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View Full Version : What is a 'lean to'?


quicken78
12-15-2003, 08:09 AM
Completely lost.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7374-933198,00.html

"After 25 minutes, one minute before Saddam’s life as a fugitive was to end, the forces came to the mud hut, situated within a small, walled compound that also contained a metal lean-to. "

This is on the UK Times website. I thought it was an American term. What exactly is a 'lean to'? I am thinking that it is a piece of sheet metal that leans up against a wall?!

Forgive my stupidity as I feel as though I should know this.

Mr. Duality
12-15-2003, 08:15 AM
Against a wall or other support, yes.

brainchild876
12-15-2003, 08:18 AM
As I understand it a lean-to is a 3 walled stucture with a roof on top. So it ends up having one side completely open.

jjimm
12-15-2003, 08:24 AM
Nope, for it to be a lean-to it merely has to be constructed against another building or wall - it can be completely enclosed, or open.

Lean-to (http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=lean-to).

Kalhoun
12-15-2003, 08:47 AM
Kind of like a carport, but not as sturdy.

don't ask
12-15-2003, 08:54 AM
This is on the UK Times website. I thought it was an American term. What exactly is a 'lean to'? I am thinking that it is a piece of sheet metal that leans up against a wall?!

Any rough shelter were the roof has one slope. So a sheet of wood or metal leaned against anything, in the outback a tree. I had always assumed it was an Aussie phrase.

Futile Gesture
12-15-2003, 09:15 AM
What makes a lean-to and lean-to is that it is a rudimentary structure that is dependant on another for support. It literally leans against the stronger structure and would not stand on its own.

RealityChuck
12-15-2003, 09:19 AM
Not always. A lot of hiking trails have lean-tos that are basically a roof with one end on the ground and the other held up by poles. No other structure is involved.

everton
12-15-2003, 09:58 AM
Originally posted by RealityChuck
Not always. A lot of hiking trails have lean-tos that are basically a roof with one end on the ground and the other held up by poles. No other structure is involved.
But the OP was inspired by British usage, in which case Futile Gesture is correct.

spingears
12-15-2003, 10:29 AM
Sort of a shack or add-on to the main building. Usually of somewhat primitative construction.







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