PDA

View Full Version : Correct Pronunciation of "Nutella"?


a daft girl
04-21-2003, 03:50 PM
Exactly how is "Nutella" pronounced?

The answer isn't on the website, and to clear up a mild debate.... I'd like to know if it's:

Nuh-tella
or
New-tella

Rob V
04-21-2003, 04:11 PM
It's pronounced new-TEL-uh, and spelled Gnutella, IIRC.

Ice Wolf
04-21-2003, 04:17 PM
Different things, (http://www.thestandard.com/article/display/0,1151,22499,00.html) but pronounced the same.

Super Gnat
04-21-2003, 04:18 PM
According to my (sadly empty) jar, it's spelled Nutella. I think Gnutella is some kind of software doohicky. As to the pronunciation, we always pronounce it New-tella, but I don't know if that's official.

psychonaut
04-21-2003, 04:18 PM
Originally posted by Rob V
It's pronounced new-TEL-uh, and spelled Gnutella, IIRC. I've got a jar of it sitting right here on my desk, and it most definitely is not spelled "Gnutella". Perhaps you're thinking of the popular P2P file-sharing protocol, which was named after the homophonous hazelnut-chocolate spread.

Hello Again
04-21-2003, 04:20 PM
You nkow I've pronounced it both ways, but I'm not sure which is more correct. "New-tella" sounds a bit more "European" but not for any reason I can put my finger on.

Rob V it is sad that we live in a world where not everyone has tasted Nutella. It is truly joy in a jar.

Ruok
04-21-2003, 04:40 PM
Originally posted by psychonaut:
It is truly joy in a jar.

LOL. I don't eat it but my kids do. They love it. I tried it and it tasted like hot fudge sauce. Healthy, chocolatey, what could be better?

If I get a vote it is for nuh-tella. Nut as in hazlenut, ella as in, erm, Fitzgerald? Seems obvious.

missbunny
04-21-2003, 04:48 PM
I thought it was nuh-tella. Like nuts. As in the hazelnuts from which it is made.

Mmmmm, Nutella crepes.

a daft girl
04-21-2003, 04:49 PM
Yeah thanks for correcting the jar's spelling.... I guess i should have specified "Hazelnut Chocky Spread" heh, sorry.

It used to have the 2 little dots over the "u" on the package, but as of today, the packaging has a plain ole "U" and i say it's

Nuh-tella

Someone needs to make the Nutella people put that in the FAQ on the webpage, to avoid crap arguments like this between women and their bf's

:)

missbunny
04-21-2003, 04:54 PM
Although I suppose if you're pronouncing it as the Italian manufacturer intended, it would be more like new-tella.

I'm torn.

a daft girl
04-21-2003, 04:58 PM
Ok now im effing mind blown.

I thought this stuff was from western europe (like uh.... specifically Germany, hence the goofy "New" tella pronunciation that is justified by some people with the former double dotted "u" on it's packaging.


Can someone call these fools and ask?
I cant find a phone number, only an address in NJ.

psychonaut
04-21-2003, 04:58 PM
If it really did have two dots on the u, then the original pronunciation of the first vowel was probably neither "uh" nor "ew", but rather the same as in the French "tu" or German "früh". It's rather like pronouncing "ee" with rounded lips.

Yeah
04-21-2003, 06:24 PM
Nutella was never spelled with an umlaut in Germany where it is pronounced new TELLA. However, it's Italian.

a daft girl
04-21-2003, 07:03 PM
So popular guess is that it isn't pronounced the way it's spelled.

I just wonder if this "newt" stuff is accent based, like Italians say Marinara one way and in our accent it sounds different. <shrug>

InTransit
04-21-2003, 07:34 PM
I always thought that it was pronounced NU-tella, as in The Knights Who Formerly Said "Ni!" But Now Say "Nu!".

It is yummy goodness from Italy & has been around since the 1940s. I believe the parent company is Ferrero, the people who also bring you those delicious Ferrero Rochers. According to the Nutella USA site, it is Kobe Bryant's favorite spread (no jokes, please).

