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Weirddave
06-13-2004, 11:46 PM
Unfortunately, it's come to this. We have endured a recent onslaught of mice here at the WeirdNorth household. I bought box traps, the kind supposed to catch the mouse for later release, this was a waste of money, they didn't catch a single mouse. I placed snap traps around, and caught a few mice, but lately what we've been cursed with are baby mice. They are small, about the size of a quarter, and they think the snap traps are an E ticket ride. They pull on the bait and the bar snaps over their heads, flipping them and the trap into delightful parabolas. I swear I can hear them yelling "wheeeee!" in their little mice voices as they flip around. I'll be the first to admit that the mice are cute, and all things being equal, I'd much rather catch them and let them go in the field or kill them instantly, but those methods haven't worked, and I can not live in a house with vermen. We moved a shelving unit t'other day and the floor underneith was covered in mice poop. Which brings us to....


Glue traps. I am sure I can catch the mice with these, there are several pathways they run along, I've seen them. The problem is what to do after I catch them. Once, many moons ago, I tried to peel a mouse off of a glue trap for release. It didn't work. What I wound up peeling off of the trap was the top half of a mouse. :eek: Even though I want the mice out of my house, dead if need be, I don't fancy having them stuck to traps in the trashcan for days while they starve to death. This seems unnecessarily cruel. So, once I get the little buggers on the traps, what suggestions can you, the Teeming Millions, give me for humaine disposal of the mice?

Oh, and to put the obvious suggestion to rest, a cat WOULD be the ideal solution, unfortunately Ginger is very allergic to cats, and I don't want her sneezing herself into a miscarrage. I had to send my cats to live in Georgia when we got married. :(

Lissa
06-13-2004, 11:56 PM
I had the same dilema at one point.

You have to kill it. It's the only humane thing to do. Hit it with a hammer, is what I'd suggest-- it's about as quick and painless as possible.

You ought to try the live traps. They work well. I used them, and then set the mice free in the woods.

It's not their fault they're mice. They're just tryin' to earn a living, feed the kids, have a warm place to sleep . . . I kinda feel sorry for them. Rather than kill them, I prefer to evict them.

And no, a cat isn't the perfect solution. Not only can the cat potentially catch parasites or diseases from the mouse, but cats have also been known to torture their prey.

stuyguy
06-14-2004, 12:04 AM
Meet stuyguy, mousekiller.

My apartment building had a recent infestation which I helped cure. My kill score is well in the double digits. All you need is a a plastic grocery bag and bucket or sink filled with a couple of inches of water.

Slip the bag tautly over your hand like a glove. With that hand grasp the mousefilled trap by the edges, avoiding the sticky gluepad. Drop the trap in the drink, mouseside down. Tilt it a bit to release any trapped air. Wait a few minutes for Mickey to give up the ghost. Grasp the trap again with your bag-covered hand. Pull the bag over your hand; the trap will now be inside. Tie the bag closed -- I like to knot the handle flaps -- and dispose.

Done.

stuyguy
06-14-2004, 12:06 AM
Lissa -- a hammer?

I think you need to read my post too. Forget the hammer, okay.

Lissa
06-14-2004, 12:26 AM
Lissa -- a hammer?

I think you need to read my post too. Forget the hammer, okay.

I did.

The hammer was the only thing I could come up with after debating the myriad ways of killing a mouse. Drowning seemed painful, as did suffocation. (Plus, they take too long, and I don't like the idea of the poor thing struggling in vain for its life.) I didn't like the idea of decapitation, since I couldn't ensure that I would instantly kill him with the first blow. Shooting him seemed to be, uh, overkill, and I just couldn't leave the poor thing to starve. I even considered putting him in the freezer, but, though they say hypothermia isn't painful, I imagine that it is to begin with. A hammer blow would be instant, painless death, and if you put him in a bag before you struck, you wouldn't have to worry about any . . . er . . . messes.

I did see where you said that the live trap you had didn't work. There are probably a couple different kinds out there--- I wouldn't give up yet, was all I was saying. I baited mine with peanut butter and dog food. I actually caught two in the same trap one evening.

peri
06-14-2004, 12:29 AM
The way I've dealt with this is to place the trap in a plastic grocery bag and swing it with great force into a wall. No signs of life at all after this. (I've checked. I wanted them to die as quickly as possible.)

