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ComeToTheDarkSideWeHaveCookies
09-06-2005, 09:27 AM
This (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=333551) GQ thread has prompted me to querey my fellow dopers in search of other folks who wore corrective casts, etc, as a child.

I was apparently pigeon-toed on my right foot, beyond the timeframe that is considered normal (toddlers are often pigeon-toed when they first start walking). So I had to wear a corrective cast that went from my upper thigh all the way down my leg that rotated the toes in my right foot outward. I'm not sure how long I wore it, but it probably wasn't longer than a few months.

I assure you that was the last time I was "correct" in any way. ;)

So what's your story?

davmilasav
09-06-2005, 09:36 AM
I was born with both my feet turned in and had to wear special shoes with a bar between them to straighten my feet. I've been told that learning to walk was a real trial b/c my feet were effectively shackled together. Oddly enough, my shutterbug parents took no pictures of Baby in Bondage.

I'm fine now. Well, my feet are.

MLS
09-06-2005, 10:00 AM
I had my right leg rotated outward and had to wear some sort of "thing" -- a brace or special shoes -- but obviously don't remember what it was. So now both my feet point forward correctly, but my right knee kinda points to the left. I have a slightly "off" walk and tend to wear out the sole of my right shoe unevenly.

Interestingly, my younger daughter had a similar condition, which was corrected with a strap on her shoes that basically fastened her heels together. She is now an adult, is fine, and does not have the crooked knee thing that I have.

swampbear
09-06-2005, 10:06 AM
As a wee cub I wore corrective shoes with a brace on both legs because I was flat footed. Somehow the combo of shoes and braces was supposed to help my feet develop some arch. Later (around the age of nine) I no longer wore the braces but wore the corrective shoes until I was twelve. My feet do have arches but I am really choosy about shoes. I use those support inserts to this day. If I don't I can tell the difference in walking.

I have really ugly feet.

CalMeacham
09-06-2005, 10:16 AM
I had flat feet, fallen arches, and tendonitis as a kid. I learned this after the 20 mile Boy Scout hike (for which I also wore brand-new unbroken hiking boots, but that was my own stupidity).


I had to wear a Thomas Heel and Scaphoid Pads for years. Later on I heard about the "Rubber Cooke', which was a different beast entirely.

WhyNot
09-06-2005, 10:23 AM
I remember having to wear these really heavy shoes as a toddler, and sleeping in another pair as well. When I slept there was a piece of wood that the shoes were nailed to, which I suppose acted as a brace. I don't know what they were for.

My grandmother has absolutely flat feet (if she steps on a piece of paper where her arch should be, you cannot remove the paper) and so my mother was always paranoid about me getting flat feet. She had me doing the marble game I wrote about in that other thread as early as I can remember.

My arches are now too high - only a few degrees away from clubfoot. :smack: Thanks, Mom! Finding shoes that don't cut into the top of my feet is a real challenge - mules are right out.

WhyKid had spinal fusion with Harrington rods last summer because of an idiopathic ("we don't know why") congenital ("but he was born with it") scoliosis ("my gawd! his spine looks like a spiral staircase!") complete with an extra rib on the left side. He's recovered just fine, and is now doing just about everything he ever did, with increased flexibility and range of motion.

Shirley Ujest
09-06-2005, 10:29 AM
I had flat feet, fallen arches, and tendonitis as a kid. I learned this after the 20 mile Boy Scout hike (for which I also wore brand-new unbroken hiking boots, but that was my own stupidity).


I had to wear a Thomas Heel and Scaphoid Pads for years. Later on I heard about the "Rubber Cooke', which was a different beast entirely.


I had no arches or left/right feet, apparently. I have glimpses of a memory going to a speciality store ( that had a stuffed monkey on a swing) and getting special shoes that would give me left and right indentations. I now have torn muscles in my arches and have to wear inserts or birks to help.



I remember a kid at our school that had the special shoes with the bar between it. I always wondered what the heck was wrong. I always assumed it was his legs that needed straightening. How come we don't see that method of pure humilitation anymore?

Sattua
09-06-2005, 10:32 AM
I was born pigeon-toed and wore corrective shoes as an infant. They were off well before I tried to walk and definitely before I remember anything. Later, a doctor told me that I had flat feet. Either he lied or I eventually corrected it by consciously walking on the outside edges of my feet, because now I have high arches.

Missy2U
09-06-2005, 10:36 AM
Wore shoes at night that had a bar between them to point my feet in the right direction for a year or so, then also wore leg braces all day every day for two years - they went around my waist with a belt like dealie, then connected to my legs at the knees and at the shoes. It was awful. This was all around first grade. You know, when the other kids would NEVER EVER pick on someone who was different... :rolleyes:

cher3
09-06-2005, 11:04 AM
Was this some kind of medical fad in the 60's or thereabouts? I didn't have the bar thing, but I did have to wear weighted shoes until I was in second or third grade. I remeber being thrilled when I was able to buy a pair of "normal" shoes. I've never heard of it being a concern with any of the kids my children have been to school or daycare with.

