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Quasimodem
11-16-2002, 03:44 AM
With me I guess it all started with The Time Machine and then evolved (de-volved?) from there.

I loved the film Somewhere In Time, and it is one of my most prized videos, but I digress.....

I'm being a bit selfish, here, but what I really want y'all to do is to recommend some time travel stories I might not have read yet.

I am especially fond of the ones that take the reader to 18th or 19th century New York or London.

And I love references to the Flatiron Building! :D


Quasi

Lynn Bodoni
11-16-2002, 03:56 AM
Millennium by John Varley. I need to dig my copy out again and re-read it. It's absolutely amazing. Check out the chapter titles...

AncientHumanoid
11-16-2002, 06:10 AM
The End of Eternity (I think that's the title) by Isaac Asimov

AncientHumanoid
11-16-2002, 06:28 AM
The Heinlein people need to help me out on this one.

A short story, Somewhere In Time (???) A professor had his students listen to some sort of recording and they vanished into some sort of alternate universe/ other time. One student became an angel, a couple became some sort of ultra-future queen and king warriors....

Not really time travel per se, but still a fascinating story.

Plot twist spoiled on next one:

There was also another one, title a complete blank, where a "time viewer," "chronoscope" was invented and lied about, because it didn't allow viewing distant past, but only recent past. However, it allowed a viewer to see anywhere. Setting it at say, one second in the past, allowed a viewer to spy on anyone in almost real time, thus ending forever any sort of privacy.

I would love to reread either of these stories, if I could just find the real titles. So, Heinlein experts... ideas?

Not really a hijack. These are great time travel type stories that you might enjoy, Quasi.

RIF!

Tuckerfan
11-16-2002, 09:12 AM
It's out of print, but if you can find it, I highly recommend The Ivanhoe Gambit by Simon Hawke. It's the first book in the "Time Wars Adventure Series" which was up to 8 or 9 books I think, before Hawke quit writing them. I quit reading them after about the third or four book since he killed Lucas Priest who was the main character up until that point.

ivylass
11-16-2002, 10:03 AM
Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon.

A romance time travel story.

Trust me.

delphica
11-16-2002, 10:16 AM
Jack Finney is the man for you. Time and Again is about a man who goes back to NYC in the 1880s, and has the added bonus of being illustrated with nifty period reproductions. Finney does a great job of combining the mystery plot elements with fascinating little tidbts about the differences in day-to-day life that surprise the time traveller. The sequel, From Time to Time is also pretty decent, although the plot is a little more stereotypical.

My favorite though is his book of short stories, About Time. Most of the stories are witty and light, a few are insightful, one of them was heartbreaking.

Daylon
11-16-2002, 10:38 AM
Can't believe no one has mentioned:

"A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court"


All time best time travel novel.

IMHO.

D.

carnivorousplant
11-16-2002, 10:54 AM
Another vote for Time and Again.

"Allow me, Sir."

Athena
11-16-2002, 11:32 AM
I'm partial to Octavia Butler's book Kindred. It's about a modern black woman who finds herself whisked back to slaveholding times. Very good read & very thought provoking.

KneadToKnow
11-16-2002, 11:41 AM
I'd have to say my favorite is Connecticut Yankee, though Stephen Fry's Making History wasn't bad, it just had a bad ending.

Greywolf73
11-16-2002, 11:47 AM
Originally posted by ivylass
Outlander, by Diana Gabaldon.

A romance time travel story.

Trust me.

Oh yeah!! I second that! :D

I cannot recommend Outlander, or the entire Outlander series for that matter, highly enough.
Amazing books.

You also might want to check out The Doomsday Book, by Connie Willis.
Time-travel in the time of the plague.

Lsura
11-16-2002, 11:53 AM
I just recently finished Pastwatch: The redemption of Christopher Columbus by Orson Scott Card. It was an interesting read.

One thing about the Outlander series - they are definitely written from a woman's point of view. I enjoyed them, but I can only think of one male friend who did.

Fenris
11-16-2002, 11:55 AM
Originally posted by NoClueBoy
The Heinlein people need to help me out on this one.

A short story, Somewhere In Time (???) A professor had his students listen to some sort of recording and they vanished into some sort of alternate universe/ other time. One student became an angel, a couple became some sort of ultra-future queen and king warriors....

"Elsewhen" which can be found inthe collection Assignment in Eternity. It's a fun llittle story, but for Heinlein's two best time travel stories, try "By His Bootstraps" and "All You Zombies". One can be found in The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathon Hoag and the other...erm...in one of his other collections (The Menace from Earth?)


Plot twist spoiled on next one:

There was also another one, title a complete blank, where a "time viewer," "chronoscope" was invented and lied about, because it didn't allow viewing distant past, but only recent past. However, it allowed a viewer to see anywhere. Setting it at say, one second in the past, allowed a viewer to spy on anyone in almost real time, thus ending forever any sort of privacy.


It's not Heinlein, it's Asimov: "The Dead Past" available in a billion collections (and the last line is NOT "Happy Goldfish Bowl" or "Welcome to the Goldfish Bowl.". But everyone misremembers, 'cause it should be.


Laumer's Dinosaur Beach is another classic of time travel.

Fenris

Fenris
11-16-2002, 11:57 AM
Originally posted by Fenris
(and the last line is NOT "Happy Goldfish Bowl" or "Welcome to the Goldfish Bowl.". But everyone misremembers, 'cause it should be.
[/B]

(Erm...but it's awful damned close. I have no idea what I was thinking when I typed that.)

Captain Amazing
11-16-2002, 12:03 PM
Originally posted by Greywolf73


You also might want to check out The Doomsday Book, by Connie Willis.
Time-travel in the time of the plague.

And, for a funnier Connie Willis time travel story in the same "world", read "To Say Nothing of the Dog".

koawala
11-16-2002, 12:22 PM
Another vote for Jack Finney's books. His are some of the few books that I keep after reading.

Sampiro
11-16-2002, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by NoClueBoy
There was also another one, title a complete blank, where a "time viewer," "chronoscope" was invented

RIF!

That sounds like THE LIGHT OF OTHER DAYS

The Light of Other Days (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0812576403/qid=1037467399/sr=8-2/ref=sr_8_2/103-4120834-0745447?v=glance&s=books&n=507846) by Arthur C. Clarke and Stephen Baxter.

I liked Tim Powers' The Anubis Gates, especially the code for identifying other time travellers in 18th centruy England (whistling McCartney's "Yesterday".)

