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04-06-1999, 11:08 AM
how does comedy central fit the 1.5 hour saturday night live into one hour? they have to get rid of something.

04-06-1999, 11:10 AM
Eliminating the half-hour of network advertising time (i.e. lame commercials) and very probably some of the lamer or more dated skits? Just a thought.

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04-06-1999, 12:07 PM
It's been a while since I've had Comedy Central but I seem to remember that the musical guests only had one appearence in each show, whereas they had two in the live broadcast. I concur with Olentzero, that some of the lamer skits were exorcized. As an on and off viewer of the live show for almost 25 years I can attest to the questionable quality of the material presented during the last half hour of the show.

04-06-1999, 12:29 PM
If they got rid of the lame skits in last season's shows, each episode would run about 5 minutes

04-06-1999, 12:54 PM
As an on and off viewer of the live show for almost 25 years I can attest to the
questionable quality of the material presented during the last half hour of the show.

"Questionable" is an appropriate word for it. While there's no doubt that the sketches shown during the last half hour of SNL are usually the lamest, they are sometimes the most innovative and funniest. Seems like they put the "safe", obvious stuff (the political humour, the parody of the guest host's TV show, etc.) up front, and the weird, different, out-there stuff towards the end.

The best example I can think of is "Wayne's World". As I recall, "Wayne's World" started out as a quarter-to-one filler sketch. I can just imagine Mike Myers going up to Lorne Michaels, saying, "I'd like to introduce this new character", and Lorne saying, "Yeah, OK, how about we put it on right after the second musical number..." Of course, "Wayne's World" became so popular, they kept moving it up until it was often the opening sketch. (And then it took on a life of it's own in the movies.)

Frankly, I wish SNL would cut back on the Clinton impersonations and the tiresome recurring characters, and put on more weird quarter-to-one type sketches.


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"For what a man had rather were true, he more readily believes" - Francis Bacon

04-06-1999, 02:57 PM
Does anyone find those cheerleader skits funny? You couldn't bury them deep enough in a broadcast. And the studio audience has to stomach them between 5 and 6 p.m. How many guests has Lorne Michaels lost by suggesting they appear with those nimrods? Can you say "death knell"?

04-06-1999, 05:48 PM
{{And the studio audience has to stomach them between 5 and 6 p.m.}}

No, the studio audience has to stomach them between 11:30 pm and 1:00 am. Hence the word "Live" in the title "Saturday Night Live". I agree with you, though. The cheerleeders stopped being funny around 1996.


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"For what a man had rather were true, he more readily believes" - Francis Bacon

04-06-1999, 10:11 PM
{{And the studio audience has to stomach them between 5 and 6 p.m.}}

No, the studio audience has to stomach them between 11:30 pm and 1:00 am. Hence the word "Live" in the title "Saturday Night Live". I agree with you, though. The cheerleeders stopped being funny around 1996.}}}

There's an audience for the dress rehearsal, as a last-minute pre-screening.
Lorne Michaels once said in an interview, "If it goes well in dress, it often bombs live."

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Remember, I'm pulling for you; we're all in this together.
---Red Green

04-06-1999, 10:37 PM
What is up with the Goat Boy sketches? Those are even less funny than the Spartan cheerleaders. :P

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04-06-1999, 10:45 PM
I will always sit still and laugh at a fresh SNL. To me, who was young but cognisant in the Belushi/Radner days, SNL represented being "bad", rebellious, staying up past your bedtime. For me it still does. Living on the East coast I get an extra thrill that I maybe just might hear something outlandish go forth ("shit" etc)... something that will be excised from the West Coast transmission. Live TV is a highwire act and like it or not SNL is an American institution.
Nowadays, the "Cheerleaders" have their moments. "Goth Talk" is an absolute freakin' riot and makes me howl (did you see Jeff Goldblum as 'Count Feedback'?). The NPR ladies are less so but are still amusing. The grody Catholic school girl has lost her luster but there's a cunning there which appeals. My current favorite is that absurd Antonio Banderas impersonation from "The - how do you say? - Show". And those whacked out mariachis: "Oh No!! Please!! Is too sexy ..." LOL

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04-06-1999, 10:46 PM
The all-time least funny series of sketches was the "You lika da sauce, eh?" gyro shop skits. The sad thing was that one of the most talented casts the show ever had were wasted on them.