ComeToTheDarkSideWeHaveCookies
09-06-2005, 11:41 AM
I had my right leg rotated outward and had to wear some sort of "thing" -- a brace or special shoes -- but obviously don't remember what it was. So now both my feet point forward correctly, but my right knee kinda points to the left. I have a slightly "off" walk and tend to wear out the sole of my right shoe unevenly.

I've never noticed anything about the position of my knees (my left knee "pops" and generally makes more noise than my right, but I've always attributed that to the years I spent squating behind home plate as a catcher). I do, however, seem to be a lot harder on the shoes I wear on my right foot. I was just re-noticing that this morning when I was lacing up my New Balances. I _always_ seem to wear a hole in the back of my right shoe with my heel. I bought these shoes about 6 months ago, and the right one has a big hole worn in the heel, while the left is completely intact. I also seem to wear down the outside edges of the soles of my shoes on both feet, with more pronounced wearing on the right foot.

So no other cast-wearers? I was born in 1974, so I'm assuming the cast was put on sometime in 1975.

Baker
09-06-2005, 12:10 PM
My right foot turned inward when I was born, so I wore a special shoe that had a strap connected to it and wound around the leg to a sort of belt at my waist. It was gradually tightened and pulled my foot into shape.

I don't really remember it though, as it came off for good when I was three. There is one picture of me wearing it though, an Easter photo with me in a hat, holding a stuffed bunny. I have the vaguest memory(dream?) of being put to bed and having it taken off for the night, but I don't know if it's real or a "created" memory.

psycat90
09-06-2005, 12:35 PM
Another 'pigeon-toed' person here. I wore special weighted shoes when I was a toddler. I vaguely remember it, I know about it more through pictures and from my parents talking about it.

Kythereia
09-06-2005, 12:38 PM
I have bunions on both feet (gee, thanks, Dad) and I have flat arches, which means I can't wear heels for too long and have to slip inserts into my shoes to help me walk. Bugger. :(

Amazon Floozy Goddess
09-06-2005, 12:40 PM
I used to be so pigeon-toed that I would trip over my own feet when walking. My doctor thought I would grow out of it, but it only got worse as I got older. When I was 10 I was taken to a specialist who made a contraption for me that consisted of a thick padded belt. Connected to each side of this belt were two cables that ran down either side of my legs. There were velcro straps at the thigh and the calf to keep them against my legs. The cables were then bolted at the bottom into sneakers. When worn, the tension of the cables pulled my toes outwards. Walking was a little awkward, but they did help over time. I wore them for about a year and was then re-evaluated, and it was decided there had been enough of an improvement that I wouldn't need it anymore.

Now at 25, I walk with my toes pointing straight ahead - it never did turn my feet out all the way, but enough so it was no longer a problem.

The only downside to this method was that if the sneakers, which were permanently attached, didn't fit through a pair of pants, I would have to wear the contraption outside my clothes (sometimes I could conceal it underneath). This caused some pretty bad bullying from the other kids at school.

Greywolf73
09-06-2005, 12:47 PM
Another 'pigeon-toed' person here. I wore special weighted shoes when I was a toddler. I vaguely remember it, I know about it more through pictures and from my parents talking about it.


Same here. All I remember about them was that the shoes were Buster Brown and very, very ugly and clunky.

Geez, did anyone NOT wear corrective shoes in the 60s-70s?

lizardling
09-06-2005, 02:22 PM
Does being born with a dislocated hip count? The orthopedists did a quick surgery to cut the tendon in my groin, then popped my hip back into place and put me in a cast running from my waist to my feet. Being a baby at that time was not fun -- they cut a little hatch in the ass to change my diaper. I feel sorry for my parents. :D

My dad also put little wooden pegs in the stroller to hold me in place so I wouldn't go skidding clean out of there, since I was basically held in a Y-shape all in one plane until my muscles and whatnot shortened enough to hold my hip in place.

There's plenty of photographic evidence of me in this condition, cast and all. Fortunately it worked -- today you can't tell that I had a dislocated hip in the first place.

aruvqan
09-06-2005, 02:36 PM
I was born with both my feet turned in and had to wear special shoes with a bar between them to straighten my feet. I've been told that learning to walk was a real trial b/c my feet were effectively shackled together. Oddly enough, my shutterbug parents took no pictures of Baby in Bondage.

I'm fine now. Well, my feet are.

OOO I had that, I think my mom *still* has a pair of the shoes that the bar screwed onto somewhere [my mom saves everything. I wouldnt be surprised if she had a little mummified birth cord and placenta stuck away somewhere=\]

But I only had to wear them at night :confused:

vix
09-06-2005, 03:51 PM
I was also born with a dislocated hip, thought it wasn't detected right away. I was quite miserable until the problem was discovered. I was in a cast and then a brace. Or maybe vice versa? Obviously I don't remember. Apparently, the cast/brace both looked horridly uncomfortable, but I was happy to not be in pain anymore.

