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View Full Version : Have US vice-presidents ever been changed for the second term ?


Rashak Mani
06-02-2004, 04:55 PM
Seeing how the Chalabi stories are getting hot, I wondered if its an attempt at knocking out Cheney. My boss asked me if there was ever a change of Vice-Presidents in US history.

Did a US president change his running mate for his bid for a second term ? Even if he didn't get reelected. Do indicate which got reelected.

Thanks

Captain Amazing
06-02-2004, 04:59 PM
Sure. Off the top of my head, Roosevelt had John Nance Garner as his vice president for the first term, Henry Wallace for the second and third, and Harry Truman for his fourth. Abraham Lincoln's vice president his first term was Hamlin, his second was Anderew Johnson. I know that there are other times this happened, I just can't think of them now.

Q.E.D.
06-02-2004, 05:05 PM
There were several. See this list (http://www.presidentsusa.net/presvplist.html) of US presidents and their vice presidents.

Shoeless
06-02-2004, 06:33 PM
Keep in mind that "vice president" and "running mate" are not necessarily the same thing. The earlier vice presidents did not run with the president, but ran against the president (and lost).

friedo
06-02-2004, 08:07 PM
Keep in mind that "vice president" and "running mate" are not necessarily the same thing. The earlier vice presidents did not run with the president, but ran against the president (and lost).

That only happened three times. The 12th Amendment was ratified in 1804, IIRC.

Northern Piper
06-02-2004, 09:22 PM
Several times. Here's a list (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?postid=4498391#post4498391) I posted in a thread some months ago:- Jefferson ran with Aaron Burr as his running mate in 1800, but dumped him for George Clinton in 1804. Reason for dump: after the tie vote in the Electoral College in the 1800 election, Burr had made a push to get the presidency himself when the election was thrown to the House for decision. Jefferson never trusted him again.

- in an interesting twist, President John Quincy Adams got dumped by his Veep in 1828. Calhoun had run with Adams in 1824, but switched and ran as Jackson's running mate in 1828. Jackson-Calhoun beat Adams.

- Jackson, a strong federalist, had a very uneasy relationship with Calhoun, a strong states-righter. Eventually, Calhoun resigned the vice-presidency shortly before his term ended. Jackson ran successfully for a second term with Van Buren in 1832.

- Lincoln ran with Hannibal Hamelin in 1860. Hamelin was a high profile Democrat Senator who left the Democrats over slavery shortly before the 1860 presidential elections, so he was a natural person for the Republicans to put on the ticket to broaden their support. He put in a particularly undistinguished term of office as veep (and there's a pretty low threshold for that category), serving as a private in the Maine Coast Guard as a cook during the Civil War. Lincoln replaced him in the 1864 election with Andrew Johnson, another former Democrat Senator, in part because of Hamelin's ties to the Radical Republicans, and in part because Lincoln wanted a southerner on the ticket. (Note that Lincoln is unique in being the only president to have running mates who had been prominent members of the other party.)

- Grant ran with Schuyler Colfax in 1868, but the party dumped Colfax in 1872 because of his invovlement in the Crédit Mobiler scandal. Grant ran with Henry Wilson in 1872, in part because of Wilson's reputation for probity.

- FDR ran with three different veeps: John Nance Garner for the first two terms, then Wallace, and finally Truman. My recollection is that Garner, a Texan's Texan, gradually drifted away from the eastern elitist FDR, partly over the New Deal, but mainly over the court-packing plan and then finally over FDR's decision to run for a third term. Wallace was a bit of a crank, and FDR dumped him for the 1944 election for Truman.

- when Ford succeeded Nixon as President, he nominated Nelson Rockefeller to be Veep under the 25th Amendment, but when the election rolled around a couple of years later, he picked Dole as his running mate.

Northern Piper
06-02-2004, 09:26 PM
There's also the case of Ford, although that's not quite the same as the President dumping the Veep for the re-election.

Nixon had two vices because Agnew resigned part-way through their second term because he was facing criminal charges.

633squadron
06-02-2004, 10:39 PM
Keep in mind that "vice president" and "running mate" are not necessarily the same thing. The earlier vice presidents did not run with the president, but ran against the president (and lost).

This is very early presidents. The practice ended after Jefferson left office, but it was doomed from the start. Washington and Adams got along well enough in their two terms. Then Adams was elected with Jefferson as his VP. They represented highly polarized opposites in politics, and fought [i]constantly]/i]. Of course, they'd been fighting since the days of the Declaration of Independence!

Colibri
06-02-2004, 11:45 PM
Nixon had two vices .

Nixon had a lot more vices than that . . .

wevets
06-03-2004, 12:25 AM
Nixon had a lot more vices than that . . .

True enough. :)

My perspective from here in the States is that a lot more than anything currently in the news would be required to make Bush dump Cheney.

Pjen
06-03-2004, 03:06 AM
Given the balance of power, acumen and supporting forces, maybe Cheney would dump Bush :dubious:

Colibri
06-03-2004, 11:11 AM
Given the balance of power, acumen and supporting forces, maybe Cheney would dump Bush :dubious:

Fed-Up Cheney Enters Presidential Race Himself (http://www.theonion.com/news/index.php?issue=4021&n=0&id=3635)

WASHINGTON, DC—As President Bush's public-approval ratings hit an all-time low, Vice-President Dick Cheney announced Monday that he has been "forced" to throw his hat into the ring for the 2004 presidential race.

. . .

"Do I have to do everything around here?" Cheney asked, pausing to gesture angrily around the White House. "I guess I do."

While Cheney has not yet chosen a running mate, he said it "certainly will not be the president."'