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UncleBeer
04-20-2000, 05:45 PM
But if Unc ever starts a thread with MY name in the title, I will NOT press the bright, shiny, red, candy-like button that opens it.

All right, let's see if I can get on one more shitlist today. Uke's gonna wander in here shortly and recommend a book for anyone who asks.

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 10:46 AM]

Geobabe
04-20-2000, 06:04 PM
Heeheehee. I'm gonna get in on this one. Hook me up, Uke! Let's see what you can do with the limited amount of info you have to work with here. BTW, John McPhee is out, 'cause I've already read all his books.

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The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between the lightning and the lightning bug.
Mark Twain

Lord Derfel
04-20-2000, 06:08 PM
Assuming Uke does wander in, I'm always on the lookout for a good book recommendation. Uke, how about something vaguely nautical?

Arnold Winkelried
04-20-2000, 06:11 PM
OK, for my light summer reading, I need a few crime novels. Agatha Christie, Conan Doyle, P.D. James, Ruth Rendell, Elmore Leonard, Tony Hillerman, Sue Grafton are all out (I've read several books by each author, all the books in some cases.)

I want a new detective whose career I can follow throughout several novels!

Falcon
04-20-2000, 06:13 PM
I'm in. Got a book for me, Uke?

Whammo
04-20-2000, 06:13 PM
OH yeah! we be books! I'll take one please :)

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I was sad because I had no shoes, until I saw a snake with no legs.

- A Wally original.

Sealemon88
04-20-2000, 06:15 PM
Maybe some leather S and M erotica?

I've been a very naughty boy.

P.S. Bonus points if it has pictures.

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You say "cheesy" like that's a BAD thing.

Manda JO
04-20-2000, 06:16 PM
I, myself, am looking for a light author as an antidote to the very heavy literature I have been reading the last few years--most recently, a lot of Chaucer and Melville. A whole lot of Melville. But, this English degree I have paid so dearly for has all but robbed me of the ability to read bad writting--I cringe at authors I loved before. So who out there is a light read without an amature style?

Mullinator
04-20-2000, 06:20 PM
Booyah. Book me Uke!

elelle
04-20-2000, 06:47 PM
Har! Here's another request, Ike. Nothin' by Faulkner, though. Been there, am livin' that.

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The ride is short and the thrills are cheap- Men and rollercoasters. - - -Courtesy of Wally, that Signifying Guy.

pluto
04-20-2000, 06:52 PM
Whatuvya got along the lines of "Philosophy for Dummies"?

Osip
04-20-2000, 07:00 PM
Arnold Winkelreid.

I am not Ukulele Ike but I can give you a suggestion for a trilogy you might enjoy.

Gorky Park.
Polar Star.
Red Square.
all my Martin Cruz-Smith.

great trilogy following Detective Arkady Renko who is one of my all time favorite fictional characters.

Ukulele Ike:
You opend your mouth and look what you got.
Better you than I.



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Oh your from Wales?? Do you know a fella named Jonah?? He used to live in whales for a while.

Bucky
04-20-2000, 08:12 PM
Manda JO--P.G. Wodehouse, S.J. Perelman, and perhaps Kingsley Amis would fit your needs.

Wodehouse would be my first choice for light reading--delicate truffles of writing. You can overdose (he suggested no more than one or two short stories of his a day), but they're a delight!

Bucky

jazzmine
04-20-2000, 08:28 PM
Ike...give it to me, Baby.

You KNOW you want to.

trisha

TVeblen
04-20-2000, 08:57 PM
<uttered in appallingly polite tones>

Mayhap you could recommend something on, oh say, hobbies and leisure pursuits? Possibly a small press offering geared toward mental health workers.

Veb

Zyada
04-20-2000, 09:35 PM
Originally posted by Sealemon88:
Maybe some leather S and M erotica?

I've been a very naughty boy.

P.S. Bonus points if it has pictures.

No pictures, but have you read the Beauty trilogy by Anne Rice?

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I do not merely dance. I bewitch. I seduce. I enchant and I bewilder. Throw money.
(Gee, Wally must have seen me dance!)

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 10:51 AM]

Ukulele Ike
04-20-2000, 09:56 PM
Oh, UncleBeer...this is TOO nice of you!

No shit...this makes me feel like Santa on Christmas morning! Let's see what I have in my bag for all the good little boys and girls...

First...COAL AND SWITCHES for Osip and Bucky. Bugger off, you two. This is MY thread.

Geobabe: You remind me of my good friend John from my college days. He was an earnest literature major before he snapped and switched to geology in his junior year. Before he turned to rocks, he liked to settle in with a good depressing Russian novel. So it's The Brothers Karamazov for you!

Lord Derfel: For the finest in nautical reading, I favor the novels of Commander Edward Ellsberg, the great naval salvage man. His 30 Fathoms Deep (1930) is one of the best diving novels I read as a lad.

Arnold W: A man with such a taste for the classics (except for Sue Grafton. Ewwwww.) must have read the Nero Wolfe series by Rex Stout, right? And the Father Brown stories by G.K. Chesterton? If so, look for the brilliant western Pa. regional crime novels of K.C. Constantine, the greatest crime novelist no one's heard of. Blood Mud is the most recent.

Falcon: No hints? Okay, for you, James Thurber's My World and Welcome To It.

B_Line12: For YOU, the recently reprinted Roland Huntford nonfiction thriller of Polar Exploration, The Last Place on Earth. A classic, and deservedly so,.

Sealemon: You want S&M? Have you read Anne Rice's "Beauty" trilogy? Bondage and paddlings galore, and both the sexes get equal time! If you want pictures, get a subscription to JANUS magazine.

Manda Jo: Yeah, P.G. Wodehouse is an excellent choice. And everyone here will second my recommendation of Terry Pratchett. Ronald Firbank is also light and airy and whimsical a British...New Directions has his Five Novels in print.

Mullinator: For my good buddy, only the best: Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita. It'll change your f*cking life, man. You'll be running naked through the streets of Moscow. (The Devil hisself is the hero.)

Elelle: Try Joe R. Lansdale. It's Southern Gothic (well, East Texas Gothic) but with enough bizarre humor to make Faulkner roll in his grave.

Pluto: "Philosophy for Dummies" ? I have JUST the thing for you: R. Rust Hills; How to Do Things Right: The Revelations of a Fussy Man. I'm also reading G.K. Chesterton's life of St. Francis, and recommend that as well...

Jazzmine: Robert McCloskey; Make Way for Ducklings. Hee hee hee...

TVeblen: First, you have to get me a hobby. But if you really want a lovely tale of madness, try John Franklin Bardin; Devil Take the Blue Tail Fly. The story of an insane felmale harpsichordist. Talk about redundancy.

Okay, who's next? (No shit, Unc, I owe you a CASE of Labatts for this one...)


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Uke

Ukulele Ike
04-20-2000, 09:59 PM
zyada, EXTRA switches for you (pun intended) for beating me (pun not intended)to that recommendation.

You know how long it took me to type that shit up?

Trion
04-20-2000, 10:06 PM
Hey Ike. What do you have along the lines of Lord Dunsany?

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"My mind reels with sarcastic replies!" - Snoopy

Pixoid
04-20-2000, 11:15 PM
Hey, Uke. Can you hook me up? I'm looking for something that make you think, but not too hard. :p

Just kidding. Actually, something either off the wall, or that makes you think.

Thanks!

-Pix

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My classes are optional. So is graduating.
(Certifiable WallyM7Sig)
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Homepage: www.lightwave.com (http://www.lightwave.com)
Occupation: Photon
Location: I'm still stuck on this phosphor screen
Interests: Illuminescence, Phosphorescence and Florescence
(Profile by UncleBeer)

Sassy
04-20-2000, 11:20 PM
Me! Me! I want to see what kind of impression I've made... fiction only, please. I am too frazzled for serious stuff.

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I am a redhead, you see, and I do not tempt. I insist. -Cristi

mega the roo
04-20-2000, 11:21 PM
Can I have one too, please? Huh? Huh? Can I?

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"Organs gross me out. That's organs, not orgasms."
-the wallster

Persephone
04-20-2000, 11:23 PM
Ooh! Ooh! Gimme one o' them thar book thingies!

One of my favorite subjects is early (really, really early) religious history, particularly Judeo-Christian history. Yeha, I know. "But Cristi, aren't you a pagan?" Well, yes. But from a purely historical standpoint, Judeo-Christianity is really damned interesting.

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Cristi, Slayer of Peeps

I made my husband join a bridge club. He jumps next Tuesday.

(title & sig courtesy of UncleBeer and WallyM7!)

Falcon
04-20-2000, 11:29 PM
Uke, I gave no suggestions because I read anything and everything. I will second your recommendations of Brothers Karamazov and the works of K.C. Constantine. Both are excellent. Actually read Karamazov for fun once.

And I've also read the Beauty trilogy. Like I said....I read everything.

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Homepage: www.tiercel.com (http://www.tiercel.com)
Occupation: Culling slow moving vermin
Location: The wild blue yonder.
Interests: Thermals, updrafts, downdrafts, air currents in general.
(Profile by UncleBeer.)

Environment? Nah. Mood lighting and ambience is what counts. - a genuine WallyM7 sig

Valerieblaise
04-21-2000, 12:21 AM
Books, huh? I've heard of those. Can I have one, Uke? Please?

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You're a penny in the tip jar of life
But you're shiny and you're mine
-the Judybats

NothingMan
04-21-2000, 12:25 AM
Ike, I can't get enough good Arthurian fantasy, the longer the better . . . suggestions ?