SanibelMan
06-14-2004, 12:56 AM
I believe my father said he killed mice in glue traps by putting them in an old sock and slapping them against the kitchen counter until they stopped twitching.

I like stuyguy's suggestion.

norinew
06-14-2004, 09:46 AM
We've had good luck with poison. They eat the poison, and they die. The poison contains a dessicant, so they kinda mummify. IOW, you don't have decomposing mice stinkin' up your house. FWIW, we didn't have any luck with the spring traps, either. I swear, I saw one of the little bastards carrying away the hunk of cheese, and holding up a sign that said "Thanks for the grub"!

If they weren't so destructive, I'd be happy enough to let them stay, but they crap everywhere, and eat everything in sight, so I can't have them around. Come to think of it, I just described little kids. I wonder why I let them stay?

BiblioCat
06-14-2004, 09:58 AM
We had mice in our apartment when I was in college (we were in a high-rise building). Maintenance brought us glue traps, and told us to dump them down the incinerator chute when we caught a mouse. :eek:
I know that doesn't help you much, but that's what we did with 'em.

Uvula Donor
06-14-2004, 10:14 AM
I've killed many a baby mouse with snap traps. They are lighter weight and a little more delicate in their eating habits than adults, which is why they sometimes will clean the bait out of a trap without springing it, but there are additional tweaks you can do to the traps to make them effective.

First of all, forget the nonsense about mice liking cheese. That's probably the least effective bait you can use. What they do like is bird seed, nuts, and especially peanut butter. Peanut butter is the best bait of all for any kind of trap because it's sticky and adheres well to the trigger mechanisms, forcing the mouse to stay put while it works at eating. Get the Victor mousetraps with the copper triggers if you can, not the ones with the big plastic fake cheese triggers. The copper trigger curls around on itself. Work the peanut butter into that curl when you bait the trap, and the mouse will just about stand on top of it trying to lick out all the peanut butter.

The second tweak is to take a pair of needlenose pliers and adjust the little prong on the trigger that holds the catch. Move the prong a little closer to the trigger so it doesn't stick out as far, and the trap will be a LOT more sensitive. Mice that were formerly able to clean out the bait without springing the trap will be caught easily - actually, they're the easiest to catch because they're already conditioned to think of your traps as safe food sources.

When I'm forced to use glue traps, after they've caught a mouse, I fold them over on the mouse, sandwiching the poor little S.O.B., then I step on them to put them out of their misery.

Oh, and catch-and-release is a bad idea. Mice don't stay outside when you let them go. They will always come back.

Dogzilla
06-14-2004, 11:03 AM
And no, a cat isn't the perfect solution. Not only can the cat potentially catch parasites or diseases from the mouse, but cats have also been known to torture their prey.

Not true. My cat caught a rat in the rental I moved out of last year. I told my vet I was concerned about the cat being exposed to bubonic plague. I was kidding, but she politely informed me that realistically, the perfect diet for a cat would be small rodents. They contain all the perfect levels of proteins, vitamins and minerals that healthy cats need to survive! (Aren't I starting to sound like a cat food commercial?) So I disagree with the parasites or diseases part of your post. I think the cat would be a perfect solution if it weren't for the allergies. Now the torture part I won't argue with and can only shrug my shoulders... Cats will be cats, I'm afraid. I think they'd be less likely to torture if we didn't also feed 'em cat food. A hungry cat will hunt to eat. A spoiled well-fed house cat will play with its "caught" food.

As for the OP, I hate the glue traps. I'd rather watch a cat torture a mouse than listen to the bitty squeaks of a mouse starving to death. I once worked in a place with a horrible mouse problem and the solution of preference was glue traps. I'd come into work on Monday to find a couple starving mice under my desk, pleading for freedom. I had to call maintenance to get rid of the traps.

Doesn't anyone use poison anymore? (Now that we've established there's no cats in the OP's house!)

norinew
06-14-2004, 11:27 AM
WeirdDave, there were points during my pregnancy when I was really hard to live with; maybe you can catch the mice in the glue traps, and then let Ginger bitch at them until they kill themselves!

