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View Full Version : Take your stinking paws off me, you damn dirty ape!


Anaamika
08-09-2005, 06:50 PM
I just finished watching the 1968 Planet of the Apes for the first time ever. I realize I'm really, really late to the party. I did a search on it, but found only a handful of threads and seemingly only one directly related.

I should point out that we should all be very, very thankful that Charleton Heston can act so dramatically to go with the score, it was so impressive. They'd be eating or something, and I'd rush out of the kitchen thinking someone's head was getting lopped off.

I did like it a lot. I saw where the movie was going fairly quickly, but it was enjoyable all the same.

Favorite lines:

"But...you're so damned ugly!"

"You won't like what you find."

And of course, "Take your stinking paws off me, you damn dirty ape!"

I thought stuffing the other crewmember was pretty grotesque, not to mention lobotomizing the third.

And I was surprised at the "Flying is impossible" thing. If anything showed the predominant difference between humans and apes, that was probably it. Hasn't mankind always dreamed of flying?

Are any of the sequels worth watching?

Oh, and lastly, since I'm female: Damn, Charleton Heston was hot in this flick! Bronzed, well-muscled, especially when he was shaved. I don't remember him being that good-looking from 10 Commandments. Of course I was fairly young when I saw it.

silenus
08-09-2005, 06:54 PM
The first sequel is ok, but after that they are wretched. Heston insisted on getting killed off in the sequel, because he felt Taylor's story had been told.

Sir Rhosis
08-09-2005, 06:59 PM
Always good to have new fans. Great script by Wilson and Serling, interesting direction (the zoom thing that Schaffner (sp?) does constantly looks weird on pan and scan, not so much on wide screen), and probably Heston's second-best performance (Will Penny, being first).

I pretty much hated all the sequels. Liked the short-lived '74 series and the '75 cartoon better than any of the sequels.

Sir Rhosis

lhovis73
08-09-2005, 07:09 PM
The sequels aren't as good as the original (surprise, surprise), but they're still filled with great monkey action, drama, thrills, chills, and other good stuff.

The second one in the series is probably most likely to disappoint you, because Charlton Heston is replaced by a sort of look-alike nobody (well, Heston appears in the movie, but the role of handsome, cynical human stranger to the planet of the apes is taken over by that nobody). The third, fourth, and fifth movies tell the story of how we get from our own world to a world run by apes...and I love these flicks. In fact, I promised myself that someday I would write a book comparing the Planet of the Apes series to the master/slave dialectic from Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit (this is my idea, everyone, so hands off!)

The TV series is pretty dumb. Humans get caught by the apes. Humans escape. Humans captured again. Humans escape. Ad infinitum.

it was earth all along

h.sapiens
08-09-2005, 07:23 PM
I agree that Jerry Goldsmith's score is one of the best things about the movie.

Obligatory Simpson's reference:

"I hate every ape I see, from chimpan-A to chimpan-Z. No, you'll never make a monkey out of me…"

Spatial Rift 47
08-09-2005, 07:23 PM
it was earth all along


You finally made a monkey out of meeeee ....



Yeah, I've never seen the original. I should do that.

Baker
08-09-2005, 09:29 PM
On July 4, 1974, I sat through all five POTA movies at a local multiplex. Buy one ticket, see five movies. It was quite an experience, especially as it was my first time to see any of the five.

The theater had two copies of each movie, so it was being shown in two of the four theaters they had. I kid you not, they were selling bananas in the lobby, as a tie in.

Two things Heston said about the dialogue. One was his words after he saw what lay down the beach. He said he couldn't believe the studio was nervous, or the ratings system balking, at using "Ah, damn you, goddamit all to Hell!" He didn't think Taylor was cussing so much as he was literally calling down God's wrath .

And when he uttered the "damn, dirty ape" line, in such a raw voice, he said he had a miserable cold. His croaking tone, supposedly due to an injury to his throat, was due to a very sore throat. He wouldn't quit working though, and he says in all his film career he never missed a day due to sickness, giving him just about the lowest insurace rate in the business.

Baldwin
08-09-2005, 09:51 PM
I got the 35th Anniversary edition DVD, and showed it to my girlfriend; somehow she had never seen the movie. I advised her to view the movie as a fable, not a story to examine logically (since it don't make a lick of sense).

