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rjung
05-20-2004, 08:07 PM
As the title says, what do prostitutes do during their period? I can't imagine them "plying business" while menstruating; do they simply take the week off, or get an alternate source of income?

drachillix
05-20-2004, 08:27 PM
As the title says, what do prostitutes do during their period? I can't imagine them "plying business" while menstruating; do they simply take the week off, or get an alternate source of income?

Can't support your $200 a day crack habit if you don't go to work.

ZebraShaSha
05-20-2004, 08:37 PM
Isn't most of their revenue from blow-jobs?

Mangetout
05-20-2004, 08:41 PM
If a woman on birth control pills skips the 7 placebo pills at the end and just starts a new pack, it is often the case that she will experience little or no menstrual bleeding - apparently this can be done for some months (but you really shouldn't do it without first talking to your doctor).

Harriet the Spry
05-20-2004, 08:41 PM
I opened this thread after Zebra Sha Sha just to post the old joke

"What's black and white and red all over?"

I wish I could have stopped myself, sorry Zebra Sha Sha.

TellMeI'mNotCrazy
05-20-2004, 08:55 PM
Depo Provera can also lead to the lack of a period. The Instead cup claims to allow "clean sex" during menstruation. So there are "work-arounds", but I have a feeling that they probably just stick to offers of, er, sucky-sucky... I can't believe I actually used the word sucky-sucky in a sentence.

Twice even.

Somebody stop me.

fubbleskag
05-20-2004, 09:00 PM
free upgrades to the "gold" package for all john's that week.

citrus x paradisi
05-20-2004, 09:29 PM
I think ZebraShaSha is right here. Or they might take a week off-- those without drug habits surely don't enjoy a seven-day work week.

Balthisar
05-20-2004, 10:07 PM
What? Seven of those pills are placebos? I'd always thought that women on birth control just didn't have periods... am I way out of date with old, old pills?

pulykamell
05-20-2004, 10:32 PM
As the title says, what do prostitutes do during their period? I can't imagine them "plying business" while menstruating; do they simply take the week off, or get an alternate source of income?

Umm...why not? I'm sure there's plenty clientele willing to pay (possibly extra) for having sex with a menstruating woman.

Mr2001
05-20-2004, 10:53 PM
What? Seven of those pills are placebos? I'd always thought that women on birth control just didn't have periods... am I way out of date with old, old pills?
I think in the old days, women were just supposed to skip the pill for a week. Now, some of them are placebos, so it's easier to use (just take one pill every day).

I don't know if there's any medical evidence that having a period is actually beneficial for women who are on birth control. I read somewhere that doctors just thought it was "normal", so they had women who used the pill skip the hormones for a week, and the tradition just stuck around.

CurtC
05-21-2004, 12:29 AM
I heard from a reliable source (I wish I could remember what it was now) that the only reason that birth control pills were introduced with an "off" week, was that the drug companies didn't think women would want to take the pill if they didn't still have a period. The pill at the time seemed unnatural, and if it had eliminated the period altogether, it would have seemed more so. Anyway, it's supposedly perfectly fine to not take the placebos and stay on the real pills the whole time, and not have a period. It was just a marketing decision to skip that week.

TellMeI'mNotCrazy
05-21-2004, 12:59 AM
I heard from a reliable source (I wish I could remember what it was now) that the only reason that birth control pills were introduced with an "off" week, was that the drug companies didn't think women would want to take the pill if they didn't still have a period. <snip>

Really, I have to wonder where these places get their information.

Askance
05-21-2004, 01:02 AM
What I wanna know is, how did they stop getting pregnant before practical contraception was available? I mean did they make every john wear a canvas condom? Ouch!

Guinastasia
05-21-2004, 01:21 AM
Um, birth control has been around for a long time, longer than you'd think.

And condoms have been around for a couple hundred years-previously they were made of animal skins. (Can't you still get lambskin condoms?)

However, I believe a lot of them ended up having back alley type abortions. Or else just staying pregnant.

