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Thin Lizzy
07-30-2005, 05:08 AM
I have a bottle of 100% lemon juice that says on the nutrition panel "Not a significant source of...Vitamin C..." WTF?

Patty O'Furniture
07-30-2005, 06:50 AM
I'd like to see that label. What's the brand? Can you take a picture of it?

Walloon
07-30-2005, 07:00 AM
WTF?Calm down.

Eleusis
07-30-2005, 07:15 AM
What's the serving size?

One teaspoon probably isn't very significant, but if you chugged the whole bottle....

WotNot
07-30-2005, 07:32 AM
If itís bottled lemon juice intended for use in cooking, it may be that itís been pasteurised or something that would reduce the vitamin content.

norinew
07-30-2005, 08:30 AM
My guess is along the lines of what Eleusis said; that is, since it's intended for cooking, the quantity you use isn't a significant source of anything except that wonderful tarness.

norinew
07-30-2005, 08:31 AM
:smack: Of course, if you want tarness in your cooking, that's probably a sign of some sort of vitamin deificiency. If you want tartness, otoh, that's a good use of lemon juice.

pulykamell
07-30-2005, 08:33 AM
Considering the serving size is about 1 teaspoon, from all the info I could find online, a fresh lemon contains about 4-5% Vitamin C in one serving, and bottled lemon juice contains about 2% Vitamin C in a single serving.

Duck Duck Goose
07-30-2005, 09:24 AM
Patty, they all say that. I've got a bottle of Kroger brand lemon juice, and that's what it says.

Thin Lizzy, the deal is that the FDA, in their labeling requirements, goes by "serving size". One teaspoon of lemon juice does contain Vitamin C--but the amount of Vitamin C in a single teaspoon of lemon juice is so low that it's officially considered to be "not nutritionally significant", by which the Feds mean it doesn't come anywhere near satisfying a person's minimum daily requirement for Vitamin C. In other words, there's just a smidgen of Vitamin C in each serving of one teaspoon, so the Feds require the manufacturer to spell it out explicitly that their product will not fulfill your daily need for Vitamin C.

Phnord Prephect
07-30-2005, 10:29 AM
Considering the serving size is about 1 teaspoon, from all the info I could find online, a fresh lemon contains about 4-5% Vitamin C in one serving, and bottled lemon juice contains about 2% Vitamin C in a single serving.


Uh... does this imply that I should seriously be eating twenty to twentyfive lemons a day?!

Wow. I may have scurvy. I never eat that much lemon at one sitting. :eek:

norinew
07-30-2005, 11:51 AM
Uh... does this imply that I should seriously be eating twenty to twentyfive lemons a day?!


Only if lemons are your only source of vitamin C. I mean, if you don't consume any other citrus fruits, peppers, tomatoes and the like, I guess you'll be needing some new lemon recipes, huh?

pulykamell
07-30-2005, 11:56 AM
Uh... does this imply that I should seriously be eating twenty to twentyfive lemons a day?!

Wow. I may have scurvy. I never eat that much lemon at one sitting. :eek:

Or you can eat one bell pepper, which, depending on varietal, average at around 150% USRDA Vitamin C per serving (one pepper).

Patty O'Furniture
07-30-2005, 03:52 PM
What's the serving size?

One teaspoon probably isn't very significant, but if you chugged the whole bottle....

About 2.5 mg vitamin C per teaspoon. Assuming 500 mg of vitamin C per liter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemon), and 1 liter ~ 202 teaspoons.

Maybe a better question is why the makers of lemon juice felt it necessary to state that you shouldn't expect to get much C from a serving of lemon juice. Does the label say the same thing about vitamin A?

I wonder why they didn't say that a serving size is a quarter of a cup (let's make lemon chiffon pie!) that way they could say that you'll get half your RDA of vitamin C from their product. Doesn't seem any sneakier than coke tellimg me that a bottle of soda contains two servings so that they can cut all the fat and sugar numbers in half on their nutrition labels.

SmackFu
07-30-2005, 07:23 PM
Here are the relevant FDA labelling guidelines (http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/12feb20041500/edocket.access.gpo.gov/cfr_2004/aprqtr/21cfr101.9.htm):
Alternatively, except as provided for in paragraph (f) of this section, if vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, or iron is present in amounts less than 2 percent of the RDI, label declaration of the nutrient(s) is not required if the statement "Not a significant source of -- (listing the vitamins or minerals omitted)'' is placed at the bottom of the table of nutrient values.Presumably they were listing more than just Vitamin C, otherwise the alternate form would be longer than the normal form.

Duck Duck Goose
07-31-2005, 11:43 AM
Maybe a better question is why the makers of lemon juice felt it necessary to state that you shouldn't expect to get much C from a serving of lemon juice.

What you're missing is that the makers--and the FDA--felt it necessary to state that you shouldn't expect to get much C from a serving of this particular product. You are overlooking the fact that bottled lemon juice is "reconstituted", which means that it's made up of lemon juice that has been cooked down to a concentrate (my bottle of Kroger lemon juice uses concentrate from Argentina and Mexico), and then had water added. Heat destroys Vitamin C, so the heat of cooking and pasteurization will destroy a lot of the Vitamin C in lemon juice. Thus, a teaspoon of RealLemon Reconstituted Lemon Juice is not the same thing, nutritionally, as a teaspoon of lemon juice from a freshly-squeezed lemon, and thus the Feds felt it necessary to inform consumers of this.

Sloozen
05-20-2014, 03:19 PM
It contains 2% per teaspoon. There are 189 servings in my bottle. It does seem like it would be more but a teaspoon is not much.

Sloozen
05-20-2014, 03:20 PM
Makes sense...

Kimballkid
05-20-2014, 03:23 PM
You do realize the question was asked and answered 9 years ago.

Chronos
05-20-2014, 04:37 PM
Similarly, a can of cooking spray can be labeled as "zero Calories", even though it's essentially pure fat.

dstarfire
05-20-2014, 06:29 PM
You do realize zombies don't actually need vitamins, don't you?

Alley Dweller
05-20-2014, 06:44 PM
You do realize zombies don't actually need vitamins, don't you? Cite?

DSeid
05-20-2014, 06:59 PM
Well brains (http://www.news-medical.net/health/Sources-of-Vitamin-C.aspx)do have about 17 mg Vitamin C/100 gm serving (and that's cooked!) A human brain weighs in at 1.5kg leading to almost 3 times daily human RDA in just one brain ... so zombies are probably okay there. :)

Learjeff
05-21-2014, 11:36 AM
:smack: Of course, if you want tarness in your cooking, that's probably a sign of some sort of vitamin deificiency.Do zombies deify vitamins?

Malacandra
05-21-2014, 12:54 PM
Do zombies deify vitamins?

As long as you want to know what zombies do, you may as well ask a dead person.

KarlGrenze
05-21-2014, 01:26 PM
And here I was wondering if norinew came back from beyond. :(

RivkahChaya
05-21-2014, 01:33 PM
Would you even be able to tell if a zombie had scurvy?

Colibri
05-21-2014, 02:07 PM
Since this question was answered 9 years ago, and no new information has been added (and is mostly just flybait for zombie jokes), I'm going to close this.

Colibri
General Questions Moderator