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View Full Version : Baggy Pants vs Rudeness


Faucet
03-29-2004, 09:09 PM
This happened when I was in the mall with one of my friends I was still in my school uniform but he was wearing some jeans and was sagging pretty low and some lady about 40ish takes it upon herself to tell him how disgusting it was that his pants were that low in public and that she could see his boxers, that if he were her kid she would never let him leave the house looking like that, etc. So I'm thinking "how rude." I wouldn't have come up to her and made a rude comment about her clothes, so why would she feel the need to make a rude comment to a person she doesn't know? Who do you think is in the right? My friend because he was minding his own business or the woman because my buddy did have his pants pretty low even by my standards.

flamingbananas
03-29-2004, 09:14 PM
Really low pants or not, you don't start yelling at a complete stranger for it. It is their body, their clothes, and if they aren't showing any "offensive" body parts their should mind their busniess.

WaryEri
03-29-2004, 09:21 PM
Personally...I think the whole falling-down-baggy pants thing looks ridiculous. Mostly due to associating it with guys I knew who did it to look "tough", when it eliminated their ability to move at anything faster than a careful shuffle.

That said, to each his own, and walking up to a stranger in public to insult their manner of dress is a far worse breach of manners in my book. She was rude. And unless she'd have the balls to do something like that to some one her own age, she's also a bully (and I can't help but think that the relative ages had something to do with her feeling she had a right to comment. Just a feeling). Just because your friend was young doesn't mean he doesn't deserve basic respect from other people. No one asked her for her opinion. Unless his manner of dress crossed the lines into illegal exposure, she'd no place to comment.

There are alot of fashions that I find rather "disgusting" ( girls with thongs showing...please, stop!)...but if I took it upon myself to berate strangers for not dressing to my standards, I'd be a jackass.

Thudlow Boink
03-29-2004, 09:25 PM
"Sometimes the rear ends justify the means!" -Opus the penguin

El Zagna
03-29-2004, 09:38 PM
Ah, yes, the more things change, the more things stay the same. I grew up in the sixties - mini-skirts, no bras, long hair - so you can imagine we got our share of this kind of rudeness.

So long as your friend's outfit was not lewd or obscene, there was no reason for the woman to comment at all. When it comes to fashion and taste, there's no right or wrong.

unclviny
03-29-2004, 10:00 PM
I am old beyond my years and when you are cruisin' around in public showing off your underwear it gets a reaction from me (why do you think they call it underwear?), with all of that being said I normally just laugh out loud at these morons (the baggy pants crowd and the sideways hat club).

A story, I was at Long John Silvers one day in a small town (Pearland, Texas), I am having some fish when in walks the ultra-giant contingent of the saggy pants club (these were some massive pants, I had never seen any this big before), I couldn't help but laugh at them and before I could stop myself the smartass in me said "the store must have been all out of the big ones, huh?" , the cops sitting a few tables behind me were trying hard to keep straight faces, the idiots wanted to argue about how cool they were but I just finished my tasty fish and left.

My suggestion is to photograph these people so you can sell the pictures back to them in a few years when they grow up.

And please remember that wearing giant pants and wearing your hat sideways (or wearing a Mr. T starter set of jewelry) seriously impedes your employability? in this world (you are NOT dealing with my customers looking like that!).

Unclviny

Magiver
03-29-2004, 10:25 PM
Children traditionally use clothing as a right-of-passage defiance of authority. With that said, I remember seeing a young man wearing an entire outfit that looked like it came from the catalog of teen-age angst. He had a bright yellow tennis visor upside down and sideways, a neatly trimmed 4 day beard, baggy butt-crack clothes and some strange boots I've never seen. I had to turn away and bite my lip because of the obvious amount of effort that went into the look.

Yah, it's rude to comment on someone's looks. Adults should take into account the whole right-of-passage thing. Kids should also realize that it IS possible to look goofy to adults. Parents should always get photographs of their kid's rebel years so they can resurrect them 20 years later.