Kat
04-21-2000, 12:53 AM
I'm in, naturally.

No suggestions list, because there are too many possible categories to make a comprehensive list.

Bonus points if Uke can recommend a book I haven't read, double bonus points if he hits upon a book I've been considering/planning on reading.

Narile
04-21-2000, 02:02 AM
Ahhh, Uke....A book of SF&F that is both thought-provoking, and not cliche'd.

Please no TVseries tie ins, those are by definition, cliche'd.

Extra points if it is by an author I haven't read, and even more points if it is someone I haven't heard of.

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>>Nomex underwear is optional for dragons. <<
---The dragon observes

mazirian
04-21-2000, 03:21 AM
Dear Mr. Ike,

Of your previous recommedations I've enjoyed the works of Mr. Landsdale (both Hap & Leonard and his grisly horror) and Mr. Pratchett. P.G. Wodehouse has been for a long time in my reading list, but I'm afraid he has to wait still (a severe case overindulgence of dry British wit caused by Black Adder, Fawlty Towers and Monty Python). I read mostly science fiction and swear by Jack Vance, Harlan Ellison, Robert Sheckley, Fritz Leiber, Gene Wolfe and R.A. Lafferty, a recent discovery. And I MUST mention George MacDonald Fraser's Flashman-series, I can't believe you're unfamilliar with it?

So, could you kindly recommed a good book on gardening?

Nawww, something funny will do...

Yours,
mazirian


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For once you must try to face the facts: Mankind is kept alive by bestial acts.

ultress
04-21-2000, 05:34 AM
Ok Ike, I'm in. Hit me with your best, book that is.

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*Sigh*. So many men, so few who can afford me Original by Wally

I've learned that if someone says something unkind about me, I must live so that no one will believe it.

Homepage: www.superlativeandsassy.com (http://www.superlativeandsassy.com)
Occupation: Temptress
Location: Ultra, California
Interests: surpluses, excesses, abundances, extras, lagniappes
profile by UncleBeer

Billdo
04-21-2000, 07:04 AM
Uke,

How 'bout some good historical fiction? Something that moves along but isn't too frothy, with some real history so that I can learn something without it being crammed down my throat.

Thanks buddy.

Eve
04-21-2000, 08:07 AM
Gee, I have some nice books to get me through the weekend.

How about some good cassette tapes? Say, maybe . . . Oh, I don't know . . . Ute Lemper, or a collection of Disaster Songs from the early 20th century? THOSE sound like they might be something I'd wanna borrow.

—Eve (batting her eyes into left field)

G.B.H. Hornswoggler
04-21-2000, 08:10 AM
Originally posted by Narile:
Ahhh, Uke....A book of SF&F that is both thought-provoking, and not cliche'd.

Please no TVseries tie ins, those are by definition, cliche'd.

Extra points if it is by an author I haven't read, and even more points if it is someone I haven't heard of.


Hope Uke doesn't mind me pinch-hitting here for a moment, but this is my end of the publishing world you're talking about.

For SF: the novels of Iain M. Banks (the books without the "M." are non-SF, but worthy in their own twisted ways). Use of Weapons and Consider Phlebas are good starting places. The former is a novel told both backwards and forwards; the latter one of the best of the space opera revivals on the last decade or two (and more, as you might guess if you know the source of the title).

Fantasy: George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire." Two novels to date, A Game of Thrones and A Clash of Kings, with the third, A Storm of Swords coming in the fall. It's very loosely based on England's Wars of the Roses, and the characterization (of literally dozens of named persons) is exceptional.

Both of those are from the "entertaining" end of the spectrum, but if you want something chewy, I could dig that up as well.

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I'm your only friend
I'm not your only friend
But I'm a little glowing friend
But really I'm not actually your friend
But I am

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 10:57 AM]

Esprix
04-21-2000, 08:21 AM
OK, UncleBeer... hit me. ;)

Esprix

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Evidently, I rock.
Ask the Gay Guy! (http://boards.straightdope.com/ubb/Forum7/HTML/001376.html)

SwimmingRiddles
04-21-2000, 08:22 AM
In a month or two, after my brain has cooled off from being in overdrive this week, I'm sure I'll be alookin' for something to peruse. I enjoy quirky books, and philosophy. But seeing as how it is summer, I'll want those in the soft-boiled versions.

Wassup, Uke, hook me up, yo.

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A little persistance goes a long way. Announcing:

"I go on guilt trips a couple of time a year. Mom books them for me." A custom made Wally .sig!

Bucky
04-21-2000, 08:23 AM
Oooh, Ike, I've got a book that I think you would love! It's called--

oops. sorry.

Bucky

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 08:45 AM
I better start dealing with this in chunks. If I lose my connection in the middle of a looooong post, it'll be a Brodie for me...

Da Ace: Beat it! Getcher own damn thread! No, wait. I admit my reading in SF/Fantasy has been sketchy, though gratifying. Please stick around in case I run out of ideas in that realm...

Trion: Something like Lord Dunsany? There is NOTHING "like" Lord Dunsany. So I'll stretch a wee bit and say the short novels of Lord Berners, recently reprinted in an omnibus edition. While not strict fantasy, they are certainly surreal. And he's a Lord, too, and loved at approximately the same time. If you're leaning toward horr, do you know Algernon Blackwood? Dover has a "Best of" in print, and any Dunsany/Lovecraft buff should read his short story "The Willows."

Pixoid: Stop me if you've heard this from me before, but something that'll make you think and have fun at the same time is J.K. Huysmans' A REBOURS. (Get the Dover translation, called AGAINST THE GRAIN, NOT the Penguin translation, called AGAINST NATURE.) This was the infamous "yellow book" that so affected Dorian Gray in Wilde's novel.

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Uke

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 08:51 AM
Forgot to UBB. Sorry. Now,

Sassy: Hah! You think fiction ain't serious business? Have a go at G.K. Chesterton's THE MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY. Ignatius Press just published an edition annotated by Martin Gardner. A bizarre philosphical/theological thriller from 1907, still topical, and a marvelous read. Christopher Morley was hand-selling it back in the teens; he recommends it in his novel THE HAUNTED BOOKSHOP.

mega the roo: I kinda like picking books out of the clear blue sky, I admit. For you, Eddie Condon's 1947 autobiography, WE CALLED IT MUSIC. Condon was a jazz guitarist and club-owner, and his life in the 1920s typified Jazz Age weirdness. He was a mediocre musician, but a great personality...funny as hell, too.



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Uke

rackensack
04-21-2000, 08:59 AM
Ike:
"Mullinator: For my good buddy, only the best: Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita. It'll change your f*cking life, man. You'll be running naked through the streets of Moscow. (The Devil hisself is the hero.)

Oooh. I knew I liked you. Found it at random on the shelves of the Poinsett County Public Library in Harrisburg, Ark. when I was in high school and being one of the only interesting-looking things there that I hadn't read, I took it home. And it did indeed change my life. Brilliant book and more fun than three barrels of monkeys.

But you didn't specify which translation Mully should get. There's the Grove Press edition translated by Mirra Ginsberg, with the text as censored by the Soviet authorities, which I'm told is more accurate linguistically but somewhat staid, missing the tone almost completely. Michael Glenny's translation of the complete text was the one I originally read and loved; it includes the full text, and has more of the dash and verve of the book. I have heard others say that Glenny's translation betrays a lack of intimate familiarity with life in Moscow in the 1920s. For many years, these were the two choices. However, there are now two more, only one of which I have read: Diane Burgin and Kathleen Tiernan O'Connor's Vintage Classics edition. I think this is my favorite, and since it's an annotated edition, is probably the best place for someone not reasonably well versed in Soviet history to start. There's a Penguin edition that Amazon's showing as not yet available even though the expected pub. date was in February -- apparently this translation, by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, has been available overseas for a while; obviously, I have no experience of this one.

Which one do you prefer?

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"Ain't no man can avoid being born average, but there ain't no man got to be common." --Satchel Paige

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:01 AM]

Ringo
04-21-2000, 09:01 AM
Uke:

Is there a reliable and comprehensible work out there that'll get me up to speed on what's going on with the IMF, WTO and the as yet still amorphous bands of hooters and hollerers?

Thanks for the efforts, Ike.

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 09:02 AM
Jesus, Unc is going to think I'm having too much fun here and ask the mods to close the thread...

Cristi: Do you know Karen Armstrong's A HISTORY OF GOD? It's a very intelligent history and commentary on the three Western monotheistic religions, from the Jews' transformation of pagan idol worship to the rise of Islam, through the Enlightenment to the modern age, and how the three affect each other.

ValerieBlaise: How about Henry Adams' classic of travel, history, and reportage, MONT SAINT MICHEL AND CHARTRES? "A frolic power unusual to historic literature," said William James.

NothingMan: You like Arthurian fantasy? Go for Lewis Spence's HERO TALES AND LEGENDS OF THE RHINE. First published in 1915, it's one of the best samplings of Teutonic folklore, recounting the lives and deeds of a host of mythic figures...Siegfried and Brunhild, the Jester of Heidelberg, Tannhauser, Lorelei. Makes a nice comparison and contrast to Brit fantasy, but is similar enough that you'll enjoy it in the same vein. And as a bonus, you'll be able to understand Wagner's operas!