Jenaroph
06-14-2004, 11:29 AM
We've had a good deal of success with these. (http://www.victorpest.com/store/product.asp?dept_id=51&pf_id=M130) (bought at the hardware store, not online.) We found they're more sensitive than the balsa wood/wire traps (we never once had the bait stolen), kill cleanly when properly baited* and are easy to empty. They also close OVER the mouse, so even if it's a teeny one, it's caught. And no, I don't work for the company or anything.


*The instructions suggest you put peanut butter on the ROOF of the trap. Do not do this. The two mice we caught with these instructions were still kicking when we found them and had to be killed. Eeeuuurgh. Put the peanut butter on the bait paddle. Every mouse we caught that way was caught right across the neck.

gluteus biggus
06-14-2004, 11:33 AM
Weirddave, the bottom line, once you've decided to actually kill the critters, is:

Just how humane do you want/hope/pretend to be?

On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being a Jainist vegan who wouldn't dare use mouthwash out of fear of hurting a single bacterium...

Well, I guess you've guessed by now that glue traps score a low "zero".

How would YOU want to die?

S l o w l y ... in agonizing sticky terror? [BITE THE STICKY LEG! BITE THE STICKY FOOT! BITE THE STICKY TAIL!!! BITE BITE BITE!!!!]

Or would you want it quick and painless, and unsuspected, while dining on your favorite snack?

If you say you'd like to meet your end by being played with by some toothy predator, I'm afraid you haven't quite achieved or understood the essence of mouse existence, and you need to meditate a bit more.

Weirddave
06-14-2004, 12:01 PM
Good grief, gluteus biggus, I said in the OP that I'd prefer to catch and release the mice, or, failing that, kill them instantly. Glue traps are cruel, that's kind of the point of this thread. What else do I have to do to achieve zen and the art of mousecide?

lieu
06-14-2004, 12:11 PM
Hit it with a hammer, is what I'd suggest-- it's about as quick and painless as possible.Yes, but at least send Mickey out in style. First, rent a large stage and charge admission. Then dress up in funny clothes and get a great freakin' big, oversized wooden mallet. Have a small table right up front and break the ice by first smashing a few watermelons, etc. Then, have everyone coverup in plastic sheeting, set the little mouse up on the table, raise the mallet high and... Whammo!

Mtgman
06-14-2004, 12:14 PM
Slip the bag tautly over your hand like a glove. With that hand grasp the mousefilled trap by the edges, avoiding the sticky gluepad. Drop the trap in the drink, mouseside down. Tilt it a bit to release any trapped air. Wait a few minutes for Mickey to give up the ghost. Grasp the trap again with your bag-covered hand. Pull the bag over your hand; the trap will now be inside. Tie the bag closed -- I like to knot the handle flaps -- and dispose.

Done.While I think this is a fine, and certainly one of the easiest methods, it does seem a bit less humane than the OP is looking for. I'd recommend a little sleep chamber. Collect your glue traps, take them to the garage or driveway, place a box over them and pipe(with a garden hose or something similar) the exhaust from a car into the box. Cutting a small hole in the box and placing it right next to the tailpipe should work as well. The exhaust fumes will kill the mice. Wait a bit and then dispose. Not quite as humane as the drugs used in shelters to euthanize dogs and such, but since you probably don't want to purchase those drugs and then inject each individual mouse with them this is probably a more viable option.

Enjoy,
Steven

Phèdre nó Delaunay
06-14-2004, 12:31 PM
This really won't be helpful to you, but what I did the one and only time I used a glue trap was to scrap the little guy off the glue and into an old hamster cage I had. I kept him all winter and then released him outside in the spring.

Phèdre nó Delaunay
06-14-2004, 12:33 PM
That should be SCRAPE not scrap.

Mister Rik
06-14-2004, 01:09 PM
Glue traps have to be about the most vile method of mousecatching I've ever seen. The former kitchen manager at the homeless shelter I cooked in set some of those things out. I came in the next day and found, in most of the traps, two mice, screaming in pain and terror and eating each other alive. Yuck.

Poison works very well, but with cats around it should be avoided. I've already seen one cat who got so sick from eating poisoned mice that she had to be put to sleep. Granted, she was already a very old cat, but still...