04-06-1999, 11:18 PM
The true mark of quality/desperation in any given ers of SNL is what sketches they choose to feature as recurring. I don't know if it's a function of the quality of writing, the quality of the ensemble, or the quality of editorial oversight, but the "good" eras are marked by generally wise choices of recurring characters, while the "poor" eras continuously feature characters who sure didn't seem funny the first time, let alone the 20th.

I mean, c'mon, was anyone in America amused by Jackie Rogers Jr?? The Cheerleaders at their funniest aren't as good as the worst Wayne's World. Did anyone outside of NYC care about Billy Crystal's "Joe Franklin Show"? Lisa Lupner vs. Goatboy. The death knell of the last great era was when they kept trotting out "It's Pat" again and again and again.

So is it that the writers are so desperately out of ideas that every week they throw up their hands and say, "I dunno, let's do the cheerleaders again?" Are people afraid to go to Lorne and say, "Uh...sir...those idiots from the Roxbury aren't 1/1000000000 as amusing as the 2 wild and crazy guys"? Only time will tell.

04-07-1999, 12:14 AM
What is up with the Goat Boy sketches?

One of the Goat Boy sketches, back when they were done, was actually amusing. It was the one with someone doing an imitation of David Lee Roth, although I can't remember who. And Pamela Lee was playing Jenny McCarthy. I was rolling on the floor at one point.



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--elm

I'm trying to see things from your point of view, but I can't get my head that far up my ass.

04-07-1999, 12:17 AM
Oh, and TV Funhouse is almost always hilarious. And yes, Goth Talk is a riot, especially since I live on a college campus and see people like that walking the streets all the time...at least, as long as it's not daylight out.

04-07-1999, 01:05 AM
SNL is a corpse waiting to die.
It's never been the same since Belushi died.

It doesn't even have the "Wayne's World" guys anymore. Come on! That show has lost everyone that made it funny a decade ago. They should admit that the well has dried up and end SNL.

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"I had a feeling that in Hell there would be mushrooms." -The Secret of Monkey Island

04-07-1999, 01:20 AM
I'll agree with you, Mark, that the last half hour is the most improvisational and surreal (not always a good thing) but even you have to admit that you have to dig through a lot of crap in those collective half-hours to find the rare gem.

04-07-1999, 08:15 AM
Its time slot is secure. Ratingswise? Well it is on in the middle of a party night, but remember when Howard Stern's show came out and he bragged it was the end of SNL? He got his head handed to him. MadTV, same story, just not as bloody.
I'd say it's alive and well; furthermore, Belushi was never (as the kids might say) "all that". (Joe Piscopo WAS a load.)
Just look at it this way - if you didn't ultimately care about it, you wouldn't criticize its ups and downs.

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04-07-1999, 09:11 AM
I definitely think the problem is with the writing, because the cast seems at least reasonably talented. The only thing on SNL these days that I find really laugh-out-loud funny is "The Ladies Man" with Tim Meadows. And the cartoons are always great - especially "Fun with Reel Audio" and "The Ambiguously Gay Duo".

04-07-1999, 12:32 PM
The main problem with those really bad recurring skits lies with how the show is developed. Monday the guest star arrives and gets to know the cast. Then the cast and writers brainstorm and write for the next two days. Thursday finds them reviewing -- Lorne, censors, sponsors and the network all take a shot at the proposed script. Blocking and rehearsals wrap up the week.
As you can see, a skit would have to be canned pretty early in the week in order for a brand-new idea to be developed to replace it. The director and writers probably try to repair problems instead of returning to the drawing board.
Per my earlier post regarding the time of the show, I thought they went "live-to-tape" at 5 pm -- like Leno and Letterman. I think I got that from Belushi's bio "Wired".