K364
11-16-2002, 12:24 PM
Fenris is, of course, correct. Heinlein's "By His Bootstraps" and "All You Zombies" are required reading.

I also love his "The Door Into Summer" - another time travel paradoxer, this time a full novel (the other two are Novellas?". It was written when RAH was at the peak of his storytelling powers.

Great Stuff!

AncientHumanoid
11-16-2002, 12:57 PM
Thanks Fenris, those are they.

Another vote for Orson Scott Card's Pastwatch: The Redemption Of Christopher Columbus a very unique take on time paradoxes (paradi?)

CalMeacham
11-16-2002, 01:26 PM
I second Mark Twan's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, follwed very close behind by L. Sprgue de Cmp's classic Lest Darkness Fall, arguabl th best of its kind ver. It as recently been republished with David Drake's To Bring the Light, which has the distinxcion of being the only time travel story I know of where someone from he past (circa 400 AD) gets sent even further into the past.

I also recomens Robert Silverburg's Up the Line, which delves into Time Travel into the Byzantine Empire, James Hogan's The Proteus Project, and Leo Frankowski's novels. Robert L Forward's Time Master is a time-travel novelk by a physicist who has looked into time travel. Also a guarded note about Michael Crichton's Timeline.

Exapno Mapcase
11-16-2002, 01:47 PM
I think the two Heinlein pieces are no longer than short stories. A novella has to be at least 15,000 words long.

One of the best recent time travel novels is John Kessel's Corrupting Dr. Nice. The first section takes place in 1st century Jerusalem and layers modern time travelers over the lives of those who really lived there at that time and also over the lives of those who work for the time travel business and have been co-opted and corrupted by future ways. It's as good an illustration of what time travel would do to a culture as anything in sf.

The rest of the book doesn't quite live up to that, but there are a number of fun scenes concerning an apatosaur brought as a pet to suburban Connecticut.

rjk
11-16-2002, 01:56 PM
Nobody mentioned The Dancers at the End of Time (http://www.sfsite.com/09b/dan41.htm) by Michael Moorcock. I have to go re-read it every couple of years. Time travel isn't really a big part of the events of the plot, but did set up the situation.

And don't forget The Big Time (http://www.sfsite.com/09b/dan41.htm) by Fritz Leiber.

I'll of course second Connecticut Yankee and The Time Machine. (That last scene on the beach still shakes me up.)

Both of those Connie Willis books are great too. I just started To Say Nothing of the Dog, and would suggest the (non-time-travel) Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome if you like the boating scenes. Yes, that's a spoiler! :p

WSLer
11-16-2002, 02:21 PM
If I Never Get Back by Daryl Brock which is about a guy who travels back to the 1890's and end up playing with the Cinncinatti Reds of that time period and meets Samuel Clemens.

Very entertaining so rush on out and get it at your local bookstore or library.

Lok
11-16-2002, 04:22 PM
Originally posted by Tuckerfan
It's out of print, but if you can find it, I highly recommend The Ivanhoe Gambit by Simon Hawke. It's the first book in the "Time Wars Adventure Series" which was up to 8 or 9 books I think, before Hawke quit writing them. I quit reading them after about the third or four book since he killed Lucas Priest who was the main character up until that point.
It ended up at 12 novels. A fun read and you might really want to go and find the later books if that is the only reason you dropped the series and you were enjoying it up until then. Remember, we are talking time travel here.

Tapioca Dextrin
11-16-2002, 04:42 PM
I'd vote fro The Time Ships by Steven Baxter. It's a re-write of The Time Machine but with modern physics thrown in.

KidCharlemagne
11-16-2002, 06:19 PM
Didn't Ray Bradbury write a short story about an exhibit where you went back in time and were supposed stay within a certain path but some dude stepped on a bug (Butterfly?) and when he went back the alphabet was different? Isn't that where butterfly effect came from? I can't remember the story.

kitarak
11-16-2002, 06:20 PM
Originally posted by Tapioca Dextrin
I'd vote fro The Time Ships by Steven Baxter. It's a re-write of The Time Machine but with modern physics thrown in.

Not entirely true. It's a sequel to the Time Machine by Stephen Baxter. It was reasonably good on it's own, but it didn't follow well from the Time Machine - the perspectives in the two are so different that it detracts a lot from the Time Ships IMO.

I'll add yet another vote for 'To Say Nothing of the Dog'

ivylass
11-16-2002, 06:23 PM
Originally posted by KidCharlemagne
Didn't Ray Bradbury write a short story about an exhibit where you went back in time and were supposed stay within a certain path but some dude stepped on a bug (Butterfly?) and when he went back the alphabet was different? Isn't that where butterfly effect came from? I can't remember the story.

Yes. The men were going back in time to kill dinosaurs who were very close to death anyway. That way the time line wouldn't be contaminated

While they were shooting at a T-Rex who was about to have a tree fall on top of him, one of the hunters stepped on a butterfly.

They go back to the present, find the language has changed and a dictator has taken over.

As punishment, they sent the hunter back in time to the dinosaur age.

I can't remember the title either.

CalMeacham
11-16-2002, 07:04 PM
The Ray Bradbury story is The Sund of Thunder. I think that L. Sprague de Camp wrote the similarly-themed A Gun for Dinosaur because he didn't lik the way Bradbury andled time travel. Much, much later, de Camp wrote more stories using the same characters and published it as a book, Rivers of Time.

Quasimodem
11-16-2002, 07:33 PM
Lynn Bodoni answers one of my posts.

I need a little time (!) to let that one settle.

I am honored, Lynn.
I'll get a copy of Millennium ASAP!

I also appreciate the list y'all provided, and I must say I'm looking forward to many winter nights curled up in bed and taking a trip backward in time!

Also looking forward to my re-read of Connecticut Yankee....!
Thanks for the reminder! :D

Quasi

c_carol
11-16-2002, 07:56 PM
Another good O.S. Card novel with a really different take on time-travel is Enchantment. It's more fantasy than sci-fi, though.

Baker
11-16-2002, 08:16 PM
In addition to time travel stories I like alternate history stories. You know, what if something had happened differently, how would it affect history? My favorite author of this type of story was H. Beam Piper, who died over forty years ago. His Lord Kalvan of Otherwhen was booklength, most of the rest were short stories or novellas. The best short story was "He Walked Around the Horses." It was based on the Charles Fort story about the British diplomat who disappeared in Germany early in the nineteenth century. If you know your history, the last line of the story will be very funny/ironic. Go and find it if you can.
Anybody else like Piper?

