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View Full Version : How do I make chewy, soft cookies?


Scott Plaid
08-13-2005, 01:17 PM
You know, I love eating the three-for-a-dollar cookies sold at the subshop called Subways. However, it would be far cheaper for me to make them at home. When I attempt to do so, however, I wind up with hard cookies. True, they are not very hard, but still, they-oh, wait, I can find the recipes on www.topsecretrecipes.com. No, wait, I canít install It requires flash, and I donít have time to download it and install it right now. I need to run out the door.

So, instead I turn to ask people for advice. How do I make chewy cookies? Half-bake em? Use different ingredients? Use a stove that isnít thirty year old? I don't know. Confering with my friends seems to result wiith me being told that the way I bake em' is how they normally taste, and that store bought cookies cheat somehow.

Hello Again
08-13-2005, 01:41 PM
IME, when you bake with margarine, they tend to come out chewy. When you bake with butter, they come out crispy.

Revtim
08-13-2005, 01:50 PM
My Mom once made the "Mrs. Fields" fake cookie recipe floating around, and it was kinda chewy, I think because of the ground oatmeal.

Alessan
08-13-2005, 01:57 PM
Try these (http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_13617,00.html). My wife and I made them last week and they were deliciously chewy.

Left Hand of Dorkness
08-13-2005, 02:31 PM
My understanding is that if you make your cookies with slightly more flour, they'll come out a little cakier, and will be less crispy.

You could also get an air-cushion baking sheet, which prevents browning on the cookie and makes it almost impossible to burn them; they should therefore come out chewier. (These sheets should set you back about 10 bucks).

And, of course, take them out of the oven earlier: they'll cook for a minute or two once they're out, so if you want them chewy, take them out while there's still a small spot of raw dough in the cookie's center.

Daniel

BobT
08-13-2005, 02:46 PM
Brown sugar helps. Or extra molasses. And since brown sugar is really just white sugar with molasses added, you can see why either one works.

Melted butter helps too.

Also be sure to refrigerate the dough before baking.

And take the cookies out before they look completely done. They will finish baking as they cool.

racer72
08-13-2005, 02:56 PM
A bit more fat (butter, margarine) and a lower baking baking temp will get your cookies nice and chewy. It will work for any cookie recipe.

Scott Plaid
08-13-2005, 02:58 PM
Well, I already tried the "Take the cookies out before baking" trick. I seems to work, but only for a short time afterwards. The bags of chips creates one hell of a lot of cookies, and while they are not stale three days later, I find they are the same consistency of normally baked cookies. That I not to say this may be due, to your suggestion, but perhaps to improper storage methods, or some other cause.

That being said, thank you everyone, and I will try out your suggestions soon.

nivlac
08-13-2005, 03:03 PM
How do I make chewy, soft cookies?

One word: WHY?
I like my cookies crunchy. OK, they can be a tiny bit soft inside, but the outside has to be crunchy.

Scott Plaid
08-13-2005, 03:14 PM
Reply that implies that anyone that likes crunchy cookies needs a check up from the neck up.

You see, tastes differ, and while you might only enjoy crunchy cookies, I prefer soft ones, though I have adapted to eating crunchy one, since they are what I come across most of the time. Really just a matter of preference.

Hello Again
08-13-2005, 03:37 PM
FYI, if you find a batch makes too many at once, freeze the batter in cookie-sized lumps, storing in a well-sealed container. Make as many or as few as you want, whenever you want!

Scott Plaid
08-13-2005, 03:40 PM
FYI, if you find a batch makes too many at once"too many at once"? :confused: My mind is refusing to parse this sentence. Individually I know what the words mean, but when put together like this, I have no idea of what you mean.

Hello Again
08-13-2005, 03:44 PM
"too many at once"? :confused: My mind is refusing to parse this sentence. Individually I know what the words mean, but when put together like this, I have no idea of what you mean.

LOL -- you mentioned them going stale & hard before you had a chance to eat them. This way, you make some every day and they are delightfully fresh whenever you want them.

SkipMagic
08-13-2005, 03:57 PM
That I not to say this may be due, to your suggestion, but perhaps to improper storage methods, or some other cause.
If they're chewy when they come out of the oven and harden later on, try storing them with slices of bread covering the cookies. This isn't necessary for all recipes (for example, auntie em occasionally bakes cookies with an excellent recipe calling for pudding mix--and those sumbitches never soften), but give it a try. I've done it for years and it helps keep the cookies nice and soft.

Oslo Ostragoth
08-13-2005, 10:24 PM
Alton Brown explored how to alter the basic tollhouse recipe to make thin, crispy or chewy cookies. Transcript here (http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Season3/Cookie/CookieTranscript.htm) so you understand the science; links to recipes here (http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/show_ea/episode/0,1976,FOOD_9956_17114,00.html).

Scott Plaid
08-14-2005, 12:11 AM
Bread flower, eh watered-down? Interesting. :)

Flutterby
08-14-2005, 02:25 AM
If they come out chewy at first but harden before you eat them all...

eat faster.

Or keep them in a tupperware/rubbermaid container. That's what my aunt does.. she makes the most awesome Soft Gingerbread cookies.. oh IlovethemIlovethemIlovethem. I even have the recipe.. somewhere. But my Mom always overcooks them and we need to buy a container to keep them in. The cookie jar isn't tight enough.

devilsknew
08-14-2005, 04:08 AM
The key is good old fashioned hydrogenated shortening and a minimal baking time.

Eva Luna
08-14-2005, 11:52 AM
If they come out chewy at first but harden before you eat them all...

eat faster.

Or keep them in a tupperware/rubbermaid container.

Or nuke them for a few seconds before you eat them, if you're not eating them all straight out of the oven on the first day - nice and gooey chocolate chips!

I've seen recommendations to store them in an airtight container with something moist, like a piece of raw apple or potato, but never tried it myself - seems like an invitation to mold growth. But it might be worth a shot.

auntie em
08-15-2005, 04:19 PM
(for example, auntie em occasionally bakes cookies with an excellent recipe calling for pudding mix--and those sumbitches never soften)
{bolding mine}
Ahem. I thought you said you liked them . . .
::trying to keep lower lip from quivering::



;)

DMark
08-15-2005, 06:56 PM
Reply that implies that anyone that likes crunchy cookies needs a check up from the neck up.

You see, tastes differ, and while you might only enjoy crunchy cookies, I prefer soft ones, though I have adapted to eating crunchy one, since they are what I come across most of the time. Really just a matter of preference.

I am the same with cereal...hate "crunchy" but I must be in minority as all cereals seem to brag theirs is crunchier than the next.

At any rate, don't know about cookies, but my mother used to make really chewy, soft brownies and she simply undercooked them by about 2-3 minutes. Then lots of white icing. I make them all the time and people love the gooeyness factor.

devilsknew
08-15-2005, 09:48 PM
I am the same with cereal...hate "crunchy" but I must be in minority as all cereals seem to brag theirs is crunchier than the next.


Ha, me too! I will sometimes let my cereal sit for five minutes or so in the milk to reach desired soggieness.