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Nobody
08-21-2003, 12:22 AM
A while ago I had a thread asking people in England what the most popular accent to fake there is.
In that thread, different kinds of English accents were mentioned. Now, being an American who's never been to England or studied different English Dialects or regional accents, it got me to thinking, what are good examples of various types of English accents.
So, what I want to do, is list various entertainers and what I know them from, and have someone tell me which kind of English accent they speak with.
Of course, with my luck, everybody I list will have the same accent :(
Anyway, here goes
Any of the Absolutely Fabulous cast : Jennifer Saunders, Joanna Lumley, and/or Julia Sawalha.
Josie Lawrence who've I've only seen on both the British and American versions of Who's line is it anyway?
Graham Norton, from, of course, So Graham Norton
Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie from the various BlackAdder's, A bit of Fry and Laurie and I've seen Fry in some movies who's names escape me.
Anybody from the cast of Are You Being Served?
And before this list gets too long, I'll end it with, any of the Doctor's from Doctor Who:
William Hartnell, Patrick Troughton, Jon Pertwee, Tom Baker, Peter Davison, Colin Baker, or Sylvester McCoy.
And yes, as you can see, most of the British shows I watch or I've seen are either comedies or sci-fi. I'm not really into British drama (sorry).

ruadh
08-21-2003, 02:15 AM
Graham Norton is Irish.

tvguide
08-21-2003, 03:20 AM
do yo guys like Chinese English accent?

Galanthus
08-21-2003, 04:06 AM
Actually with th exception of Graham Norton pretty much all the people you mention there have as close to a standard english RP (received pronuniation) accent as you can get.

Graham has a mild irish accent. Different accents that you can here are RP, London, Various Scottish, Welsh, Geordie, Liverpool, Yorkshire, Manchester, West Country etc ...

All of these are pretty distinctive but the advent of mass media has tended to iron these regional variations out. What where once dialects are now just accents and given another 50 years we may all just be speaking RP.

FP@work
08-21-2003, 05:48 AM
Agree with Galenthus. With the exception of Norton most of those people have received pronounciation - the differences in their voices are mostly due to personal idiosyncracies rather than seperate accents per se.

I'm not familiar with Doctor Who, but I believe Sylvester McCoy was Scottish.

For an example of a Liverpool accent ("scouse") watch any old interviews with the Beatles.

Sean Bean (actor, in Goldeneye and Ronin, amongst others) is from Sheffield and has a pretty typical Yorkshire accent.

You're gonna have to name some more celebrities you're familiar with I'm afraid. :)

FP@work
08-21-2003, 05:49 AM
Doh! Of course ... Sean Bean was Boromir in Fellowship of the Ring too.

curly chick
08-21-2003, 06:03 AM
Miss Brahms in Are You Being Served has what I would call a cockney accent, although the purists who have a specific definition of this might disagree. However, for the purposes of this thread, we could say she has a London accent most popularly known by non-Londoners as cockney.
Mr Harmon also had this accent.
If you want to see Wendy Richard, the actress who played Miss Brahms, as she is these days, she is Pauline Fowler in EastEnders.

Graham Norton from county Cork in Ireland and so his Irish accent is different from Colin Farrell's or Bono's as they are both from Dublin.

everton
08-21-2003, 07:18 AM
Originally posted by Galanthus
Actually with th exception of Graham Norton pretty much all the people you mention there have as close to a standard english RP (received pronuniation) accent as you can get.

<snip>

All of these are pretty distinctive but the advent of mass media has tended to iron these regional variations out. What where once dialects are now just accents and given another 50 years we may all just be speaking RP.
People have been heralding the demise of the regional accent since the '50s, but it hasn't happened. Arguably the opposite is the case, with many people deliberately amplifying their regional accents, presumably as an act of defiant local pride. For example, none of the Beatles sounded like the younger members of the cast of Brookside. *Dialect* (meaning regional vocabulary) might be another matter.

Joel: Nobody in Whose Line is it Anyway? spoke with the same accent the whole time, so you'd have to be clearer about which Josie Lawrence accent you're talking about. I know she's from the West Midlands, so perhaps you meant her Birmingham accent?

ruadh
08-21-2003, 08:14 AM
And, once again, there is NO evidence whatsoever that the mass media have had any effect on regional accents. This is simply a popular myth.

keithnmick
08-21-2003, 09:08 AM
If anything, I think a lot of the North of England (and some southerners even) has affected Mancunian accents after the rise of Oasis...et al in the mid nineties (and also the Madchester bands of 90-92). Regional accents seem to have amplified in many cases.