DrFidelius
11-16-2002, 08:27 PM
Fuzzys Rule.

SkeptiJess
11-16-2002, 08:35 PM
Here's an obscure one I liked: Elleander Morning by some guy whose last name begins with a "Z" (my books aren't yet unpacked after my recent move so I can't double-check). It's not a scienc-ey time travel book -- more of a fantasy, I guess, and mixed with a lot of alternative history. Basically the woman in the title goes back in time to kill Hitler and stop WWII. But it's a whole lot more complicated than that. The modern scenes set in a world where WWII didn't take place are particularly interesting. Very good read.

Jess

DreadCthulhu
11-16-2002, 09:13 PM
Guns of the South, by Harry Turtledove. Even the cover alone catches the eye ; Robert E Lee holding an Ak47.

Atreyu
11-16-2002, 09:16 PM
No mention of Kevin Grimwood's Replay? That's kind of surprising. Although it may not be technically considered a time travel story in that the main character didn't really have control over the time travel element in the story.

The aforementioned Pastwatch, Time and Again, From Time to Time, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court are all great reads as well.

Jonathan Chance
11-16-2002, 09:41 PM
More props to Beam Piper. Hell, I once fronted a band called The Beam Pipers.

And also to Turtledoves GotS.

"Give it it's proper name, General Lee. It is an AK-47."

pesch
11-16-2002, 10:53 PM
Originally posted by delphica
Jack Finney is the man for you. Time and Again is about a man who goes back to NYC in the 1880s, and has the added bonus of being illustrated with nifty period reproductions. Finney does a great job of combining the mystery plot elements with fascinating little tidbts about the differences in day-to-day life that surprise the time traveller. The sequel, From Time to Time is also pretty decent, although the plot is a little more stereotypical.

I'd also recommended his book of non-fiction "Forgotten News," in which he discusses things he picked up while doing research for Time and Again. Half of the book is about a notorious "Crime of the Century" that was played out in the pages of the newspapers of the day. He actually managed to find the house the murder took place in, looking remarkably the same considering it took place about 150 years before.

DarkWriter
11-16-2002, 10:54 PM
Lightning, by Dean Koontz. A woman's "guardian angel" is actually a time traveler who is in love with her.

Sam Stone
11-17-2002, 12:59 AM
lightning is a good choice.

I'd nominate Heinlein's Time Enough For Love. I mean, you didn't specify which direction they had to travel in...

How about David Gerrold's The Man Who Folded Himself?

And the two Heinlein stories mentioned are among the best, but they are both short stories.

Sam Stone
11-17-2002, 01:01 AM
I actually meant to say Time For The Stars, not Time Enough For Love.

Hazel
11-17-2002, 01:21 AM
Originally posted by WSLer
If I Never Get Back by Daryl Brock which is about a guy who travels back to the 1890's and end up playing with the Cinncinatti Reds of that time period and meets Samuel Clemens.

Very entertaining so rush on out and get it at your local bookstore or library.

Good book! Keep an eye out for the scene where the guy gets really board with the food of the time. He comes up with a creative solution.

I second the votes for Connie Willis' The Doomsday Book and To Say Nothing of the Dog -- also the 1st story about the Oxford time travelers, Time Watch, to be found in the collection Time Watch & other Stories.

Hazel
11-17-2002, 01:29 AM
Re Heinlein, I think "All you Zombies" was a short story, but I remember "By his Bootstraps" as being longer. It might have been a novelette.

How about Kage Baker's books?

And "Timescape". Can't remember who wrote it.

Daylon
11-17-2002, 03:58 AM
I"m just glad I mentioned Connecticut Yankee in a straight dope thread.. I can die happy now!

Sir Boss jousting with a colt peacemaker in his hand... CLASSIC!

D.

Tuckerfan
11-17-2002, 05:44 AM
Originally posted by Lok

It ended up at 12 novels. A fun read and you might really want to go and find the later books if that is the only reason you dropped the series and you were enjoying it up until then. Remember, we are talking time travel here. I picked up one of the later ones, I think it was 7, anyway, it involved the Colosseus of Rhodes and Jules Verne and I wasn't impressed. It seemed a little "cutesy" to me and just didn't have the biting edge that the first one had.

Caprese
11-17-2002, 06:37 AM
Readers who like Finney, Willis or Gabaldon would perhaps enjoy

Time Out of Mind by John Maxim.

It is a combination thriller, romance and ghost story, with, of course, plenty of time travel--19th century New York City.

Mauvaise
11-17-2002, 09:12 AM
Originally posted by Greywolf73
Oh yeah!! I second that! :D

I cannot recommend Outlander, or the entire Outlander series for that matter, highly enough.
Amazing books.

Make that a third very strong recommendation. Outlander is NOT your typical romance novel. In fact, although there is a "love story" in it, it should *not* be classified in romance. It's Historical Fiction. And damned good fiction at that. Outlander is my favourite book ever and I read it at least once a year.

The first two are set in Scotland and France during the time of the second Jacobite uprising. The third, let's just say deals with aftermath. The forth and fifth (and eventually 6th and 7th) will be dealing with the American Revolution.

Stop whatever you're doing and go NOW and buy Outlander. Then e-mail me (mauvaise3@cox.net) after you've finished and thank me ;)

tanstaafl
11-17-2002, 12:19 PM
I've always liked Andre Norton's time travel books, her "Time Traders" series (The Time Traders, Galactic Derelict, The Defiant Agents and Key Out of Time) as well as the unrelated Operation: Time Search.

I'll also second Simon Hawke's Time Wars series; not deep but good fun anyway.

I'll also mention The End of Eternity by Asimov and The Fall of Chronopolis by Barrington J. Bailey.

Shirley Ujest
11-17-2002, 12:24 PM
Bah, you folks speak ill of romance novels.

For those of you not afraid of shlock: A Knight in Shining Armour by Jude Devereaux.

Michael Crichton's Time Line I found very good. (But, then again, I primarily read romance, so I was raising my standards that day...)

Captain Amazing
11-17-2002, 12:31 PM
I read the first Outlander and didn't like it very much. It really was a romance novel, and I don't like romance novels.

Johnny B. Goode
11-17-2002, 12:39 PM
I read a short story when I was a child that was written by Michael Moorcock, I think. It was about a guy who went back in time to find Jesus Christ and upon finding Joseph and Mary, he found Jesus' other siblings and a retarded boy. The story then details how the traveller inadvertantly assumes the role of Christ and eventually becomes crucified.