Lumpy
08-09-2005, 10:06 PM
At the end of the fifth movieWe see that thanks to Cesar's decision to free the humans, they did NOT become mute animals condemned by the Lawgiver; the timeline was altered..., So does that mean that the TV series could be considered in continuity to the movies? (Yes, I know, the TV series was poorly written. But still...)

Snowboarder Bo
08-09-2005, 11:04 PM
I love these movies; I have the DVD box set.

The first is, IMO, among the best science fiction allegories ever to flicker upon the silver screen. Excellent cinematography, great acting, sets, costumes, makeup... and as has been mentioned that amazing musical score.

I agree that the follow-ups are not quite as good as the original, but they still have their moments. I still get kind of freaked out at the end of Beneath the Planet of the Apes (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065462/).

And I love Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0068408/). I'm a sucker for a good revolutionary story.

A word of advice, if I may... avoid the 2001 remake by Tim Burton at all costs.

stanger
08-09-2005, 11:12 PM
I remember seeing Planet Of The Apes during its first run in the theatres. Got in on a bargain Saturday feature - it cost all of sixty cents :D

Great movie. Loved it.

When Heston said his famous "filthy ape" line, the whole theatre erupted and everybody shouted support. It was the first time I had ever seen such a reaction during a movie showing. The surprise ending was truly unique at the time and you could hear the sudden intake of breath throughout the theatre when everyone realized what Heston saw standing on the beach.

Seldom does a movie surprise or inspire such a reaction in an audience anymore. In its own way, a true classic.

asterion
08-09-2005, 11:30 PM
First, I read the book (English translation, not the original French.) Then, much later, I saw the movie. Between reading the book and watching The Simpsons, I truly did not like the first movie and never saw the rest. Or the remake. I wonder if this is because I read the book or because freaking everything is spoiled for my generation by shows like the Simpsons?

BMax
08-10-2005, 01:42 AM
I love the music from that film. It's so raw and unstructured, it really makes you feel off-balance and in unfamiliar territory.

I own this one on VHS. I believe it's the 20th anniversary edition. I don't know if it was Heston's best work, but at that time he was doing a lot of sci-fi: POTA, The Omega Man, Soylent Green. He was a really cheesy ham, but it fit for those roles.

CalMeacham
08-10-2005, 08:42 AM
Interesting film, with a lot to recommend it (great score, first really massive use of makeup, weird visuals), but even as a kid it bothered me that it really didn't make a lot of sense. The ape civilization didn't look as if it could be supported by the cities and agriculture they showed. (Serling's script reportedly portrayed ape civilization as much like 20th century civilization, with helicopters and all. The use of the weird architecture and limited size was apparently mostly because of a shortage of money. ) The apes talking English made zero sense. The "shock" ending was interesting, but ludicrous. I really don't buy it, and never did. as science fiction, it has plot holes big enough to fly that space ship through. The sequels, though, are far worse.


The original novel by Pierre Boulle is better from that point of view, and is definitely worth reading. Also interesting -- if you can find it -- is L. Sprague deCamp's novel "Genus Homo", written ten years earlier. In it, travelers sleep through several thousand years to find an earth mostly gone back to a more primitive world, but with intelligent apes in charge, segregated by species into castes, with gorillas as the military and chimps as the scientists. The people are immediately put, naked, into zoos. The book actually seems to have more in common with the movie than Boulle's book does.

Renob
08-10-2005, 10:00 AM
Great movie. I remember as a kid watching the first three repeatedly when our local TV station would put them on as Saturday afternoon filler. I still remember how freaked out I was during the first one when the astronauts and primitive humans were in the field and they start getting attacked, and then the attackers are revealed to be apes. That messes with the mind of a five-year-old.

msmith537
08-10-2005, 10:01 AM
I hate every single ape I see...
From chimpan-A to chimpanzee...



it was earth all along


You finally made a monkey out of meeeee ....





DAMN YOU!! DAMN YOU ALL TO HELL!!!

Anaamika
08-10-2005, 10:06 AM
DAMN YOU!! DAMN YOU ALL TO HELL!!!
I read some of the trivia, and apparently the 1968 censors didn't want to pass this line!