Galanthus
08-21-2003, 09:15 AM
Originally posted by ruadh
And, once again, there is NO evidence whatsoever that the mass media have had any effect on regional accents. This is simply a popular myth.

Over simplification maybe, but not complete myth. Certain local dialects in the UK are all but dead while the accents remain.

100 years ago Yorkshire had its own names for numbers. One Two Three Four being Yan Tan Tethera Peddera. This is essentially dead now.

If its nots mass media and transport that killed them off what was it ...

ruadh
08-21-2003, 09:53 AM
Mobility. People moving out of one region and into another. This creates an opportunity for the mutual, back-and-forth communication which is necessary for significant changes in dialect to take place.

Bauer and Trudgill's Language Myths has a good chapter on the subject (I post that so often, I really ought to have it as my sig ... )

Nobody
08-21-2003, 11:42 AM
Originally posted by ruadh
Graham Norton is Irish.
:smack: Wow, I'm even worse at figuring out accents than I thought.

Nobody
08-21-2003, 11:46 AM
Originally posted by tvguide
do yo guys like Chinese English accent?
:confused: Bad attempt at a hijack I take it?

Lamia
08-21-2003, 11:57 AM
Originally posted by FP@work

For an example of a Liverpool accent ("scouse") watch any old interviews with the Beatles.


If you're trying to learn about English accents from celebrities, listening to famous musicians is probably better than listening to famous actors since they're less likely to have been trained to speak RP.

Of course, aside from The Beatles a lot of the most famous British Invasion era musicians are from the London area (The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Kinks, etc.), so it may be a little hard to find good examples of other regions. Thanks largely to my love of classic BritRock I can distinguish between several different London accents but am nowhere near as good at identifying accents from other parts of the country.

Nobody
08-21-2003, 11:49 PM
Originally posted by FP@work
Agree with Galenthus. With the exception of Norton most of those people have received pronounciation - the differences in their voices are mostly due to personal idiosyncracies rather than seperate accents per se.

I'm not familiar with Doctor Who, but I believe Sylvester McCoy was Scottish.

For an example of a Liverpool accent ("scouse") watch any old interviews with the Beatles.

Sean Bean (actor, in Goldeneye and Ronin, amongst others) is from Sheffield and has a pretty typical Yorkshire accent.

You're gonna have to name some more celebrities you're familiar with I'm afraid. :)
Not that it'll help much, since everybody else I can think of will probably all have received pronuniation, but, here goes:
Singer Phil Collins.
Any of the cast of Monty Python: Graham Chapmanm, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, or Michael Palin.
Any of the cast of Keeping up Apperances: Patricia Routledge, Clive Swift, Judy Cornwell, Geoffrey Hughes, Shirley Stelfox, Geoffrey Hughes, Josephine Tewson, David Griffin, Peter Cellier.
And let's see...well, I haven't name many singers, so...
David Bowie, Mic Jagger, Ozzy Ozbourn, Yes lead singer Jon Anderson...
Anyway, I'll stop now, because, like I said, everybody I listed probably speeks with received pronuniation.

Nobody
08-21-2003, 11:58 PM
Originally posted by everton
Joel: Nobody in Whose Line is it Anyway? spoke with the same accent the whole time, so you'd have to be clearer about which Josie Lawrence accent you're talking about. I know she's from the West Midlands, so perhaps you meant her Birmingham accent?
I'm talking about her actual accent. Her natural voice when she's talking when she's not doing a skit.

FP@work
08-22-2003, 06:58 AM
Originally posted by Joel
Not that it'll help much, since everybody else I can think of will probably all have received pronuniation, but, here goes:
*snip*

Yes I'm afraid most of them do, but there are a few others we can identify.

Ozzy Osbourn: He's from the Birmingham area and the accent is known as "brummy". It's widely regarded as the least attractive regional UK accent by natives (except by the Brummies themselves of course) and unfairly carries a stigma of low intelligence.

I don't know the actor's names from Keeping Up Appearences, but the working-class relatives that Hyacinth is always embarrassed about have some kind of generic Northern accent - mostly Yorkshire I think (but it's a while since I've seen the show).