I seem to recall that it was a very clever and well-constructed story (though I read it more than 15 years ago).

Does anyone know of the story I am referring to?

The_Peyote_Coyote
11-17-2002, 01:34 PM
Where the hell are the Poul Anderson fans? Try his novels "The Corridors of Time" and "There Will be Time." They're much better, IMO, than his Time Patrol series

Robert Silverberg wrote an excellent novella, "Hawksbill Station," about a penal camp in the Cambrian. It was expanded into a novel, but I haven't read that novel.

It's only a novelette, but I highly recommend Peter Phillips' "Manna," which is in Silverberg's collection Trips in Time

I agree with Meacham about de Camp's Lest Darkness Fall and "A Gun for Dinosaur." Wonderful stories, both.

Also agree with Baker about "He Walked Around the Horses." Beautifully written and well-researched.

A.E. van Vogt's The Weapon Shops of Isher does have time travel as a minor element. And, as Anthony Boucher wrote, it has the best ending line in science fiction.

haardvark
11-17-2002, 02:00 PM
Leo Frankowski wrote a series of books starting with "The CrossTime Engineer". I think there's about 6 of em all told. Kinda cheesy and "overly male" (I don't want to say misogynistic 'cos I think that's a bit strong) but a fun read all the same.

Fella gets transported back to medieval poland, and ends up creating an empire for himself based on his wits and technical savvy. Interesting digressions on shared property, the capitalist model, use of base-12 arithmetic, industrial chemistry etc.

Anybody else familiar with these?

'vark

rjk
11-17-2002, 02:06 PM
I can't believe I didn't think to mention The Dealings of Daniel Kesserich, also by Fritz Leiber. I just read it a few weeks ago.

It was written quite a few years back but only published in 1997. One of the blurbs on the jacket mentions both H.G. Wells and Lovecraft - and it's right! Great stuff!

BiblioCat
11-17-2002, 06:57 PM
Originally posted by DarkWriter
Lightning, by Dean Koontz. A woman's "guardian angel" is actually a time traveler who is in love with her. This is a really good book, one of Koontz's better books, IMHO.
(Koontz can be all over the map in terms of quality)

I figured out he was a time traveler, but was blown away by where he was traveling from.

Jonathan Chance
11-17-2002, 07:57 PM
Here's another one for you...

"The Last Starship From Earth" by John Boyd.

In an semi-Orwellian present a student falls in love with a forbidden woman who turns out to be from an exile planet. He goes back in time to prevent his present and rescues Jesus. He ends up being the Wandering Jew.

Sublight
11-18-2002, 12:55 AM
Bradbury had a nice short story called "The Toynbee Convector", in which an inventor created a machine that took him about 100 years into the future, from which he brought back proof that Earth had become a paradise and everyone lived in peace and harmony. The story is set at this future point where the Utopians are waiting to greet his arrival.
They discover that his time machine and all his 'evidence' was fake, and he had never travelled into the future at all. He made up everything in an attempt to inspire mankind to pull itself out of its rut and cure all its problems. It succeeded because people, believing taht his trip to the future had been real, no longer had any fear that they would fail.

Skeezix
11-18-2002, 01:11 AM
Johnny B. Goode: That'd be Behold The Man. I remember it was an interesting book, but I last read it years ago, now.

Skeezix
11-18-2002, 01:18 AM
Ack. Preview, not Submit.

I wanted to add: The version I have (someplace around here) was published as a novel, though it was awfully short, if memory serves.

He also wrote a short story, Elric at the End of Time in which he poked fun at his character, in a collection of short stories published under the same name.

[Not a Time Travel Story]
Also in the same collection, he wrote another story that completely eviscerated his own Eternal Champion-type stories (in general, though mostly it was a lampoon of Corum) with a whiney, doom-laden main character who was composed almost entirely of the grafted on body parts of demi-gods and demons. Worth reading, if you're at all a fan of the genre.
[/NaTTS]

Badtz Maru
11-18-2002, 02:29 AM
There's been so many...my favorites are the ones that explore alternate realities.

Guns of the South is one I read recently that was surprisingly good. In 2014 a radical group of South African white supremacists have stolen a device that transports you app. 150 years backwards in time. They intend to rewrite history and make the Confederacy a stronghold of racism in modern times, and do this by providing the Confederacy with 100,000 AK-47s.

The story is told from the point of view of a few different characters, mainly General Lee and a soldier from North Carolina. The background of the time travellers comes out in clues obvious to modern people, but it's not too long before some of the historical characters find out what's going on too. The story moves quickly - the actual war is less than half of the book, and the remainder tracks the changes and problems faced by the Confederacy over the next several years. Another interesting element is that nearly every character in the book is based on a real person, even minor characters, although some had details changed to fit the story or to fill in blanks.

It reads as really good historical fiction, it's obvious the author did his research and knew his stuff. The false history that results from the changes made by the time travelers has a feeling of reality to it that makes one wish you could read more about it, i.e. the war between the USA and Britain, the battles with escaped slaves who formed greatly feared bandit tribes out west...a lot of stuff gets mentioned in passing that I wish had been elaborated on.

lauramarlane
11-18-2002, 08:36 AM
I just want to second the mention of Kage Baker's "The Company" series--it begins with In the Garden of Iden. Wonderfully inventive stories of time traveling cyborgs!

Another one that was a favorite of mine in high school is Time After Time by Karl Alexander. It's about H.G. Wells inventing a time machine that gets used by Jack the Ripper and Wells has to go forward in time to stop him. Hmmm, now that I think about it, it may be time to drag that one out for a reread.

CalMeacham
11-18-2002, 08:43 AM
Leo Frankowski wrote a series of books starting with "The CrossTime Engineer". I think there's about 6 of em all told. Kinda cheesy and "overly male" (I don't want to say misogynistic 'cos I think that's a bit strong) but a fun read all the same.

Fella gets transported back to medieval poland, and ends up creating an empire for himself based on his wits and technical savvy. Interesting digressions on shared property, the capitalist model, use of base-12 arithmetic, industrial chemistry etc.

Anybody else familiar with these?

'vark



Take a look at my post above , haardvark. I mentioned 'em.

jjimm
11-18-2002, 08:47 AM
Another vote for Heinlein's The Door into Summer. A great book and great paradoxes.