I've personally had very good luck with the Victor fake-yellow-cheese-trigger snap traps. The mice in the shelter were always able to lick all the peanut butter off the copper-trigger traps without springing them. But because you don't bait the yellow-trigger traps (the plastic is scented), the mice have to actually chew on the trigger. That will set it off almost every time.

gluteus biggus
06-14-2004, 01:16 PM
Good grief, gluteus biggus, I said in the OP that I'd prefer to catch and release the mice, or, failing that, kill them instantly. Glue traps are cruel, that's kind of the point of this thread. What else do I have to do to achieve zen and the art of mousecide?

OK, then...

Sorry for the trauma ride!

Get yourself a ferret. From what my brother-in-law (my ferret-loving niece's father) tells me, the musk alone will keep the mouses away.

My niece got her ferret for free from the local animal shelter.

You can pretend you're a medieval rat-catcher. (The ferrets did all the work then, too!)

Option three: Put lots of hamster wheels around your place. If the mice are as lazy as people are, they'll avoid your house just like you avoid the gym.

gluteus biggus
06-14-2004, 01:24 PM
Oh, yeah...

... what Phase42 said.

Since I've been here in Japan, I've had two cats turn up dead from secondary poisoning. As unluck would have it, they were both special favorites of mine...

[SOB!]

So, if you've got to use poison, please do some research, and then use only poison that won't kill twice.

There are innocent cats and dogs and birds out there that don't deserve to die like vermin.

Mister Rik
06-14-2004, 01:30 PM
Get yourself a ferret.
There's a fellow at the homeless shelter who lived years ago at the old shelter (the old building that was the shelter before the current one was built.) He said that place was infested with rats - until he went and bought a pair of ferrets. The Director of the mission at the time didn't like the ferrets when he saw them. But the next day, when he saw the pile of dead rats, courtesy of the ferrets, he decided to let them stay ;)

World Eater
06-14-2004, 02:02 PM
Lieu, good one. :D

Eve
06-14-2004, 02:06 PM
This company (http://home.nc.rr.com/tuco/looney/acme/acme.html) offers a lot of products to rid you of meeces. I recommend the Do-It-Yourself Tornado Kit, the Giant Rubber Band or the Strait-Jacket Ejecting Bazooka.

Palikia
06-14-2004, 02:27 PM
If you’re really interested in catch and release, then after you have caught your rodent with your glue trap, take it outside and spray it with WD-40. That releases the glue. Of course, the WD-40 is probably fatal to the mouse, but at lease you don’t have to do any of that nasty whacking or drowning.

Kalhoun
06-14-2004, 02:41 PM
I don't get off on killing the little fuckers, but hey... they're rodents and I'm not going to lose sleep if they have an icky death. My cats aren't exactly "all about the lethal injection" when they get ahold of the furry little critters, if you know what I mean. That's my chosen method of mouse destruction. It ain't pretty, but it works. But under the circumstances, drowning is my next favorite.

Another option would be to put them in a pillow case, tie it to the exhause pipe of the car, and gas 'em to death.

hapaXL
06-14-2004, 02:49 PM
I guess I'm just cruel and sadistic cause I don't really have the time to hook up our mice to homemade drowning pools and gas chambers.

I check our traps often, usually daily. When a mouse is caught by the glue, I wrap them in a plastic bag, find the skull and take care of business with a hammer. I hate doing it, but it's instantaneous and much better than letting them starve to death.

The Asbestos Mango
06-14-2004, 03:22 PM
I'm mostly a fan of the spring traps, and have even caught baby mice in them. They are usually quick and painless. Well, except for the one time that I heard "Snap! Squeak, squeak, squeak..." The thing had got the mouse mid-spine. Feeling absolutely wretched, I used the, erm, hammer method. Thsi is the one and only time a mouse failed to die instantly in one of my snap-traps, though..,

I tried a glue trap once. Found myself faced with a live, squirming, stuck mouse which I couldn't get out of the glue without causing it a messy and painful demise. I hit upon the brilliant idea of using nail polish remover to get the mouse out of the glue so I could set it free. I set it free, alright. Fortunately, the mouse didkn't seem to suffer, but I never used a glue trap again and never will.

Zsofia
06-14-2004, 03:33 PM
I know you said there's an allergy problem with cats, but does the same hold true for dogs? Because terriers are fantastic rodent-killers and they don't play with live vermin, they just shake them to break their necks. (Might toss them around a bit afterwards, but they don't do that cat thing, in my experience.)