The greatest risk was always disease.

aruvqan
05-21-2004, 01:22 AM
I remember reading that before, though a quick google really only turned up
http://www.gladwell.com/2000/2000_03_10_a_rock.htm
These arguments, as arcane as they may seem, were central to the development of oral contraception. It was John Rock and Gregory Pincus who decided that the Pill ought to be taken over a four-week cycle--a woman would spend three weeks on the Pill and the fourth week off the drug (or on a placebo), to allow for menstruation. There was and is no medical reason for this. A typical woman of childbearing age has a menstrual cycle of around twenty- eight days, determined by the cascades of hormones released by her ovaries. As first estrogen and then a combination of estrogen and progestin flood the uterus, its lining becomes thick and swollen, preparing for the implantation of a fertilized egg. If the egg is not fertilized, hormone levels plunge and cause the lining--the endometrium--to be sloughed off in a menstrual bleed. When a woman is on the Pill, however, no egg is released, because the Pill suppresses ovulation. The fluxes of estrogen and progestin that cause the lining of the uterus to grow are dramatically reduced, because the Pill slows down the ovaries. Pincus and Rock knew that the effect of the Pill's hormones on the endometrium was so modest that women could conceivably go for months without having to menstruate. "In view of the ability of this compound to prevent menstrual bleeding as long as it is taken," Pincus acknowledged in 1958, "a cycle of any desired length could presumably be produced." But he and Rock decided to cut the hormones off after three weeks and trigger a menstrual period because they believed that women would find the continuation of their monthly bleeding reassuring. More to the point, if Rock wanted to demonstrate that the Pill was no more than a natural variant of the rhythm method, he couldn't very well do away with the monthly menses. Rhythm required "regularity," and so the Pill had to produce regularity as well

Not sure if you count the New Yorker as a reasonable source, though it seemed to have gotten its information from fairly close to the source...

Personally, I think the menses should be turned off at menarch and turned on when you decide you want to reproduce. or maybe left for once a year.

Bob55
05-21-2004, 03:12 AM
Um, birth control has been around for a long time, longer than you'd think.


I read the Greeks used to stuff animal intestines inside a woman to prevent conctraception prior to sex. (someone confirm for me please!!!)

irishgirl
05-21-2004, 03:12 AM
I watched a documentary on legal brothels in Melbourne, Australia.

Hate to tell you you're all way off base on this one.

The ladies they interviewed used cut up sponges, the kind you use to wash your car. They even showed one girl buying a 3-pack from a DIY shop and cutting them up with scissors.

Go You Big Red Fire Engine
05-21-2004, 06:29 AM
irishgirl, the plural of anecdote is not 'data'.
And how the hell does that work?

Pushkin
05-21-2004, 07:00 AM
I read the Greeks used to stuff animal intestines inside a woman to prevent conctraception prior to sex. (someone confirm for me please!!!)

The Egyptians used Crocodile dung as part of a contraceptive, um, potion didn't they??

TellMeI'mNotCrazy
05-21-2004, 07:10 AM
irishgirl, the plural of anecdote is not 'data'.
And how the hell does that work?

How is reporting something seen on a documentary about the women in question an anecdote? As far as how, I would imagine that they just cut them to size, and block off the back end of the flow for as long as the client is there. He's not going to feel a sponge.

ratatoskK
05-21-2004, 07:27 AM
The plural of anecdote is not 'data'.

This has got to be the greatest line I've read in a long time!!

Go You Big Red Fire Engine
05-21-2004, 07:37 AM
"The ladies they interviewed." The ladies were telling anecdotes. In ONE brothel, in ONE town. Doesn't make everyone 'way off'.
So they just keep forceps around to get those sponges out?

Go You Big Red Fire Engine
05-21-2004, 07:39 AM
This has got to be the greatest line I've read in a long time!!
I stole it off some other doper. I don't know who. But I read it and thought the same thing you did. It fitted the situation.

Shade
05-21-2004, 07:50 AM
irishgirl, the plural of anecdote is not 'data'.Remember no-one else offered any data at all, so anecdotal is a first step.

Go You Big Red Fire Engine
05-21-2004, 07:59 AM
Or the first step backwards if it's false...
Maybe they're on what I have... Implanon, pretty much stops my period from occuring in the next 3 years. But then there's the 50:50 chance that you'll more periods than normal. I presume, by Occam's Razor, they just use hormaonal contraception and prevent the period from happening in the first place.
Menstrual blood is not the safest thing in the world to come into contact with.
Legal brothels have to follow strict health procedures. I went through the sex worker's Health and Safety Procedures and could not see anything about menstruation though. But then again, it was on a sex worker's site.

duffer
05-21-2004, 08:05 AM
As far as the placebo pills go, it was always my understanding that while they weren't necessary, they were included to reinforce the habit of taking a pill everyday. Was I wrong?