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 09:18 AM
Kat: Joseph Roth. THE RADETZKY MARCH. One of the best 20th century German novels, right up there with Thomas Manna dn Robert Musil. Set in the pre-War Austro-Hungarian Empire. Nadine Gordimer called it a masterpiece. Read it yet?

Narile: TV series tie-ins? Pfah. What do you take me for? Read BLACK EMPIRE by George Schuyler, the Harlem Renaissance journalist/satirist. Written in the 1930s, it's a fantastic utopia novel in which the African-American mastermind Dr. Henry Belsidus schemes to liberate the continent of Africa and subjugate the white and yellow races beneath his somewhat Nazi-like boot heel. Pulpy, but in the GOOD way.

mazirian: Funny, eh? Donald E. Westlake. Any of the Dortmunder series. THE HOT ROCK was the first, WHAT'S THE WORST THAT COULD HAPPEN? is the most recent. Comic caper novels about a crook with just the most miserable luck. Not only as funny as hell, but as carefully plotted and crafted as anything in crime fiction today. You'll marvel at how the story's working out between snickering.

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 09:30 AM
ultress: Richard Rovere's HOWE & HUMMEL: THEIR TRUE AND SCANDALOUS HISTORY. Between 1869 and 1907, H&H was the most successful and notorious criminal law office in the city of New York. They defended over a thousand people indicted for murder, and had a monopoly of the rest of crook business in NYC as well. Their courtroom methods were outrageous, and their client list included P.T. Barnum, John L. Sullivan. Lillian Russell, and Marm Mandelbaum, the queen of New York's underworld. Nicely written history, too...it originally appeared as a serial in THE NEW YORKER.

Billdo: Once considered the best American novel to come out of World War One, William March's COMPANY K is now almost forgotten. The book consists of 113 sketches, or chapters, tracing the fictional company's exploits and providing an emotional history of its soldiers. Gut-wrenching stuff, told by a trench veteran. The University of Alabama Press has it back in print.

Eve: I simply do NOT trust the mails. Howzabout I return your belongings at the next NYC Round Table and Beer Blast? That would be (checks appointment book) either the SwimmingRiddles, pldennison, or SqrlCub party...

rackensack
04-21-2000, 09:31 AM
Oh yeah, forgot to put in my request for a recommendation. Whaddaya got, Ike?

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 09:37 AM
Esprix: No god damn way. Get my name right if you want favors. UncleBeer is the devastatingly handsome witty bespectacled six-footer with the moustache.

SwimmingRiddles: Quirky AND philosophical. Take Italo Calvino's INVISIBLE CITIES. It's sunset, and Kubla Khan is conversing with the young Marco Polo about the evolution of the universe...characters are created out of mathematical formulae and simple cellular structures...Prospero waves his magic wand. The Empire is ending.

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 09:44 AM
rackensack: Yeah, I read the Glenny translation first, too. Can't say it bothered me any, but I re-read it in the Burgin/O'Connor and seemed to enjoy it more. So that's the one I recommend to folks (although it may be the fact that it was a second reading that influenced my enjoyment).

I've also heard that the Ginsberg translation bites the wax tadpole. Mullinator, avoid that one like the very plague!

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 09:49 AM
beatle: Huh? Acronym help, puh-leeze!

rackensack: Lessee....you have excellent taste in literature, as you revere McTEAGUE and THE MASTER AND MARGARITA...Have you ever tried THE OLD WIVES' TALE? I think it's Arnold Bennett's best novel. 1908 English realism, with superb, almost Dickensian characters. And as a bonus, the best description of a guillotining ever written.

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Uke

Trion
04-21-2000, 09:57 AM
Ike, thanks a bunch! Berners looks like exactly what I'm in the mood for. I think I'll save Blackwood for autumn when I get in my creepy mode.


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"My mind reels with sarcastic replies!" - Snoopy

Ringo
04-21-2000, 09:59 AM
IMF - International Monetary Fund
WTO - World Trade Organization
hooters and hollerers - Seattle and DC protesters of late

ultress
04-21-2000, 10:01 AM
Very good Ike. I'll make sure I pick it up. Sounds just like my cup of tea.

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*Sigh*. So many men, so few who can afford me Original by Wally

I've learned that if someone says something unkind about me, I must live so that no one will believe it.

Homepage: www.superlativeandsassy.com (http://www.superlativeandsassy.com)
Occupation: Temptress
Location: Ultra, California
Interests: surpluses, excesses, abundances, extras, lagniappes
profile by UncleBeer

UncleBeer
04-21-2000, 10:02 AM
Holy shit! I guess I didn't think this one through completely. On further reflection, this thread is kinda like askin' a pusher which is is better, the crack or the crank.

Carry on, Uke. You're doin' a fine job. Next I think we'll get Eve to recommend silent movies for us.

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 10:06 AM
beatle: Throw off your shackles! Get down and funky with the proletariat! It's our Revolution and we can dance if we wanna! Get ANARCHISM by Daniel Guerin, the French New Left's answer to Noam Chomsky!

Eve
04-21-2000, 10:07 AM
I can just see the Teeming Millions rushing to their video stores and mail-order catalogues, breakin' their necks to see Lillian Gish or Ramon Novarro.

To quote Judy Tenuta, "Yeah. THAT could happen."

Esprix
04-21-2000, 10:31 AM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike:

Esprix: No god damn way. Get my name right if you want favors. UncleBeer is the devastatingly handsome witty bespectacled six-footer with the moustache.

D'OH! Consider me thoroughly chastised. That's what happens when someone else starts a thread for you... :(

I'd still love a recommendation, though, Ike...

Esprix, who really is sorry

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Evidently, I rock.
Ask the Gay Guy! (http://boards.straightdope.com/ubb/Forum7/HTML/001376.html)

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:09 AM]

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 10:43 AM
Esprix: Apology cheerfully accepted...for you, Evelyn Waugh's first novel, DECLINE AND FALL. Early Waugh is as funny as Wodehouse, yet infinitely bitchier. This one is a masterpiece of black humor, and I think it holds together better than the other early-'30s novels.

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Uke

Eve
04-21-2000, 10:51 AM
Ike: Bad-mouth Waugh's delicious VILE BODIES at your own risk . . .

I see you haven't yet recommended any Tiffany Thayers! And Sax adored the Olive Higgins Prouty novel I loaned her. I know you detest Thorne Smith, but how about Patrick Dennis? Anita Loos? J.P. McEvoy? James Cain? Christopher Morley? And we haven't even gotten to the wonderful histories by Stanley Loomis.

C'mon, are you a bibliophile or a mouse?

Esprix
04-21-2000, 11:22 AM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike:

Esprix: Apology cheerfully accepted...for you, Evelyn Waugh's first novel, DECLINE AND FALL. Early Waugh is as funny as Wodehouse, yet infinitely bitchier. This one is a masterpiece of black humor, and I think it holds together better than the other early-'30s novels.

Never heard of her or it. I'll look it up. Thanks!

Esprix

------------------
Evidently, I rock.
Ask the Gay Guy! (http://boards.straightdope.com/ubb/Forum7/HTML/001376.html)

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:17 AM]

Whammo
04-21-2000, 11:44 AM
WOW good choice.. that really sounds like something I would like. I think I will check it out.

pluto
04-21-2000, 11:45 AM
Thanks for your recommendations, Uke. I will take you up on them. I may even actually buy them, rather than rely on the King County Library System. (This is largely a concession to Mrs. P., who is of the opinion that a house full of books is not necessarily better than a house half full of books.)

However, as I read Eve's increasingly caustic remarks I notice that you have not yet recommended her books to anyone. That just might be the burr in her saddle. ;)

DSYoungEsq
04-21-2000, 01:49 PM
(running in and huffing and puffing from finding out about this late (it's that damn constitutional research I am always doing...))

Okay, Ike, how about something relating to linguistics, something reasonably new...Please? :)

Eve
04-21-2000, 01:49 PM
Pluto—

Surely you don't think I'm as small a person as THAT! Besides, I don't think Ike has read any of my books, so it would not behoove him to recommend them . . . After all, they might suck!

Sunshine
04-21-2000, 02:07 PM
"What about me, Mr. Youngblood?"

Where's my book? Maybe SF&F or historical fiction...

p.s. I hope somebody knows what I'm talking about...

------------------
"It's not death I fear so much as leaving something so beautiful as life."

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 02:11 PM
Originally posted by Eve:
Besides, I don't think Ike has read any of my books

Yeah, right.

Paid cash money for them too. It's not like anybody gave me a COMP copy...

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:24 AM]

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 02:13 PM
Originally posted by Eve:
C'mon, are you a bibliophile or a mouse?

Hmmmmm...well, when Unc gives you your own thread, you can freely impose your taste for pot-boilers on the TM. Me, I would never ask my friends and/or colleagues to read books by women with three names.

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:30 AM]

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 02:29 PM
Esprix: Psssssst...Evelyn Waugh's a guy. And pay no attention to the woman behind the curtain. VILE BODIES is fine, but it ain't no DECLINE AND FALL.

MoosieGirl: Gabrielle d'Annunzio's THE TRIUMPH OF DEATH. The Great Italian Decadent Masterpiece by the 20th century Italian superman, mentor of Mussolini.

DSYoungEsq: Noam Chomsky's ASPECTS OF THE THEORY OF SYNTAX. The classic of modern linguistic theory. Maybe it's a little outdated, but hey, it's a classic.

Sunshine: Mervyn Peake's TITUS GROAN, the first of the Gormenghast books. and if you like it, finish the trilogy.