Scarlett67
09-06-2005, 03:58 PM
Does being born with a dislocated hip count? The orthopedists did a quick surgery to cut the tendon in my groin, then popped my hip back into place and put me in a cast running from my waist to my feet. Being a baby at that time was not fun -- they cut a little hatch in the ass to change my diaper. I feel sorry for my parents. :D
My sister had some sort of hip dysplasia and had a similar setup -- cast, then brace, both with her legs splayed out. My mother says they just gave her a baby with a cast on and let HER figure out how to deal with diapering. My sister learned to crawl by swiveling her hips from side to side, dragging the cast (and later the brace) behind her. Her bronzed "first baby shoes" are significantly bigger than my pair.

I also had some kind of foot problem and wore corrective shoes, with a "cookie" in them and metal cleats on toe and heel. I couldn't wear "regular" shoes until about the 6th grade. Yay me. (As if I didn't have enough social problems. I was horrified when the orthodontist told me in high school that I'd have to wear headgear, but thankfully it was nighttime only.)

Contrapuntal
09-06-2005, 04:04 PM
Same here. All I remember about them was that the shoes were Buster Brown and very, very ugly and clunky.

Geez, did anyone NOT wear corrective shoes in the 60s-70s?Not me. But my mother used to beat me with a shoe. Does that count? Kidding.

MissTake
09-06-2005, 04:04 PM
I was born with both my feet turned in and had to wear special shoes with a bar between them to straighten my feet. I've been told that learning to walk was a real trial b/c my feet were effectively shackled together. Oddly enough, my shutterbug parents took no pictures of Baby in Bondage.

I'm fine now. Well, my feet are.
Same here. I still have my Stride Rite shoes with metal bar holding them about 1' apart. As an infant I wore them only at night. As I became more mobile I wore them during teh day also. I do know that I was completely out of them by the time I was a year and a half. To "further correct" my poor peds, I was enrolled in dance to learn how to move less clumsily.

Anyone else remember when the Stride Rite stores had cool play areas? Ours had the cab part of a fire truck that we could play on. I also remember them knowing us by name. ~shrug~

picunurse
09-06-2005, 04:06 PM
I had my right leg rotated outward and had to wear some sort of "thing" -- a brace or special shoes -- but obviously don't remember what it was. So now both my feet point forward correctly, but my right knee kinda points to the left. I have a slightly "off" walk and tend to wear out the sole of my right shoe unevenly.

Interestingly, my younger daughter had a similar condition, which was corrected with a strap on her shoes that basically fastened her heels together. She is now an adult, is fine, and does not have the crooked knee thing that I have.
Me too. Can you turn your affected foot backwards? I still can.

KSO
09-06-2005, 04:25 PM
My left leg was turned inward so I had a cast on it as soon as I was able to crawl, which was in 1967. That seems sort of Dickensian.

I used to be able to turn it inward and completely backward--so that my left foot was parallel with my right foot--in some sort of Exorcist-like freak maneuver but I had knee surgery in 1998 to replace my ACL and I can't turn it backwards anymore.

My brother had casts and multiple surgeries on both legs and spent a good six months in a wheelchair when he was a kid--he wasn't supposed to be able to run, ever, but of course they were wrong--he's an excellent athlete--he was born in 1956.

WhyNot
09-06-2005, 04:28 PM
Was this some kind of medical fad in the 60's or thereabouts? I didn't have the bar thing, but I did have to wear weighted shoes until I was in second or third grade. I remeber being thrilled when I was able to buy a pair of "normal" shoes. I've never heard of it being a concern with any of the kids my children have been to school or daycare with.
Yup. It was a big thing in the 60's, and still persisted into the 70's. Nowadays, it's hardly ever considered needed by doctors familiar with current research. Casting is occasionally still needed for one specific type of intoeing that shows up in the first year of life, but the vast majority of intoeing and flat-feet need no special shoe or bracing or other gear.

According to this orthopedic site, (http://www.mcg.edu/pediatrics/CCNotebook/chapter2/orthopedics.htm)"Corrective shoes are a misnomer. They are rarely indicated in children for intoeing or for flat feet."

ComeToTheDarkSideWeHaveCookies
09-06-2005, 04:34 PM
Me too. Can you turn your affected foot backwards? I still can.

Huh...I can't turn it all the way backwards, but I can rotate my (affected) right foot a good 3-4 inches further clockwise than I can rotate my left foot counter-clockwise.

cher3
09-06-2005, 04:39 PM
I thought so. Our babysitter, who is about my mom's age, was scandalized that we didn't buy shoes for our kids until they started walking outside a lot. She was certain their feet were going to be deformed by running around loose like that. I just let it go--she wouldn't have been interested in my "millions of years of evolution" arguments anyway.

Skywatcher
09-06-2005, 04:46 PM
I had underdeveloped leg muscles. I had to visit the nurse several times and lift weights that were placed over my ankles.

whiterabbit
09-06-2005, 05:15 PM
If years of bracing (for scoliosis) and finally a fusion (no rods) of most of my spine followed by six months in a body cast which, thank Og, was from chest to hips so I could walk and six more months in my last brace count, then yes, I too was corrected. I was just shy of ten when I had the surgery, too.