Kalhoun
05-21-2004, 08:05 AM
Really, I have to wonder where these places get their information.
No shit. Oh yeah...I just LOOOOOVE getting my period. The high point of my month!

I'm from the "olden days" when you still got the period every month. But I have to ask...do you still go psycho if you don't get your period every month?

Anyone?

Go You Big Red Fire Engine
05-21-2004, 08:12 AM
No. Well at least I don't.

dougie_monty
05-21-2004, 08:24 AM
No shit. Oh yeah...I just LOOOOOVE getting my period. The high point of my month!

I'm from the "olden days" when you still got the period every month. But I have to ask...do you still go psycho if you don't get your period every month?

Anyone?
Well, look at it this way, Kalhoun: If you did, wouldn't every woman approaching menopause (or suffering from amenorrhea) go bughouse?

AngelicGemma
05-21-2004, 08:36 AM
If a woman on birth control pills skips the 7 placebo pills at the end and just starts a new pack, it is often the case that she will experience little or no menstrual bleeding - apparently this can be done for some months (but you really shouldn't do it without first talking to your doctor).

I can only do it for one month. If I do it for longer, the results are... unpleasent.

KidCharlemagne
05-21-2004, 08:45 AM
I read the Greeks used to stuff animal intestines inside a woman to prevent conctraception prior to sex. (someone confirm for me please!!!)

I wouldn't say "stuffed" but the Greeks and Romans both used sheep intestines, among other things, to make barrier contraceptives. Given that some condoms are still made from lamb intestine today, it's certainly not too far a stretch.

astro
05-21-2004, 09:10 AM
Sex Workers Resources - THE FIRST NIGHT I WORKED I ONLY DID HAND JOBS AID BLOWJOB BECAUSE I HAD MY PERIOD, AND NOBODY TOLD ME ABOUT SPONGES. (http://www.escort-enz.com/swr/sponges.shtml)

Not a work safe site due to ad content so text is quoted here

Sponges
THE FIRST NIGHT I WORKED I ONLY DID HAND JOBS AID BLOWJOB BECAUSE I HAD MY PERIOD, AND NOBODY TOLD ME ABOUT SPONGES.

Sponges can be pushed high into the vagina just before you have a client, and removed afterwards.

Looked after carefully, they are a safe, clean, convenient way of, hiding your period from clients so you can keep working.

Choose a natural sea sponge, as they absorb more than synthetic ones. They squeeze down smaller too.. which means your clients are less likely to feel them. if it is large, ordinary scissor-, will cut it down easily. I find that about twice the thickness of a tampon is about right. Rinse it thoroughly, as it might have irritating grains of sand in it, then squeeze it as dry as possible. Insert it as you would a non-applicator tampon.

Then use mu& more KY or other lubricant than usual, as the sponge tends to absorb that as well, leaving you dryer. Never work dry, and don't be shy to stop and put more KY if you start to get dry.

DRYNESS BREAKS CONDOMS!
Say things like "sex turns me on so much more when it's really slippery' and since most men want to believe that they're turning you on they accept this quite happily. Fishing it out afterwards can be tricky until you get used to it.

A couple of my friends have gone rushing off to the Sexual Health Service because they couldn't get it out! Either squatting down, or bending with one foot on the edge of the bath or loo seems to work well. Wash your hands, then feel up with one hand until you can touch the sponge.

Sometimes if the client was large, the sponge will be lodged up behind your cervix. Do not panic - there is nowhere else it can go! Use your forefinger and middle finger to grip it in a scissors action, and push down as though you are straining to go to the toilet. Pull it out , rinse thoroughly, squeeze as dry as possible, and reinsert.

At times when you would go through a super tampon in 3-4 hours, you will only get an hour out of your sponge, so rinse regularly. Rinse more often if you have a cold or hay fever - when you sneeze, your vagina muscles are likely to contract, and if your sponge is nearly full it will leak. I rinse mine out very thoroughly at the end of my shif and leave it in a weak Dettol solution overnight, At the end of my period I soak it for few minutes in a mild bleach solution, then squeeze it and leave it dry in a jar wit. no lid in the bathroom cupboard.