------------------
Uke

rackensack
04-21-2000, 03:38 PM
Ike:
Have you ever tried THE OLD WIVES' TALE? I think it's Arnold Bennett's best novel. 1908 English realism, with superb, almost Dickensian characters. And as a bonus, the best description of a guillotining ever written.

I have not. Indeed, I don't think I've read anything by Bennett. My loss, no doubt. So as soon as I finish Heaney's new translation of Beowulf and Derek Walcott's new collection, Tiepolo's Hound, The Old Wives' Tale it is. Much obliged.

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----------------------
"Ain't no man can avoid being born average, but there ain't no man got to be common." --Satchel Paige

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:32 AM]

Arnold Winkelried
04-21-2000, 05:33 PM
Our host said
Arnold W: A man with such a taste for the classics (except for Sue Grafton. Ewwwww.) must have read the Nero Wolfe series by Rex Stout, right? And the Father Brown stories by G.K. Chesterton? If so, look for the brilliant western Pa. regional crime novels of K.C. Constantine, the greatest crime novelist no one's heard of. Blood Mud is the most recent.
Thank you for the recommendation Uke. I have read all of Father Brown (and you just reminded me that my Father Brown collection was loaned to a friend several years ago and never returned! the bastard!), but Nero Wolfe only here and there in mystery compilations. Maybe I'll get a collection of his, and I will look up K. C. Constantine. Thank you!

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:36 AM]

Persephone
04-21-2000, 06:30 PM
Ike: Guess what? I own A History of God. Haven't read it yet, though. It's one of those books that looked utterly fabulous when I bought it, and I had every intention of reading it, and....then I had kids. I've had it for a while.

My husband is going away next week, though. Maybe I'll read while he's gone! Yeah!

------------------
Cristi, Slayer of Peeps

I made my husband join a bridge club. He jumps next Tuesday.

(title & sig courtesy of UncleBeer and WallyM7!)

DSYoungEsq
04-21-2000, 06:56 PM
(thinking this isn't the sort of recommendation Cristi's been getting in her What do I do while my husband is away? thread (LOL))

elelle
04-21-2000, 07:07 PM
YeeIke's! Thanks fer the book. I've never heard of him, but sounds good, as East Texas is the never never land even Mississippifficianadoes shy from, lessen there's some legal hellhounds on yer trail...

But, I have a wide-ranging intellect, outside of the Southern Ghetto, so I don't see why you had to...

:::glancing out the window at the 64 Valiant up on blocks, and goats eating what was left of the yard:::

Hell, yer right...

I'm gonna print up this thread, though, as a great summer reading list...

And I hope the THREADSPOTTING GODS---YOOO-HOOO! call it to the attention of everyone!

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 07:36 PM
Arnold: If you can get your hands on the SECOND book in the series, THE LEAGUE OF FRIGHTENED MEN (1935), trust me, you will be hooked on Nero Wolfe FOREVER. The other 1930s books are very good, too...THE RED BOX, THE RUBBER BAND, SOME BURIED CAESAR, and especially TOO MANY COOKS.

Cristi: There you go.

elelle: I was thinking about suggesting a piece of Yankee fiction, but changed my mind, and am ready to provide you with the Death Tale of the SUPREME CRACKER.. After you do Lansdale, try David Zinman's THE DAY HUEY LONG WAS SHOT (Univ. of Mississippi Press, 1993). A brilliant piece of historical writing, and a detective story to boot...

------------------
Uke

WallyM7
04-21-2000, 07:50 PM
Forget about me, Uke.

I've read all the books.

AuntiePam
04-21-2000, 07:51 PM
Uke -- a Lansdale fan!? Well, then I know I can trust your judgment. I trust you've already pre-ordered Blood Dance and The Bottoms?

Back to the OP: My daughter wants to read a novel, set in the south, around the time of the Civil War, from the black point of view? If not a novel, then non-fiction would be okay, providing it doesn't read like a textbook.

Zyada
04-21-2000, 08:00 PM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike:
zyada, EXTRA switches for you (pun intended) for beating me (pun not intended)to that recommendation.

You know how long it took me to type that shit up?

Uke, I got turned down today by a really cute guy, and I'm PMS'ing.
I want you to know that this made my day a 100% better - thanks.

So - when do I get my switches? :D

------------------
I do not merely dance. I bewitch. I seduce. I enchant and I bewilder. Throw money.
(Gee, Wally must have seen me dance!)

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:41 AM]

Jodi
04-21-2000, 08:35 PM
Late as usual. May I have a recommendation, please, Mr. Uke? History, non-fiction, pre-twentieth century (the subject, I mean; not necessarily the book). Not legal history, sil vous plait. Many thanks.





------------------
Jodi

Fiat Justitia

Ukulele Ike
04-21-2000, 09:00 PM
Wally: Thanks for stopping by! Do come again! {jingle of the little bell over the door}

AuntiePam: Trust me, I've SEEN your Lansdale recommendations, and they have warmed my bitter old heart. I'm waiting impatiently for THE BOTTOMS, but BLOOD DANCE is a new one on me...when's it out? Who's the publisher?

As for a book for your daughter...the apple of my eye, Little Pianola (9 years old) just finished James Lincoln Collier's WAR COMES TO WILLY FREEMAN, and swears by it. Is your daughter in the same age range? I've read Collier's nonfiction books on jazz, and he's a damn good writer, but I think it's his YA fiction that puts the bread and butter on his table.

Zyada: {gulp, grin, flustered adjustment of clothing}

jodih: TWO ideas for you, very different books I've read over the past year. Thomas D. Clark's PILLS, PETTICOATS, & PLOWS: THE SOUTHERN COUNTRY STORE. A history of general mercantile stores and storekeepers across the American Southeast between 1865 and the early 20th century.

If you want something with a grander sweep, Edward Crankshaw's THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF HABSBURG. The story of the final decades of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the destruction of the old European order that marked a turning point in world history. Old Vienna and the lead-up to WWI. I LOVE that stuff!

------------------
Uke

AuntiePam
04-21-2000, 10:24 PM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike:
I'm waiting impatiently for THE BOTTOMS, but BLOOD DANCE is a new one on me...when's it out? Who's the publisher?

Blood Dance will be available through Subterranean Press, this month, I think. They're doing a great job getting Joe's work out to his fans. (The Magic Wagon is the only one I haven't been able to find.)

And the book recommendation for my daughter? She's 33. I guess I could have said that in the first place. :) Another suggestion, maybe?

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:46 AM]

Shirley Ujest
04-21-2000, 11:33 PM
Dear Book Man,

I am a short attention span woman. I like to laugh. I have read most of P.J. O'Rourke's,Nearly all of Dave Barry's, and I grew up on Erma Bombeck. ( All in different leagues, but they still play the same game.) Writers who mock others and poke fun at this thing we call life.

I need something fresh. Crisp. Something that will make me laugh and think, but not think too much. Dear God, that would be too much like work.

Am I hopeless?

Signed,

Shirley needs a Jesting.

Kat
04-21-2000, 11:41 PM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike:
Kat: Joseph Roth. THE RADETZKY MARCH. One of the best 20th century German novels, right up there with Thomas Manna dn Robert Musil. Set in the pre-War Austro-Hungarian Empire. Nadine Gordimer called it a masterpiece. Read it yet?


*cheerfully* Nope, never even heard of it. Or of Joseph Roth. Or Thomas Manna or Robert Musil, for that matter.

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:49 AM]

Globe-trotter
04-22-2000, 12:17 AM
Hi Uke! Is it too late to ask for a recommendation? If all else fails, I can always reread "The Master and Margarita".

------------------
Homepage: www.loosiegoosiemoosie.gov (http://www.loosiegoosiemoosie.gov)
Occupation: Taxidermist and hunt guide
Location: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada
Interests: The Loyal Order of the Moose, Moosehead (and the beer).

Oh yeah? Well, Ginger Rogers did everything that Fred Astaire did. Backwards. In high heels. - As per Wally

Girl Next Door
04-22-2000, 01:11 AM
Ooh, what a great thread. Ike, please suggest a book for me! Here are some I've enjoyed recently: Wally Lamb's I KNOW THIS MUCH IS TRUE, Barbara Kingsolver's THE POISONWOOD BIBLE, and Jill Paton-Walsh's KNOWLEDGE OF ANGELS. Do you only recommend classic literature?

------------------
Leslie Irish Evans
Leslie Irish Evans' Home Page (http://leslie.scrappy.net)

Kiva
04-22-2000, 01:55 AM
Just today, I was wandering the aisles of my local Half-Price Books in utter confusion. What to read, what to read?
Book Referral is a sorely needed public service. Ike, there's money in this.

I want an Action!/Adventure! novel. Nice and long, with lots of violence, explosions, exotic locales, and hopefully weird curses and eerie cults. Improbable events and science (of some sort).

I'm thinking Indiana Jones type stuff.

I liked The Relic and most of Michael Crichton's work.
I don't want a cop drama or Tom Clancy, or anything that could be mistaken for happening in real life.
I do want a *suspend rational thought and have fun* novel.

Am I too demanding? <g>
Thanks!

Ukulele Ike
04-22-2000, 09:32 AM
AuntiePam: Vintage has a nice omnibus out called Three Classic African-American Novels...it includes William Wells Brown's Clotel, or The President's Daughter (1853); Frances E. W. Harper's Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted (1892); and Charles W. Chestnut's The Marrow of Tradition (1901). All three deal with slavery and/or Reconstruction. How does that sound?

