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monstro
05-30-2005, 06:06 PM
When I lived in NJ, my least favorite tree was the tree-of-heaven (more like tree-of-hell), otherwise known as ailanthus altissima (http://www.washacadsci.org/Meadowlark-Gardens/articles/treeofheaven.jpg). Why don't I like the tree? 'Cuz it's ooogly. Yeah, yeah, I know it's the "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" tree, the only one that grows in the ghetto, but that don't mean it can't be ugly and ridiculous! Those orangish-brown flowers. Those crazy alternate leaves. The fact that it freakin' grows all over the place. Sometimes just thinking about them makes me get a sick headache.

Now that I live in south Florida, I've got another arborescent enemy. Her name is Schefflera actinophylla (http://www.eeb.uconn.edu/Courses/EEB271/Apiaceae/Schefflera1.jpg). She's not as bad as that ailanthus, but she's still quite stank-a-dank dank. Big ole whorled droopy leaves, arranged so they look like a monster's hand. I have a giant one right next my balconey, soaking up all the light so my beautiful plants don't get any light. She's staring at me right now through the sliding door, daring me to hack at her with an axe. Argh!

I'm well aware that I'm a tree bigot. I discriminate against trees with lots of big close-together leaves. They simply aren't trustworthy.


But I do like sea grapes.

Campion
05-30-2005, 06:26 PM
I am not prejudiced against any particular class of trees. I suppose class isn't the right word; the science folk will say it's phyllum or hedgehog or something.

But there is a tree that I loathe: it is a eucalyptus tree that borders my property. It has grown to such dimensions that it has buckled the pavement and the fence. It drops its detritus in the rain gutters. But the tree is on the property line, and the neighbor who owns it loves, loves, loves it. And since the city I live in prohibits people from cutting down trees unless said tree is about to murder someone, I must learn to live with it. But I do not like that tree. No, I do not.

fishbicycle
05-30-2005, 06:28 PM
We are renting our house. In the front yard, there is a massive sweet-gum tree. Every spring, it grows new, green, spiky seed pods. Hundreds and hundreds of them. Over the summer, they fall out of the tree, all over my lawn. And they keep dying and falling off, right up through the next spring. I hate that stupid tree. If it were not the only big tree in the front, it'd be going away. Oh well. Just don't walk barefoot in our yard!

Mr. Blue Sky
05-30-2005, 06:29 PM
The Larch.

The. Larch.

tremorviolet
05-30-2005, 06:31 PM
The Larch.

The. Larch.

Dang it, too late again.

jayjay
05-30-2005, 06:31 PM
There is a black walnut tree in our (very small) backyard that I loathe with a loathing of legendary proportions. It shades the entire yard. We can't grow anything but weeds because of a combination of deep shade and the black walnut propensity to exude a chemical that kills other plants. And I can't afford to have it removed just yet.

I tried to kill it by girdling the trunks (it's got a split trunk) last summer. Never slowed it down. It's the tree of the undead!

Cat Whisperer
05-30-2005, 06:37 PM
Poplars. The ones that make the fluff that everyone's allergic to, and the ones that drop the sticky leaf covers every spring - I'm not sure if they're the same tree, but I hate both of them. They run suckers throughout your yard, they go through your foundation to get at water, they block up your pipes - what's not to hate? We bought our house with a big ol' volunteer poplar in the back that was allowed to grow in the wrong place, and now we're in the process of getting rid of it. Buh-bye sticky tree.

monstro
05-30-2005, 06:41 PM
Poplars. The ones that make the fluff that everyone's allergic to, and the ones that drop the sticky leaf covers every spring - I'm not sure if they're the same tree, but I hate both of them. They run suckers throughout your yard, they go through your foundation to get at water, they block up your pipes - what's not to hate? We bought our house with a big ol' volunteer poplar in the back that was allowed to grow in the wrong place, and now we're in the process of getting rid of it. Buh-bye sticky tree.

The first one sounds like cottonwood sounds. They might have sticky leaves--I can't remember. But the leaves are big.

Bangiadore
05-30-2005, 07:09 PM
monstro, the minute I saw the thread title I clicked on it intending to rail about ailanthus. They're dismal, brittle weeds that mature quickly and then drop branches every time there's a high breeze. And that damned sickly-sweet smell. Ugh. It overpowers every other scent for two or three weeks.

In my neighborhood, they're called "ghetto palms" for the frond-like leaf configuration. You can tell which houses are owned by "investors" from the ailanthus growing through the front porch.