Some ladies prefer to get a new sponge for each shift, but personally I don't consider it necessary as long as it is cleaned thoroughly. Cleaning it in white vinegar seems to make it last the longest, but never use malt vinegar as the sugar in it encourages thrush to grow, I prefer bleach, because I know it kills all the bad bugs, and I suspect the dettol wasn't killing thrush earlier but bleached sponges fall to bits. after 2-3 months.

Chemists and some massage parlour operators can sell you a small sponge for $3-5. The really good news, if you're lucky enough to live near a Prostitutes Collective office, is that they sell a packet of 5 for $5.

Debra

August 1993 SIREN

Go You Big Red Fire Engine
05-21-2004, 09:22 AM
feel up with one hand
:eek:

Seems that it's not the healthiest way to go. That's just asking for thrush and other nasties. Not to mention abraising the interior lining making you more susceptible to infection and AIDS if a condom does break.
Was that excerpt from someone who worked in a legal brothel?

Lamia
05-21-2004, 09:35 AM
Really, I have to wonder where these places get their information.Well, they may have figured that women wouldn't trust that the birth control had done it's job unless they could see the bloody evidence every month that they still weren't pregnant.

What I wanna know is, how did they stop getting pregnant before practical contraception was available? I mean did they make every john wear a canvas condom? Ouch!Aside from the various forms of birth control already mentioned, plenty of prostitutes throughout history have been rendered sterile by STDs. Occupational hazard.

This wouldn't a problem for your high-end callgirls and escorts, but I would venture to guess that impoverished streetwalkers have a difficult time maintaining sufficient body fat levels to menstruate or conceive. They can't be eating well, and many have drug habits to support. I remember once seeing a news report on a charitable group that handed out condoms, clean needles, and McDonald's coupons to streetwalkers.

Philster
05-21-2004, 09:37 AM
[I]2-for-1 Deal. Blowjob and Anal Sex - $50/I]

pokey
05-21-2004, 11:08 AM
:eek:

Seems that it's not the healthiest way to go. That's just asking for thrush and other nasties. Not to mention abraising the interior lining making you more susceptible to infection and AIDS if a condom does break.
Was that excerpt from someone who worked in a legal brothel?

If putting washed fingers in your vagina is an unhealthy way to go I don't want to be healthy. Out of all the things you can put in your vagina, a clean natural sea sponge and your own clean fingers is probably the least likely to cause injury. Sea sponge is used as an environmentally-friendly alternative to disposable tampax.

I've used contraceptive sponges during my period and it stops the flow temporarily. I'm not a prostitute. You have to use your fingers to take out a contraceptive sponge too.

olefin
05-24-2004, 10:01 AM
From a cat house employee in NV.

"This question is not out of the ordinary. Us girls during that time wear
extra protection, and we use sea sponges. Yes some of do take time off."

Green Bean
05-25-2004, 09:35 AM
I should also point out that women's periods do not necessarily a) last a whole week, and b) have a constant flow. It varies woman by woman, of course.

[TMI Warning] My flow is heavy for about 2 days, and then extremely light for a few days. I would really only have to worry about those first 2 days. The remaining days I could easily control things with a diaphragm or something. The only friend with whom I have discussed this reported that her flow is very light for a day or two, then heavy for two days, and then really light for a day. In both cases, it's only 5 days, and only 2 of those days have a significant amount of flow.

And as others have pointed out, hormonal birth control methods sometimes make periods quite light to nonexistent.

Green Bean
05-25-2004, 09:57 AM
Oh--I forgot to say--sea sponges have been used since ancient times as contraceptive devices. They would usually be soaked in some sort of natural spermicidal agent, like vinegar. Between the barrier of the sponge and the acidity of the vinegar, they actually worked rather well.

And with regard to the makers of the pill's decision to have women have their periods:

First of all, very little was known about the effect of the additional hormones on women's reproductive systems. Scientists had known for a long time that oral hormones could supress ovulation, but the problem was that getting the hormones to experiment with was difficult and extremely expensive. They had to be extracted from animal organs. They could barely get enough to experiment with. It was the development of synthetic hormones from plant sources that led to the feasibility of the pill. Once they had them, they created the pill ASAP. They didn't know whether women HAD to shed that uterine lining every month or not. Other posters have mentioned other reasons that having the period was desirable. So, they developed it with the period included. Another example of their lack of knowledge about the workings of hormones is the fact that the early pills had many times the quantity of hormones that today's pills do. It was the later research that determined that the levels could be reduced.