I also got a big kick recently out of George Schuyler's Black No More (1931), a satiric novel about the discovery of a medical process that turns black people into white people. Watch what happens when the U.S. gradually sees its racial underclass disappear!

Shirley: Short and extremely funny pieces abound in Robert Benchley's collections. Dover has kept Benchley Lost and Found in print, but any good used bookstore should have multiple copies of the collections published in his lifetime, such as My Ten Years in a Quandary and No Poems.

Stephen Leacock is trickier to find, and from an even EARLIER era (turn of the century up to the 1920s or so), but well worth seeking out. Literary Lapses and Nonsense Novels are two of his many titles. (He was Groucho Marx's favorite humorist)

------------------
Uke

AuntiePam
04-22-2000, 10:15 AM
Uke -- that sounds great. I'm off to Amazon, or B&N, or elgrande, or somewhere.

Tracy will be pleased.

(She thinks I just hang out here to meet guys.)

Narile
04-22-2000, 11:09 AM
Extra points Uke. I shall have to locate a copy and read it over the next weekend.

Ahhh Titus Groan The trevails of one seriously f*ked up family and its estates. :) (Thats another one I have to reread, its been like 18 years or so I think.)

------------------
>>Nomex underwear is optional for dragons. <<
---The dragon observes

Ukulele Ike
04-22-2000, 03:26 PM
Kat: Sorry, typo. Thomas "Death in Venice" Mann, I meant. Robert Musil is best known for the two-volume doorstop novel (and landmark of 20th century literary modernism) The Man Without Qualities.

Jodi
04-22-2000, 04:02 PM
Thanks, Ike! :) (Off to the Lewis & Clark County Library, which will almost certainly have neither, but will have multiple copies of the latest Danielle Steele. But I live in hope.)


------------------
Jodi

Fiat Justitia

Ukulele Ike
04-22-2000, 08:40 PM
Originally posted by Girl Next Door:
Do you only recommend classic literature?


Not at all. Have you ever read Richard Russo? His Nobody's Fool was made into a movie with Paul Newman a few years ago, but I enjoyed Mohawk more.

And Harry Crews. If you can get your hands on a copy of The Knockout Artist, you won't be disappointed. Ah, Oyster Boy...



------------------
Uke

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:51 AM]

Ukulele Ike
04-22-2000, 08:43 PM
Kiva: How about Riptide by Child & Preston? It's a fictional takeoff on the infamus Money Pit in Nova Scotia, of which Unca Cece wrote so profoundly...

Ukulele Ike
04-22-2000, 08:49 PM
This'll whet your appetite:
www.straightdope.com/classics/a2_441.html (http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a2_441.html)

elelle
04-22-2000, 09:19 PM
Harry Crews!!?? Ike, The stories I could tell ya!!!

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The ride is short and the thrills are cheap- Men and rollercoasters. - - -Courtesy of Wally, that Signifying Guy.

rackensack
04-22-2000, 10:47 PM
Ike:
…but any good used bookstore should have multiple copies of the collections published in his lifetime, such as My Ten Years in a Quandary and No Poems.

Ike, Ike. Not all of us live in the NYC area. I've been scouring the used bookshops of the Atlanta area for Benchley for years, and so far have only copped Benchley Lost and Found and a collection U. of Chicago Press put out some time ago called The Benchley Roundup. Perhaps my timing's just lousy; it's possible that there're thousands of copies of various Benchley books circulating through the bookstores of this area and I'm always looking just when they've sold their last copies to a retired chicken sexer from Winder. Either that, or Benchley's a lot harder to come by out here in the hinterlands. I have a lot more luck finding Perelman, for some reason.

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----------------------
"Ain't no man can avoid being born average, but there ain't no man got to be common." --Satchel Paige

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:56 AM]

Girl Next Door
04-23-2000, 01:19 AM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike:
Not at all. Have you ever read Richard Russo? His Nobody's Fool was made into a movie with Paul Newman a few years ago, but I enjoyed Mohawk more.

And Harry Crews. If you can get your hands on a copy of The Knockout Artist, you won't be disappointed. Ah, Oyster Boy...



Lovely! They're both available through my local library. I thought "Nobody's Fool" was a terrific film, and that Paul Newman was robbed of the Oscar that year. If MOWHAWK was better, I'll take your word for it and read that first.

Much obliged, Ike. And I love your screen name. I'm a huge Jimmy Stewart fan.



------------------
Leslie Irish Evans
Leslie Irish Evans' Home Page (http://leslie.scrappy.net)

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 11:59 AM]

Ukulele Ike
04-23-2000, 03:28 PM
rack:

Wings Books just put out an el cheapo edition called The Best of Robert Benchley...72 pieces collected in it.

My problem with it is that is has Peter Arno illustations, Adam Barth illustrations, Herbert Roese illustrations...and NO Gluyas Williams illustrations. Some sort of copyright problem, I suppose. But for my money, Benchley just ain't Benchley without Gluyas Williams illustrations.

I love the way he draws Bob like a big ol' otter.

------------------
Uke

Finagle
04-23-2000, 07:02 PM
OK, Ike. Now that Patrick O'Brian has passed on, and I've finished off all of Dorothy Dunnett and pretty much all the Flashman series, who do I turn to for really well researched, literate historical fiction?

Ukulele Ike
04-23-2000, 08:14 PM
Fin: Edith Parteger. She wrote beaucoup historical fiction under her own name, and, as Ellis Peters, gave us the "Brother Cadfael" series of twenty historical mysteries featuring the monk/detective. Nice stuff.

If you like historical crime fiction, try also Peter Lovesey's Sgt. Cribb/Constable Thackeray books (Wobble to Death was the first) and William Marshall's two novels of 1880s Manhattan, The New York Detective and Faces in the Crowd. Marshall did it BEFORE Caleb Carr's The Alienist, and, for my money, he did it better.

------------------
Uke

Eve
04-24-2000, 09:31 AM
You're right, "Vile Bodies" is no "Decline and Fall"—"Vile Bodies" could kick "Decline and Fall's" butt around the block till it ran home crying to "Charles Ryder's School Days."

Hmmm . . . I knew you HAD a copy of one of my books, but I assumed you'd never read it, as I never heard one word about it, like, "gee, what a piece of crap!" or "You found a publisher for THAT?" Guess you were just being polite.

By the way, anyone who likes hard-boiled detective fiction along the lines of James M. Cain, I highly recommend you search out some early 1930s books by Tiffany Thayer. He's so hard-boiled ya could roll 'im on the White House lawn at Easter.

Ukulele Ike
04-24-2000, 09:55 AM
Oh, by the way, anyone who's looking for the ULTIMATE in well-researched, erudite yet thoroughly entertaining biography and film history, should look no further than THE BOOK OF EVE'S THAT I READ AND ENJOYED IMMENSELY,

Vamp: The Rise and Fall of Theda Bara.

Watch this space for a review of EVE'S NEW BOOK, WHICH I SEE IS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM AS WELL AS AT YOUR LOCAL INDEPENDENT BOOKSHOP, ASK FOR IT BY NAME AND ACCEPT NO SUBSTITUTES,

Anna Held and the Birth of Ziegfeld's Broadway.

I am very much looking forward to purchasing and reading the above title from cover to cover, which I will slip out of the office and do just as soon as somebody admits that Decline and Fall is TWICE the book that Vile Bodies is.

------------------
Uke

Eve
04-24-2000, 10:06 AM
Gee—there's nothing quite so heartwarming as a spontaneous, totally candid and constructive review!

In fact, my heart just got SO warm I'd better go pack it in dry ice. I hope you all will excuse me for a few minutes.

Ukulele Ike
04-24-2000, 10:12 AM
Okay, which Tiffany Thayer should one look for? I only know him as the guy who wrote the Introduction to the collected Works of Charles Fort.

Hey, if you're looking for some serious hard-boiled, try to find a copy of Jonathan Latimer'sSolomon's Vineyard (1941).
This one has EVERYTHING: a private eye; a shoot-out at a roadhouse; necrophilia; a shoot-out in a steam bath; mobsters; a crooked police chief; a bizarre religious cult; a knife fight in a whorehouse; kidnapping; a mystery woman with a taste for kinky sex; human sacrifice; crypt-robbing.

First sentence: "From the way her buttocks looked under the black silk dress, I knew she'd be good in bed."

Eve
04-24-2000, 10:25 AM
Ike, you genuine, heartwarming thing you, you mean you have NEVER read a Tiffany Thayer? I have to go lie down for a moment . . .

I highly recommend "13 Men" (which has, like, 42 murders in the first chapter), "13 Women" (about a vengeful sorority girl killing ex-schoolmates one by one), "Call Her Savage" (about an S&M half-caste chick who decsends to prostitution) or "One Woman" (kind of like "Laura," only earlier). All early 1930s. I'd loan you my copies, except I know I'd never get 'em back, so I direct you to bookfinder.com, where you can probably find them cheap. Anyone who calls himself a mystery fan owes it to himself to read Mr. Thayer! He is, to coin a phrase, a daisy.

UncleBeer
04-24-2000, 10:44 AM
All right you harlequins, back to the topic. How 'bout a detailed history of the Bolsheviks for UB?

Ukulele Ike
04-24-2000, 10:55 AM
Unc: I haven't read this one personally, but it's been on the communal household bookshelves since 1981, as the Missus had it as a college text and swears by it:

Adam Ulan; The Bolsheviks: the Intellectual and Political History of the Triumph of Communism in Russia (Harvard University Press)

Originally published in 1965, it was considered good enough to be reprinted without revision by Harvard within the past few years. It's as much a personal and political biography of Lenin as a sociological history of the early Soviet Union. Which sounds good to me, as we all know that BIOGRAPHY MAKES THE BEST READING.