Mic Jagger is a Londoner I believe, although his voice is so weird that it isn't really representative.

And Terry Gilliam is American. :D

everton
08-22-2003, 07:06 AM
Originally posted by Joel
Originally posted by everton
Joel: Nobody in Whose Line is it Anyway? spoke with the same accent the whole time, so you'd have to be clearer about which Josie Lawrence accent you're talking about. I know she's from the West Midlands, so perhaps you meant her Birmingham accent?
I'm talking about her actual accent. Her natural voice when she's talking when she's not doing a skit.
When she's not doing a skit her voice is neutral, educated midlands leaning towards RP. Not distinctively regional at all. Whether that's her "actual accent" or just the standard one she uses for general performance is another matter.

everton
08-22-2003, 07:10 AM
Originally posted by FP@work
Ozzy Osbourn: He's from the Birmingham area and the accent is known as "brummy".
Correct, but although Ozzy may be the only person on American TV with a brummy accent, the damage done by years of abuse suggest that his may not the best example for reference purposes. Not all people from Birmingham sound like they're drunk 24/7.

FP@work
08-22-2003, 07:13 AM
No indeed. That would be the Glaswegians. :D

(joking... ;))

WotNot
08-22-2003, 07:50 AM
Have they ever shown Auf Weidersehen Pet in the US? That would be a good show for comparing different UK regional accents, with Geordie, Brummie, Scouse, Bristolian and Cockney.

Of course, you may need sub-titles ;)

everton
08-22-2003, 09:22 AM
Christopher Fairbank makes a mess of his scouse accent IHM(&WQ)O, but that's a decent suggestion, WotNot.

You may also have heard of Dave Prowse's disappointment when he discovered that James Earl Jones's voice would be used for Darth Vader instead of his own Bristol burr. Evidently ďI foind your lack of faith disturbing, me luvverĒ didn't have the right ring to it.

Nobody
08-22-2003, 11:45 AM
Originally posted by FP@work
And Terry Gilliam is American. :D
Well yeah, I don't know I included him.

Lamia
08-22-2003, 12:31 PM
David Bowie is from south London, but his accent sounds trained to me...IIRC he did attend acting school in the 1960s.

Nobody
08-23-2003, 12:52 PM
Originally posted by Lamia
David Bowie is from south London, but his accent sounds trained to me...IIRC he did attend acting school in the 1960s.
Trained? What exactly do you mean by that?
Also, this thread is pretty much over, so I just have one final question for everyone. In Blackadder the Third or Blackadder Goes Forth do Rowan Atkinson (Blackadder), Tony Robinson (Baldric), and Hugh Laurie (George) speak with different British accents? I mean, know that their voices are different, and their character's personalities are different, but Rowan Atkinson seems to have less of an accent than the other two, and Hugh Lauri and Tony Robinson seem to have different accents than each other, although I can't think of the words to describe the differences that I notice.

Lamia
08-23-2003, 04:46 PM
Originally posted by Joel
Trained? What exactly do you mean by that?


I mean I think it's not the accent he grew up speaking, but one he learned to speak later (probably in acting school). I'd suspect he was trained in RP.

KarlGauss
08-23-2003, 06:41 PM
This is a complete hijack, but ...

Do you people from the UK hear us Canadians as different from, the Australians or the Americans. Is there a "Canadian accent"?

Nobody
08-23-2003, 08:07 PM
Originally posted by KarlGauss
This is a complete hijack, but ...

Do you people from the UK hear us Canadians as different from, the Australians or the Americans. Is there a "Canadian accent"?
As an American, sometimes I hear a difference, sometimes I don't.
And just to let you know, the word is pronounced About and not Aboot :D

Daver914
08-24-2003, 03:46 AM
I have a hard time telling a Canadian accent from an American (I'm from Ohio, US). An Australian accent is easily distinguishable. It sounds more "English", but broader and somewhat more nasally.