By the way, I did the same thing when I was younger but I believe now it's possible to find clothes that bridge the age gap.

LolaBaby
03-29-2004, 10:44 PM
while i may have thought what that lady actually said, i would never say it. maybe if it WAS my own kid. but yes, she was out of line.

somewhat on topic, isn't that look out of fashion by now?

TVeblen
03-29-2004, 10:56 PM
... walking up to a stranger in public to insult their manner of dress is a far worse breach of manners in my book. She was rude. And unless she'd have the balls to do something like that to some one her own age, she's also a bully (and I can't help but think that the relative ages had something to do with her feeling she had a right to comment. Just a feeling). Just because your friend was young doesn't mean he doesn't deserve basic respect from other people. No one asked her for her opinion. Unless his manner of dress crossed the lines into illegal exposure, she'd no place to comment.


Amen, Wary! You summed up the main principles beautifully. Age does not confer the right to be rude.


Yah, it's rude to comment on someone's looks. Adults should take into account the whole right-of-passage thing.

It goes a lot further than that, IMO. Adults should lead by example. The standard this "lady" set was that it's perfectly okay to sideswipe a total stranger with criticisms about personal appearance. That's tacky and rude beyond belief.

SSgtBaloo
03-29-2004, 11:16 PM
I am reminded of a remark I made to one of the more "mature" people with whom I work: "You have to remember what their parents looked like at that age. Today's youth are hobbled by parents (and grandparents) who are eager to accept almost anything as falling within the range of "normal". I suspect it is a task of Herculean proportions to find a look that an old hippie will find unacceptably odd.*"

I blame the parents. If they were more easily upset by signs of self-expression, their kids wouldn't have to go to such lengths to get the desired result. They should've objected to the sideways/backwards hats right away. Then everyone would've been happy (except of course for the folks who make those extra baggy pants). I wonder if some Japanese couturier is planning to reintroduce the hakama as youth-wear? ;)

--SSgtBaloo

*No, usually I don't talk like that, but sometimes I'm inspired.

Unregistered Bull
03-29-2004, 11:51 PM
Who do you think is in the right?

You're right. She's rude.

She's right about the pants though.

BraheSilver
03-30-2004, 12:05 AM
I think last week I may have misadvertantly participated in the end of some kid's clothing rebellion.

I was leaving a store and passed a family on the way in; the mother and father were dressed "normally" (I say that in quotes because I can't really remember what they were dressed in, so it wasn't anything that stuck out in my mind) and trailing behind them was a boy, I guess about 13, wearing baggy pants with the belt around the mid-thigh to keep them from falling off, a tight black t-shirt, a spiked collar and spiky hair. I must have snickered after passing by, which I admit may have been rude, but he looked so goofy waddling along.

The father turned around and asked if I had laughed at his son. I explained that while the kid was fully in his right to dress that way, I wasn't offended but I did think he looked stupid. He turned back to his family and said "Yes! He was laughing at you!" The boy looked so crushed, I almost felt guilty.

I can imagine the conversation that went on beforehand:
Boy: I do not look like an idiot! I'm hardcore!
Father: Fine. We'll go out in public and see about that.
Boy: Fine!

Doomtrain
03-30-2004, 12:09 AM
Don't worry. Remember they looked like morons when they were young, too. If she's in her 40s, that'd put her youth in the 70s. Have you SEEN some 70s clothes?

Remember this cardinal rule: Everyone who bitches about kids today did something equally stupid, if not MORE stupid, when they were young.

Doomtrain
03-30-2004, 12:10 AM
Oh, but the baggy pants thing is extra goofy looking.

Not that the flannel-and-jeans of my late-90s grunge youth was any better, mind.

BraheSilver
03-30-2004, 12:11 AM
Never! I'm square now, and always have been square! I bitched about "kids today" when I was a kid!

gotpasswords
03-30-2004, 01:14 AM
I'm often tempted to "pants" these kids. Wouldn't be very hard to do.

