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View Full Version : Why does Levon Helm hate Robbie Robertson


constantine
11-16-2005, 02:16 AM
Just saw the Last Waltz.

Of course I'd heard some of the Band's songs before but after seeing this movie (several times now) I'm just blown away.

So, as I start to read more about them on the web, I learn that Levon Helm despises Robbie Robertson. (Based on second hand accounts of "This Wheel's on Fire".)

In the interviews I've read with Robertson, he seems pretty cool. It seems like Helm's big gripe is that Robertson made so much in royalties from being credited as the writer of the songs. Is there more to it?

Zoe
11-16-2005, 04:33 AM
Do you have a link?

The Last Waltz is a favorite of mine.

plnnr
11-16-2005, 08:19 AM
The Last Waltz is also a favorite of mine.

I don't know the answer to the question (I suspect royalites have a big part to play), but I do know that the last time I saw Levon Helm on TV he looked really terrible.

Richard Manuel, Rick Danko...let's hope Levon Helm holds on.

RealityChuck
11-16-2005, 08:26 AM
There was friction within the group because Robertson was the only one getting songwriting royalties. I hadn't heard that Helm destested Robertson, though.

The Last Waltz is a great film, and the Band is one of the great forgotten groups in rock. People forget that at their height they were considered up with the Beatles, the Stones, the Dead, the Doors, and many other rock legends. But they had no hit singles and classic rock stations have generally ignored them.

Ukulele Ike
11-16-2005, 09:33 AM
Really? "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" and "Up on Cripple Creek" don't count as hits?

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
11-16-2005, 10:16 AM
Really? "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" and "Up on Cripple Creek" don't count as hits?
"The Night..." was a hit for Joan Baez, not for the Band. "Up on Cripple Creek," though I personally remember it as a heavy airplay item back in the day, was only a minor hit, reaching #25 on the singles chart.

RealityChuck
11-16-2005, 10:20 AM
"Up on Cripple Creek" got to #25 on the Billboard Charts. It was their most successful single.

Their version of "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" never charted. (Joan Baez's version did get to #3.)

So, no. They didn't have any hits. A single song just barely making the top 25 hardly qualifies, and they are criminally overlooked by "Classic Rock" stations, who tend to stick with groups that had successful singles (the the exception of Traffic).

They were primarily an album group: The Band reached #9 and Cahoot hit #5.

Nonsuch
11-16-2005, 10:24 AM
The Last Waltz is a great film, and the Band is one of the great forgotten groups in rock. People forget that at their height they were considered up with the Beatles, the Stones, the Dead, the Doors, and many other rock legends. But they had no hit singles and classic rock stations have generally ignored them.
Except for "The Weight." Ad nauseum.

astro
11-16-2005, 10:42 AM
Rolling Stone interview from 1969 is interesting - The Robbie Robertson Interview (http://theband.hiof.no/articles/rr_intreview_rs1969.html)

Wartime Consigliori
11-16-2005, 11:07 AM
I don't know the answer to the question (I suspect royalites have a big part to play), but I do know that the last time I saw Levon Helm on TV he looked really terrible.

Levon came down with a nasty case of throat cancer a few years back. He can't sing anymore, but can speak well enough to give interviews. He still plays gigs, doing the drumming while his daughter, Amy, handles the singing chores.

Albert Rose
11-16-2005, 11:40 AM
Great interview there. My favorite quote: I came very late, and just heard Yoko Ono's music, or screaming, or whatever you want to call it, and saw the Doors, who were a drag. They haven't done anything new or gone anywhere in a long time.

Sam Stone
11-17-2005, 12:18 AM
I think the beef with Robbie Robertson is that various members of the Band believed they made legitimate contributions to some of the songs that Robertson claimed for himself.

I think it would go something like this: Robbie would come in with a piece of a song, or melody, or whatever. He'd say "Guys, I'm working on a new song, and this is what I've got. What do you think?" And then they'd all sit around and talk about it, and maybe come up with a lyric or a melody change or whatevre. Finally, Robbie would go away, write up the song, and take full credit.

To be fair, I think Robbie was definitely the genius behind The Band, and deserves the lion's share of the credit. But whether he should get 100% of it, I don't know. But that's where the conflict is.

Also, having seen The Last Waltz a couple of times, Robbie's demeanor sure is off-putting. He comes across as very arrogant at times and almost condescending. It may just be that he's a jerk. I know almost nothing about him personally, so I don't know if that's the case.

Eonwe
11-17-2005, 02:06 AM
"The Night..." was a hit for Joan Baez, not for the Band.

And if that isn't tragic, I don't know what is. Baez's version has always felt unemotional and forced, while the Band's gets it just right.

Cliffy
11-17-2005, 10:30 AM
I haven't seen The Lasst Waltz in a long time, but I recently rediscovered my copy of their Greatest Hits CD and it's been on heavy rotation on my iPod.

My dad and I did catch a bit of the film a few months ago; his favorite scene, where Van Morrison is getting himself psyched higher and higher and then busts an o-ring or something, because he immediately walks off stage, never to return.