When I was a kid and we had to tear up the floor of our guest bedroom for whatever reason, we had a serious mouse problem for the first time ever. Our West Highland White Terrier would wait patiently at the kitchen doorway when we went to bed, and the next morning there would be a little row of mousie corpses. Complete with head, for you cat people out there. There was a bad moment for my mom that I remember like it happened yesterday - one morning she was cooking breakfast and a little gray streak ran between her feet towards the cabinets, followed by a much larger white streak. The dog caught the mouse, but it didn't do much for my mother's nerves or balance. :)

Plus, you'll need a dog when the baby starts eating solid food.

GingerOfTheNorth
06-14-2004, 03:43 PM
OK, then...

Sorry for the trauma ride!

Get yourself a ferret. From what my brother-in-law (my ferret-loving niece's father) tells me, the musk alone will keep the mouses away.

My niece got her ferret for free from the local animal shelter.

You can pretend you're a medieval rat-catcher. (The ferrets did all the work then, too!)

Option three: Put lots of hamster wheels around your place. If the mice are as lazy as people are, they'll avoid your house just like you avoid the gym.
I am allergic to ferrets. I am allergic to 90% of mammals. If I weren't, we would have a cat, and this would not be an issue at all.

GingerOfTheNorth
06-14-2004, 03:55 PM
I am allergic to ferrets. I am allergic to 90% of mammals. If I weren't, we would have a cat, and this would not be an issue at all.
I also forgot to mention that we can not have pets in this house. We rent, it's a condition of the lease.

Weirddave
06-14-2004, 04:09 PM
I also forgot to mention that we can not have pets in this house.
Except, aparently, for mice.

SSgtBaloo
06-14-2004, 06:14 PM
Amateurs!

Weirddave, just go to your local auto supply and get a can of diesel engine cold-start spray (ether). IN A WELL, VENTILATED PLACE, place a small cloth over the mouse in question. Hose it down with the ether (Make it wet). Wait a bit. Do it again.*

Mousey will quickly lose consciousness, then stop breathing, then die in his sleep. You can then pitch the little @#$% in the trash with a clean conscience.

--SSgtBaloo

*To be extra certain little mousie won't wakey-wakey, raise the cloth and check. If he isn't conscious, replace the cloth, place your heel on the little bastard, and grind his life out like a used cigarette.

SSgtBaloo
06-14-2004, 06:25 PM
(Er... that should be WELL-VENTILATED.)

Scopata Fuori
06-14-2004, 07:04 PM
May I refer you to the Words of the Master, in the ancient art of rodenticide:

http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a1_019.html

The Asbestos Mango
06-14-2004, 10:12 PM
I also forgot to mention that we can not have pets in this house. We rent, it's a condition of the lease.
Hmm, let's see if we can find a way 'round this.

OK, got it. Most apartments/houses with no pets rules are thinking in terms of four legged furry creatures. They generally do allow tenants to have birds.


So, what you do is this. You get a bird. Of prey. Say a kestral or one of the smaller species of owl. Owl is probably best, you can just let him out of his cage at night and pick up the pellets in the morning.

AncientHumanoid
06-14-2004, 10:26 PM
Sammich!



;j

Uvula Donor
06-14-2004, 10:31 PM
Sammich!
I hate the way they stick to the roof of my mouth, though.


Weirddave, just go to your local auto supply and get a can of diesel engine cold-start spray (ether). IN A WELL, VENTILATED PLACE, place a small cloth over the mouse in question. Hose it down with the ether (Make it wet).
Hey, Sarge, gotta light?

SSgtBaloo
06-15-2004, 02:31 AM
Hey, Sarge, gotta light?

*Foosh!*

Uvula Donor
06-15-2004, 06:53 AM
Damn, I lose more eyebrows that way...

35340
06-15-2004, 07:43 AM
When I was a kid and we had to tear up the floor of our guest bedroom for whatever reason, we had a serious mouse problem for the first time ever. Our West Highland White Terrier would wait patiently at the kitchen doorway when we went to bed, and the next morning there would be a little row of mousie corpses. Complete with head, for you cat people out there. There was a bad moment for my mom that I remember like it happened yesterday - one morning she was cooking breakfast and a little gray streak ran between her feet towards the cabinets, followed by a much larger white streak. The dog caught the mouse, but it didn't do much for my mother's nerves or balance. :)

Plus, you'll need a dog when the baby starts eating solid food.\

Go Westies Go Westies Go! Yup, our Westies kept the yard free from Vermin, mice, rats, lizards, possums .... the vermin larn real quick and those who don't, well, die.