FairyChatMom
05-30-2005, 07:19 PM
Paulownia (http://www.paulownia.org/) - I have a huge one right outside my kitchen window, and several other small ones throughout the yard. The seed pods are sticky. Lots of the branches seem to die over the winter, but new ones are put out to replace them.

We're going to cut town the big one, and any of the smaller ones near the house. The ones in the far back part of the yard can grow or die as they wish. I've got one in a pot - not sure if I should plant it or yank it out and let it die. Apparently the previous owner of this house really really loved them.

Bangiadore
05-30-2005, 07:22 PM
jayjay, won't hostas grow in the shade under that tree? They're incredibly hardy and thrive in the dark conditions under the vast old maple in my backyard, and the variegated ones really look good with their white rims, 'n'all. Another plant that might be able to withstand the walnut's chemicals is sweet woodruff, which looks great with hosta, spreads rapidly, and has the side-benefit of smelling wonderful when dried.

I've been told by sailor friends that there's an old superstition that black walnut must never be used in building a wooden boat; in fact it shouldn't be aboard at all, in any form. Apparently no good can come of it.

It's quite nice for furniture, though.

Mirror Image egamI rorriM
05-30-2005, 07:36 PM
Mulberry. The berries, oh god, the berries. Too tart and seedy to eat, but the birds love them and then poop purple all spring everywhere. And they stain the sidewalks and your feet, if you walk on them barefoot. We had a big one in our backyard, but all its branches broke off in an ice storm a few years ago.

Kilvert's Pagan
05-30-2005, 07:41 PM
We don't like our black walnuts either - we have 5 of them. They drop twigs and nuts all over the place. We probably fill 6 wheelbarrows with the nuts each fall. I'm told that you can get some sawmills to pay you to take it down because the wood can be quite valuable. But I have yet to test that theory.

Jeep's Phoenix
05-30-2005, 08:10 PM
Mulberry. The berries, oh god, the berries. Too tart and seedy to eat, but the birds love them and then poop purple all spring everywhere. And they stain the sidewalks and your feet, if you walk on them barefoot. We had a big one in our backyard, but all its branches broke off in an ice storm a few years ago.
And the stupid little berries get lodged in the treads of your shoes, so when you walk inside your nice beige carpet is quickly covered in purple splotches.

Some birds react poorly with mulberries; they'll gorge themselves, and instead of producing little purple pats of poop, they produce huge amounts of purple liquid nastiness that's almost impossible to clean off of glass once it's had a chance to dry.

chique
05-30-2005, 08:37 PM
The first one sounds like cottonwood sounds. They might have sticky leaves--I can't remember. But the leaves are big.Yeah, they're related. Cottonwoods, poplars, and aspens all have "real" names that start with populus.

SnakesCatLady
05-30-2005, 08:48 PM
Magnolias. The brief season of beautiful flowers and heavenly scent does not make up for the fact that the darn things shed leaves all year long - and it's hard to get anything to grow under them. The roots grow so close to the surface there's no soil for other plants.

Thank goodness I left those behind when I moved.

Mangetout
05-30-2005, 09:19 PM
Sorry to plump for the obvious, but I think it would have to be the Leyland Cypress (Cupressocyparis leylandii) - as a specimen tree in a large arboretum, I've got nothing against it; as a forest confier, it's magnificent. As a 'fast-growing' hedge in a small English suburban garden, it's the most obnoxious and stupid choice possible.
There's a reason why it will quickly become a full-sized hedge - and that reason is that it intends to go right on growing, upwards and outwards at a phenomenal rate, until - in a few short years - both you and the unfortunate neighbour on whose boundary you planted them have neither light nor space in what used to be your small English suburban gardens.

Zsofia
05-30-2005, 09:23 PM
I hate how people screw up their magnolias! They trim their lower branches and then bitch about how they can't grow anything under them - you're not supposed to! The magnolia's supposed to go all the way down and then you'd never see the leaves, duh.

Wile E
05-30-2005, 09:26 PM
The bane of my existence is the Punk Tree (http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/mequ1.htm). It's name says volumes about it. Sure it looks pretty but it smells like rotten boiled potatoes and it is extremely allergenic (I am very allergic to it). It's also one of those invader plants that has taken over and has become almost impossible to get rid of.

Queen Bruin
05-30-2005, 09:34 PM
I loathe Siberian Elm trees. Unfortunately they're about the most popular tree out here as they could probably grow on Mars unassisted, but I hate them. Damn roots screw up the plumbing, and in the early spring they drop thousands and thousands of their damn pods.