You oughta see my spine x-rays. They're weird and surreal.

Sarah Woodruff
09-06-2005, 06:49 PM
According to this orthopedic site, (http://www.mcg.edu/pediatrics/CCNotebook/chapter2/orthopedics.htm)"Corrective shoes are a misnomer. They are rarely indicated in children for intoeing or for flat feet."
Yeah, I probably should have mentioned in the linked thread that in addition to flat feet I also have knock-knees. Not too bad, but noticeable if I'm barelegged. :( Despite all the money spent on my orthotics and trips to paediatric orthopedic specialists during my childhood (late 80s-early 90s), I still have flat feet and knock knees. I think that one condition is a cause of the other condition, since they often seem to go together.

Carm6773
09-06-2005, 08:02 PM
I was born in 1973 and so early that my hip sockets didn't form all the way. Specifically, the sockets are too shallow, so my hips readily pop out. I was born weighing 3lb, 11 oz, screaming my head off, but with the right hip out. I was placed in this brace that in effect pulled my knees up to my chin. I was in the contraption until I was 2. As a result of the brace, I was pigeon toed; this was remedied by placing my shoes on the "wrong" feet.

I have a slight limp, but it's only really noticeable when I am tired. The toes turn inward when I am tired too. The muscle structure around my hips basically keeps them in place. They still pop out, the right more than the left. When they do go out, it's a painful experience.

Kiminy
09-06-2005, 09:44 PM
I was born in 1961, and I have *completely* flat feet. No arch whatsoever. My wet footprints look like duck footprints.

My father also had flat feet, and wore super-duper arch supports for as long as I knew him. (We haven't really spoken much in the last ten years, so I don't know if he still uses them.)

I wore orthopedic shoes with super-duper arch supports until I was ten or eleven years old or so. I think it was in large part because my parents simply believed that I could not possibly be "normal" without arches in my feet, but also because my father's doctors had somehow convinced him that flat feet were not normal, and should be fixed at any and all costs.

I do remember the day though when the orthopedist told my mother that she could officially stop hoping that I would get arches in my feet, so orthopedic shoes really weren't necessary. The doctor did advise me to always chose shoes with flexible soles, and to avoid high heels, but told me that I could also wear any shoe that I wanted to wear from then on out.

I generally wear pumps for work, and tennis shoes for play. The last time I wore heels (about 30 years ago, I think), I fell down a flight of stairs and broke a toe, so I don't own any high-heeled shoes anymore at all. I had major hip problems in my teens, but I think that was a direct result of the orthopedic shoes I wore when I was growing up, and the hip problems have completely disappeared now. I do have major bunions, but as long as I insist on wearing wide, comfortable shoes, they don't bother me too much.

Our daughter got arches from her father (whose arches are as high as mine are flat), but our son has my flat feet (or nearly so). Since he has other more serious birth defects, we did ask an orthopedist at one point if we should consider using corrective shoes, and the answer was basically no, unless it becomes obvious that our son has pain or other problems with his feet. Flat feet are now seen as part of the natural scope of feet shape, with no real need for correction. However, I have already told our son (now 10yo) that if he wants to wear heels, it will be HIS money and HIS risk. :)

Leaper
09-06-2005, 11:37 PM
I believe that figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi was born with her feet turned in towards each other.

missdavis102
09-06-2005, 11:55 PM
OOO I had that, I think my mom *still* has a pair of the shoes that the bar screwed onto somewhere [my mom saves everything. I wouldnt be surprised if she had a little mummified birth cord and placenta stuck away somewhere=\]

But I only had to wear them at night :confused:
My mom has this too, in my original 1973 baby bag in the attic with all the other crap too special to throw out. My little bar thingie had baby-sized c-clamps at either end so shoes could be put in and taken out as the occasion called for, I suppose. It's funny, though - in my baby pictures, my feet don't look wonky at all. Except for one, where I look like a tiny bowlegged cowboy in a red dress and red stockings.

Hometownboy
09-07-2005, 12:27 AM
Born in 1949 and yep, pigeon-toed. In the late 1950s/early 1960s taken to a specialist who decreed arch supports, which my younger brother and I wore for several years. We also had exercises - picking up marbles with our feet and putting them in a coffee can. To this day, I can still pick up some items (towels, clothing on the floor, marbles) with my feet.
I keep trying to think of a scene in an action movie that will require the hero to escape from the villian by use of this arcane ability...

Ruby
09-07-2005, 12:54 AM
This (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=333551) GQ thread has prompted me to querey my fellow dopers in search of other folks who wore corrective casts, etc, as a child.

I was apparently pigeon-toed on my right foot, beyond the timeframe that is considered normal (toddlers are often pigeon-toed when they first start walking). So I had to wear a corrective cast that went from my upper thigh all the way down my leg that rotated the toes in my right foot outward. I'm not sure how long I wore it, but it probably wasn't longer than a few months.