That said, When I was in London in June, two girls (South African and Australian) could tell a difference between my accent and that of our Canadian roommate.

ruadh
08-24-2003, 06:00 AM
It's easy to tell a difference in accent when you're listening for one. I work very closely with a Canadian (from Toronto), and our other co-workers say they hear differences in our accents. Yet she is constantly mistaken by others as an American, and I've been asked "are you American or Canadian" on a couple occasions, as well as having had one person tell me "You're American? You sound Canadian."

everton
08-24-2003, 06:52 AM
Originally posted by Joel
Also, this thread is pretty much over, so I just have one final question for everyone. In Blackadder the Third or Blackadder Goes Forth do Rowan Atkinson (Blackadder), Tony Robinson (Baldric), and Hugh Laurie (George) speak with different British accents? I mean, know that their voices are different, and their character's personalities are different, but Rowan Atkinson seems to have less of an accent than the other two, and Hugh Lauri and Tony Robinson seem to have different accents than each other, although I can't think of the words to describe the differences that I notice.
In all the BlackadderÖ stories, Hugh Laurieís character uses an exaggerated version of RP (received pronunciation Ė dictionary English) of the kind associated with public (i.e. private) schools; Rowan Atkinsonís character talks with a less exaggerated version of RP; Tony Robinsonís character talks with his own light version of a working class Londoner. Laurie and Atkinson did both attend public schools, and Robinson was born in London.

Lamia: Iíve seen David Bowie being interviewed as a schoolboy in the í60s and he didnít sound like a typical Brixton boy then either, so he mustíve hidden it for the interview or else had a pretty neutral accent to begin with.

By the way, if youíre a Blackadder fan you can hear a radio documentary about it online. Itís called I Have A Cunning Plan and is available from this site (http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/progs/listenagain.shtml) for the next seven days.

I notice that nobody tried to locate Jon Anderson from Yes yet, so Iíll just add that heís from Accrington, Lancashire (North West England). If you look on a map you might be forgiven for thinking it should be very similar to a Manchester accent. It isnít (at least not to the ears of those of us from that part of the country).
Originally posted by KarlGauss
Do you people from the UK hear us Canadians as different from, the Australians or the Americans. Is there a "Canadian accent"?
Perhaps some of the comments in this thread (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?threadid=206303) will answer your question further. Personally I do fairly well recognising a Canadian accent, but thatís probably because I have relatives there. Familiarity seems to be the key.

According to comments made in numerous other threads there is certainly more than one Canadian accent though. BTW that ďabootĒ thing is wearing pretty thin even to this Englishman Ė it must be like bamboo under the fingernails to the Canucks themselves ;).

gex gex
08-24-2003, 09:30 AM
Try and see some episodes of British cop show The Bill. Lots of different accents on there.

Dawne
08-24-2003, 10:10 AM
I was walking through central park a few weeks ago and some men stopped us, asking if we were German. I don't think any of us have been so offended in a long time.

amanset
08-24-2003, 10:48 AM
Originally posted by Dawne
I was walking through central park a few weeks ago and some men stopped us, asking if we were German. I don't think any of us have been so offended in a long time.

I am from Kenilworth, Warwickshire.

When I was in Atlanta the guy cleaning my room asked me if I was "from France or something".

I didn't know whether to laugh or cry.

Oy!
08-24-2003, 03:53 PM
The character Daphne Moon (Jane Leeves) on Frasier has a western industrial (Brummie or Mancunian or Liverpudlian) accent. I say the character because I don't think Jane Leeves herself has that accent; it's assumed for the character.

Stephen Fry has just about the most public school accent imaginable. Was he born wearing tweed and with a pipe in his mouth?

amanset
08-24-2003, 04:16 PM
Originally posted by AvhHines
The character Daphne Moon (Jane Leeves) on Frasier has a western industrial (Brummie or Mancunian or Liverpudlian) accent.

I think she has those accents all at the same time. She may even possibly have a few others involved as well.

everton
08-24-2003, 05:56 PM
Or none of them. Please let's not do the whole Frasier thing again shall we?

AvhHines: None of those suggestions would be described as western, btw.

masonite
08-24-2003, 10:10 PM
How about Bubble on Absolutely Fabulous? (Jane Horricks, I think it is.) What's her accent, or is it just a weird voice?

everton
08-24-2003, 11:08 PM
See my previous comment about Jon Anderson. Jane Horrocks is from nearby in the Rossendale Valley (http://www.streetmap.co.uk/streetmap.dll?G2M?X=385500&Y=422500&A=Y&Z=5) (although she cranks it up a bit for Bubble). You can use the zoom buttons and scroll south a little to see where that is in relation to Manchester and scroll south west to Liverpool.