Terrorcotta
11-18-2002, 12:04 PM
Here is another vote for Tim Powers' 'Anubis Gates'. I just reread it again and it is an amazing adventure and includes your 18th century England and Eygpt plus 14th century England.

How about Vonnegut's 'Slaughterhouse 5'?

Exapno Mapcase
11-18-2002, 03:05 PM
"Behold the Man" by Moorcock was originally a novella. As such, it was one of the absolute greatest sf stories of the 60s, of all time, really.

But I remember the book-length version as being incredibly disappointing.

Canyon Surfer
11-18-2002, 03:40 PM
One that I enjoyed was Island in the sea of time (http://www.sfsite.com/04a/isl30.htm) by S M Stirling. The link gives a brief overview of the novel and also mentions that this is the first of a trilogy. Have not finished the second book yet, but the first one on its own is a good read.

mhendo
11-18-2002, 03:42 PM
I love Twain's Connecticut Yankee, mentioned by quite a few others on this thread.

Another great nineteenth century novel was Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward, 2000-1887 in which he describes the US in 2000 as a type of socialist utopia, in contrast to the horrendous working conditions and the pains of industrialization during the Gilded Age.

Sam Stone
11-19-2002, 01:27 AM
Yep. Definitely The Door Into Summer. One of my favorite books.

Fenris
11-19-2002, 07:10 AM
Originally posted by haardvark
Leo Frankowski wrote a series of books starting with "The CrossTime Engineer". I think there's about 6 of em all told. Kinda cheesy and "overly male" (I don't want to say misogynistic 'cos I think that's a bit strong)
I don't.

The scene in the third(?) book where the woman is raped and all the characters including the hero stand outside the door cheering and making jokes isn't all that woman-friendly...and the fact that the rape works as a romantic gambit (she marries the rapist, 'cause all a woman needs is a good f*cking to make her fall in love :rolleyes: )is pretty damned misogynistic.

And there's never any challenge or threat. He's NEVER in any danger. Conrad is such a Mary-Sue of a character that he could outfight Juan Rico (in full battle-armor), outthink Hari Seldon, outsneak Lazarus Long, etc. :rolleyes:

He knows everything (th' guy writes a book on nuclear physics, he just happens to know the locations off all ancient mineral deposits, he's an agricultural genius, he's a master chemist and metallurgist, all this in addition to being an engineer who can build anything.) I'm just fine with heroes being heroically competent, but this is insane.

In the horribly named Conrad's Quest for Rubber, you've got retarded Oompa-Loompas (who look like the kind from the book, not the fat orange kind from the movie) living in South America AND you have Magic godlike Time Travellers who solve all Conrad's problems. THAT makes for good reading :rolleyes: Th' upshot is that Conrad decides he needs rubber and sets sail for South America. He gets there, meets the tribe of Oompa Loompas, gets married to one :rolleyes: and spreads European diseases amongst the native people of South America and then, when the epidemic is to pandemic proportions, the magic time travellers show up and give Conrad a Serum of Deus Ex Machina. And that makes everything all better. :rolleyes:

The first book is still a fun romp but each subsequent book is like ten times worse than the last. And for God's sake, stay away from Fata Morgana by Frankoski. It makes Pel Torro's work look like Urusla K. LeGuin's.

Fenris

Baldwin
11-19-2002, 11:09 AM
I'm surprised nobody's mentioned Roadmarks by Roger Zelazny. In that book, the protagonist drives an old pickup truck along a highway with exits that take you to different times and places. One of my favorite scenes is where he pulls into a truck stop along the way and his windshield is washed by a soldier from one of the Crusades, who's hoping a priest will show up to release him from his vow of chastity. (One of the characters is a talking copy of Leaves of Grass.)

I wish somebody would make a good movie version of Connecticut Yankee, and bring back Twain's truly vicious satire rather than playing it as a farce.

CalMeacham
11-19-2002, 11:28 AM
I wish somebody would make a good movie version of Connecticut Yankee, and bring back Twain's truly vicious satire rather than playing it as a farce.


I very much second this. But it's not usually done as farce -- twice it's been a vehicle for a star (Will Rogers, Bing Crosby). The problem is that nobody is going to present Twain's criticism of Catholicism. I have yet to see a version that approaches the material (all of it) as Twain did. Hell, I'll settle for a good version of the "restoration of the Holy Fountain" sequence.

Polycarp
11-19-2002, 01:50 PM
I should have known that Fenris would beat me to posting the name of "Elsewhen." And I want to be about the fifth vote for The Door Into Summer.

But perhaps the most poignant time travel story ever written hasn't been mentioned: Asimov's "The Ugly Little Boy."

-- Polycarp
(who has found his own door into summer)

Exapno Mapcase
11-19-2002, 02:27 PM
Interesting how few women are being mentioned here as authors. Let me add one more.

Octavia Butler's Kindred is about a black woman from 1976 who is brought into the past, over and over, to save the life of the white slaveowner who would be one of her ancestors. Without her intercession he would die and she would never be born. But to do that she has to live as a slave in the early 19th century. Haunting book.

photopat
11-19-2002, 03:12 PM
I'd have to go with the one I just read. Terry Pratchett's Night Watch.

Also, Heinlein- Farnham's Freehold, and Asimov-The End of Eternity.

Ellen Cherry
11-19-2002, 05:01 PM
How about The Eight, by Katherine Neville, Exapno? It's not my favorite time-travel book of all, but I enjoyed it very much. It's been a while so the plot details are fuzzy, but it has to do with Charlemagne's chess set.

Fibonacci
11-19-2002, 06:43 PM
Maybe not time travel so much as a different perspective on time, but Billy Pilgrim becoming unstuck in time in Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.'s Slaughterhouse Five has to rank right up there as one the most original.

Larry Mudd
11-19-2002, 06:59 PM
Live From Golgotha (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0140231196/qid=1037749811/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_1/103-0735029-1886209?v=glance&s=books&n=507846) by Gore Vidal.

Funny as hell, and a compelling conspiracy/mystery.

A weird synthesis of Kabbala and "cyberpunk" forms the principal conceit-- that a "hacker" has infected the gospels with a destructive virus, which, when it runs its course, will cause the phenomenological universe to cease to exist.

One of the lesser apostles is contacted by agents from the future and charged with inscribing a covert account of the gospels, to avert a premature apocalypse. Meanwhile, television networks engage in all manner of intrigues in order to beat each other out for the opportunity to carry exclusive "live" footage of the crucifixion.