I assure you that was the last time I was "correct" in any way. ;)

So what's your story?
Ditto.

Born in 1959 and wore a cast as an infant then corrective shoes for several years. How I hated saddle shoes.

ErinPuff
09-07-2005, 07:12 AM
I don't remember what it is that was wrong with me, but I wore a harness thing for a while as a baby, as seen in this picture (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v313/erinpuff/Pictures%20of%20Me/pic01.jpg). That fixed the problem, but I knew a girl in elementary school who had the same thing but hadn't had it fixed as a baby, and she had to have surgery and a big cast on her legs for a while. Eep.

(I was born in 1986.)

Max Torque
09-07-2005, 08:50 AM
I am told that I had some sort of leg problem when I was a baby, and I had to wear braces of some sort while still in the crib. Of course, I have no memory of it. Really surprised me when my brother told me he remembers the braces.

First Lady of Infinity
09-07-2005, 02:25 PM
Yep! Corrective shoes for about four years, and a leg brace for a year or so, because I was very pigeon-toed. (And, as has been observed, I'm also knock-kneed. I never noticed any correlation between the two features, but that's probably because my sibs were both very knock-kneed too, but neither had foot problems... we just had a knock-kneed father!) I vividly remember hating, hating, hating those dad-blamed shoes, and my mother swears that I'm the only child she ever knew who could ball her foot up into a "fist" to avoid having those torture devices shoved on my poor little tootsies.

Thirty years later, I see three results: I flatly refused to buy those white baby high tops for my own kids; my mother still nags me (and my pediatrician, if I'm not looking) to put her grandbabies into shoes to "correct" their every foot idiosyncracy; and I will happily abandon a pair of shoes whenever and wherever, if they make my feet hurt. (When I asked Doc about my daughter's slightly inturned left foot, he told me to let her run barefooted.)

ComeToTheDarkSideWeHaveCookies
09-07-2005, 02:36 PM
Welcome to the boards, First Lady of Infinity. :)

*throws the switch on the tractor-beam to slowly suck her into Cecil's clutches*

Hold still. This will only hurt for a second...

The Scrivener
09-07-2005, 03:57 PM
I walked pigeon-toed as a toddler and wore corrective leg braces, day and night, for two years (ages 3-4). I remember the frustration of trying to fall asleep (and forget turning over) and even trying to get up with those things on... I also have fallen arches, mismatched feet (almost a half-size different), and slightly mismatched legs.

Unsurprisingly, when I was a kid my favorite "sports" were swimming and chess. :D

Kyla
09-07-2005, 04:36 PM
I was pigeon toed as a kid. My dad believes to this day that it was caused by jelly sandals (remember those?). He took me to a podiatrist or something when I was six or seven and they had plastic inserts made for my feet. I had to wear them in my shoes all the time. By the time I grew out of them, my feet were pretty much okay. After years of ballet, my feet now turn outwards.

They're still dead flat, though. The inserts didn't help at all with that.

First Lady of Infinity
09-07-2005, 09:38 PM
No need for the tractor beam: My best friend got me hooked by sending a link to one of Sampiro's threads. No other coercion needed! (Of course, now I don't know whether to blame Friend or Sampiro when I miss a deadline because I'm busy reading about people's corrective shoes/insane relatives/favorite movies/whatever.)

FilmGeek
09-07-2005, 10:32 PM
I was born with huge fat pads on the bottoms of my feet, and tiny tiny femurs. The doctors told my mom I would never walk. When I was an infant and sat up, my baby belly fat covered my femurs completely, and it looked like my knees and hips were attached to each other.

I wore orthotics in my shoes for the first couple of years until the fat melted away and my arches were found to be low, but normal. I still have a fat pad, so my arches look fallen in wet footprints, but they're not.

I still need to be careful what shoes I wear because my chronic sesmoiditis (http://www.drgregmorris.com/sesmoiditis.htm) and plantar fasicitis (http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/987116429.html) act up if I wear hard soled shoes.

irishgirl
09-08-2005, 05:47 AM
I have very high arches as a result of mild spina bifida. So when I learnt to walk my feet took the path of least resistance and I walked on the outside edges, so that my soles actually faced each other.

Not such a great thing.

My mother of course took me to an orthopaedic surgeon who wanted full leg casts, calipers, traction and og knows what else. Mum sought a second opinion, from another consultant (one about 30 years younger who specialised in paediatric cases) and all I ended up with were tiny grey plastic things that sat around my heels when I wore shoes, which I wore from the age of 2 til 5. I don't think they were even visible to an observer, and I don't remember any pain or discomfort.

I still have insanely high arches and wear down the outside of my heels (most of my shoes need re-heeled every 6 months) but at least I walk normally.

matt_mcl
09-08-2005, 09:48 AM
Wow, I had no idea that very flat feet were considered orthopedically severe. Mine are also very flat (full footprints!) and I regularly take very long walks and bike rides. They hurt a fair bit after a while but it doesn't bother me that much.