Sooner or later, they'll wake up and realize how silly they look waddling down the street trying to catch a bus.

unclviny
03-30-2004, 01:24 AM
One of my friends has a son who started to go through the "giant pants with the underwear showing" stuff and as a form of intervention we were all urged to give him a "wedgie" whenever we saw the chance, the "saggy pants" deal didn't last very long., it's hard to be cool when you are constantly clearing out a wedgie!.

Unclviny

Daftbugger
03-30-2004, 07:28 AM
Ahhh, when I see baggy pants, I point and laugh!
Saying that, I had one of the baggy pants brigade (BPB) make a rude comment on MY t-shirt, in the library of all places. It happened to be a t-shirt for local local rock club (where I used to work) where the BPB hang out. He thought it was very 'sad' for me to wear such a t-shirt.

Dung Beetle
03-30-2004, 07:48 AM
The lady was wrong, although she was right. Hope that clears things up! Also, what fun would it be to dress like an idiot if it didn't offend the old people?

This topic reminds me of a time when my son was about three or four. We were waiting in a doctor's office when a teenager came in with his huge pants falling off. My son burst into peals of laughter: "Mama! Mama! Look at the man in the funny pants!" I didn't see what the kid's reaction was; I was too busy hushing my son: "No, no, honey, he's serious!"

Good story, Brahe.

HeyHomie
03-30-2004, 07:59 AM
Reminds me of a bumper sticker I saw the other day. It has nothing to do with the baggy pants thing, but it does have to do with the whole teenagers-dressing-to-shock-their-parents thing.

Anyway, the bumper sticker said, "I'm so goth, I'm dead." :D

Back to the OP: while I think the lady's behavior was rude, I can't help thinking that somebody needed to tell this lad that he looked ridiculous.

DanBlather
03-30-2004, 08:32 AM
I am reminded of a remark I made to one of the more "mature" people with whom I work: "You have to remember what their parents looked like at that age. Today's youth are hobbled by parents (and grandparents) who are eager to accept almost anything as falling within the range of "normal". I suspect it is a task of Herculean proportions to find a look that an old hippie will find unacceptably odd.*"

I blame the parents. If they were more easily upset by signs of self-expression, their kids wouldn't have to go to such lengths to get the desired result. They should've objected to the sideways/backwards hats right away. Then everyone would've been happy (except of course for the folks who make those extra baggy pants). I wonder if some Japanese couturier is planning to reintroduce the hakama as youth-wear?Yeah, no one looked weird before the 60s: zoot suits, racoon coats, flappers, crew cut hair, pegged pants, bobby sox, poodle skirts, beehive hairdos, saddle shoes.

Mottpot
03-30-2004, 10:32 AM
I think some people are looking too far into why kids and young adults wear these types of clothes. Quite a few of my male friends wear their pants this way, and its not because they are rebelling against their parents or society, or because they want to shock people, its because the look is "in fashion" for young men in their social and age group. I was reading all the reponses and I am just thinking to myself, he doesn't wear those because of that! And I think there is a line between a slight sagging of the pants and having your entire rump hanging out. I like the way my boyfriend dresses, and he does sag his pants, but not to the extreme.

Binarydrone
03-30-2004, 10:34 AM
Yeah, I think that the lady was rather rude. But, although I hate to sound like one of those old farts that goes on about these kids today, I think that this whole baggie pats and the associated regalia goes much further and is a little more ominous than some folks are giving credit for.

As I understand it, the origin of this fashion was based in the fact that while in prison the dungarees that the prisoners were issues were of a notoriously bad fit. This fashion (as I understand it) was either young thugs fresh out of prison wearing the prison wear as a badge of honor, or folks on the outside paying tribute to their friends still on the inside.

Golf hats upside down and/or sideways, as I understand it is a pretty universally know gang sign. Same with the one pant leg rolled up and so on. So, make no mistake about it, these young folks are imitating gang fashion. This is not only troubling from a morality POV, but I should guess can be dangerous as well.

Just my $0.02.