You must read this book, if only to learn the secret origin of Bingo.

Larry Mudd
11-19-2002, 07:02 PM
And I second Kindrid.

Merrin
11-19-2002, 11:37 PM
Have to put in a vote for Mike McQuays "Memories". It's out of print but I remember reading it as a kid and thinking wow. If I could get hold of a copy maybe I'd be able to give an adult opnion (it was kinda an adult book, I'm sure my Mother wouldn't have approved). Still it was good at the time and I'd love to get hold of a copy, even Amazon don't offer it, I guess it's time for 2nd handbook shops.

Merrin

Exapno Mapcase
11-19-2002, 11:47 PM
And then there's David Gerrold's [/i]The Man Who Folded Himself[/i], the twistiest novel about time travel complexities ever conceived of.

Chronos
11-20-2002, 12:13 AM
The absolute best time travel story ever written or ever likely to be written is Heinlein's "By his Own Bootstraps". Heinlein, in general, is capable of both extremes of the spectrum: His good time-travel stuff (BhOB, "All You Zombies", The Door into Summer, Time Enough for Love) is all excellent, but his bad time-travel material ("Elsewhen", The Cat who Walked through Walls, The Number of the Beast) is terrible.

And I'd like to add a negative vote for The End of Eternity. There's no time travel in it. All it is is a really bad space opera, with the word "time" substituted for "space", "physiotime" for "time", and "century" for "planet". I mean, Eternity is supposed to be the only medium for exchange between different Centuries? What, does the planet dissappear and start from scratch every time the year shows a double zero?

Asimov's best time travel story is probably "The Red Queen's Race". "The Ugly Little Boy" wasn't too bad, but its appeal had nothing to do with the time travel aspect (which Asimov mangled as usual). And "The Dead Past" was good, but it wasn't really a time travel story.

I'll also throw in a mention of The Stars My Destination, here (I know I'm not the only fellow on the SDMB who likes that one). Who wrote that one, again? It's a bit surreal, but definitely good if you like that sort of thing.

Lok
11-20-2002, 01:15 AM
Originally posted by Fenris
In the horribly named Conrad's Quest for Rubber, you've got retarded Oompa-Loompas (who look like the kind from the book, not the fat orange kind from the movie) living in South America AND you have Magic godlike Time Travellers who solve all Conrad's problems. THAT makes for good reading :rolleyes: Th' upshot is that Conrad decides he needs rubber and sets sail for South America. He gets there, meets the tribe of Oompa Loompas, gets married to one :rolleyes: and spreads European diseases amongst the native people of South America and then, when the epidemic is to pandemic proportions, the magic time travellers show up and give Conrad a Serum of Deus Ex Machina. And that makes everything all better. :rolleyes:

The first book is still a fun romp but each subsequent book is like ten times worse than the last. And for God's sake, stay away from Fata Morgana by Frankoski. It makes Pel Torro's work look like Urusla K. LeGuin's.

Fenris
Not disagreeing about the quality of the books, but the main character in Quest for Rubber is not Conrad. And did you know that there is another one out in hardback? Conrad's Time Machine Looked like more of the same.

Lok

don't ask
11-20-2002, 01:55 AM
Stanley Shapiro's A Time to Remember and these (http://users.metro2000.net/~stabbott/timetravel.htm#books) others.

Yllaria
11-20-2002, 02:32 AM
I agree completely with Greywolf73's and Captain Amazing's recommendation of

The Doomsday Book, and To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis.

Thanks to Hazel to pointing out "Time Watch" from _Time Watch & other Stories_.

Actually thank to all of you guys, this makes a great reading list.

glassphyxie
11-20-2002, 02:49 AM
The Smithsonian Institution - Gore Vidal

tanstaafl
11-20-2002, 10:45 AM
I'll also throw in a mention of The Stars My Destination, here ... Who wrote that one, again?
Alfred Bester

TwungTister
11-20-2002, 01:54 PM
Haven't read many; vote best novel Time and Again. Worst, I'm sorry to say, is Madeleine L'Engle's A Swiftly Tilting Planetthen Slaughterhouse 5.
best in short story, April in Parisby Le Guin.

Zweistein
11-20-2002, 03:40 PM
The Forever War, by Joe Haldeman

Payne N. Diaz
11-20-2002, 05:14 PM
Many years ago I read one about a team of mercenaries who go back to the Alamo and hand out some whoopass to Santa Ana, all so a super-rich guy can gain control of the Mexican oil fields. They are stuck in that time, since there isn't enough power in the world to bring them back. The day is saved when somebody from even farther in the future imports another Mexican army, and Davy and the boys get wiped out one day later. Anybody remember this one?

Avalonian
11-20-2002, 05:32 PM
I'm not a big fan of time travel books, but I'll join the crowd and agree with the round of applause for Connecticut Yankee... it combines Arthurian fiction (one of my favorite genres) with some of the best satire this side of Monty Python. How can you not like it?

I'll also second Atreyu's recommendation of Replay by Ken Grimwood. One of the finest time travel stories i've ever read, if only because it takes it from a very unique perspective.

My original recommendations... Stephen King's short novel "The Langoliers." Again, a refreshing take on time travel that doesn't involve the reverse causality problems most time travel stories get into. A pretty good story, and an original one, with King's usual footprint on it. :)

And though it's not strictly about time travel, Einstein's Dreams by Alan Lightman is one of the best books I have ever read. Time travel (or ideas about time travel) certainly play a large part in most of its vignettes.

I tried reading the first Outlander book, after my wife recommended it to me. We lived near Gabaldon's family and she was a frequent visitor in our local bookstores at the time (nice enough woman, at least then). I finished it, but I can't say I was all that impressed. As a time-travel story, it's a fairly standard progression of causality loops and such. As a historical romance, it's above the cut of most books of that genre (and yes, I have read others). As a historical novel, it's all right. An interesting book, in ways, but not compelling enough for me to read the rest of the series. She got the history mostly right, but the story was thin to me.

detop
11-20-2002, 05:44 PM
Originally posted by Hazel
And "Timescape". Can't remember who wrote it.

That would be Gregory Benford.

Tuckerfan
11-20-2002, 10:12 PM
Originally posted by Avalonian
<snip>
And though it's not strictly about time travel, Einstein's Dreams by Alan Lightman is one of the best books I have ever read. Time travel (or ideas about time travel) certainly play a large part in most of its vignettes.