Secondly, and perhaps more important--the pill was originally introduced as a remedy for menstrual irregularity. The pill is generally thought of as being introduced in 1960. But it was actually approved by the FDA in 1957, but only for treatement of menstrual irregularity. Naturally, lots of women with in-the-know doctors developed "menstrual irregularity" in the late '50s. :) ) The developers of the pill basically had to do this in order to get it approved at all. They knew that a "birth control pill" would be a real hard sell, so they made sure that it had a more "legitimate" purpose.

It's hard to express how disdained birth control and birth control information was at the time. In fact, it was still technically illegal in some cases. It was only a few decades earlier that people (including Margaret Sanger) were jailed for disseminating birth control information! They were able to get approval for the birth control aspect of the pill in 1960 largely because it had been on the market for a few years already, and proved to be pretty safe and effective.

Lissa
05-25-2004, 11:21 AM
What I wanna know is, how did they stop getting pregnant before practical contraception was available? I mean did they make every john wear a canvas condom? Ouch!

Post-coital douches were also employed by some women as a birth-control measure. Believe it or not, Lysol was once marketed as such. (We have a glass Lysol bottle in the museum in which I work which gives directions for dilution and use.) As you can imagine, many women were horribly burned.

There's a great book on this subject called Devices and Desires by Andrea Tone. I recommend it highly as not only informative, but a very entertaining read.

Since birth control was illegal, women's magazines and other such information outlets used euphamisms in order to inform their readers. Douches were for "killing germs" and condoms were for "preventing disease". Folk medicines, and herbs such as Queen Anne's Lace were also used as contraceptives, with varying degrees of success. In cases such as for these herbal contraceptives or abortificatient medicines, the ostensible purpose was to keep menstruation regular, or to "restore" it.

neuroman
05-25-2004, 02:36 PM
Pull it out , rinse thoroughly, squeeze as dry as possible, and reinsert.
Ewwwwww.

Guinastasia
05-25-2004, 02:51 PM
Don't sponges breed bacteria-constant moisture and all those little crevices?

And WHY was birth control illegal?

TellMeI'mNotCrazy
05-25-2004, 02:56 PM
Because they thought of non-procreative sex as a sin: (cite (http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1982/6/82.06.03.x.html))


Those who saw fit to define contraceptive information as obscene opposed birth control, citing the following objections: birth control practice is sinful; the nation needs a growing population of large, stable families (and indeed some of them feared that “Yankee” stock would be overcome by immigrants, non-whites and the poor); and birth control represented a rebellion of women against their primary social duty—motherhood.

A. Comstock, who was born in New Canaan, Connecticut, was responsible for the federal law banning birth control and for the passage of similar laws in twenty two states. The strictest laws were passed in Connecticut and Massachusetts.


1879 General Statutes of Connecticut, Section 6246: Use of drugs or instruments to prevent conception. Any person who will use any drug, medicinal article or instrument for the purpose of preventing conception shall be fined not less than fifty dollars or imprisoned not less than sixty days nor more than one year or be both fined and imprisoned.
Accessories. Section 54-196: Any person who assists, abets, councils, causes, hires or commands another to commit any offense may be prosecuted and punished as if he were the principal offender.


Comstock worked as a special federal agent charged with the responsibility of enforcing laws aimed at stopping proliferation, distribution and use of “obscene” articles.

dougie_monty
05-25-2004, 05:39 PM
Comstock, who was born in New Canaan, Connecticut, was responsible for the federal law banning birth control and for the passage of similar laws in twenty two states. The strictest laws were passed in Connecticut and Massachusetts.

Don't you admire someone who thinks through his zipper? It makes me wonder what large wet rock Comstock crawled out from under. I guess that is what happens when first cousins intermarry. :mad:

Yamirskoonir
05-25-2004, 06:21 PM
No shit. Oh yeah...I just LOOOOOVE getting my period. The high point of my month!