BraveNewSquirle
03-30-2004, 11:13 AM
Reading this made me remember something very important: Man, do I hate old people. :mad: especially the ones who think that they're better than me (because I do kick quite a bit of ass).

Really Not All That Bright
03-30-2004, 11:38 AM
Semi-reformed baggy pants-wearer checking in here. Let it be known that I never did the visible boxers thing, though. Even today, if I lift my shirt up, my boxers stick out above my beltline- it's just more comfortable that way. My pants aren't hanging off my ass, though- they're belted around my hips, maybe two or three inches below where my dress pants sit. I always wear a shirt long enough to cover the boxers, anyway.

When I did wear giant pants (Jncos, Bullheads, that kinda stuff) I expected to get a rise out of old people. The same way I turn up the radio if someone at a stoplight glares at me because it's too loud (if they just asked, I'd turn it down in a second). Plus, I have really big feet, relative to the rest of me. This results in what I call "Golf Club Syndrome" when I wear narrow-leg trousers. So, extra-wide pants, which were a) way cooler than the crap that the "wigger" kids were wearing, and b) as I say, wide enough to hide my giant feet, were definitely the way to go.

While the woman is clearly in the wrong here, I'd wager your buddy either didn't care or enjoyed the reaction he got. If he can't handle it, tell him to start dressing preppy.

Binarydrone
03-30-2004, 11:38 AM
Reading this made me remember something very important: Man, do I hate old people. :mad: especially the ones who think that they're better than me (because I do kick quite a bit of ass).
You know the best part? Assuming that you do no meet a premature demise, someday you will be an old person! Cool!

Shodan
03-30-2004, 12:38 PM
Reading this made me remember something very important: Man, do I hate old people. especially the ones who think that they're better than me (because I do kick quite a bit of ass).
You know the best part? Assuming that you do no meet a premature demise, someday you will be an old person! Cool!Not if he keeps posting like this he won't be.

BraveNewSquirle - I am older than you (almost certainly). Nobody thought they were better than you based on your clothes. That only became clear when you posted.

Consider this a cyber-pantsing.

Regards,
Shodan

js_africanus
03-30-2004, 01:33 PM
Man, do I hate old people.
Old people are evil.

I blame the parents.
For wearing pants?! Just 'cos they don't have their pants hiked up to their ribs like Abe Simpson doesn't mean they're out fancy walkin' on a sidewalk meant for regular walkin'.

...wearing baggy pants with the belt around the mid-thigh to keep them from falling off....
I love the irony in that. Evidently when he goes to jail they let him keep his belt.

So long as your friend's outfit was not lewd or obscene....
Um...I don't see the wisdom in that. The woman in the OP, provided she has been accurately represented, obviously found the outfit to be obscene. Otherwise, she wouldn't have had such a fit! I imagine her having a similar reaction to the OP when her friend is accosted by Elaine Benes for wearing a fur.

I submit that the better rule is that it is incredibly rude to point out another's rudeness. She may have found the OP's friend's display to be in poor form; however, calling him out on (her perception of) his rudeness is an even greater offense.

This leads to the conclusion that the OP was indeed polite.

IMHO, of course.

Indygrrl
03-30-2004, 01:52 PM
The issue isn't whether you like the baggy pants look or not. Hell, I don't like the look of polyester pantsuits on old women, or old men who pull their pants up to their nipples, but I would NEVER have the audacity to say something to one of these fashion victims.

I find it hard to believe that people think it's ok to "point and laugh" at someone who is dressed differently. Give the kids a break. We all wore silly stuff when we were growing up. It's a right of passage. I don't think it's so important that we should concern ourselves with the wardrobes of strangers. People need to learn to mind their own business in these matters.

Binarydrone
03-30-2004, 02:48 PM
I have to admit that I am a little torn here. On the one hand, I am all about keeping things smooth and non-confrontational in public, and so can agree that it is simply poor form to point and laugh (although to be fair, I can had occasions where I have seen things in public and laughed simply because I can't help myself). On the other hand, imitating gang wear seems a little more serious to me than some folks are taking it. I am sure that for the most part the intent is "shock the old farts" but I am not sure that the consequences are as benign as they once were.