<snip>Whoa! Hold on there! I read that book when it came out, mainly because of the positive quote from Salman Rushdie on the back of the book. When I finished the it, I was sorely tempted to send Salman a letter which said, "If you think that's a great book, you really need to get out more."

Baldwin
11-20-2002, 10:43 PM
The Forever War, by Joe Haldeman

Well, if we include that, we should mention the ultimate time-dilation story, Poul Anderson's Tau Zero, in which the crew of a ramjet-type starship is unable to shut down their engine and stop accelerating, and consequently push so close to lightspeed that they actually ride out the collapse and rebirth of the entire universe.

Ruby
11-20-2002, 10:59 PM
Can I pleeeeze be the 48th person to also mention Finney's Time and Again?

It's one of my favorite novels of all time and based on your OP, it's perfect.

rjk
11-21-2002, 12:48 AM
The Garden of Forking Paths by Jorge Luis Borges is an excellent short story as well, though more in the alternate-worlds mode, IIRC. I read it years ago.

There's a rather strange site based on the story right here (http://www.geocities.com/papanagnou/).

(As good as they are, I don't think either Tau Zero or The Forever War really count as time travel, even though time is the whole basis for both. Read them anyway!)

Hometownboy
11-21-2002, 02:16 AM
Julian May's Pleistocene Saga is a tetrology that is also an absolute hoot, space opera in the grand style without being over the top even when you throw in a pair of alien races, a time warp in a French lady's basement, advanced mental powers, kings and queens, combat on the fields of gold and the flooding of the Mediterranean Sea.

Also near the absolute top of my time travel list is a short story by Clifford Simak called "Time and Again." Similar titles, have been used for books which bear no relation to this gentle story about the way many of us fantasize about time travel. The hero goes to sleep one night and wakes up the next morning as a teenager in his old family home with all of his memories intact. His father finally figures out that his son is acting different and son confides in dad. They end up preventing a neighborhood murder that the son knows is coming. Top notch work by one of the most overlooked writers out there, IMHO.

Exapno Mapcase
11-21-2002, 02:17 PM
Aarrgghhh.

I hate people who don't read through threads and then go and post something that had already been said.

And here I go and do it not once, but twice, in the same thread.

So my apologies to Athena and Sam Stone.

I don't know how I missed your posts, but I did, and I now feel like an idiot.

Good thread, though, and good books, so I hope mentioning them more than once gets them noticed so at least some good comes out of it.

Lok
11-22-2002, 01:37 AM
Originally posted by Hometownboy
Also near the absolute top of my time travel list is a short story by Clifford Simak called "Time and Again." Similar titles, have been used for books which bear no relation to this gentle story about the way many of us fantasize about time travel. The hero goes to sleep one night and wakes up the next morning as a teenager in his old family home with all of his memories intact. His father finally figures out that his son is acting different and son confides in dad. They end up preventing a neighborhood murder that the son knows is coming. Top notch work by one of the most overlooked writers out there, IMHO. While Simak may have written a story with a similar plot, this sounds like Time and Time Again by H. Beam Piper. It was originally published in 1947, so it predates Simak by a while.

Lok

Larry Mudd
11-22-2002, 03:14 AM
Hometownboy and Lok, I'm positive that the story you are both describing is actually Time and Again by Jack Finney. The murder involves the loan of the father's gun, right?

Did Clifford D. Simak and H. Beam Piper both write similar stories, or are we all experiencing some sort of time-travel glitch, here? ;)

Larry Mudd
11-22-2002, 03:25 AM
Ach, I am confused now. I have Time and Again by Jack Finney on my bookshelf (at home, alas.) Drawing a blank on the plot of it. I have the story you're both talking about in an anthology, and I also have a radio adaption of it. Googling around a bit (http://members.aol.com/jimfnshr/radio/x_minus_one.html) confirms that Lok is the one with the functioning memory with regard to the author, and HTB correctly remembers the title. Me, I'm just befuddled."Time And Time Again" 1/11/56 ****
I love time travel stories, and this is one of the best. A soldier, about to die, goes back in time to 1945 to prevent the war that leads to his death. Jack Grimes is believable as the boy who wakes up in 1945 and first prevents a single murder in his hometown, then tries to save the world. From a story by H. Beam Piper.I am so embarrassed. Is it possible for senile dementia to set in at 32?

Larry Mudd
11-22-2002, 03:28 AM
Still confused, obviously. :smack: Sorry, Lok.

May as well point out that the above synopsis makes it sound as though he deliberately goes back in time. It just sorta happens.

Now I'm going to go to sleep before I embarrass myself further.

Fenris
11-22-2002, 07:22 AM
I don't remember the Simak, but the story described is by Piper (th' kid prevents a murder by removing the firing pin from his dad's gun). I just re-read it.

IIRC, Time and Again by Finney was the so-so movie "Somewhere in Time" (where a guy goes back in time by immersing himself in an environment of the time he wants to visit. The guy stays in a hotel room from the 1900s(?) ).

Trust me. The one with the miltary guy who goes back in time, ends up in his 14(?) year old self's body and prevents the murder of a neighbor's wife is H.Beam Piper.

Fenris

Lok
11-23-2002, 01:31 AM
Don't worry Larry. I just make it a habit to re-read Piper about once every year or so. So I tend to remember his stuff. I believe Fenris is right about the Finney story.

Lok

Larry Mudd
11-23-2002, 02:12 AM
Well, I'm home now, and as an act of contrition I've made the radio play available on my webserver. It's a 5Mb .mp3 file. Be gentle.

Time and Time Again (http://216.232.71.251/~larry/radio/time.MP3), on X Minus One, from the story by H. Beam Piper.

Mods, the entire run of X Minus One is now in the public domain, if you're concerned at all.

Avalonian
11-23-2002, 02:13 AM
Originally posted by Tuckerfan
Whoa! Hold on there! I read that book [Einstein's Dreams] when it came out, mainly because of the positive quote from Salman Rushdie on the back of the book. When I finished the it, I was sorely tempted to send Salman a letter which said, "If you think that's a great book, you really need to get out more."

*shrug* Well I didn't say that it was everyone's favorite book... just that I read it, loved it, and have recommended it to many of my friends, who have also read it and loved it. I'm no big fan of Rushdie's, but I happen to agree with him here. I think Einstein's Dreams is one of the finest novels written in the last decade.