Then I spend all spring and summer digging up their filthy, hardy progeny. That and they're ugly and the people out here don't know how to prune for shit. Usually people just cut them right off at the top and let the buggers poof out, turning the ugly into the truly horrific. Did I mention they are resistant to Dutch Elm disease? Unfortunately though they're all I have as far as shade goes.

LifeOnWry
05-30-2005, 09:50 PM
Yeah, they're related. Cottonwoods, poplars, and aspens all have "real" names that start with populus.

Count me in as a cottonwood-hater. Our neighbors (delightful people otherwise) have five of them on their property. We have a swimming pool. I spend a good portion of my summer scooping the equivalent of a sweatsock on fluff out of my pool filters.

I don't like snow in winter, and I sure as HECK don't want more of it in the spring and summer!

Rayne Man
05-31-2005, 02:28 AM
Good news Mangetout . From June 1 a new law comes into force to try and control the Leyland Cypress and its ilk. If you neighbour objects you will be limited to keeping the Cyprus hedge below 2 metres. And you will have to pay to get the things down to this size.

Details here :-

High hedge law (http://news.scotsman.com/latest.cfm?id=4625641)

monstro
05-31-2005, 09:31 AM
The bane of my existence is the Punk Tree (http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/mequ1.htm). It's name says volumes about it. Sure it looks pretty but it smells like rotten boiled potatoes and it is extremely allergenic (I am very allergic to it). It's also one of those invader plants that has taken over and has become almost impossible to get rid of.

Argh. Meluluca. They were intentionally planted down here to dry out areas for development. Someone once told me that people would sprinkle the seeds out of salt-and-pepper shakers from airplanes. That sounds silly, but I wouldn't put it pass the government to do something like that.

And now whenever lightening strikes, the meluluca catches on fire like crazy.

Punk tree indeed.

missbunny
05-31-2005, 09:42 AM
I hate the Norway Maple. It has the root system of the devil. They will travel far and wide to spread their evil.

I also hate those trees that smell like sperm. They're not bad looking but they reek.

Dorjän
05-31-2005, 10:11 AM
ailanthus altissima is a tree?? In all of my growing up in the 'hood days, I thought it was just an overgrown weed.

NurseCarmen
05-31-2005, 11:12 AM
The invasive non-native buckthorn (http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/rhca1.htm) (Rhamnus cathartica). Damn things just keep coming back, no matter how many I cut down each year, I find more the next.

Fuck you buckthorn. Fuck. You.

Chefguy
05-31-2005, 11:24 AM
Another cottonwood hater. The bark is interesting, but the things are like goddamn weeds, choking out other growth and creating summer snowstorms.

Cat Whisperer
05-31-2005, 11:38 AM
Ah, doing a little more research, I see that the female of the poplars are the ones that make the fluff. We must have a male one in our yard, because it was producing sticky little yellow things that got stuck on everything and tracked into the house, not the drifts of "cotton" that the females produce. But I still hate both of them.

Archergal
05-31-2005, 12:37 PM
Bradford Pear. (http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/Graphics/pear/bpear.htm)

They look nice when they bloom in the spring, but they're not sturdy. After a few years, their branches break off, sometimes splitting the tree in half. They're the bane of houseowners in my neighborhood.

Captain Amazing
05-31-2005, 12:50 PM
The tamarac. Which, apparently is just another name for the larch. So, I'm another larch hater.

minor7flat5
05-31-2005, 01:00 PM
We are renting our house. In the front yard, there is a massive sweet-gum tree. Every spring, it grows new, green, spiky seed pods. Hundreds and hundreds of them. Over the summer, they fall out of the tree, all over my lawn. And they keep dying and falling off, right up through the next spring. I hate that stupid tree. If it were not the only big tree in the front, it'd be going away. Oh well. Just don't walk barefoot in our yard!I have one of those in my back yard and I hate those stupid balls. A few years back I was washing down the pool cover after opening the pool, walking on the cover in my bare feet. I managed to stumble into the small bump made by one of those spikey balls through the tarp and it caused my second toe to curl under as I slipped and my entire weight fell upon the curled toe. There was an audible *pop* as the toe broke. All because of that little spikey seed pod. (btw: the doctor simply taped it to the next toe. Not very satisfying).

Corii
05-31-2005, 01:01 PM
Ginkgos - their dropped berries smell like fermented vomit. Ugh.

Archergal
05-31-2005, 01:03 PM
Ginkgos - their dropped berries smell like fermented vomit. Ugh.