I'm from the "olden days" when you still got the period every month. But I have to ask...do you still go psycho if you don't get your period every month?

Anyone?
Nope. I was on depo provera for a year and a half, then went off for 9 months, and now I'm back on (it's been another 4 months). I laugh in my friend's faces as they haul off to the store to buy necessary feminine products and smelly rubber contraceptives, while I frolic worry-free in swimming pools and in bed with the live-in SO. :eek:

Why did I ever go off it, you ask? My previous SO and I of 5 years broke up, and I didn't see a need to continue the shots at the time. I was quickly reminded how god-awful my periods used to be - (TMI, here it comes) ridiculous flow, crippling headaches, cramps that had me curled fetal for 6 hours at a time and made me miss work. Funny though, never had PMS. Anyhow, after tiring of aunt flo's visit and moving in with the SO, it seemed natural and reasonable to go back on it. Besides, condoms were getting expensive (yes I know they can be had for free in sondry places, but they smell funny).

Long story short - birth control keeps me SANE.

TellMeI'mNotCrazy
05-25-2004, 07:59 PM
Don't you admire someone who thinks through his zipper? It makes me wonder what large wet rock Comstock crawled out from under. I guess that is what happens when first cousins intermarry. :mad:


Certainly not one of those things that makes me proud to be from Connecticut.

Green Bean
05-26-2004, 08:39 AM
Don't you admire someone who thinks through his zipper? It makes me wonder what large wet rock Comstock crawled out from under.Comstock was quite an interesting character. He used to go to burlesque shows and the like and bust them--after watching the show.

And in another example of birth control being marketed as something other than birth control--in the late 1900s, many doctors prescribed devices to "support a weak uterus." They were basically diaphragms.

There are actually a number of great books on the history of birth control. One of my favorite profs at Rutgers, James Reed, was quite the expert. From Private Vice to Public Virtue (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/046502582X/qid=1085574734/sr=1-2/ref=sr_1_2/102-4662772-6743351?v=glance&s=books) is probably his best known book. (He was from Louisiana, and I just loved how he would pronounce "coitus." He would say "co-eye-tus.") I'd also recommend The Pill: A Biography of the Drug That Changed the World (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0679435557/qid=1085574948/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-4662772-6743351?v=glance&s=books) by Bernard Asbell. There are a number of good biographies of Margaret Sanger out there.

TellMeI'mNotCrazy
05-26-2004, 10:05 AM
<snip>...in the late 1900s, many doctors prescribed devices to "support a weak uterus." They were basically diaphragms.


Would that be the 1980s, or 90s? ;)

RitzyRae
05-26-2004, 10:25 AM
No shit. Oh yeah...I just LOOOOOVE getting my period. The high point of my month!

I'm from the "olden days" when you still got the period every month. But I have to ask...do you still go psycho if you don't get your period every month?

Anyone?

Uh... I would like to think that I'm not psycho. I've been on depo for almost 2 years and have had one period during that time. Of course, there are side effects associated with any kind of drug, but I haven't experienced any with depo. Not to mention, I have adored not having a period every month. I didn't realize how much it used to wear me down until it stopped happening.

Now, a nurse friend of mine was telling that there is a new trend in medicine concerning women's cycles. Doctors are discovering the possibility that women maybe weren't really designed to bleed every month, and that it's not necessary to do so. Your uterus will be fine, and you get the added benefit of not risking anemia. They may begin suggesting that women only have a period 4 times a year, instead of every month, or, like me, no period at all.

Back to the Ladies of the Evening, yes there are fetishes that include having intercourse with menstruating women. You can learn much from pornographic spam... :eek:

chorpler
05-26-2004, 01:21 PM
My wife recently went to the gynecologist and got Seasonale, which is a relatively new pill regimen where you take active pills every day for ... I think it's 83 days, and then have seven days on placebo pills so you menstruate. The idea is that you only have to menstruate four times a year. It's basically just regular BCPs without the monthly break.

Unfortunately, shortly after she finished the second month's pill regimen and started on the third month's, she started bleeding, and the amount of blood increased slowly until after a week she was bleeding heavily, significantly more than she does with a normal period. This heavy bleeding lasted another week or so, and then eventually faded out like menstruation usually does.