This isn't orthopedia, but kind of analogous: as a kid I developed amblyopia (lazy eye) so I had to wear patches over my right (dominant) eye so that my left eye would learn to see. Otherwise it could have gone blind despite being physically normal. Today, I see almost entirely out of my right eye when both are open (except for the far left of my visual field), but I still have normal vision in my left eye when I close my right.

I have widely spaced teeth, like my mother (who also contributed the upper left canine that never fell out and had to be extracted when I was in college). There was talk of braces, but it turned out that I had properly spaced but small teeth, so braces would have just crowded them into the front of my dental arcade. So we left well enough alone.

jayjay
09-08-2005, 10:33 AM
I used to have to wear the shoes with the bar as an infant, as well, and I'm fairly certain that my mother still has them in her hall closet somewhere in the back. I also have flat feet and had to wear special shoes with the cork "cookie" in the sole until I was in something like 8th grade.

CantUseMyRealName
09-08-2005, 05:04 PM
I used to have to wear the shoes with the bar as an infant

it's called a dennis-brown bar, and i also had one.

YaWanna
09-08-2005, 06:10 PM
My mother mentioned that I had to wear special corrective shoes as a baby, but I don't know any details.

monstro
09-08-2005, 06:19 PM
I was really bowlegged as toddler, to the point that it looked difficult for me to walk (I say "look" because I have no memory of that period of my life beyond what I've seen in home movies and photos). I had to wear special shoes too. My legs are pretty straight now but sometimes I think I'm a little bandy-legged when I see my reflection in the mirror.

stargazer
09-08-2005, 07:07 PM
I called my parents today to check on the particulars... neither remembers the exact timeline, but apparently I had pigeon-toes and my feet rotated outward. I had casts up to just below my knees from when I was 6 or 7 months old until I was about a year -- my dad says I started standing and perhaps walking in the casts. Then I got the special shoes, and I had the bar between them to wear at night. The shoes looked like I was wearing them on the wrong feet. I had that until I was almost 2 years old -- and, man, I HATED that bar! That must be one of my first memories, because I distinctly remember hating that bar.

I'm no longer pigeon-toed, but my feet do still rotate out some -- most of my shoes have the outside of the sole worn down much faster than the rest, and I'll stand or rest on the outside of my feet -- especially when I'm tired.

Hm, I'm doing that right now, as I'm typing -- I'm wearing new shoes, and they're a little uncomfortable since I've been wearing them all day. My foot bottoms are touching, and it feels perfectly normal to me.

I do have some knee problems, but we have no way of knowing if that's because of the orthopedic gear or in spite of it, or if it's completely unrelated. I do have a tendency to roll my ankle, sometimes quite badly. It's kind of embarassing -- it looks like I've tripped over nothing.

Dangit, how come I got the sucky genes and my brother got the good ones? I have bad eyesight, huge tonsils, bad knees and ankles, and I'm short and overweight (I know, the overweight isn't entirely genetic, but if you look at my family....). My brother is tall and trim, is the only one in the family who doesn't need corrective lenses, doesn't have any health or joint issues, nothing! Oh, well -- I did get the red hair. :)

ComeToTheDarkSideWeHaveCookies
09-08-2005, 08:17 PM
I do have a tendency to roll my ankle, sometimes quite badly. It's kind of embarassing -- it looks like I've tripped over nothing.


I TOTALLY do this all the time and I hate it. :mad: In fact I just did it a couple of days ago in my front yard. I was walking toward my garbage bin with a small trash bag in each hand. I stepped down onto a very slight depression in the yard that was masked by the grass and then *THWUMP*... I instantly collapsed in a heap like someone had yanked the ground out from under me.

Most of the time I don't cause injury to my ankle, but a few months ago when I was in Vegas with my girlfriend, I "fell off" a 1" overlap of the sidewalk :dubious: into a heap in front of a McDonalds and sprained my ankle pretty bad. I blamed it on it being 3am and us having spent the night drinking and dancing at the dyke club on the Strip. But now that I think about it, and how commonly it happens to me for little or no reason, I'm certainly willing to consider my walking posture as the culprit.

It doesn't seem to happen to me nearly as often when I'm running or playing sports and such, though. Maybe because I'm concentrating more on my footing when I run than when I walk?

danceswithcats
09-08-2005, 09:52 PM
Another pigeon toed kid checking in. I also had that hateful brace between my baby shoes, and wonder why my nose protrudes at all, as many times as I fell on my face. That didn't fix things, and it wasn't until an orthopedic doc realized that my right leg was shorter than the left that the problem was fixed. I had to wear special shoes with a lift in the heel, but thankfully, my adolescent growth spurt caused the legs to even out and the crappy special shoes are a thing of the past.

CaliforniaSun
11-26-2011, 05:39 PM
I wore those corrective shoes with a bar as a baby too. I recall my parents supporting me as I jumped on the bed with them on. :) But I also recall screaming into the darkness from my crib. :(

I have mixed feelings about the therapy.

jayjay
11-26-2011, 05:41 PM
I had the shoes with the bar, too, but I don't remember it at all. I only know about it because my mom kept it in the upstairs closet well into my adult years.

chiroptera
11-26-2011, 05:49 PM
I wore those corrective shoes with a bar as a baby too. I recall my parents supporting me as I jumped on the bed with them on. :) But I also recall screaming into the darkness from my crib. :(

I have mixed feelings about the therapy.