Sketch
03-30-2004, 03:33 PM
Alright I wear my pants semi-baggy, no underwear in public though, and I think what you folks have to realise is that it's just a style. When teens wear their clothes that emulate gangsters, most of them aren't thinking "I want to look like a real gangster," they're thinking it looks cool. :cool:
To illustrate, a few years back when I was in Grade nine all of us guys had to take a judo course in P.E. Our teacher tells us about the origin of baggy pants, i.e that it's derived from prisoners, and where other recent fashion trends came from (gangs, criminals etc.) 95% of the class wore baggy pants, and no one had heard about where it came from before (or cared for that matter.) So it's not as if we're idolizing gangs.

Mister Rik
03-30-2004, 03:34 PM
Not that the flannel-and-jeans of my late-90s grunge youth was any better, mind.
The really funny thing, though, to those of us who grew up in Western Washington (where Seattle is *G* ), is the way y'all thought that look was some sort of fashion statement. I guess in a way it was - Nirvana/Pearl Jam et al decided that, instead of putting on "stage clothes", they'd just go on stage wearing what they normally wore every day.

'Cuz you see, flannel-and-jeans really had nothing to do with "grunge". Moss, maybe, but not grunge. It was simply the standard mode of dress amongst the middle-to-lower-classes in Western Washington. I think it's a combination of the weather and the prevalence of logging industries there. (In fact, if I remember correctly, Cobain grew up in a logging town.) The rain falls all year 'round, though it's not constant. It's not hot enough there to wear shorts most of the year. It's not cold enough to dress warmly most of the year. The temperature is fairly mild most of the time, never too extreme. So the flannel shirt worn over a T-shirt is the perfect attire for the climate. If the temperature is cool, the flannel keeps you warm. If the weather warms up, you can take off the flannel and tie it around your waist - it's not heavy enough to be annoying.

If anything, the youth of Western Washington mostly just made small modifications to the "uniform" from one generation to the next. For my grandfather, it was heavy trousers, T-shirt/tank, flannel shirt tucked in and buttoned to the neck, and suspenders. For my dad, it was jeans, T-shirt/tank, flannel shirt tucked in but without the top 2-3 buttons fastened, and a belt instead of suspenders. For me, it was the same, but with tighter jeans and the flannel untucked and unbuttoned, and no belt.

Naturally, there were other styles that came and went, but the "jeans & flannel" look has remained a constant through several generations.

Now, I have to say that I rather enjoy the current "skin-tight, low-rise jeans & thong-showing" look popular with the young ladies today ;)

cher3
03-30-2004, 04:26 PM
Don't worry. Remember they looked like morons when they were young, too. If she's in her 40s, that'd put her youth in the 70s. Have you SEEN some 70s clothes?

Yeah, I've seen them. I've seen them on the local high school kids and the racks at Mervyns last weekend. I wish they would go away again and stay away.

mbh
03-30-2004, 04:45 PM
The GI Generation made rude comments about the styles of the mods and hippies.

The Baby Boomers made rude comments about the styles of the preppies and punks.

Generation X is now making rude comments about the baggy pants brigade.

And someday, your contemporaries will make rude comments about the way your children dress.

Priam
03-30-2004, 05:51 PM
I must say that I don't mind the baggy, underwear-showing trend among my peers... especially the better-looking ones. Tight t-shirts as well. For quite the same reason others have chimed in about low-rise + thongs.

Of course the ones with belts quite literally around their legs just look dumb.

Doomtrain
03-30-2004, 07:03 PM
I am sure that for the most part the intent is "shock the old farts" but I am not sure that the consequences are as benign as they once were.

Please, that's like the school that banned pink clothes (http://www.indystar.com/articles/2/133722-1992-102.html) "out of concerns that the color has become associated with gang activity." Even though there was no evidence of gang activity.