Gilligan
08-10-2005, 10:37 AM
I also saw this in a theatre during the first run; may have been my first time seeing a movie in a theatre, at least the first one I remember. I always catch the first, Beneath, and Conquest when they're on, but could do without Escape and Battle.

I got a laugh out of the VHS version that came out a couple years ago. The big surprise ending is pictured right on the box cover. Here is a pic
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/6301661729/002-8545451-9016047?v=glance

saoirse
08-10-2005, 12:09 PM
Don't forget:

You cut out his brain, you bloody baboons

I had a comic book of Beneath, along with a 45 that read the comic and beeped when it was time to turn the page. The dialogue was laughably wooden. At the end,

Right after the "turn the page" beep came the sound of the Alpha-Omega bomb exploding.

Baldwin
08-10-2005, 12:27 PM
Posted by Lumpy:At the end of the fifth movie:
We see that thanks to Cesar's decision to free the humans, they did NOT become mute animals condemned by the Lawgiver; the timeline was altered...
, So does that mean that the TV series could be considered in continuity to the movies? (Yes, I know, the TV series was poorly written. But still...)
I'm pretty sure that's not right -- but I'm not willing to acquire and sit through a copy of Battle for the Planet of the Apes to see.

Acsenray
08-10-2005, 01:02 PM
I recall seeing an ape movie in which the apes were driving full-size early 1970s sedans. I don't know whether it was a ripoff of Planet of the Apes or a sequel. Does anyone else remember this?

Push You Down
08-10-2005, 02:16 PM
I recall seeing an ape movie in which the apes were driving full-size early 1970s sedans. I don't know whether it was a ripoff of Planet of the Apes or a sequel. Does anyone else remember this?


It is probably "Time of the Apes".. a Japanese POTA knock off.. well actually it was a movie made from cobble-ing pieces of a tv series together. It was on MST3K.. It was hilarious. I have managed to see the regular version as well.... That movie makes NO sense....

Push You Down
08-10-2005, 02:20 PM
Posted by Lumpy:
I'm pretty sure that's not right -- but I'm not willing to acquire and sit through a copy of Battle for the Planet of the Apes to see.


That is one way of reading the ending.... But if memory serves the original takes place some 2000 years in the future... And the epilogue at the end of movie 5 with the Lawgiver and the human and ape children learning together takes place only a 1000 in the future. A lot could happen in terms of Human/Ape relations in that time.

I love the entire series.

Each one is so different than the other. The first two are sci-fi. Escape is largely a comedy until the last 30 minutes, Conquest is a political film, and Battle is a kids adventure flick.

JohnBckWLD
08-10-2005, 03:05 PM
On July 4, 1974, I sat through all five POTA movies at a local multiplex. Buy one ticket, see five movies. It was quite an experience, especially as it was my first time to see any of the five.You gave me flashbacks to the summer before my eight birthday. The kids in my neighborhood went 5 times a week to watch them. In our neck of the woods, it was 'The Go Ape Festival'.

As I look back on the series, after Beneath (Part II - Which I liked but for some reason received a Golden Turkey Award ) the final 3 episodes sucked. the plots are just too stupid and unbelievable.A word of advice, if I may... avoid the 2001 remake by Tim Burton at all costsIt was beyond wretched. It probably wouldn't have been such a letdown had Burton used a screenplay that closely followed Pierre Boulle's book, 'Monkey Planet' (Where Taylor escapes back to Earth). It would've been different enough from the original FILM and just might've worked.

Sir Rhosis
08-10-2005, 05:57 PM
I own a copy of Rod Serling's 2nd Draft, dated December 23, 1964. It indeed does have an ape society on the level of 1964 humans. Quite an interesting read. George Thomas (George Taylor in the final film, though I don't remember if the "George" was ever spoken on-screen) spots the Statue of Liberty as he flies away in a helicopter. He already knows it is Earth because Serling actually has him, bit by bit, piece together the oddly familiar star patterns and speculate that it probably is Earth.

FTR, in this early draft, Thomas' first words after regaining his voice (he is prodded by an ape in the lab) are: "No! Get away! Let me alone!"