04-07-1999, 08:54 PM
I said this on the old board, but I'll say it again. I think to truly appreciate SNL, one has to be between 15 and 23, with a tendency to be high or drunk on Saturday night.
What is wrong with this board? The reply page is taking forever to load.

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Remember, I'm pulling for you; we're all in this together.
---Red Green

04-07-1999, 09:34 PM
UBB 5.+ is one of the lamer forum progs, that's why.
As far as your assigned demographic goes I am well over 23 and generally cold sober on Satuday nights, and I enjoy SNL immensely.

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04-07-1999, 09:53 PM
The original SNL was the funniest show on TV, ever.
Peace
mangeorge

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"If you tell the truth you don't have to remember anything" Mark Twain 1894

04-09-1999, 05:22 PM
Back to the original topic, I've seen some SNL's on Comedy Central where they have shown both performances of the musical guest. I've seen shows where the first skit with the "Live from New York, it's Saturday Night!" has been cut out. As far as I can tell, about the only that's safe in the shows is the host's monologue. Everything else is subject to the preferences of the Comedy Central editors.

04-10-1999, 02:14 PM
Thanks for the answer. Now I have another question. What ever happened to Joe Piscopo? I thought he was pretty funny on SNL but never heard anything about him after he left.

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04-10-1999, 03:17 PM
[[ What ever happened to Joe Piscopo? I thought he was pretty funny on SNL but never heard anything about him after he left.]]

"A maturing Joe Piscopo taught us how to laugh ... "


He's probably a bouncer or a mob enforcer somewhere, after all the steroids he seems to have pumped into himself.

04-10-1999, 03:46 PM
<< [[ What ever happened to Joe Piscopo? I thought he was pretty funny on SNL but never heard anything about him after he left.]]
"A maturing Joe Piscopo taught us how to laugh ... "


He's probably a bouncer or a mob enforcer somewhere, after all the steroids he seems to have pumped into himself. >>

The IMDb (www.imdb.com) has the 1996 movie Open Season as his most recent work.

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"If there are two or more ways of doing something, and one of them can lead to catastrophe, then someone will do it."
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04-11-1999, 12:40 PM
Suprised no one has mentioned FNL-Friday Night Live.

04-11-1999, 02:28 PM
Joe Piscopo also provided the voice of a claymation Frank Sinatra in a recent iced tea commercial.

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07-06-1999, 08:14 PM
Rasputin
Member posted 04-09-99 04:22 PM
Back to the original topic, I've seen some SNL's on Comedy Central where they have shown both performances of the musical guest. I've seen shows where the first skit with the "Live from New York, it's Saturday Night!" has been cut out. As far as I can tell, about the only that's safe in the shows is the host's monologue. Everything else is subject to the preferences of the Comedy Central editors.

I just saw one of the Comedy Central shows today. Chevy Chase hosted and they cut out his monologue. I guess then that nothing is safe.

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further enraged... that he beat his fist down upon the table even harder and
hurt his hand some more." -- Joseph Heller's Catch-22

07-06-1999, 11:45 PM
Take away what you will, but don't you dare cut anything with Matt (Live in a VAN DOWN BY THE RIVER) Foley.
Also, I was quite bummed when Harry Carey bought the farm, because no longer would I see Science Talk with Will Ferrell as bag o/ nerves Harry Carey.

*Join us next week when our guest will be Albert Einstein. Oh! I've just been informed that Mr. Einstein's been dead for over forty years! That's ok, we'll try to get him any"

07-08-1999, 03:21 PM
jcamacho66 mentioned the "Friday" show. It was a blatant rip-off of SNL but it did have some funny stuff. Most notably Michael Richards as the psycho little kid with the mushroom cloud on his T-shirt and as "Dick" the lounge lizard. I believe Larry David, the main writer for "Sienfeld" was also on that show.

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07-08-1999, 07:53 PM
Wasn't "Kramer" on that Friday show too?

You guys sure don't have much to look forward to on SNL.Back in the early days I had a 12 inch black and white TV and it was still worth watching. We had no VCRs.So you had to do more barhopping fridays to stay home and drink beer saturday, even if it was by yourself.