But well trained, they are fabulous with kids, too ... we've had him 'bite' kids not allowed in the yard (they were retiriveing a football they'd thrown in the yard by accident after running out of beer cans to throw at the dog) without breaking the skin, pick up kittens and bring them home, and break large bones in half with their powerful jaws.

If you can't get a cat mouser, a dog mouser works well, too. :)

Unfortuneatly with the glue traps I'd have to go with the hammer method, too. I've wracke dmy brains and can't think of any othe option. But try all the live traps first.

bobkitty
06-15-2004, 07:54 AM
Vegetable oil gets mice off glue traps. Pick up trap, place in (empty) trash bucket, pour oil directly onto mouse, wait 30 seconds while mouse frees itself, dump contents of bucket outside **well away from the house**. You wind up with mice that look like members of Sha Na Na for a little while until they can get themselves clean (we had to keep a couple in an aquarium until they were dry when it was especially cold), but it's non-toxic and non-lethal.

GingerOfTheNorth
06-15-2004, 07:59 AM
Hmm, let's see if we can find a way 'round this.

OK, got it. Most apartments/houses with no pets rules are thinking in terms of four legged furry creatures. They generally do allow tenants to have birds.


So, what you do is this. You get a bird. Of prey. Say a kestral or one of the smaller species of owl. Owl is probably best, you can just let him out of his cage at night and pick up the pellets in the morning.
Allergic to birds, too.

And Mynn, I am allergic to dogs as well as cats - and ferrets, and almost all other kinds of animals. If I could have a westie, I would - they're adorable, and I understand they're good for allergic people. Sadly, a condition of the lease is NO PETS. See above.

35340
06-15-2004, 08:31 AM
I have to say, allergic to birds is a first for me. But I can understand it.

No feather comforters in your home, eh?

BiblioCat
06-15-2004, 09:20 AM
Is there anyway you could borrow a friend's cat for a weekend of mouse-icide, and Ginger could stay somewhere else? At another friend's or even a motel?

dnooman
06-15-2004, 09:33 AM
If the poor guy's already in the glue trap, put it on the groung mouse side down and place a plastic bag over it. This should be done outside. Drop a cinder block on it and you're done, just throw the bag away. He doesn't have to drown, you won't miss (as one might with a hammer) and you can be fairly certain you've accomplished your task. Takes 2 seconds. He wasn't going to come off that trap alive anyways, might as well make it quick.

dropzone
06-15-2004, 10:13 AM
Reminding everybody what bobkitty said, you don't have to kill a mouse in a glue trap! But be sure to have the mouse where you want to release it (near your neighbor's house is good) BEFORE pouring on the vegetable oil because no matter how glued down it starts within a minute it's getting fat at your expense licking off the oil--it's really that fast and effective.

Cub Mistress
06-15-2004, 10:23 AM
I have had to fight mice in various rental housings in my salad days. Poison works well, wafarin dries them up nicely; I never had problems with stinking. For snap traps, I baited with peanut butter or braunschweiger liver sausage spread on a bit of paper towel and tucked into the little curl in the trigger. A jellybean smooshed well into the trigger is good too. The only problem I ever had with traps was once when the trap snapped down onto the back end of the mouse and it squealed and squealed. An emergency late night call to my dad yielded the obvious solution: sweep it out the back door (trap and all) and into the range of our dog who happily got a mousie snack. Now, I make little bait packets of mouse poison using envelopes and toss them into the crawlspace under the house. The mice find them there, eat and die before they ever come into the living area. Neat and untroubling to my conscience.

Traps seem humane to me as they are usually pretty quick. I don't hate mousies, I just don't want them living with me. :eek:

GingerOfTheNorth
06-15-2004, 03:03 PM
I have to say, allergic to birds is a first for me. But I can understand it.

No feather comforters in your home, eh?
None. There is one feather pillow in our house, and it gets nowhere near me.