Welcome to SD.

Are you aware that you're responding to a thread that is over 6 years old and almost all of the original posters are long gone?

CaliforniaSun
11-26-2011, 06:13 PM
Welcome to SD.

Are you aware that you're responding to a thread that is over 6 years old and almost all of the original posters are long gone?

Hello! Yes, I'm aware this is an old thread. I was doing research on the Dennis Brown Bar corrective shoes and came across these posts and found them helpful as I process my experience.

Scarlett67
11-26-2011, 06:39 PM
Maybe if somebody put corrective shoes on zombies, they wouldn't shamble so badly.

(Second thought: Phew, I already posted here once, don't have to tell the whole story again!)

aruvqan
11-26-2011, 06:43 PM
Welcome to SD.

Are you aware that you're responding to a thread that is over 6 years old and almost all of the original posters are long gone?
I'm still here .... what am I, chopped liver?

*wanders away sniffling because she feels abandoned and ignored*

whiterabbit
11-26-2011, 08:35 PM
Ah, another zombie where I think, "Hey! I should post in this thread!" until I notice that it's several years old..and I already had anyway.

carnut
11-26-2011, 08:44 PM
I was born with both my feet turned in and had to wear special shoes with a bar between them to straighten my feet. I've been told that learning to walk was a real trial b/c my feet were effectively shackled together. Oddly enough, my shutterbug parents took no pictures of Baby in Bondage.

I'm fine now. Well, my feet are.

wow, .... I was suckered. I never looked at the date.

vix
11-26-2011, 09:33 PM
Ah, another zombie where I think, "Hey! I should post in this thread!" until I notice that it's several years old..and I already had anyway.

Ha, same here.

Baker
11-26-2011, 09:38 PM
When I was born one foot was twisted slightly in towards the other. It didn't require surgery, but at the point I began to walk my shoe had a strap attached to it that wound around my leg, gradually pulling the foot into it's proper direction as I grew. I have the vague memory of being put to bed and it coming off, but I'm not sure if it's a real memory or something I "remember" because I was told about it. Easter of 1958, when I was a little over three years old, there's a picture of me dressed for church wearing the shoe and strap.

I didn't see this was a zombie, and that I'd already posted the same story!

It's still a good thread.

phouka
11-26-2011, 10:24 PM
What's the opposite of being pigeon-toed? I'd say duck-footed, but that implies being flat-footed. If I try really hard, I can walk with my feet pointed straight ahead, but otherwise, my feet open at about a 45 degree angle from where my heels touch. If I stand in ballet position 1 - feet in a straight line, touching at the heels - I can turn my toes further out until my feet are at about a 195 degree angle.

CaliforniaSun
11-26-2011, 11:18 PM
When I was born one foot was twisted slightly in towards the other. It didn't require surgery, but at the point I began to walk my shoe had a strap attached to it that wound around my leg, gradually pulling the foot into it's proper direction as I grew. I have the vague memory of being put to bed and it coming off, but I'm not sure if it's a real memory or something I "remember" because I was told about it. Easter of 1958, when I was a little over three years old, there's a picture of me dressed for church wearing the shoe and strap.

I didn't see this was a zombie, and that I'd already posted the same story!

It's still a good thread.

Although it's been many, many, many years since I've worn the corrective shoes, they somehow made a deep impression on me and I feel I'm just getting out of them, finally. Each little story I hear from others, helps me let go of the trauma of being physically restrained at such a tender age.

CaliforniaSun
11-26-2011, 11:19 PM
P.S. Thank you all for posting...

Guinastasia
11-26-2011, 11:36 PM
Another pigeon-toed kid here and I had to wear corrective shoes until I was about, maybe six? All I remember is that they were these big clunky things and that they were butt ugly and I hated them.

I don't know if they did all that much good, since I still walk a wee-pigeon toed, but perhaps it was a lot worse when I was little. I don't really remember. (I DO remember getting my first pair of slip-on shoes and being so happy)

ComeToTheDarkSideWeHaveCookies
11-26-2011, 11:42 PM
Wow, this thread is so old I feel like I'm posting as another person now. Glad you found it helpful though!

missinformation
11-27-2011, 02:42 PM
My sister had some sort of hip dysplasia and had a similar setup -- cast, then brace, both with her legs splayed out. My mother says they just gave her a baby with a cast on and let HER figure out how to deal with diapering. My sister learned to crawl by swiveling her hips from side to side, dragging the cast (and later the brace) behind her. Her bronzed "first baby shoes" are significantly bigger than my pair.

I also had some kind of foot problem and wore corrective shoes, with a "cookie" in them and metal cleats on toe and heel. I couldn't wear "regular" shoes until about the 6th grade. Yay me. (As if I didn't have enough social problems. I was horrified when the orthodontist told me in high school that I'd have to wear headgear, but thankfully it was nighttime only.)