So she's pretty much soured on Seasonale now -- it may prevent her menstruation for a bit, but it doesn't seem to do so for as long as it should, and the resulting period is a lot worse than usual.

She does have a pretty harsh case of endometriosis, which may be why the Seasonale isn't working as well as it should -- it makes menstruation painful and irregular. She's already had surgery once for it, two years ago, but apparently it has come back since then. She was really excited to only have to go through the hideously painful experience of menstruation every three months instead of every month, but alas, it looks like that is not to be.

But anyway, hopefully Seasonale works better for most women, and it does show that medical science is beginning to realize that monthly menstruation may not be necessary.

RitzyRae
05-26-2004, 02:46 PM
She does have a pretty harsh case of endometriosis, which may be why the Seasonale isn't working as well as it should -- it makes menstruation painful and irregular. She's already had surgery once for it, two years ago, but apparently it has come back since then. She was really excited to only have to go through the hideously painful experience of menstruation every three months instead of every month, but alas, it looks like that is not to be.

But anyway, hopefully Seasonale works better for most women, and it does show that medical science is beginning to realize that monthly menstruation may not be necessary.

Ah. My best friend is in the same boat as your wife. She was practically living on Vicodin. I'm so terribly sorry for any woman that has to deal with that kind of pain.

And yes, if your wife continues to suffer from endo, then of course any menstruation could have the same or increased effects. If Seasonale caused her to have 4 painful periods a year, maybe Depo would cause one or none? But I'm sure you guys have been exploring anything that might help. Hang in there.

Has this thread been hijacked? I'm sure your wife isn't a prostitute!

irishgirl
05-26-2004, 04:31 PM
Heh, it wasn't an anecdote, it was primary source material!

And has since been supported by astro's cite.

So now it's official- sex workers use sponges!

chorpler
05-26-2004, 06:33 PM
If Seasonale caused her to have 4 painful periods a year, maybe Depo would cause one or none? But I'm sure you guys have been exploring anything that might help. Hang in there.

She's actually afraid to try Depo-Provera because of the reported side effects that some women experience. She says at this point she's more keen on just having them perform a hysterectomy ... but I don't know how serious she is. Last time she had surgery, the doctor said that one of the endometriosis ... fibroids? tumors? whatever they're called ... had very nearly eaten clear through her uterus, and she thinks that it may have succeeded by now. I'm not sure if a uterus with an opening into your abdominal cavity is dangerous or not, or if it can support a pregnancy. Seems unlikely.


Has this thread been hijacked? I'm sure your wife isn't a prostitute!

Heh heh ... yes, somewhat of a hijack, I guess. So to bring it back on topic, I'll say that Seasonale, or other menstruation-stopping hormone regimens, could be a big advantage for prostitutes everywhere. They wouldn't have to rely on sponges anymore!

Lissa
05-26-2004, 08:57 PM
She's actually afraid to try Depo-Provera because of the reported side effects that some women experience.

I have endometriosis, too. Every period was hell on earth-- I'm talking writhing-on-the-floor-screaming-and-puking-and-wishing-I-was-dead kind of pain.

My doctor put me on Depo and it was the best thing that ever happend to me. I had no side effects other than a temporary weight gain of a couple of pounds. I've been on it for almost five years now.

Tell your wife it's worth the risk, in my opinion. I know several other women on Depo, and none have reported any significant side effects. They happen, of course, but everyone I know has had a positive experience on it.

She says at this point she's more keen on just having them perform a hysterectomy ...

Wow, if she's worried about the side effects of Depo, she should really stop to think about this one. A hysterectomy is pretty nasty. It's painful, takes a while to recover, and then there are all of the hormonal aspects. I think that the side effects of Depo are pretty mild in comparison.

I know how she feels. I wanted one, too, before I was able to find a doctor who understood my illness and was able to treat it. There were a few tries before we finally found something that worked for me.

You wife needs to find a better doctor, first of all. I went through over a dozen doctors before I found someone who understood endometriosis. Really, it's a poorly understood condition, and most doctors are a bit baffled by it. I had doctors tell me that it was "all in my head." One doctor even suggested that I have a baby to "clear it out." I was fourteen at the time! Other doctors just wrote out a pain prescription and told me just to live with it.

If you're lucky enough to live in a large city, you might be near a clinic which exclusively treats endometriosis. Even if you're not, you need to find someone who can give your wife more options than surgery.

