English would call a vest.

elisa
05-30-2002, 04:25 AM
Thank You everybody! How nice the song is.
I've just a last question: I saw in the link sent to me from Olentzero (by the way, how did you learn italian?)the followins sentences:

"Christmas shopping is often done in shorts and t-shirts. At many beaches, Santa Claus arrives on a surfboard, or even on a surf lifesaving boat."
Is it a Joke or does really anyone go surfing dressed in red and white? I hope the reindeers can swim....
e.

Olentzero
05-30-2002, 09:28 AM
Originally posted by TheLoadedDog
The 2001 Christmas barbie at my place was particularly memorable because of the bushfires ringing Sydney. We were peering through the smoke haze, the sun was deep red, and blackened leaves were falling like rain.

[Nat King Cole]

Sydney roasting on an open fire....

[/NKC]

elisa - I taught myself Italian. Languages are a hobby of mine. :)

I think if Santa comes in on a surfboard, it's not in full polar uniform, but probably a pair of red and white board shorts.

Morgainelf
05-30-2002, 10:03 AM
In Louisiana, St. Nick's sleigh is pulled by alligators. See? (http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0882890026.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg)

kaylasdad99
05-30-2002, 04:15 PM
Originally posted by hawthorne
A "singlet" is an undershirt, what the English would call a vest.

I have suspected this, since encountering the word "singlet" (solely) in the short stories of W. Somerset Maugham, but I'm still confused. Maugham was English, why did he use "singlet" instead of "vest"?

Is there no further distinction between the two terms?

tracer
05-30-2002, 06:30 PM
Is There a Santa Claus? (http://funnies.paco.to/santa.html)

Motog
05-30-2002, 06:51 PM
tracer

You're no fun at all

Tsubaki
05-30-2002, 06:59 PM
Dashing through the sand,
In our bathers and our thongs,
Running through the waves,
Singing Christmas songs.
Visiting our friends,
Laughing all the way.
Swatting flies and eating pies
On a sunny Christmas Day.

Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way.
Oh what fun it is to ride on a surfboard, not a sleigh
Hey!
Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way
Oh what fun it is to ride on a surfboard, not a sleigh.

(But I like TLD's version better).

LolaCocaCola
05-30-2002, 08:16 PM
"singlet" in the US is a tank top/"wife beater"

elisa
05-31-2002, 04:21 AM
And what about South Africa or Brasil?
Do people celebrate Xmas in the same way of europe and Usa?

Olentzero
05-31-2002, 10:46 AM
If they celebrate Christmas like they celebrate Carneval down in Brasil, I'm heading south next December.

hawthorne
05-31-2002, 10:49 AM
Originally posted by kaylasdad99
I have suspected this, since encountering the word "singlet" (solely) in the short stories of W. Somerset Maugham, but I'm still confused. Maugham was English, why did he use "singlet" instead of "vest"?

Is there no further distinction between the two terms? This is an intriguing question, and one I've yet to find a satisfactory answer to. It's not an Australianism, even though that where the word seems to have the greatest currency. My 'Strayn Colloquialism Dictionary's only mention of the word was as part of "useful as a hip pocket in a singlet" (meaning as useful as a one-legged man at an arse-kicking party).

First off, here is a picture of the iconic Aussie singlet as worn by Chesty Bond (http://www.bonds.com.au/).

It appears that both singlet and vest mean may mean much the same garment in the UK, although like you kaylasdad99, I'd never heard a Pom call one a "singlet". Maugham is not the only British user of "singlet". The OED (which is not a free site so I can't give you a link) has for "singlet": "An unlined woollen garment (knitted or woven), now usually close-fitting and worn as an undershirt or jersey." Quotations date from 1746 and the term is not labelled obs.

As for "vest", it's "c. A knitted or woven undergarment for the upper part of the body, worn next to the skin." Quotes only go back to 1851.

As for other sources, see dictionary.com for singlet (http://www.dictionary.com/search?q=singlet) and vest (http://www.dictionary.com/search?q=vest). "Tank top" (http://www.dictionary.com/search?q=tank%20top) appears distinguishable, but only on the basis that it may not chiefly be underwear.

None of this really seems to address the issue of the difference between a vest and a singlet. Not tightness of fit, the occasional presence of buttons, material (jersey seems to mean either a soft cloth or a clinging one), nor sleevelessness. Perhaps vests are longer.

It is curious that in no case I've seen does the definition of one refer to the other. No mention of regional use is made, but that's what I'd guess.

Pommyaussie
05-31-2002, 11:56 AM
Well there is a man's garment called a doublet but I can't find any historical connection between the singlet and the doublet, they're both similar insofar as they cover the torso so maybe it was just an original term which was replaced by vest?

See www.crimsongypsy.com/gallery6.html

BTW Marks & Spencers in the UK always sold 'Singlets' rather than 'Vests'. And in Aus a waistcoat is generally referred to as a vest. Gets confusing!

TheLoadedDog
05-31-2002, 10:05 PM
The classic Australian Chesty Bond singlet in hawthorne's link is also known as a Jackie Howe (http://or.essortment.com/legendsshearing_rvha.htm) after the famous Queensland shearer. The dark blue variety of this singlet is the standard uniform of truck drivers.

TheLoadedDog
05-31-2002, 10:10 PM
Originally posted by Pommyaussie
And in Aus a waistcoat is generally referred to as a vest. Gets confusing!
I'm not too sure about that. This Aussie has always thought of a waistcoat as the tailored, button-fronted, sleeveless part of a three-piece suit, and a vest as being a sleeveless jumper, usually woollen, but always without an open front (it's a pullover type thing).

Caught@Work
05-31-2002, 10:23 PM
Originally posted by TheLoadedDog
<<SNIP>>
The dark blue variety of this singlet is the standard uniform of truck drivers.
Or the traditional (perceived) garb of a hard-core lesbian playing the guy.

Jodi
06-01-2002, 12:38 AM
Nobody move! This thread is going to Cuba!

Okay, help me out here. In the U.S.

Vest: Buttoning sleeveless garmet such as one gets with a three-piece suit.

Sweater-vest: Non-buttoning sleeveless garmet, usually knitted, like a sleeveless sweater. Usually V-necked.

Tank-top:[b/] Sleeveless, scoop-necked cotton or ribbed cotton pull-over top. Causal, like a T-shirt.

[b]Jumper: One-piece skirt and top combination, usually worn with a blouse underneath it, commonly worn by little girls and some school teachers.

How does this corrolate to the Aussie/British terms?

TheLoadedDog
06-01-2002, 01:33 AM
Hmmmmm, okay...

Australian Terminology

Vest: Non-buttoning, sleeveless, usually V-necked, usually woollen garment of the type favoured by nerdy clerks in grocery stores. I think this is the US sweater-vest.

Waistcoat: The inner part of a three-piece suit

Singlet: Close-fitting, sleeveless, with shoulder straps. Usually cotton. Designed as an undergarment, but often worn on it's own by blue collar workers. Often worn in its intended sense (undergarment) under business shirts by white-collar workers.

Tank top: Not an expert here, being a guy. I think it's like a singlet, but (slightly) more dressy, and not designed as an undergarment. A female, casual, summer top.

Jumper: Knitted, sleeved, buttonless, item of winter clothing worn by both sexes.

Cardigan: Knitted, usually woollen, casual, sleeved, buttoned garment. Looks a bit like a coat. Very nerdy.

Sloppy Joe (No, you don't eat them): Buttonless, sleeved, casual, unisex top made out of tracksuit (trainer) material.