karomon
08-25-2003, 12:03 AM
What about Alan Rickman? He has some pretty weird rolling Rs going on.

everton
08-25-2003, 08:23 AM
They would be the rolling Rs of RADA (the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts), although having an Irish dad and a Welsh mum would have helped.

ruadh
08-25-2003, 08:40 AM
Probably not, actually. Parents' accents generally have very little if any effect on children's. If he spent a significant amount of time in Ireland or Wales growing up, maybe.

everton
08-25-2003, 09:19 AM
It's an enduring image though, surely? Ė Rickman impersonating his mum while hacking away at Robin Hood.

ruadh
08-25-2003, 09:28 AM
Maybe he took too closely to his part of Eamon de Valera.

That's a pretty frightening thought, actually.

gallows fodder
08-25-2003, 10:37 AM
Can anyone suggest a good example (actor, public figure, etc.) of a Norfolk accent? (I just read of someone having a "harsh Norfolk accent" and now I'm curious.)

Regarding parents' accents and their influence...I was born in Philadelphia and raised nearby, and I've always felt (though can't prove, of course) that I was protected against developing a nasty Philadelphia accent by having a mother from Nebraska. I don't say "wooder" for "water," for example, because my mother doesn't say "wooder," and she's the person I heard speak the most when I was a child. (On the other hand, my father is from northern Italy, and I couldn't mimic his accent if I tried.)

everton
08-25-2003, 10:39 AM
Yes it is. In fact I'm ashamed to admit I haven't got a clear enough mental image of de Valera's accent to know how good/bad a job he did in that film.

Back to the OP (or from the sublime to the ridiculous perhaps), I notice that there's another accent we haven't covered: Mrs Slocombe in Are You Being Served had a West Yorkshire accent with fake gentility laid on by the trowelful. Patricia Routledge has a similar sort of accent but from Wirral, West Cheshire.

everton
08-25-2003, 10:58 AM
Originally posted by gallows fodder
Can anyone suggest a good example (actor, public figure, etc.) of a Norfolk accent? (I just read of someone having a "harsh Norfolk accent" and now I'm curious.)
I just ran a search on IMDb for actors from Norfolk, but although there are plenty of references, I wouldn't say any of them had a distinctively Norfolk accent. I wouldn't have though the word "harsh" would apply to it either. The only person I can think of with a Norfolk accent is Bernard Matthews, who's a famous turkey farmer over here who appears in TV commercials for his own products, and is very unlikely to be familiar to an American audience.

If you've seen The Vicar of Dibley, Alice's accent will give you some idea of what it sounds like, but as far as I know she's not from that county.

Rayne Man
08-25-2003, 12:11 PM
Another person who had a strong Norfolk accent was the Singing Postman - Allan Smethurst who made famous the song " Hev Yew Gotta Loight Boy ?". (sic)

Rayne Man
08-25-2003, 12:28 PM
For those with Real Player this web site gives some examples of the Norfolk accent / dailect :- http://www.bbc.co.uk/norfolk/have_your_say/dialect.shtml

gallows fodder
08-25-2003, 01:20 PM
Wow, thanks, Rayne Man! Great examples!

everton, one of my local TV stations airs the Vicar of Dibley on Saturdays, so I'll make a point to watch that, too.

You're right -- "harsh" is not a word that comes to mind after hearing the soundclips on the BBC site. Maybe the description I read was using "harsh" as in "strong"...eh, who knows.

Rayne Man
08-25-2003, 02:28 PM
Glad you liked the examples Gallows Fodder. That BBC site also raises the difference between accent and dialect. To my mind accent just means the way the spoken word sounds but dialect means the use of different or modified words in every day speech to replace the usual ones.

everton
08-25-2003, 02:48 PM
I probably ought to add that the examples Rayne Man linked to are the real McCoy, but Alice in TVoD was just the best approximation I could think of on the spur of the moment. I recall jjimm explaining that the show is set in the Cotswolds on the other side of the country. The accents in the west and East Anglia are similar to a degree.

cowgirl
08-25-2003, 03:18 PM
Don't anyone forget about Tricky, Massive Attack and Portishead. Great Bristolian accents there, loverrrrr.

It's really shitty that all the awesome diversity of UK accents are almost invisible over here, because of the way they train actors to speak recieved English. Very boring. Is it because they think we won't understand it?

actually, I know people who had trouble understanding Trainspotting. (I know, not English.)