See: http://www.ferrerousa.com/ and hit "History".

Now I'm hungry.

GuanoLad
04-21-2003, 07:42 PM
There used to be an ad on TV, "Oooooh, Nutella!" and they pronounced it "Nut-Ella".

mangeorge
04-21-2003, 07:53 PM
People here in Berkrley, and we are so sophisticated, pronounce it nuh-tella. I could run up to Shattuck and ask Alice, I guess.
Whatever gets it on your crepe, I say. ;)
Peace,
mangeorge

karomon
04-21-2003, 08:40 PM
I think it's nu-tel-la ... that's how I used to hear it when I was a kid.

pokey
04-21-2003, 08:57 PM
Weirdly enough there's a commercial on in Canada lately where they call it New-tella.

I always called it NUT-tella as a kid because it is so very hazelNUTTY and I used to be bothered very much that my ex's Italian family called it New-tella. I think there were even fights about it.

I have a funny feeling that there may have been ads for Nutella when I was a kid where it was pronounced Nut. I think it really is the North American vs. European pronounciation. I've changed my pronounciation to NEW tella though. I'm keeping up with the times!

amarone
04-21-2003, 09:38 PM
Originally posted by girlb0x
So popular guess is that it isn't pronounced the way it's spelled.

I just wonder if this "newt" stuff is accent based, like Italians say Marinara one way and in our accent it sounds different. <shrug> Actually, although I'd never heard of it, I assumed it to be new-tella by the look of the word (but I'm European). A quick check of my Oxford English Dictionary shows there to be 10 words beginning with "nut" (apart from nut itself) and 8 of them are pronounced new-. There again, in the US the first syllable is often more noo than new.

Richard Pearse
04-21-2003, 10:49 PM
The stuff's made of chocolate and nuts hence IMO it should be Nuhtella.

j_kat_251
04-21-2003, 11:15 PM
In fact the correct pronounciation is

"Dear Lord Almighty what is this hellish crud?"

Richard Pearse
04-22-2003, 01:09 AM
Nooooo, it's:

mmmmmmmmm...choocolaateandnuuuutss!

Mangetout
04-22-2003, 02:24 AM
Advertising here in the UK always vocalised it as Nuh-tella (as it is made from nuts, the possibility of an alternative English pronunciation never crossed my mind)

Ice Wolf
04-22-2003, 04:19 AM
I agree with Mangetout and GuanoLad -- having only heard "Nut-ella" locally, until this thread I didn't realise there was another pronunciation.

Essured
04-22-2003, 04:29 AM
I've only ever heard Nutella pronounced as Nuh-tella, and assumed (as others have) that the name was derived from the hazelnuts it contained. Ditto for every commercial I've seen advertising the horrid stuff.

Newtella just sounds so horribly wrong :)

Einmon
04-22-2003, 06:28 AM
The Western German pronounciation would be "nuh-tella". Sounds more Italian to me, too.

And no, there never were dots on the u. Then it would sound kind of French, I guess.. (Le Nütella)

But I pronounce it "Devil's scourge on toast".

(I wish they still had the "Millenium Jar". Four pounds of chocolatey goodness. Then again, it's probably better they don't.)

tomndebb
04-22-2003, 07:19 AM
Since the accent is almost certainly on the second syllable, Yanks should be able to fake either pronunciation by relying on the General Purpose Reduced Schwa: n'TELLuh.



(And if they ever add a variety with honey, we could call it n'TELLuh the hon'.)

WonTon Sean
04-22-2003, 07:20 AM
I had the joy of living with a German exchange student for a year, and he gave me they joy of the awesome 2000 gram Millenium Jar. I miss him.

As for the debate, I pronounce it New-tella.

jjimm
04-22-2003, 07:28 AM
Since it's derived from the word "nut" (+ "ella", as in "diminuitive nut"), referring to the hazelnuts in it, it's surely NUT... I.e. pronounced "Nut-ELL-uh".

Jammers
04-22-2003, 07:52 AM
I'm a Nut Ella also. If it was Nu-Tella, like Nu-metal then I would make it Noo, but as it isn't...