But they're so pretty in the fall, when they turn all gold.

Archergal, who never had to live very near a ginkgo.

Corii
05-31-2005, 01:05 PM
I should clarify, only the FEMALE ginkgo tree drops those nasty, stinky, slimy fruits. The male tree is okay by me.

Largo62
05-31-2005, 02:04 PM
Joshua trees. Even the ones that are supposed to look pretty (http://www.joshua.tree.national-park.com/) look ugly to me. They look like Chewbaka with multiple heads. Butt ugly! They are one of the "features" of the high desert that made me long to leave there. And they are protected. You can't cut one down even if it's on your own property. Any other tree okay, but the Joshua's must be left with their ugly shapes and bearded limbs wherever some perverse god spread them.

Shagnasty
05-31-2005, 02:11 PM
Oh! Very on topic for me. I hate this giant oak tree that fell onto my house last Wednesday night at 11:30 pm (http://maverickpace.com/v-web/gallery/album21/P1010113). It could have easily killed my daughter if the shattered remains of the chimney didn't stop it. $100,000+ worth of damage later, we now have to rebuild a sizable part of our house over the next few months. I am now going to become like the anti-Johnny Appleseed. My trademark will be a chainsaw.

lieu
05-31-2005, 02:18 PM
Mimosas. Their horrid shade of pink is appropriate only on a hooker's feather boa.

pravnik
05-31-2005, 02:31 PM
Not to one-up or nuffin', but these minor irritations are but a drop in the bucket comapred to the histamine hell that the scrubby, omnipresent Texas cedar tree and its vile, loathesome pollen spore put me through each spring. Imagine being deathly allergic to cats and then attending a cat zoo in the middle of a ten thousand acre cat preserve with severe overcrowding problems, all while wearing a garment made entirely of live cats.

I actually kinda like the trees themselves; they're pretty in a gnarled sort of way, but I wish they'd just reproduce like normal people.

pravnik
05-31-2005, 02:35 PM
Not to one-up or nuffin', but these minor irritations are but a drop in the bucket...Er...'cept for that one tree that smashes up houses and nearly kills family members and such. :eek: :D

Ashes, Ashes
05-31-2005, 03:01 PM
I hate palm trees. Especially those damned super tall skinny ones. Around here at least, they're ugly, just a scraggy pole with limp hairy fronds that drop all year, some have disgusting useless berries. They harbor pigeons, rats, and roaches, crack concrete, catch fire and give no shade worth mentioning. Removal is a nightmare and volunteers are forever volunteering exactly where they shouldn't. Damned palm trees, tropical splendor my ass.

Indian laurel trees aren't my favorite tree either. Mainly because they're just green. Boring bunches of leaves, never turn color and then they drop little yellow fruits for variety. Year after year as they get bigger and bigger, boring trees..

Shayna
05-31-2005, 03:37 PM
Magnolias. The brief season of beautiful flowers and heavenly scent does not make up for the fact that the darn things shed leaves all year long - and it's hard to get anything to grow under them. The roots grow so close to the surface there's no soil for other plants.

Thank goodness I left those behind when I moved.
OMG, I opened this thread to post this very thing. I LOATHE magnolia trees now that I have a gigantic one littering up my entire front "yard", walkway, porch, street & driveway. It's a nightmare. Those blasted leaves literally blanket everything on a daily basis. There is no amount of sweeping and raking that will keep your yard/walkway looking halfway decent for any period of time longer than a nanosecond. And the blasted leaves get tangled up inside every other shrub, tree and flower anywhere in its vicinity, some of which are actually dangerous to stick your hand in to pick them out (like the huge pampas grasses with razor-sharp leaves that will shred your arms if you stick them in there without long sleeves and gloves, and some of the small, thorny palm trees we have). And they don't just drop leaves, but those damn bulb thingies (http://160.114.99.91/astrojan/flowers/4/magno.jpg), too, which are extemely dangerous to accidentally step on, as they roll under your feet and cause you to lose your balance.

And there's not a damn thing we can do about this monstrosity because it's on that strip of city property between the sidewalk and the curb, not to mention that it's an "historic" tree, so it can't be touched.

Hate, HATE, HATE that freaking tree!
http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/forums/showthread.php?t=7144

"...at ground level, a wide tarn of black shade, and a summer long litter of big leaves in ones and twos over a long period. To my mind this handsome tree has little place in home gardening." - G. Schenk, The Complete Shade Gardener (Houghton Mifflin) Truer words were never spoken.

monstro
05-31-2005, 04:27 PM
I like magnolias because they remind me of my childhood and stuff, but one of my most traumatic childhood injuries occurred at the hands of a magnolia.