Phase42-I just can't believe that we thought dressing up like lumberjacks was cool!

NinjaChick
03-30-2004, 07:50 PM
Once again, I'm amazed at how people evidently forget about what they thought when they were teenagers. Or maybe teens today care less about their parents than you folk did. But I can assure you, the majority of teens dress the way they do because it's comfortable, or it's what their friends are doing, or they simply like the look, to hell with what others think of it.

But I suppose the concept of "teens don't exist solely to be a collective menace to little old women and puppies and babies" is beyond most people. The woman in the OP had NO RIGHT to criticize that guy. If she had gone up to a 29-year old, or someone in her own age bracket, or someone older than her - meaning, anyone not a teenager - and gone into a diatribe about how disgraceful their clothing was, there would be absolutely no debate over how astoundingly rude she was.

Not everyone likes the same fashions. Not all teens dress to 'shock' the older folk - most of us really don't give two ounces of crap what you people think about us.

enipla
03-30-2004, 08:06 PM
Yep I used to wear bell bottom jeans, now I wear regular jeans.

I wore 'tennis' shoes, now I wear 'running' shoes.

My hair was longer in the '70s, I remember when leather vests where in. And cowbot shirts.

Sure stlyes change. But none of the previous styles have anything on the baggy pants with the crotch at the knees style. Sillyest damn thing I have ever seen.

And my god, it looks so incredibly uncomfortable, and impractical. How the hell do you get somthing out of your pocket?

CanvasShoes
03-30-2004, 08:13 PM
Very rude behaviour. And this is coming from a 40ish woman who thinks the whole baggie pants thing is hilarious looking. Like a toddler with full and sagging diapers. (hey, you asked :D)

However, I would never be rude enough to yell at some stranger about what they should or should not be wearing.

I did ask one young man, very politely, and not in a judgmental way, (in a class i subbed for a few months back), how they kept them from falling down.

His answer really made me understand these young men a WHOLE lot better than I previously did. He looked a little sheepish and said "we don't", and then he kind of blushed and gave his pants some adjustment.

What I don't get is, the young women dress in such a cute way, and the young men look like they wrapped up in denim bedsheets.

MLS
03-30-2004, 08:25 PM
The venerable Miss Manners, BTW, would agree that correcting someone in public is rude, rude, rude.

Tangent: Being different from your parents is a rite of passage. As in a ritual. Not a right.

js_africanus
03-30-2004, 08:26 PM
The really funny thing, though, to those of us who grew up in Western Washington (where Seattle is *G* ), is the way y'all thought that look was some sort of fashion statement.
Fashion statement?! You have not obtained an unbiased sample of America.

...there would be absolutely no debate over how astoundingly rude she was.
I don't see much debate on that point.

enipla
03-30-2004, 08:28 PM
I did ask one young man, very politely, and not in a judgmental way, (in a class i subbed for a few months back), how they kept them from falling down.

His answer really made me understand these young men a WHOLE lot better than I previously did. He looked a little sheepish and said "we don't", and then he kind of blushed and gave his pants some adjustment.

Bolding mine.

That must be SO uncomfortable.

Remember the 'un-tied shoe' style about 8-10 years ago?

We all grow up, some styles are sillyer than others, some are just darn right dumb.

Flutterby
03-30-2004, 09:15 PM
Very rude behaviour. And this is coming from a 40ish woman who thinks the whole baggie pants thing is hilarious looking. Like a toddler with full and sagging diapers. (hey, you asked :D)

That's exactly how both myself and my Grandma feel about this fashion.. and I'm 21.

I'm just extremely glad my younger brother hasn't taken to this fashion. He just wears a lot of Nike :P

On the other hand though I would never go up to some strange person and berate them for their fashion choices. If they want to spend their money on that, and dress that way, they have that choice.

burundi
03-30-2004, 09:17 PM
What a cranky old bitch! How would she feel if someone came up to her and said, "Those horizontal stripes make your ass look huge! That's so repulsive!"?

enipla
03-30-2004, 09:33 PM
Don't get me wrong, I agree that what the women did was rude.