Andy
04-24-2000, 11:36 AM
OK Uke, i've got to jump in here. I'm almost past the 'unchewable' books stage and very, very bored of chemistry books. So, you name it, i'll read it. I really must start to read more widely.

UncleBeer
04-24-2000, 11:38 AM
Uke, I was just looking at a review of that exact same book over at the Barnes & Noble website the other day. I guess I'm off to the bookstore to order a copy tonight. Thank you, my stringed friend.

Ukulele Ike
04-24-2000, 11:48 AM
andy: Ah, I've met you. You're easy. {grin}

Charles Bukowski. He drinks, he has sleazy sex, he drinks, he works at some foul job, he drinks, he listens to Mahler on the radio, he drinks. You'll simply adore 'im.

Start with Post Office, his first novel.

------------------
Uke

Ukulele Ike
04-24-2000, 06:39 PM
Two words for YOU, Evie m'dear...

"Sophomore Slump."

{Note to those not engaged in the publishing business: Most authors who make a big splash with a carefully-crafted first novel...oh, like Evelyn Waugh, for example, with Decline and Fall...fall over onto their noses with their second book, which is cobbled together and rushed out while there's still "buzz" over the first.}

{Note to those not aware of the "special relationship" Eve and I share on this board: Vile Bodies really IS a terrific book.}

------------------
Uke

Eve
04-25-2000, 12:53 AM
Oops . . . Uke did indeed say how much he liked my book, several months ago, but that darned lobotomy I got . . . Hmmm. Serves me right for paying so much attention to slams I forget to write down the compliments.

But anyway—I highly recommend anyone who likes hard-boiled mystery to search out Tiffany Thayer, even if you have to go to the ends of yhe earth!

Eve
04-25-2000, 12:54 AM
. . . But I STILL prefer "Vile Bodies" to "Decline and Fall" . . .

UncleBeer
04-25-2000, 06:45 AM
Uke, I have one more request, if'n dat's okay wit'chu. Santeria; I'd like an account of the rites and practices of this religion.

G.B.H. Hornswoggler
04-25-2000, 07:16 AM
Decline and Fall is probably the best of Waugh's early (meaning minor) novels, though Vile Bodies has its moments. The real deal for funny Waugh is The Loved One, which has the added advantage of being Waugh taking on America. (Spoken as a man who's reading A Little Learning right now, though I still think The Sword of Honour trilogy is his best work.)

Hey, Uke, how 'bout something for me? I'll be coming off A Little Learning and Slavomir Rawicz's The Long Walk (which I plugged on some other book thread), so I'll be looking for something light and airy. (Let's see if you can recommend something I haven't already read.)

------------------
I'm your only friend
I'm not your only friend
But I'm a little glowing friend
But really I'm not actually your friend
But I am

Eve
04-25-2000, 09:07 AM
Awright, awright, awright! I will GO to the library and get a copy of "Decline and Fall" today at lunchtime! Haven't read it in 20 years, maybe it's better than I remember . . . But I still say it's no "Vile Bodies."

Ukulele Ike
04-25-2000, 02:04 PM
Unc: Much as I hate to admit it, I cannot in good conscience tell you which book on Santeria to read. My opinion would be worthless; you're better off going to an on-line bookselling site and typing "Santeria" into the subject search line.

Ace: "Minor" my rosy Irish arse. I agree that The Loved One is great stuff, but Waugh's 1930s novels are MUCH moer entertaining than later and stuffier material like Brideshead Revisited.

Here's a novel for you that's so light and airy you'll have to tie it to your wrist with a string: The Circus of Dr. Lao by Charles G. Finney. Welcome to Abalone, Arizona, and is that thing in the middle wagon a bear or a Russian?

------------------
Uke

Ukulele Ike
04-25-2000, 03:30 PM
Eve, you'll die laffin', especially at the national characterization of the Welsh, and the part when Prendy gets his head sawed off.

And I understand he wears (wore) a wig.

Eve
04-25-2000, 03:42 PM
"Eve, you'll die laffin', especially at the national characterization of the Welsh, and the part when Prendy gets his head sawed off.
And I understand he wears (wore) a wig."

WHAT are you babbling about, dear heart? Have you been kicking the gong around?

Gazelle
04-26-2000, 07:18 AM
<b>Uke</b>baby!

I read many different genres (mostly within the realm of fiction) but how about I give you my top ten books and you recommend something for me...

1. The Talisman - Stephen King
2. Geek Love - Katherine Dunn
3. Ender's Game - Orson Scott Card
4. Oath of Fealty - Larry Niven & Jerry Pournelle
5. An Instance of the Fingerpost - Iain Pears
6. Song of Solomon - Toni Morrison
7. The Sparrow - Mary Doria Russell
8. The Stand - Stephen King
9. Lost in Place: Growing Up Absurd in Suburbia - Mark Salzman
10. Mists of Avalon - Marion Zimmer Bradley

Can't wait to see what you recommend!

------------------
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say will be misquoted, then used against you.

With love from the poster voted as having the "Most Confusing Username"

Gazelle
04-26-2000, 07:20 AM
Crap... still can't get used to HTML being out. Make that Ukebaby!

Please strike number nine and add the following book in its place:

Kindred - Octavia Butler

UncleBeer
04-26-2000, 08:58 AM
All right kids, just so Uke knows this wasn't just a pointless exercise, tell us now if you've actually pick up the book(s) he's painstakingly selected for you. Here's what I ordered from my local bookstore just last night.

This title personally selected for me by Mr. Uke - The Bolsheviks: The Intellectual and Political History of the Triumph of Communism in Russia - by Adam B. Ulam.

This one on a subject which Uke declined to make a sugestion for - Santeria: The Religion, Faith, Rites, Magic - by Migene Gonzalez-Wippler.

And just for good measure - The Theory of the Leisure Class - Thorstein B. Veblen

UncleBeer
04-26-2000, 09:58 AM
I know that post is here somewhere. Trust the CGI my ass. I say, "Fuck the CGI."

Lord Derfel
04-26-2000, 11:48 AM
Uke, you picked a tough one to find. I've spent the last 5 days trying to track down a copy of 30 Fathoms Deep. Amazon doesn't list it. The book hunt keeps me from actually doing work at my job, so I'll keep at it until I find a copy. I found an online copy of On the Bottom which has served to whet my appetite. If anyone knows of an online bookstore with a copy of 30 Fathoms Deep by Edward Ellsberg, let me know and I'll order it, otherwise the search continues...

Lord Derfel
04-26-2000, 04:28 PM
Thanks, Uke. By "found an online copy", I meant that I read On the Bottom online here (http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/military_veterans/7017). Fascinating stuff. There were several used copies for sale - that was the easy one to find. I might still pick up a print copy, we'll see. Kids book or not, I'll keep my eye out for 30 fathoms deep but it looks pretty rare.

Since I couldn't find my book, I think I deserve another recommendation. ;)

Lord Derfel
04-26-2000, 05:55 PM
Originally posted by UncleBeer:
I know that post is here somewhere. Trust the CGI my ass. I say, "Fuck the CGI."
Fuck the CGI, indeed Unc. C'mon missing post, show yourself!

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 12:04 PM]

Ukulele Ike
04-27-2000, 12:01 AM
Canthearya: Where you been? I've missed you!

Thanks for deleting #9 on your list, otherwise I would have been tempted to say something snippy. I went to college with Mark Salzman.

Actually, he was a pretty nice guy. We were in a play together at the Dramat, a rewriting of Barrie's Wendy and Peter (the basis of Peter Pan). Salzman played a minor Indian; I played a minor Pirate.

The other thing I remember about him was his habit of practicing shirtless Tai C'hi on weekend mornings in the Branford courtyard. The women would peek at him from behind their curtains. The men felt that he should be taken off and subjected to a massive Swirlie.

Book, book, book. Here's one that combines several aspects of your top ten list: Compulsion by Meyer Levin. It's a fictionalized reconstruction of one of the century's swingingest crimes, the Leopold-Loeb case. Thrill-killing in its infancy. It combines psychological realism, a mounting sense of horror and suspense, and superb courtroom drama.

------------------
Uke

Ukulele Ike
04-27-2000, 12:03 AM
Unc: Thank you for your support. <grin>

Ukulele Ike
04-27-2000, 12:15 AM
Lord D: Whoops, sorry! Snap up that copy of On the Bottom, though...that's the book that made Ellsberg's name.

When the U.S. Navy's S-51 submarine sank in the waters near Block Island in 1926, losing all hands, the Navy planned to hire a civilian salvage company to retrieve the craft, as they had in the past. Commander Ellsberg argued that the Navy should be responsible for reclaiming its own dead. He was allowed to mount the salvage operation, involving over thirty divers, which brought the sub and the bodies of the sailors to the surface.

On the Bottom tells the story. Ellsberg adroitly handles the difficult task of describing a complex job of underwater engineering and making it comprehensible to a Humanities Major like me. He also tells the tale with an enormous amount of suspense...men against the sea, the crushing pressure of the icy depths, the primitive state of 1920s diving apparatus.

30 Fathoms Deep is great fun, but it's fiction, and essentially a kid's book. The characters dive for pirate gold, not the corpses of their comrades. However, it's a 1930 kid's book, which means it's more sophisticated than most contemporary fiction for adults.