I was in nursery school. The playground had a big ole magnolia (I'm thinking it was a southern, but I'm not sure). Anyway, there was always a bunch of dead leaves surrounding it, and in my four-year-old mind, they resembled taco shells. I decided that the sand in the sandbox made for a nice taco filling, so I started making "tacos" for everyone. Harmless enough, right?

Little did I know how leaky my tacos were. Sand on smooth concrete = very slippery. My mother showed up to pick me up and as I ran over to her, I slipped on the sand and fell flat on my FACE. My bottom lip exploded all over everything. I was very unhappy pre-schooler.

It wasn't actually the magnolia's fault, but I still blame it.

Poonther
05-31-2005, 05:49 PM
CRAPPY MYRTLES aka Crepe Myrtles. Every median from Ocala, Florida up to Virginia seems to be lined with these stupid tree shrubs. Oh they are especially beautiful in the winter after they have been hat-rack cut and are nothing but sawed off bare sticks in the cold ground...yeah that's beautiful!

Troy McClure SF
05-31-2005, 05:52 PM
I really hate those long, thin palm tress. They look like mutant Q-Tips. If you've been to the beach of Santa Barbara, you've seen 'em (http://www.igougo.com/photos/journal_photos/palm%20trees.jpg).

I don't mind the ones with less freakish proportions, like on Market on Dolores (http://www.bigfoto.com/sites/galery/san-francisco/san_francisco_71_dolores.jpg) street here in SF.

Cat Whisperer
05-31-2005, 08:29 PM
CRAPPY MYRTLES aka Crepe Myrtles. Every median from Ocala, Florida up to Virginia seems to be lined with these stupid tree shrubs. Oh they are especially beautiful in the winter after they have been hat-rack cut and are nothing but sawed off bare sticks in the cold ground...yeah that's beautiful!
I looked up the Crape Myrtles - do they all drop their bark like this (second picture down)? (http://www.floridata.com/ref/l/lager_i.cfm) Cause that's neither alluring nor tantalizing - that's just gross.

Bear_Nenno
05-31-2005, 09:06 PM
I hate ALL trees! Trees of any type, size, color or shape! I think they are all disgusting and any tree would be better replaced by something steel, glass or concrete.

... I'm not a big fan of grass either.

PapSett
05-31-2005, 09:32 PM
I simply can't believe no one has mentionsed a catalpa tree , AKA as the "cigar tree" , because of it's long seed pods . The things grow like ...... weeds . EVERYWHERE . We cut ours down a couple years ago , and still the seedlings keep popping thier ugly heads up . The trees are home to catalpa caterpillars , which are MAJOR ugly , tho I hear they make good fishing bait ... and the trees are covered in flowers in the spring that I will admit are PRETTY ... while they are on the tree , but once they drop off ,they very qickly rot into a slimy , stinking mass that the dogs track in constantly . Nope ... not a catalpa fan...

Archergal
05-31-2005, 09:51 PM
There is some kind of trash tree that grows around here. It has pointy leaves kinda like a maple, but I don't think that's what it is. It's one of those trees that starts growing up immediately after a patch of ground is cleared, and it's hard as h*** to get rid of. I have several in my yard I've cut back multiple times, and the dratted things keep growing.

I wish I knew what they were. Maybe then I'd have some power over them.

Captain Amazing
06-01-2005, 10:54 AM
Mimosas. Their horrid shade of pink is appropriate only on a hooker's feather boa.
Good drinking, though.

Man With a Cat
06-01-2005, 11:01 AM
[QUOTE=missbunny]I hate the Norway Maple. It has the root system of the devil. They will travel far and wide to spread their evil.QUOTE]

Are these the ones that drop those annoying helicopter seeds ALL OVER THE FUCKING PLACE????

The ones that never sweep up and are so fertile that when they drop in your gutter, they grow. if they drop in the cracks in your driveway, they grow. If they drop, so help me god through a crack in your deck, they grow!!!!!!!!

Hate them.

monstro
06-01-2005, 06:17 PM
I hate the Norway Maple. It has the root system of the devil. They will travel far and wide to spread their evil.

Are these the ones that drop those annoying helicopter seeds ALL OVER THE FUCKING PLACE????

The ones that never sweep up and are so fertile that when they drop in your gutter, they grow. if they drop in the cracks in your driveway, they grow. If they drop, so help me god through a crack in your deck, they grow!!!!!!!!