I don't usually find clowns funny. But if the next fashion is big floppy shoes and a red nose because it's supposed to make you look like a tough guy, I may not be able to surpress myself.

Magiver
03-30-2004, 10:22 PM
Reminds me of a bumper sticker I saw the other day. It has nothing to do with the baggy pants thing, but it does have to do with the whole teenagers-dressing-to-shock-their-parents thing.

Anyway, the bumper sticker said, "I'm so goth, I'm dead." :D


Ha ha ha, ho... man. That made me laugh out loud.

Faucet
03-31-2004, 03:05 AM
I like all the reponses even the ones that I completely disagreed with. My only regret about that incident was that I was wearing a school uniform looking all neat and proper and not some low riding jeans and a T-Shirt with words written in Graffiti, the crazier I could have looked the better.

BlackKnight
03-31-2004, 03:17 AM
But I suppose the concept of "teens don't exist solely to be a collective menace to little old women and puppies and babies" is beyond most people. The woman in the OP had NO RIGHT to criticize that guy.
Here here! I agree whole-heartedly with everything you said.

I don't much care for the baggy-pants look, but it's remarkably rude to criticize a stranger's choice of fashion. Hey, I don't go around telling guys wearing neckties how ridiculous and impractical they look. (Although I've been tempted.)

yosemite
03-31-2004, 05:15 AM
I agree with everyone else, it was very rude of this woman to say anything to the kid. I don't know where she gets off doing that.

I may laugh inwardly at the way some people dress, but it's not that huge of a deal for me that I'd go out of my way to say something to them. That's just silly. And I wouldn't avoid saying something because I'd fear being rude (though that's part of it), it's just that I don't think it's worth the effort.

One thing that several of you have pointed out with the baggy pants thing is that not only is it goofy-looking, but it's downright impractical. Sure, other extreme fads have been somewhat impractical (clog shoes, low-cut pants, super-tight jeans, etc.) but the fashion victims of these particular styles didn't go around "waddling," which obviously is what some of these young men have to do in order to wear these pants.

I'm sorry, but "waddling" just adds so much more flavor to a silly-to-begin-with fashion. I can far more easily keep a straight face when someone's wearing a goofy tank top or silly shoes or a bizarre cut of trouser, but if the fashion forces them to waddle and/or shuffle also, well, that's freakin' hilarious. I'll try not to laugh, but really, it's hard not to. ;)

One funny side-tangent: a few years ago I was wearing some ill-fitting, too-big jeans to work and I kept on having to hitch them up. My underwear wasn't showing, but they were just too loose and saggy. I apologized to my 19-year-old coworker for my baggy pants, and he said, "Actually, I was just going to compliment you on them." ;)

By the way, how long has this baggy pants style been in? I remember seeing it as far back as 10 years ago in L.A. That's quite a long while.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
03-31-2004, 05:25 PM
As I understand it, the origin of this fashion was based in the fact that while in prison the dungarees that the prisoners were issues were of a notoriously bad fit. This fashion (as I understand it) was either young thugs fresh out of prison wearing the prison wear as a badge of honor, or folks on the outside paying tribute to their friends still on the inside.

Golf hats upside down and/or sideways, as I understand it is a pretty universally know gang sign. Same with the one pant leg rolled up and so on. So, make no mistake about it, these young folks are imitating gang fashion. This is not only troubling from a morality POV, but I should guess can be dangerous as well.

Just my $0.02.

Actually, according to what I heard, they don't allow you to wear a belt in prison, so many inmates' trousers sag.

You might be wrong about rolling up one side of their pants. I heard that was for safe bicycle riding.

We did wear some goofy things in the 70s, but--they fitted, for the most part.

I'm so going to date myself now, but in the 1970s, when EVERYBODY wore flares--you could hardly ever see a guy wearing straight jeans--you could buy little clamps to fit over your lower pants legs, so they wouldn't get mixed up with the bicycle.