So [i]On the Bottom[i] is a more than aceptable substitute.

Ukulele Ike
04-27-2000, 12:18 AM
Oh! Should have mentioned this before.

For out-of-print books, try the website:
www.bookfinder.com (http://www.bookfinder.com)

It links together all or most of the online search services, including ABE Booksearch, Bibliofind, etc.

------------------
Uke

Gazelle
04-27-2000, 12:54 AM
I've missed all y'all so much! But I have a real job now, so... ?

Ukelicious I just ordered Compulsion. Can't wait to read it and let everyone know how perfect it was!

Ukulele Ike
04-27-2000, 09:12 AM
Originally posted by Lord Derfel:
Since I couldn't find my book, I think I deserve another recommendation. ;)

You just had it, four or five posts up. Ellsberg's On the Bottom. Lucky you can read it online, thus saving your shekels for your next caulk-and-paint job.

And all the little Ellsbergs miss their next royalty check, so it looks like groats and lentils for their dinners for the next fiscal quarter.

[Edited by UncleBeer on 08-29-2001 at 12:09 PM]

Sassy
04-27-2000, 01:23 PM
Damn! I checked that BookFinder site, and input the author I can never find, the most obscure author I look for - and got 48 matches!

Uke, it's your fault if I spend all my loose cash on Seabury Quinn collections... :eek:

Necros
05-18-2000, 05:00 PM
Uke, I'm in awe. Simple in awe. I thought I knew a lot about books. I've never even heard of half of the books you've mentioned here. :)

Necros
05-18-2000, 05:08 PM
Necros babbled:

Simple in awe.

Simply, rather. I try not to be simple if I can help it.

AuntiePam
05-18-2000, 07:53 PM
Uke -- I immediately ordered your selection -- Three Classic African-American Novels and it's on back order.

In the meantime, I'm reading Lansdale's "Blood Dance." Hope you manage to track down a copy. It might be "early" Lansdale, but I think this guy was good from Day One.

Thanks again for your insights here.

Ukulele Ike
05-18-2000, 09:25 PM
AuntiePam:

Just got my signed copy of BLOOD DANCE in today's post. That line in the front flap copy had me in stitches:

"Written fifteen years ago. Sold to several publishers over the years. Never published...until now."

I'm paraphrasing...I left the book in the office. It was MUCH funnier than that...

Ukulele Ike
05-18-2000, 09:48 PM
Sassy, you're a Seabury Quinn fan?

Have you read ROADS?

Sassy
05-28-2000, 07:17 PM
I just got back to this thread. I am making a spreadsheet for easy referral to all the things I want!

I have not read <b>Roads</b> I have some short story collections that were reprinted in the 70's and that's all I've been able to find. I will keep looking tho' - he makes Poirot look like a wimp!

Ukulele Ike
05-29-2000, 02:28 PM
Sassy:

Seabury Quinn was THE most popular author in the history of the pulp mag Weird Tales...go figure.

A cite for a Quinn story on the cover meant that the issue would easily outsell ones that touted H.P. Lovecraft, Clark Ashton Smith, Ray Bradbury, Carl Jacobi, Robert Bloch, and any of the many other WT authors who could write rings around Master Seabury.

There's an anecdote told about SQ involving a New Orleans whorehouse where the girls proved to be avid readers of Weird Tales, and were especially fond of the Jules de Grandin stories...the visiting writer was offered a night "on the house" in honor of his illustrious status.

UncleBeer
08-29-2001, 12:14 PM
Here's a very special treat for our new mod. I dug this old thing out and fixed all the boogered up ol' UBB code.

Enjoy, Uke.

Ukulele Ike
08-29-2001, 12:20 PM
(gulp, sniffle)

Awwwww, Unc...you shouldn't have...



(Goes back and reads the OP)

Yeah, you REALLY shouldn't have. You BASTARD. You know how much WORK this was?

(insert smiley here)

Maeglin
08-29-2001, 01:12 PM
Time to tap the font o' knowledge, then...

Between The Rhetorics of Desire in Vergil, Augustine, and the Troubadours and Theory and the Premodern Text, my summer's been a smidge on the dry side. I'm looking for something a touch on the saucy side, with great prose. All the better if it touches on ancient literature somehow.

Good luck. ;)

AbbySthrnAccent
08-29-2001, 01:19 PM
Ohh Ohhh me! I just finished my current read this morning. What should I read next?

dropzone
08-29-2001, 01:33 PM
I never finish anything and don't have much use for fiction. Before you knew me you recommended something I neither remember nor read (that I remember). You know me better now. What should I read?

CrankyAsAnOldMan
08-29-2001, 02:15 PM
I know many people think Pearl S. Buck sucks ass, but I've been trying to get through more of her stuff.

What, besides "The Good Earth," is a good choice?

beagledave
08-29-2001, 07:56 PM
Mystery fan here...just finished the Dennis Lehane series...

Can you throw me a bone?

Thanks

Ukulele Ike
08-29-2001, 09:07 PM
Maeglin: Why dontcha read what I'm reading now? We can discuss it over liquor next time we get together.

The Manuscript Found in Saragossa, by Jan Potocki (1761-1815, a Polish traveller, political activist, ethnographer, and aristocratic adventurer).

This baby is BEYOND weird. It's a series of tales layered upon layers...the narrator is Alphonse van Worden, a young Walloon officer, diverted into the Sierra Morena and mysteriously detained in the company of thieves, cabbalists, noblemen and gypsies, whose stories he records day by day over a period of months.

And it's delightfully DIRTY. Alphonse is repeatedly seduced by a pair of lovely young Islamic princesses, who repeatedly attempt to convert him from Christianity. After each night of passion, he awakes to find himself beneath a gallows decked with rotting corpses. And every time anyone ELSE gets laid, they also wake up beneath the gallows.

This is extemely cool shit.

Ukulele Ike
08-29-2001, 09:20 PM
AbbySthrnAccent: Hokayyyyyy...you get Palgrave's Golden Treasury, a collection of English verse spanning Shakespeare, Milton, Gray, and Wordsworth.

Francis Palgrave made the selection with the aid of contemporaries Matthew Arnold and Lord Tennyson...it's a nice shot at making Imperial England seem humane and moral. Politics aside, it's a buncha really nice verse.


dropzone: Don't care for fiction? I hear ya. How about Jim Jones's From Here to Eternity? It runs over a thousand pages, so you can feel you're doing some SERIOUS reading, and it has enough fascinating detail about the U.S. peacetime Army in Hawaii that you'll sop up the facts without even noticing you're getting an enthralling narrative at the same time. Trust me; there's some great stuff in there that never made it into the movie.


CrankyAsAnOldMan: You got me on THAT one. Pearl Buck never got my blood flowing. You'd be better off reading the reviews on Amazon.com.

Did you know that Buck was the only U.S. Nobel Prize winner for Literature that did NOT have an alcohol problem?

beagledave: Have you read Jim Crumley's The Last Good Kiss (1978)? THE great post-WWII private eye novel.

If you don't mind PRE-WWII private eye novels, grab up Hammett's Red Harvest or Chandler's [i]Farewell, My Lovely.

dropzone
08-29-2001, 10:45 PM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike
dropzone: Don't care for fiction? I hear ya. How about Jim Jones's From Here to Eternity?
Psssst! Ike! Just in case you didn't know, it's fiction!

If I want to read about pre-war Pearl Harbor I'll read NON-fiction, thank you very much. Har-umph!

As for Chandler, The High Window,, not Farewell, My Lovely. The writing's better. And "Red Wind" comes close to the perfect short story. Lou Grant even read the first paragraph to MTM as an example of great writing.

[sub]Psssst! drop! Lou Grant's fictional, too!

Moe
08-29-2001, 10:48 PM
I wish I caught this thread the first time around!!!
Uke you are my hero. If I acquire half the knowledge you have about books and jazz in this lifetime I will die fulfilled.

Now that my semester has just started I won't be doing any recreational reading for awhile, but while the thread is breathing, what have you got for me? I enjoy witty satire, dark and depressing stuff, intelligent stuff, I especially love good dialogue, umm... well, I'll just give some examples of stuff I've read and enjoyed and let you take it from there (if you aren't too busy doing Mod stuff): Dosteovsky (my fav), Orwell, Hesse (Steppenwolf), Douglas Adams (of course), Pratchett, Vonnegut, Tom Robbins, Bukowski. Oh, and I also enjoy light pleasant reads like The Princess Bride.

Thanks in advance :)

TwistofFate
08-30-2001, 07:41 AM
Hi Uke!!

I've currently read a few biographies of drug lords (Hunting Pablo which is excellent, Mr. Nice a great autobiography by Howard Marks, and a few others in this vein). Could you recommend a good book about non-Mafiosi American Crime Lords (and I've already read Casino, the biography of Frank "Lefty" Rosenthal" which was a million times better than the film, and a must read for all thoose interested in the workings of a casino)?

Ukulele Ike
08-30-2001, 08:40 AM
Originally posted by dropzone
Psssst! Ike! Just in case you didn't know, it's fiction!

Sorry, I thought I was being fairly clear...I was recommending a novel that offered enough factual detail to be of interest to someone who usually doesn't read fiction. Hoping to expand your horizons.

(Sorry if that sounded snippy. But if I heard you in person recommending the slender The High Window (aka The Brasher Doubloon) over Farewell, My Lovely to someone who hasn't read Chandler yet, I'd tip my beer into your lap.)