Know any good movies featuring non-recieved-English-speaking-English people that we could get over here?

Rayne Man
08-25-2003, 03:44 PM
One oldish film I can think of is Kes , set in Yorkshire ,which used a lot of non-professional actors. I am almost sure that when this film was released in the US sub-titles were used

everton
08-25-2003, 06:56 PM
Originally posted by cowgirl
Know any good movies featuring non-recieved-English-speaking-English people that we could get over here?
The Full Monty (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0119164): set in Sheffield, Mark Addy and William Snape have authentic South Yorkshire accents and Robert Carlyle does a decent imitation of one, Tom Wilkinson is from up the road in Leeds but has had a lot of it trained out, ditto Hugo Speer (Harrogate). Paul Barber is from Liverpool and couldn't be from anywhere else.

Nobody
08-25-2003, 07:56 PM
Yesterday, my wife and I had a BBQ with some friends. One of them is from England. He maped out where he's from in relationship to other English towns. He's from Balper Derbyshire, and when I asked him what kind of English accent he speaks with, he said it was a Derbyshire accent.
That got me to thinking, it seems that for the most part, what accent an Englishman/Englishwoman speaks with, is the same name as the town or region they live in or grew up in (I.E. London Accent, Liverpool Accent, etc...) Is that pretty much the case?

everton
08-25-2003, 08:29 PM
No it varies quite a bit, but if somebody was to explain their accent to you they might identify it by place to avoid complicating the issue or to make it easier to remember where they claimed to be from.

A person from Liverpool might be described as having a Scouse accent; someone from Newcastle-upon-Tyne* might be said to have a Geordie accent; a Londoner might have a Cockney accent etc.

'scuse the spelling nitpick, but I suspect your friend was from Belper.

*There are several places called Newcastle. N-on-Tyne is the biggest and best known, and is usually just abbreviated to Newcastle.

meenie7
08-25-2003, 09:18 PM
Ok, now I'm curious...does anyone know what the accent from Kent is like? Specifically Cranbrook, Kent (which is near Tunbridge Wells, I think). That's where my dad's family is from originally (we're talking way back...our ancestor from England was a Puritan who came over here only a little while after the Pilgrims and lived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony) and I've always sort of wondered what sort of place it was and how people talked and lived and all...someday I want to go over there and see if there are any Starrs left, all these years on :)

everton
08-25-2003, 09:30 PM
Originally posted by cowgirl
Know any good movies featuring non-recieved-English-speaking-English people that we could get over here?
A few others:

Bend It Like Beckham (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0286499): The central character is played by Parminder Nagra who is from Leicester and has an East Midlands accent.

Anita and Me (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0303661): Story about a young Indian girl growing up in the Black Country area of the English West Midlands in the '70s. The "Me" in the title is played by Chandeep Uppal, who has a strong Black Country accent.

The 51st State (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0227984): Partly set in Liverpool; Ricky Tomlinson, Michael Starke and Paul Barber (again) have authentic Liverpool accents and Robert Carlyle attempts one (with less success IMHO than he achieved in the To Be A Somebody edition of Cracker (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0105977)).

Billy Elliot (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0249462): Set in Newcastle, most of the characters either have (or attempt) Geordie accents. Billy's and his gradmother's are genuine, his elder brother's isn't, nor is his teacher's. His dad is from Glasgow.

everton
08-25-2003, 09:36 PM
Originally posted by meenie7
Ok, now I'm curious...does anyone know what the accent from Kent is like? Specifically Cranbrook, Kent (which is near Tunbridge Wells, I think).
Royal Tunbridge Wells (http://www.visittunbridgewells.com/), to give it its full name, is Received Pronunciation Central, archetypally the most conservative town in the whole of England. It may not have been that way when your dad's ancestor left of course.

I was there for a wedding a couple of summers ago and found it a very pretty town.

Nobody
08-25-2003, 11:37 PM
Originally posted by everton
No it varies quite a bit, but if somebody was to explain their accent to you they might identify it by place to avoid complicating the issue or to make it easier to remember where they claimed to be from.

A person from Liverpool might be described as having a Scouse accent; someone from Newcastle-upon-Tyne* might be said to have a Geordie accent; a Londoner might have a Cockney accent etc.

'scuse the spelling nitpick, but I suspect your friend was from Belper.