It just is.

yojimbo
04-22-2003, 07:52 AM
Gotta go with my English friend here.

It's Nut-ELL-uh. That's how it's pronounced when it's advertised on TV as well BTW.

Mops
04-22-2003, 07:58 AM
As for the original Italian pronounciation I'd tend more to nooTELLuh.

pulykamell
04-22-2003, 08:09 AM
I'm partial to noo-TELL-uh, having never actually heard it pronounced any other way, actually... Then again, it was Germans and French who introduced me to the stuff, and the only time I saw the stuff in the States was in European groceries, so I suppose that's my excuse...

a daft girl
04-22-2003, 08:47 AM
*cackle*

Well, like pokey - I have seen many arguments over this.
This particular question has only been a topic of debate between my bf and I. And with him being the honorary genius that he is, I'm sure you will all soon see the resulting questions of our many arguments over who is the true loser with no intelligence.

(It's usually me - because I don't typically go on mahunts searching to find any shred of evidence that he may be wrong when he poses an idea that i find rediculous or unfounded)

I give up on the NUTella. It's made with nuts, it tastes effing good (Goo, you really need to try some my friend... on a shortbread cookie to start) And it's spelled "NUT" so im sticking with that.

If anyone wants to refer to nut spread as "newt" spread.... go for it, lol. I personally find nothing remotely resembling the flavour of water lizards in that jar. Only that of NUTs. :)

Im going to write the company today and ask them.
Im sure if they tell me it's NEWT, I will have a lizard flavour comment for them too and then just be wrong in calling it what i do. Hahah. But I will come back with their reply when and if i ever get it. (Today if i can get my grubby fingers on their phone number)

Thanks for all of the opinions, this has been quite a humorous
question to ask afterall.

Cheers!
:)

ShadiRoxan
04-22-2003, 08:48 AM
i grew up calling it noo-TELL-uh. i lived mainly in germany and that's how i heard it pronounced.

oh, it's also great on apples.

Zazie
04-22-2003, 08:54 AM
Yes, Nutella is Italian, the company is Ferrero. The one that brings you the Rocher and Kinder!
I don't think we should try comparing the pronounciation with the word "nut" as it isn't made to make sense in English!
The sound "u" is quite hard to get in English... If you can hear it in French, that's what it sounds like, kind of!
Nutella is the best, I can find it in every store now, it is awesome, only a few years ago it was hard to find.

sailor
04-22-2003, 09:00 AM
If the word is Italian (and I believe it is) then it would be more like noo-tell-a. The "new" pronunciation is strictly an English distortion. In English speaking countries I guess you can pronounce it any way you like but Italian definitely is not pronounced with English sounds.

I never understood why Nutella is considered a (sort of) high end product in the USA. There is a similar product in Spain (chocolate + hazelnut + vanilla paste) called Nocilla and it is considered pretty basic stuff for kids. Still delicious though for those of us with a sweet tooth.

AHunter3
04-22-2003, 02:11 PM
It doesn't get to be pronounced "nut-ella". If they want people to pronounce it "nut-ella" instead of "new-tella", they've got to spell it "Nuttella".

Them's the rules. :mad:

mhendo
04-22-2003, 02:35 PM
Well, those who suggested that the name derives directly from the word "nut" are correct, according to the spread's history (http://www.nutellausa.com/history.htm) at the NutellaUSA website:Nearly three generations of Europeans have grown up eating Nutella®, which was created in the 1940's by Pietro Ferrero, a pastry maker and founder of the Ferrero company.

At the time, cocoa was in short supply due to war rationing, and chocolate was a delicacy limited to a lucky few. So Pietro Ferrero mixed cocoa with toasted hazelnuts, cocoa butter and vegetable oils to create an economical spread of chocolate which he called "pasta gianduja" (pronounced: pasta jon-du-ja). Pasta gianduja's success was unprecedented.

In February 1946, 660 pounds were sold. To keep up with demand, Ferrero worked with local farmers to improve and extend the cultivation of hazelnuts.