I recently enjoyed Commander Edward C. Raymer's Descent into Darkness: Pearl Harbor, 1941, A Navy Diver's Memoir. If that's the sort of thing that floats your boat. (Sorry again. Couldn't resist)

Maeglin
08-30-2001, 08:47 AM
Uke, that sounds perfect. Getting it today.

MR

Ukulele Ike
08-30-2001, 08:51 AM
Moe: If you love Dostoyevsky, plus those other guys, try Nikolai Gogol's Dead Souls.

Gogol doesn't currently have the hipster status of Fyodor, but Dead Souls is an important precursor to better-known late-19th and 20th century Russky literary weirdness. And though its a fat chunk of a novel, it qualifies as fairly light reading...very funny, good narrative drive, etc. Not rough going at all.

TwistofFate: If you want to read a great drug-and-social history, get hold of Storming Heaven: LSD and the American Dream by Jay Stevens. All right, it's not really true crime...LSD "drug lords" have nothing in common with cocaine drug lords. Really good book nonetheless.

dropzone
08-30-2001, 03:12 PM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike
Sorry, I thought I was being fairly clear...I was recommending a novel that offered enough factual detail to be of interest to someone who usually doesn't read fiction. Hoping to expand your horizons.(Hmmmmm. Do I get snippy back at someone who can ask that my posting privilages be revoked? Especially since he was doing me a favor by recommending a book he thought I might enjoy? ESPECIALLY since I probably would if I'd get off my high horse about trashy bestsellers? Sure, why not?)

And I thought I made myself PERFECTLY clear that I DON'T read trashy bestselling fiction. Especially fiction in which people have "relationships" AND nobody gets killed until the third act. No, I limit my trash intake to GENRE fiction. Although From Here to Eternity COULD be dumped in the "war fiction" genre. But I'm more likely to read The Thin Red Line were I to read any Jones.

Hmmmmm. Maybe I could pick it up at the library the next time my daughter works. Better yet, SHE could pick it up for me. Thanks for the tip!

(Actually, I appreciate your tips if only to get my brain working in unaccustomed directions, but don't tell yourself that or you'll get a swollen head.)

Ukulele Ike
08-30-2001, 03:22 PM
Well, I don't consider From Here to Eternity to BE trashy bestselling fiction.

In four pages of book suggestions (and yeah, they ARE favors) I don't think that ANYONE who asked me for a title got a trashy bestselling novel offered to them. Since I don't read the stuff either, it'd be wrong for me to recommend it.

And don't be ascairt of being snippy with me...the worst thing I could do to you would be to start a Dropzone Will Recommend a Book to Anyone Who Asks Him! thread. Come to think of it, maybe you should be ascairt.

gallows fodder
08-30-2001, 03:32 PM
Hello, Ike. Pleased to make your acquaintance.

I like books about people who are dying to do or say something but can't because they're too repressed/reserved. Emotional torment is a must. Take Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro, for example.

Any suggestions?

Moe
08-30-2001, 03:35 PM
Thanks a bunch Uke. I'm gonna order it right now.

Humble Servant
08-30-2001, 03:51 PM
OK, I'm just a posting machine today--I'm sure I just passed whatever paltry postmark I've previously set.

And, I'm poaching on Uke's thread besides! Oooh, I'm bein' bad.

But I gotta do it, cause I have got THE book for you, gallows fodder, in fact I've ranted about this before because the repressed nature of the heroine of this book drives me absolutely freakin' nuts! I am a Jane Austen geek, but I simply cannot bear Anne Eliot of Persuasion, the simpering little idiot, unable to open her mouth even after all the other barriers to her beloved are removed. I'm not being anachronistic here, I swear, she is just as reserved as a front row center seat at a Dylan concert.

You should love it!:)

gallows fodder
08-30-2001, 03:51 PM
(BTW, I said Ike and I meant Ike. Can't get all informal on a bruthah without a proper introduction, can I?)

dropzone
08-30-2001, 04:08 PM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike
the worst thing I could do to you would be to start a Dropzone Will Recommend a Book to Anyone Who Asks Him! thread. Come to think of it, maybe you should be ascairt.
Hah! I'll just recommend the same book to EVERYBODY! And not even a GOOD book! That'll kill the thread almost instantaneously.

Perhaps I came to the "trashy bestseller" conclusion because it was a bestseller (and thus suspect) and I have had that image of Lancaster and Kerr smooching on the beach burned into my brain since infancy.

dropzone
08-30-2001, 04:30 PM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike
In four pages of book suggestions (and yeah, they ARE favors) I don't think that ANYONE who asked me for a title got a trashy bestselling novel offered to them.
(grumble grumble threaten to tip a beer on MY lap, does he grumble grumble KNEW I'd find one!)

Sealemon: You want S&M? Have you read Anne Rice's "Beauty" trilogy? Bondage and paddlings galore, and both the sexes get equal time!

PunditLisa
08-30-2001, 04:37 PM
Uke -- I'm desperate for a good book to read while bobbing on my pontoon boat over Labor Day. Something with lots of graphic sex, please, but it can't be obvious from the cover (as the kiddies will be there, too).

Yer fictional friend, Lisa

Ukulele Ike
08-30-2001, 05:07 PM
gallows fodder: Uke is perfectly fine. It's what I usually go by myself.

Before I even got to the second half of your post, I was thinking "This guy wants a modern Japanese novel!" Have you read Kobo Abe's Woman in the Dunes? Sufferin' humanity! Repression! Nightmare! It made a good movie, too. (If you have, his The Face of Another is good, too.)

drop: WAS Eternity a bestseller? Yeah, it probably was, after the flick won all those Oscars. But I'll betcha fewer than 5% made it through all one thousand-plus pages.

Hah! I read the Anne Rice softporn back when it was published under the pseudonym A.N. Roquelaure! I'm sure they never sold in Rice numbers until her publisher convinced her to re-issue under her own name! Neener, neener!

PunditLisa: You need a copy of the early (1929) Jean Rhys novel Quartet. Adulterous group sex, complex psychology, AND murder!

Plus your kids will see it and think "Oooooh, momma's reading a novel by the acclaimed author of The Wide Sargasso Sea! What a hip chick!" little dreaming you're digging on Marya's hot sticky relationship with that odd Englishman and his wife.

dropzone
08-30-2001, 05:16 PM
It doesn't matter the circumstances under which they became bestsellers. Bestsellers they were.

(Christ! I write more like James Fenimore Cooper every day. I probably SHOULD read something more recent.)

Ukulele Ike
08-30-2001, 05:27 PM
To Kill a Mockingbird was a bestseller.

Are you saying that three million Chicagoans can be wrong?

(insert winking smiley here)

dropzone
08-30-2001, 07:59 PM
TKaMB didn't have gratuitous sex scenes interupting the violence. No, that sanctamonious SOB Atticus does. Then Bo Radley does. Nothing but interrupted violence in that book, but no smut. If I want smut I take it neat, thank you. Anthracite writes some mean porn, for instance.

gallows fodder
08-31-2001, 07:26 AM
Thanks, Uke! I'll get right on it.

Humble Servant, I actually loved Persuasion -- the book and the movie. Anne's and Frederick's torment was palpable. Delicious!

Miss Creant
08-31-2001, 12:05 PM
Me next me next
read:
Confederacy of Dunces
David Sedaris
just finished all of Christopher Moore(my new favorite author)
Witness from the Grave by Clyde Snow MD
Ann Rule
Kyle Mills
Cecil Adams
The Reader
almost every John Irving I belive A Prayer for Owen Meany is his best work
Caleb Carr
The Onion's Finest News Reporting
Gone With The Wind
Several books on the making of the film Gone With The Wind
and the search for Scarlett

So....what do ya think?


Eve I've gotta go get Vamp now. I read a biography of her years ago and it was damn interesting. I can't wait to read yours!!

ps
is it REALLY true about the UCLA football team?
I know, I know....read the book.

Ukulele Ike
08-31-2001, 12:47 PM
Originally posted by Miss Creant
is it REALLY true about the UCLA football team?

It was USC.

And it was Clara Bow.

And no, it's not true.

dropzone
08-31-2001, 12:53 PM
Originally posted by Miss Creant
Confederacy of Dunces
Witness from the Grave by Clyde Snow MD
Ann Rule
Cecil Adams
Gone With The Wind

Gee, could that have been an imposter at the party Saturday? Based on your reading, I could swear you were my wife. Just throw in some books on invertebrates, fossil and otherwise, and you've got her reading list covered.

Miss Creant
08-31-2001, 01:17 PM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike
Originally posted by Miss Creant
is it REALLY true about the UCLA football team?

It was USC.

And it was Clara Bow.

And no, it's not true.

OH SH%T! Dammit dammit dammit...I told you it was a while ago...I'm still going to go get Vamp

Ukulele Ike
09-01-2001, 08:35 AM
Oh, and here's a book for you, Miss Creant...

The Voice Imitator by Thomas Bernhard (first translated into English in 1997, although the author lived 1931-1989).

One hundred and four pages, one hundred and four stories. Well, not so much "stories" as a series of parable-like anecdotes, subtle and acerbic, portraying an ordinary world teetering on the edge of absurdity.

The subtitle reads "18 suicides...6 painful deaths...26 murders...1 love affair...13 instances of lunacy...20 surprises...4 disappearances...2 instances of libel...3 character attacks...5 early deaths....1 memory lapse..4 cover-ups."

(Yes, I know that's one short, but that IS the subtitle.)