Sir Rhosis

Baker
08-10-2005, 06:07 PM
Quote:
A word of advice, if I may... avoid the 2001 remake by Tim Burton at all costs


It was beyond wretched. It probably wouldn't have been such a letdown had Burton used a screenplay that closely followed Pierre Boulle's book, 'Monkey Planet' (Where Taylor escapes back to Earth). It would've been different enough from the original FILM and just might've worked.

I second this. I've only read Boulle's novel in English translation, but it was very different from either the original or the 2001 remake. Only thing I like about the latter was the makeup.

Did anyone ever see the short test clip made, to try out ape makeup? James Brolin and the gal who ended up playing Nova were Cornelius and Zira, with Edward G. Robinson as Zaius and Heston as Taylor(but a very different one). The documentary said that when the short was shown to the studio execs, if they didn't laugh, the filmmakers would get their backing. The chimp makeup was very rudimentary, but the orangutan was good, although different from what it became in the actual film. I forget his name, but the guy who designed it got his start in film makeup after working in veteran's hospitals, designing prosthetic replacements for ears, noses, and such. Guy knew his way around a face, and ended up in the movies.

Sir Rhosis
08-10-2005, 06:11 PM
I have that test (it is on a documentary made back in 98 or so, hosted by McDowell just a year or so before his death). It is a scene from Serling's screenplay, and Heston is referred to as "Mr. Thomas" by Zaius.

Sir Rhosis

wheelie
08-10-2005, 06:32 PM
How many damn dirty apes does it take to change a light bulb?

Three.

One damn dirty ape to change the light bulb, and two damn dirty apes to throw feces at each other. :D

pinkfreud
08-10-2005, 06:35 PM
How many damn dirty apes does it take to change a light bulb?

Three.

One damn dirty ape to change the light bulb, and two damn dirty apes to throw feces at each other. :DIs this one of those damn dirty jokes?

Bryan Ekers
08-10-2005, 08:27 PM
Welcome to Fantasy Island... you inhuman bastards!

Cat Fight
08-10-2005, 08:28 PM
I thought the first one was good, campy fun, but dammit, I was disappointed every time they didn't burst into song. Someone really should turn this into a real musical. I'd watch it. Or Streetcar!

saoirse
08-10-2005, 08:31 PM
How many damn dirty apes does it take to change a light bulb?

Three.

One damn dirty ape to change the light bulb, and two damn dirty apes to throw feces at each other. :D

I heard it this way:

How many damn dirty apes does it take to screw in a lightbulb?
Damn dirty apes don't screw in lightbulbs.
They screw in piles of their own feces.

Okay, that one comes out pretty gross.

wheelie
08-10-2005, 08:40 PM
I stole it from Family Guy, but your version's funnier. Disgusting, but funny.

saoirse
08-10-2005, 09:49 PM
It was originally about college boys.

Oh, yeah, and pools of their own vomit.

Glad I could brighten your day...

Otto
08-10-2005, 11:45 PM
Charlton Heston is replaced by a sort of look-alike nobody
I don't know that I'd describe James Franciscus (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0002082/?fr=c2l0ZT1kZnxteD0yMHxsbT01MDB8dHQ9MXxmYj11fHBuPTF8cT1qYW1lcyBmcmFuY2lzY3VzfGh0bWw9MXxubT0x;fc=1;ft =20) as a "nobody" exactly.

Dr. Rieux
08-11-2005, 12:37 AM
Battle is the only one I saw in a theater. Escape is my second favorite after the first.
I used to have all the issues of Marvel's B&W POTA magazine. They did some pretty good original stories, especially the ones by Doug Moench and Mike Ploog.

CalMeacham
08-11-2005, 07:52 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhovis73
Charlton Heston is replaced by a sort of look-alike nobody


I don't know that I'd describe James Franciscus as a "nobody" exactly.


They showed Beneath the Planet of the Apes at the Salt Lake City SF Filmfest several years ago. The hosts were the film critic from the salt Lake Trib and Orson Scott Card. Their comment was that James Franciscus was sort of "Charlton Heston Lite", and when the big CH himself shows up at the end of the film, he just blows Franciscus away.

Push You Down
08-12-2005, 01:35 PM
I have a book of POTA trivia and in it it claims that "Franciscused" is a popular 'geek' term for replacing a popular actor with a less popular actor... I have never heard this term used anywhere outside of this book.