Scarlett, I was also born with congenital hip dysplasia. The ball and socket joint on my right hip were only partially formed when I was a baby. I had a surgery when I was 3 months old and put in a Spica cast, with a skate bar across both feet. My mother was lucky, the cast had a hole for the diapering. I learned how to get from point A to point B by dragging myself everywhere by my arms...anything that stood still was fair game...wore out the knees and the bottom of the cast, because if I was sitting up, I bounced my way across the floor on my backside. (My mother said she was glad we had tile floor in the kitchen because she could keep track of my whereabouts.)

I learned to walk at 2.5 years old, and had another hip surgery not long after. I remember being in the hospital and some family friends coming to visit me...they brought me flash cards of the alphabet...strange memory....I still walk with a limp to this day because I never had the final surgery to correct. My right ball and socket joint are now half formed, and my right leg is an inch and a half shorter than my left, so I can change my height!!

guizot
11-27-2011, 03:01 PM
wow, .... I was suckered...

Ha, same here."Suckered"? That's an interesting word choice. Do you feel violated or cheated somehow? Or is there a fine you have to pay because you didn't make a (tired and unnecessary) zombie joke? Will you be socially ostracized? Or is the need for orthopedic correction a phenomenon so long of the past that it has been eliminated by modern medicine--like polio?

Lacunae Matata
11-27-2011, 03:08 PM
We were both born in 1969, and my husband and I both wore corrective shoes (plus braces for me.) Now that we have our own little pigeon-toed daughter, our moms are losing their minds because she isn't wearing the shoes/braces/etc., and my husband is buying into their hype. (I have older kids. I've learned to ignore this particular bee in my mom's bonnet.) But current medical advice is different from what our parents were told. And unless it's medically necessary, I'm sure as hell not planning to make my kid wear those damned hurty shoes!

I may have to club a few well-meaning folks to make them listen when I tell them that doctors don't routinely advise those shoes any more, though! I actually made Tony take the baby for her last checkup, because he kept questioning whether I was telling him the doctor's exact advice. Yes, dear: 2 pediatricians and both of their nurse practioners say the very same thing. But I try to be patient, recalling how neurotic I was with my first, and how naggy my own mom has been about this issue. (And my oldest will be 21 in a few weeks. You'd think that Ma would have shut up about it by now... and you'd be wrong!)

Shirley Ujest
11-27-2011, 04:30 PM
I was born with both my feet turned in and had to wear special shoes with a bar between them to straighten my feet. I've been told that learning to walk was a real trial b/c my feet were effectively shackled together. Oddly enough, my shutterbug parents took no pictures of Baby in Bondage.

I'm fine now. Well, my feet are.

There was a kid in our school that had this treatment. When we had church service, we could always hear him squeak as he walked. He was elementary school during this happyfuntime for him.

vix
11-27-2011, 05:36 PM
"Suckered"? That's an interesting word choice. Do you feel violated or cheated somehow? Or is there a fine you have to pay because you didn't make a (tired and unnecessary) zombie joke? Will you be socially ostracized? Or is the need for orthopedic correction a phenomenon so long of the past that it has been eliminated by modern medicine--like polio?

I wasn't actually responding to carnut's post, but his word choice didn't bother me. I assume he was jokingly noting that he read some or all of the thread before realizing it was a zombie, as I did. No big deal.

rhubarbarin
11-27-2011, 06:50 PM
Mercifully, I didn't inherit the severe issues my parents (born in the 50s) had! My dad wore braces on his lower legs for years as a young child to correct bow legs and pigeon-toed feet, then he spent 6 years in headgear and braces for his teeth when he was older. My mom was in a gigantic cage of a back brace ages 11 to 18 to correct severe scoliosis.

I had braces on my teeth, and I have one leg shorter than the other that I should really wear a lift for, but I don't.

Like matt_mcl I have amblyopia but my eye doesn't drift, so it wasn't caught until 3rd grade when I failed an eye exam - and I guess they don't do the eyepatch thing with older kids. My right eye, which has very good vision, does most of the work unless I wear my glasses.

whiterabbit
11-27-2011, 07:10 PM
Zombie threads don't leave me feeling suckered. Amused, yes.

elfkin477
11-27-2011, 11:16 PM
Are you aware that you're responding to a thread that is over 6 years old and almost all of the original posters are long gone?And at least one has in fact died... :(

AboutAsWeirdAsYouCanGet
11-28-2011, 02:28 AM
Inserts in my shoes, also was night casted as a kid until fourth grade (89)

Spoons
11-28-2011, 02:59 AM
I had to wear horrribly uncomfortable shoes for years. According to my mother, flat feet were unacceptable. So, as one who had flat feet, I suffered, wearing those awful orthopedic shoes that were supposed to correct flat feet.

After I walked hundreds of miles in my sneakers (I liked to walk), Mother was willing to concede that maybe flat feet weren't so bad.

Why were flat feet bad? I never had a problem with them, and I still wonder.