RitzyRae
05-26-2004, 09:26 PM
Lissa said everything I was going to say. Thank you.

And I find it strange that almost every woman I've ever talked about Depo is afraid of it, and has heard horror stories. I would really like to know what the statistics actually are. Anyway, let me just say again, I have loved Depo. Loved, loved, loved it. I really hope your wife could benefit from it. It just seems that a hysterectomy would be 10 times harder on her body than any Depo shot could be...

Again, my best to your wife.

dougie_monty
05-27-2004, 02:03 AM
Schoolchild's boner in essay about American history:
"When a Northern soldier could not go to the Civil War he sent a prostitute."

Go You Big Red Fire Engine
05-27-2004, 06:44 AM
Heh, it wasn't an anecdote, it was primary source material!

And has since been supported by astro's cite.

So now it's official- sex workers use sponges!
Since you seem to not be a prostitute, it was second hand information, in fact maybe even third hand, since you watched it and didn't actually talk to a prostitute. And the only reason I point this out, is because you said we were all "way off" when you did not have enough just evidence to prove so. Next time, stick to, this is what I saw on a documentary.
Yes it has been supported, and only now does it gain creedence. What do they do if a client wants more than an hour? Bleach and vinegar in the vagina? I remember watching a doco on Catalyst about how using lemon juice (it kills AIDS) or some spermicides up there, actually increases your chances of getting AIDS and other diseases because it's abrasive.
It seems something strange to do, but then again, people still use douches even though they make thrush worse. :rolleyes:

And on the hijacked note.. I mentioned this early and I want to give another shout out, to the new Implanon. A three year implant, I barely have periods, a 99.97%(?) [theoretical] failure rate, although it has never failed in clinical trials.
I have experienced no side affects, no weight gain, no migraines, no acne.

dougie_monty
05-27-2004, 02:26 PM
I remember watching a doco on Catalyst about how using lemon juice (it kills AIDS) or some spermicides up there, actually increases your chances of getting AIDS and other diseases because it's abrasive.
It seems something strange to do, but then again, people still use douches even though they make thrush worse. :rolleyes:

That sounds like something Dr. Bronner (he of the weird messages on the soap containers) thought up. :p

Ca3799
05-27-2004, 03:53 PM
I read a book called "Storeyville" that was a history of New Orleans brothels. I recall it being mentioned that many women did take some time off during their periods.

Regarding todays "crack addicts" that someone mentioned above, I would guess that a crack addict would have some plan to ensure future crack during a dry (or too wet, ha ha) spell such as setting some crack or cash aside, leaving some hidden or with a trusted coworker or pimp, etc. Perhaps a pimp would be inclined to keep a woman supplied or indebted to ensure future work from her. Surely today's crack addict is not really too far removed from yesterdays opium addict. Just a couple of WAG's.

Mame
05-28-2004, 08:55 AM
IANAP but I talked to a sex-workers representative about this approx 4 years ago. (No, I don't want to explain why!). She said they used diaphragms (effectively as Keepers, which were not readily available here at the time), which they would remove, clean and reinsert a couple of time each shift.

So, unless we have some Pros on the Board who are willing to chime in, this may be as near as we will get.

Gfactor
05-28-2004, 10:09 AM
IANAP but I talked to a sex-workers representative about this approx 4 years ago. (No, I don't want to explain why!). She said they used diaphragms (effectively as Keepers, which were not readily available here at the time), which they would remove, clean and reinsert a couple of time each shift.

So, unless we have some Pros on the Board who are willing to chime in, this may be as near as we will get.

In the 1986 film Working Girls one of the prostitues is shown trying to insert a diaphragm during her period. Her friend comes into the bathroom and asks if the customer has injured her. Of course, this is from a work of fiction . . .

Gfactor
05-28-2004, 11:27 AM
Here is a real life anecdote from my misspent youth:

I once visited an in-call escort. She was probably around 19, and there was another woman around the same age hiding in the bathroom (apparently, I wasn't supposed to know about her). Anyway, I discovered that she had some wadded up facial tissue in her vagina. Soon after that she excused herself for a conference with the other woman in the bathroom. When she returned, she explained that she was menstuating and could not have intercourse. So that is what one prostitue did in real life.