Is there anyway you could borrow a friend's cat for a weekend of mouse-icide, and Ginger could stay somewhere else? At another friend's or even a motel?
That's a good idea - but then who's going to clean up all of the cat hair and dander all over the house? I can't do it - I can't take anything for my allergies while I'm pregnant.

BiblioCat
06-15-2004, 03:12 PM
Well, I didn't say it was a perfect plan. ;)

The Asbestos Mango
06-15-2004, 07:17 PM
Allergic to birds, too.

And Mynn, I am allergic to dogs as well as cats - and ferrets, and almost all other kinds of animals. If I could have a westie, I would - they're adorable, and I understand they're good for allergic people. Sadly, a condition of the lease is NO PETS. See above.
OK, let's talk reptiles. Maybe turn loose a couple of king snakes in the house? Or maybe a predatory lizard of some kind? A small one, of course, we don't want a big ol' honkin' monitor lizard snaking on baby WeirdNorth when he/she arrives.

Alessan
06-16-2004, 06:52 AM
Try killing the "execution-style" - one bullet, back of the head. It's fast, efficient and painless.

Hard on the floors, though.

Actually, back when we were living in Manhattan, I used to just throw the used glue traps out the window and into the airshaft. We weren't very good tenants.

norinew
06-16-2004, 07:08 AM
Originally posted by The Asbestos Mango
Maybe turn loose a couple of king snakes in the house?
Y'know, back in the day, hubby and I were just starting to date. I still lived with my parents, and he was living with his after the divorce from his first wife. My mother was terrified of any rodent smaller than a rabbit; hubby's father kept snakes as a hobby. Hubby tried to talk my mother into letting him turn a non-poisonous snake loose in our house for a couple of days. After that, he said, the smell of snake would be left, and mice would be afraid to come in. Turns out that if there's one thing my mom was more paranoid about than mice, it was snakes. :(

GingerOfTheNorth
06-16-2004, 07:38 AM
Quite honestly, snakes don't bother me. I just can't have any pets in the house. The landlord isn't even really thrilled about the fishtank we have.

dropzone
06-16-2004, 11:41 AM
I can see his point. If the tank leaks it can murder the floor.

So what you do is get another tank and put a big oscar in it. Float some mouse bait in the middle of it and have a bridge that pivots down leading from the edge of the tank to the bait. Mousie takes the bridge, dips into the water, and you don't have to feed the oscar that day. No disposal problems and no screaming dying mice to haunt your conscience, just the Circle of Life in action.

The Asbestos Mango
06-16-2004, 02:30 PM
Quite honestly, snakes don't bother me. I just can't have any pets in the house. The landlord isn't even really thrilled about the fishtank we have.
That's a bit odd. I know very few "no pets" apartments/rental houses that won't allow caged animals, and a snake, unless it happened to escape ;) would fall into this category. Mostly, they're thinking in terms of dogs and cats which can cause destruction if not well trained, or can do territorial marking things that could result in the expense of new carpet. I've lived in more than one "no pets" apartment that had no problem with people having birds or pet rodents, reptiles, etc.

Perhaps your landlord should seek counselling. Being upset because a tenant has a fish tank is a sign of some very deep rooted psychological problems. Perhaps he has had some kind of trauma involving animals commonly kept in households.

Meanwhile, maybe you should consider a cane toad. They're not terribly atheletic, seem to have no fear of humans (have actually tried to mate with people's boots when they take a stroll 'round the yard) and one could be easily caught and concealed when the landlord comes to call. He'd never have to know it was around.

Anyway, I don't think a critter whose sole purpose in being in your house qualifies as a pet any more than a glue trap does.

The Asbestos Mango
06-16-2004, 02:34 PM
Uh, that last sentence should read "I don't think any critter whose sole purpose for being in your house is to control vermin qualifies as a pet any more than a glue trap does"

Your landlord is a :wally

GingerOfTheNorth
06-16-2004, 03:33 PM
Meanwhile, maybe you should consider a cane toad.
1. They shoot poison.
2. I don't want any animals in the house, whether or not they are allowed by the landlord. No lizards, ferrets, toads, snakes, anything.

We are likely going to have to kill the damned mice ourselves.

Also, thank you to the lurker-lady who didn't want to post, I received your email.