Hate them.

Norway's kind of look like sugar maples, but they are much more common. Also, Norways produce a milky sap.

Bewildebeest
06-01-2005, 10:01 PM
[QUOTE=missbunny]I hate the Norway Maple. It has the root system of the devil. They will travel far and wide to spread their evil.QUOTE]

Are these the ones that drop those annoying helicopter seeds ALL OVER THE FUCKING PLACE????

The ones that never sweep up and are so fertile that when they drop in your gutter, they grow. if they drop in the cracks in your driveway, they grow. If they drop, so help me god through a crack in your deck, they grow!!!!!!!!

Hate them.

Silver maple is much worse. In addition to all the other bad maple qualities, the wood is brittle and snaps in the least little breeze. When you burn it, it gives off a horrid bitter stench.

Amazon Floozy Goddess
06-01-2005, 10:09 PM
This is one of the worst descriptions ever, but here goes. When I was in gradeschool there was a bus stop in my neighborhood that had a small stand of trees just outside it. I don't know what they were, I don't even remember what they looked like. But when their leaves came out in the spring, they STUNK! Holy crap, did those trees reek. They smelled like...I don't know...something musty. I didn't like them.

kiz
06-01-2005, 11:46 PM
Speaklng of Trees Of Heaven, I thought this (web/vet/cornell.edu/.../plants/PPTRIP2-2004.html) was what Monstro was talking about. We have them in practically every roadside, abandoned lot, etc. around here. When I was little I thought it was poisonous :eek:

Electronic Chaos
06-02-2005, 01:57 AM
Bradford Pear. (http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/Graphics/pear/bpear.htm)

They look nice when they bloom in the spring, but they're not sturdy. After a few years, their branches break off, sometimes splitting the tree in half. They're the bane of houseowners in my neighborhood.

I second that. Almost every lawn in this area has one, and I hate them.

You forgot to mention the fact that when they bloom, they smell like rotting meat.

Katriona
06-02-2005, 12:40 PM
I'm allergic to cotton wood trees, so I've got a bias there!

Other than that, I can't think of any tree I actively dislike. I really can't tell one from another.

Yookeroo
06-02-2005, 02:15 PM
This is one of the worst descriptions ever, but here goes. When I was in gradeschool there was a bus stop in my neighborhood that had a small stand of trees just outside it. I don't know what they were, I don't even remember what they looked like. But when their leaves came out in the spring, they STUNK! Holy crap, did those trees reek. They smelled like...I don't know...something musty. I didn't like them.
Maybe the "Sperm" tree (http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a2_363.html)?

Tentacle Monster
06-02-2005, 02:40 PM
I'll second the mimosa. I think the flowers are pretty, but the tree itself is just a big weed. They love to grow right at the base of a house, and the only way I've found to kill the little ones is with boiling water.

My mom has a chinaberry tree in her yard. It's not an ugly tree, but it heavily sheds chinaberries everywhere. They clogged up the gutter and made bulges in the latex paint on the porch after one of the rare rains in Southern California.

kelly5078
06-02-2005, 04:44 PM
Pin oaks. They hurt, and seem to jump out to get you. Fortunately, they don't appear to exist in Texas. But I remember back in Ohio they were damned near impenetrable.

elfkin477
06-02-2005, 05:03 PM
Poplars. The ones that make the fluff that everyone's allergic to, and the ones that drop the sticky leaf covers every spring - I'm not sure if they're the same tree, but I hate both of them. They run suckers throughout your yard, they go through your foundation to get at water, they block up your pipes - what's not to hate?

You forgot the best part- the damn things have a very short life span (20-40 years, tops), so they're falling down all the time. We lose at least half a dozen every winter. They worry me because I've already had one tree (a massive pine) fall through the roof of a house before, and I'd like to never repeat the experience.

vetbridge
06-02-2005, 05:15 PM
Locust trees.

A mile and a half tall, with seventeen leaves at the very top. Supposed to make good fence posts; feel free to make all the posts you want.

mike1dog
06-02-2005, 08:54 PM
Osage Orange. (http://www.gpnc.org/osage.htm) The tree itself is inoffensive, but it drops those godawful seed pods that are the size of volleyballs. They make it a pain to mow the yard, and the tree is a pain to cut down because the wood is probably the hardest wood out there.

ouryL
06-02-2005, 08:57 PM
Nawa Tree

Oo what a pretty seed pod.

Yikes!! Where the f--k did all those needles come from!! :mad: :(