In 1949, Ferrero made a "supercrema gianduja" which was spreadable as well as inexpensive. This product became so popular that Italian food stores started a service called "The Smearing". Children could go to their local food store with a slice of bread for a "smear" of "supercrema gianduja". In 1964 supercrema gianduja was renamed "Nutella" (its origin being the word "nut"), and began to be marketed outside Italy!I've always pronounced it nuh-tella, and will continue to do so.

Zazie
04-22-2003, 02:45 PM
Originally posted by Zazie

I don't think we should try comparing the pronounciation with the word "nut" as it isn't made to make sense in English!



Oops then!

Misery Loves Co.
04-22-2003, 04:21 PM
:: looks up to verify this is GQ and not IMHO ::

Eh - if you got a bunch of italians running around spelling it "nUtella", then I guarantee you, regardless of the source of those letters, that the pronunciation is Nootella.

End of story, no saving throw.

It matters not one damned bit where Ferrero got the idea for the name, in the language of the product's manufacture, and the language of it's owners and creators, it has one pronunciation. There can be only one "correct" answer. There might be wiggle room if Americans/Brits were incapable of forming the "oo" sound (as Americans have difficulty with the subtleties of the French and German vowels), but last I saw everybody pronounced "Moon", "Loon", and even Picayune" correctly.

Of course, while I'm at it I'll grab up a lance and look for a windmill, since every culture routinely subverts the pronunciation of other language's words.

FTR, freschetta is pronounced "Fresketta", not Freshetta, and bruschetta: "broosketta", not "brushetta".

:: hops off soapbox ::

mhendo
04-22-2003, 05:26 PM
Originally posted by Misery Loves Co.
:: looks up to verify this is GQ and not IMHO ::

Eh - if you got a bunch of italians running around spelling it "nUtella", then I guarantee you, regardless of the source of those letters, that the pronunciation is Nootella.

End of story, no saving throw.

It matters not one damned bit where Ferrero got the idea for the name, in the language of the product's manufacture, and the language of it's owners and creators, it has one pronunciation. There can be only one "correct" answer. There might be wiggle room if Americans/Brits were incapable of forming the "oo" sound (as Americans have difficulty with the subtleties of the French and German vowels), but last I saw everybody pronounced "Moon", "Loon", and even Picayune" correctly.

Of course, while I'm at it I'll grab up a lance and look for a windmill, since every culture routinely subverts the pronunciation of other language's words.

FTR, freschetta is pronounced "Fresketta", not Freshetta, and bruschetta: "broosketta", not "brushetta".

:: hops off soapbox :: So, in the interests of consistency, if you are planning a trip to Italy, i presume that you say to your friends that you will be visiting:

Roma
Firenze
Milano
Venezia
Napoli
Citta del Vaticano
Torino

etc., etc.

And you will presumably fly in via Munchen, or perhaps "Barthelona" or "Paree"?

Also, in the interests of consistency, i demand that Americans start pronouncing New Orleans and Notre Dame the same way as the French would. And that similar accuracy be devoted to names of Spanish origin like Los Angeles.

Give me a break. If we follow your strictures, we'll all end up sounding like those Americans who, when discussing Central America, punctuate their mid-west or west coast accents with references to "Neeeeecarrrrrrraaagwa."

As you yourself point out, cultures subvert each others' pronunciations. When words, especially proper nouns like place names and company names, shift across national and linguistic borders, changes occur. My undergrad Spanish teacher told me that in Spain, "Vogue" magazine is pronounced "bo-gay" (two syllables). I think that's pretty funny, but i don't think they're "wrong" to pronounce it that way. I'm sure you're right that the Italians do indeed pronounce it "nootella," but that doesn't mean that there's anything wrong with pronouncing it nut-ella in the United States or Australia or anywhere else.

Mangetout
04-22-2003, 05:38 PM
Next up: 'Lego' vs 'Legos'

manhattan
04-22-2003, 06:31 PM
I do hereby declare that this has been beaten to death with the trunk of a hazlenut tree.