I admit I need to go out more, though I don't see how that bears on my opinion of the books I've read. If anything, "getting out more" would just take away from my reading time. ;)

Hometownboy
11-23-2002, 02:14 AM
f

Hometownboy
11-23-2002, 02:24 AM
For cryin, out loud!:smack:That'll teach me to bring up half-remembered stuff. For the record, Fenris is, as usual, absolutely correct. The story is "Time and Time Again" by Piper, copyright 1947, and I have it in the collection The Worlds of H. Beam Piper, Ace, ed. by John R. Carr in 1983.


Simak wrote Time is the Simplest Thing, which of course had nothing to do with time travel.

And while we're on Piper, Carr also edited the collection Paratime, which neatly gathered the five non-Kalvan Paratime stories. Ace put that one out in 1981.

Tuckerfan
11-23-2002, 04:25 PM
Originally posted by Avalonian
*shrug* Well I didn't say that it was everyone's favorite book... just that I read it, loved it, and have recommended it to many of my friends, who have also read it and loved it. I'm no big fan of Rushdie's, but I happen to agree with him here. I think Einstein's Dreams is one of the finest novels written in the last decade.

I admit I need to go out more, though I don't see how that bears on my opinion of the books I've read. If anything, "getting out more" would just take away from my reading time. ;) Ya been whooshed! At the time Einstein's Dreams was out in hard back, Rushdie was in hiding because of the fatwa against him. So, by saying that he needed to get out more....

lurkernomore
11-23-2002, 04:36 PM
I say Forever War dilation is big enough here to make it de facto time travel, if one-way.


Originally posted by Jonathan Chance
And also to Turtledoves GotS.

"Give it it's proper name, General Lee. It is an AK-47."


He says that to a staff officer, not Lee. Fine book, though.

delphica
11-23-2002, 06:54 PM
Originally posted by Fenris


IIRC, Time and Again by Finney was the so-so movie "Somewhere in Time" (where a guy goes back in time by immersing himself in an environment of the time he wants to visit. The guy stays in a hotel room from the 1900s(?) ).



The so-so 1980 movie Somewhere in Time about the guy in the hotel is based on the 1975 Richard Matheson novel Bid Time Return (which was later republished as Somewhere In Time title -- I suspect for a movie tie-in, but I'm not sure about that.)

Time and Again by Finney is a different book altogether, although the time travel method is similar.

To complicate things further, I vaguely think that Finney is mentioned somewhere in the credits for the so-so Somewhere in Time movie. I believe (again, very vague) that the film script (also by Matheson) elaborated on some of the time travel ideas introduced in Finney's book. So it was like an homage, so to speak, more than a rip-off. But plot-wise (the plot mostly consists of Christopher Reeve mooning around an old hotel), Somewhere in Time is not at all like anything found in any of Finney's books.

Fenris
11-23-2002, 09:37 PM
You're right Delphica: it was from Bid Time Return.

But I'm pretty sure about the hotel room made up of 1900s(?) materials as the time-machine being from the Finney book.

(Finney rocks)

Fenris

luckyloo
11-24-2002, 10:04 AM
Armageddon: The Musical by Robert Rankin. The best I can describe it as Scott Addams on crack. I had to read it twice before I truly understood the whole thing. Elvis travelling through time with the help of an over-talkative time sprout and those two characters are the most normal thing about the book.

Oh man! Thinking about it just reminded me about how much of it I forgot. Now I'm going to have to read it again.

CthulhuSpawn
11-24-2002, 11:40 AM
I don't think anyone has mentioned this one:

The Technicolor Time Machine by Harry Harrison. It's a fun read concerning a small studio wishing to make an epic motion picture about the discovery of America by the Vikings. What better way to cut costs and gain realism that to film it on location and in the proper time?

lurkernomore
11-24-2002, 11:46 AM
Originally posted by CthulhuSpawn
I don't think anyone has mentioned this one:

The Technicolor Time Machine by Harry Harrison. It's a fun read concerning a small studio wishing to make an epic motion picture about the discovery of America by the Vikings. What better way to cut costs and gain realism that to film it on location and in the proper time?

and pay off your Viking liaison with a silver mark a month, and a bottle of Jack Daniels a day!

New & Improved Scott
11-24-2002, 03:16 PM
Originally posted by NoClueBoy
Thanks Fenris, those are they.

Another vote for Orson Scott Card's Pastwatch: The Redemption Of Christopher Columbus a very unique take on time paradoxes (paradi?)

That one gets my vote too.

Larry Mudd
11-24-2002, 03:45 PM
I would also cautiously recommend The Time Trip (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0595170838/qid=1038170015/sr=1-6/ref=sr_1_6/002-6792453-5523200?v=glance&s=books) by Rob Swigard. Cautiously, because I haven't read this book since I was a teenager, and I'm not entirely sure that it would have the same pronounced effect on me as an adult.

I found it in the public library one morning, sat down, and read it cover-to-cover. I couldn't tear myself away from it long enough to check it out. I still think of that book from time-to-time, and would like to find another copy of it.

The protaganist, dejected after his neglected wife kills herself, turns to hacking to keep himself amused. He stumbles across a database for "Holiday Inn Deathwest", which, as it happens, turns out to be Hell. He manages to track down his "relocated" wife in ancient Mesopotamia.

If I remember correctly, the time-travel is accomplished through the hedonistic research of an organisation called "Multiple Orgasms for Men", which is referred to by an unfortunate acronym. I wouldn't swear to that, though.

The_Peyote_Coyote
11-24-2002, 03:49 PM
CthulhuSpawn's post reminded me of another story about filming events in the past: Tom Sherrard's classic "E for Effort." Man, that was a great story (you can find it in Volume 2B of The Science Fiction Hall of Fame -- Greatest Novellettes and Novellas).

Fenris
11-24-2002, 11:12 PM
Originally posted by CthulhuSpawn
I don't think anyone has mentioned this one:

The Technicolor Time Machine by Harry Harrison. It's a fun read concerning a small studio wishing to make an epic motion picture about the discovery of America by the Vikings. What better way to cut costs and gain realism that to film it on location and in the proper time?

And anyone who likes this should hunt up a copy of Keith Laumer's The Great Time-Machine Hoax wherein a virtual reality computer decides it's a damnsite easier to just timetravel these picky bastards back to the Jurassic then to do a "holodeck" full-sensory illusion. Very much the same tone as the Harrison.

And Laumer's The Time Trap is about a time-war. With a giant rutabega. For control of reality. Hysterical stuff.

Fenris