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
03-31-2004, 05:31 PM
Oh yeah:

I still think the woman was rude, and making such remarks to strangers in public is unacceptable.

Starving Artist
03-31-2004, 05:50 PM
especially the ones who think that they're better than me (because I do kick quite a bit of ass).No. They don't just think it...

Cinnamon Girl
03-31-2004, 07:34 PM
Whoever would like to believe that the unfortunate choices teens make regarding attire are the parents fault probably does not understand what it's like to be the parent of a teen who wants to express him through his clothing.

My son at 13 has partially succumbed to baggy pants fad. Of course, being a fad I know it will blow over eventually because the thought of seeing his tuxedo pants sagging at the altar makes me want to cry. Since I see it as a fad and its not terribly obscene in its unattractiveness, I try not to make much of a fuss about it. Our compromise is that he gets to wear his pants riding low (about 3 inches lower than his boxer's waistline) provided nobody else is subjected to it meaning he wears long tshirts over them. Surely, I've got worse things to worry about. I have tried to discourage it, but it's really not worth fighting over. So what is a reasonable mother to do?

We were at the mall, DroopyPants, his little sister, and I. Droopy is wearing low-slung shorts over his boxers and a long tshirt. Walking down the center, the little one starts to run ahead toward some interesting distraction. Droopy, apparently deciding that chasing-little-sister is preferable to walking-with-mom-through-mall, proceeds to chase her breaking out into a run. As they get several stores ahead of me, Droopy's shorts drop to the ground directly in front of an older couple he's just breezed by. They stop dead in their tracks, turning around to look for whomever he belongs to, if anyone. On their faces is a look of horror mixed with righteous indignation. Instantly realizing that there's not a damn shred of evidence the kid is mine, I bust out in uncontrollable laughter as I watch Droopy look around in embarassment to see if anyone else noticed that his pants are around his ankles and his tshirt now appears to be a dress. Sheepishly, and to my even further amusement, he attempts to pull up his offending shorts as he CONTINUES to run/hobble/shuffle away from the scene of the crime and all those damn eyewitnesses.

I figure sometimes good parenting means allowing your kids to realize the folly of their wayward ideas on their own. And if you can laugh at your kid and they don't hate you, maybe they'll realize that they can laugh at themselves too because it was pretty damn funny.

Incidently, Droopy doesn't hate me, can laugh at himself, still wears his pants slung low, and is much more careful about hanging on to them when he runs through malls. Whatever became of Mr. and Mrs. Indignation, we really could care less.

My take: (a) baggy pants are stupid; and (b) not getting over the fact that some people like to look stupid regardless of the opinion of others is even more stupid and not worth the time it takes to tell them to get a life. Although a bronx cheer is worthwhile for the entertainment alone. :D

Cinnamon Girl
03-31-2004, 07:54 PM
What a cranky old bitch! How would she feel if someone came up to her and said, "Those horizontal stripes make your ass look huge! That's so repulsive!"?

I just have to ask:

Do you have any idea how uncomfortable it is to a macaroni suddenly lodged in your nasal passage above your throat? Stop that, damn it! :D

CrazyCatLady
03-31-2004, 08:20 PM
Who's wrong here? Both of 'em. He's rude to walk around in public with his ass hanging out, and she's rude to tell him off about walking around with his ass hanging out.

CanvasShoes
03-31-2004, 08:26 PM
Don't worry. Remember they looked like morons when they were young, too. If she's in her 40s, that'd put her youth in the 70s. Have you SEEN some 70s clothes?


Ummm, YES. They're the same styles that have made a comeback and are now being worn today.

I hated the polyester shirts and clunky shoes when I WAS a teen, (in the 70s), and I hate them now.

Some things are dorky no matter WHY they're being worn.

El Zagna
03-31-2004, 08:31 PM
Who's wrong here? Both of 'em. He's rude to walk around in public with his ass hanging out, and she's rude to tell him off about walking around with his ass hanging out.What exactly is rude about that? Bad taste, maybe, but rude?