*There are several places called Newcastle. N-on-Tyne is the biggest and best known, and is usually just abbreviated to Newcastle.
Yeah, I had a hard time reading what he wrote, so it is probably Belper.

El Gui
08-26-2003, 02:47 AM
Originally posted by everton
Jane Horrocks is from nearby in the Rossendale Valley (http://www.streetmap.co.uk/streetmap.dll?G2M?X=385500&Y=422500&A=Y&Z=5) (although she cranks it up a bit for Bubble).

I seem to recall Bubble's accent labeled as rural Lankashire(sp?)?

jjimm
08-26-2003, 04:26 AM
Originally posted by everton
I recall jjimm explaining that the show is set in the Cotswolds on the other side of the country. (The Chilterns, actually). :)

everton
08-26-2003, 06:34 AM
Originally posted by El Gui
I seem to recall Bubble's accent labeled as rural Lankashire(sp?)?
Yes, the Rossendale Valley is in Lancashire.
Originally posted by jjimm
(The Chilterns, actually).
Gulp. Blame the beer. Alice's accent doesn't sound like anyone I've spoken to from that area (my brother used to live in Chesham, btw), but I seem to recall that Pam Ayres is from Oxfordshire, so maybe that's right?

F P
08-26-2003, 06:42 AM
Originally posted by cowgirl
Know any good movies featuring non-recieved-English-speaking-English people that we could get over here?

Both Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (http://www.imdb.com/Title?0120735) and Snatch (http://www.imdb.com/Title?0208092) are both set in London and many of the cast have genuine local accents (not Brad Pitt's gypsy of course ;)).

jjimm
08-26-2003, 07:11 AM
Originally posted by everton
Gulp. Blame the beer. Alice's accent doesn't sound like anyone I've spoken to from that area (my brother used to live in Chesham, btw), but I seem to recall that Pam Ayres is from Oxfordshire, so maybe that's right? There are a lot of immigrants to the area with Lunnun type accents, as well as middle-class types with RP, that are eroding the proper Oxfordshire accent. Chesham's Buckinghamshire (IIRC) and closer to London, so the rural accent would probably have been eroded quicker. However, in the village where I grew up, most of the people spoke like Pam Ayres (well, she was exaggerating it). You can tell Oxfordshire from other ooh-arr accents by the peculiar vowels:

Post becomes paste.
Boy becomes bee.
Loud becomes laid.
How becomes ay.

jjimm
08-26-2003, 07:16 AM
So, who can translate this from Oxfordshire dialect:

Ay laid did the paste bee shate?

:)

everton
08-26-2003, 07:30 AM
"How loud did the post boy (=postman?) shout?" would be my guess. I can just hear it in the "I wish I'd looked after me teeth" stylee.

Chesham (or Trumpton as my dad called it whenever he went to stay) is in Bucks and is indeed full of immigrants from The Smoke due to it being on the Met line.

Rayne Man
08-26-2003, 10:48 AM
On the subject of Black Country accents I have been told that , because this area is actually made up of a collection of villages and small towns, that there are many accents. It has been said that a resident of that area can almost say to the nearest street where somebody was born just by hearing them speak. I had an uncle from there and his accent was very pronounced , sometimes I had difficulty understanding him.
Accents do change in a very small area . I was born and raised in Coventry and that accent is different to Birmingham twenty miles to the west and Leicester twenty miles to the north east.
To clear up something for our US friends , when we talk of the Black Country ( west of Birmingham) this has nothing to do with race or colour of the inhabitants but to the fact that this is a very industrialized area . The "black" comes from the industrial pollution of the past which has been mainly eradicated.

amarone
08-26-2003, 01:18 PM
Originally posted by everton
Billy Elliot (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0249462): Set in Newcastle. Isn't it Durham?

everton
08-26-2003, 01:59 PM
This site (http://www.bbc.co.uk/tyne/hollywood_on_tyne/billy_elliot.shtml) says it was shot all over the North East, and although it mentions Easington, there are towns of that name in Northumberland and Cleveland as well as Durham and it doesn't say which one. There is an Easington Colliery in Co. Durham though, so you're surely right.

Jamie Bell is apparently from Billingham near Middlesbrough, so technically his accent isn't quite a Geordie one, but his gran is played by Jean Heywood who's from Blyth, so hers is.