--Cliffy

RealityChuck
11-17-2005, 11:35 AM
And if that isn't tragic, I don't know what is. Baez's version has always felt unemotional and forced, while the Band's gets it just right.Agreed. And she made some really pointless changes in the lyrics that also weakened the song ("so much cavalry"? :dubious: ), as though she hadn't actually seen them.

plnnr
11-17-2005, 12:17 PM
I haven't seen The Lasst Waltz in a long time, but I recently rediscovered my copy of their Greatest Hits CD and it's been on heavy rotation on my iPod.

My dad and I did catch a bit of the film a few months ago; his favorite scene, where Van Morrison is getting himself psyched higher and higher and then busts an o-ring or something, because he immediately walks off stage, never to return.

--Cliffy

Van does get pretty animated - he even manages a high leg kick or two.

I think my favorite "guest" is Joni Mitchell. That version of "Coyote" is terrific. I could do without Neil Diamond.

sqweels
11-17-2005, 12:37 PM
The amazing thing about The Last Walz is that nearly all the classic rockers that I don't like are together in one room.

Scumpup
11-17-2005, 12:41 PM
Rolling Stone interview from 1969 is interesting - The Robbie Robertson Interview (http://theband.hiof.no/articles/rr_intreview_rs1969.html)

My knowledge of The Band is pretty minimal. I have recordings of a couple of their songs and I saw "The Last Waltz." Based on this interview, though, it would be hard to come to any other conclusion than Robbie Robertson is an arrogant prick.

Loach
11-17-2005, 01:19 PM
The Last Waltz was The Band saying that life on the road sucks and they wanted no part of it. It was their last concert and a way of saying goodbye to that part of their lives and thanks to all of those they worked with. Robbie Robertson really meant it, the rest of them not so much. I think there was a lot of resentment that he never wanted to play with them again or go on the road after they got back together. I saw them open for CSN with all the original members except for Robertson. They were great. Soon after that Rich Manuel hanged himself. Robertson claimed to have the flu and did not go to the funeral.

Robbie Robertson did not stop making music, he just doesn't tour. He put out one of my favorite records of all time (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000000OQL/qid=1132250887/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-6503629-9270553?v=glance&s=music&n=507846) many years ago. You may have heard Rod Stewarts shitty version of Broken Arrow. The album also features U2 as a backup band with Bono as a backup singer (on a couple of tracks).

Kalhoun
11-17-2005, 02:43 PM
I read the interview. He's a pud. Yeah, he's entitled to his opinion and all, but he certainly doesn't sound like anyone I'd like to spend time interviewing.

Just goes to show you...sometimes it's just better to listen to the music and leave it at that.

Godfrey Daniels
11-17-2005, 03:11 PM
You'd write him off because of one interview 36 years ago? Or have there been subsequent episodes where he's lacked the proper humility? He hasn't done much in recent years to impress me, but he was a driving force behind the success of The Band, in my mind one of the greatest groups of all time.

Kalhoun
11-17-2005, 03:16 PM
You'd write him off because of one interview 36 years ago? Or have there been subsequent episodes where he's lacked the proper humility? He hasn't done much in recent years to impress me, but he was a driving force behind the success of The Band, in my mind one of the greatest groups of all time.
Dude...read what I wrote. I think the music is great. I think he's a dick.

Godfrey Daniels
11-17-2005, 03:26 PM
If you think he's a dick because of a 36 year old interview, it's possible that you might be making a hasty conclusion. But whatever..

mamboman
11-17-2005, 03:26 PM
Also, having seen The Last Waltz a couple of times, Robbie's demeanor sure is off-putting. He comes across as very arrogant at times and almost condescending. It may just be that he's a jerk. I know almost nothing about him personally, so I don't know if that's the case.

Did Roberston have to undergo some form of hypnosis before gigs to overcome his stage fright? Or is that just a rock n roll legend? Maybe that would explain his weird demeanour?

Also onthe subject of The Last Waltz and rock n roll legend, is it true that when Neil Diamond came off stage he said to Bob Dylan "Man, you're gonna have to go some to follow me tonight" (or words to that effect) and Bob replied "What am I gonna do - go out there and fall alseep?" (or words to that effect) Even if it isn;t true, it's pretty funny!

And IMO I don't think Neil Young ever sang prettier than he did at The Last Waltz.

mm

Voyager
11-17-2005, 04:01 PM
Agreed. And she made some really pointless changes in the lyrics that also weakened the song ("so much cavalry"? :dubious: ), as though she hadn't actually seen them.
My gripe also. :)

I don't think considering how high their singles got is a measure of their importance. They were on the cover of Time, after all!

I got to see them live at Tufts about the time Stage Fright came out. They were a fantastic live band, and I loved their version of "Don't Do It." which I had a bootleg of too. Take a listen to the Basement Tapes CD - not only do they back Dylan, they have some good stuff of their own.

RealityChuck
11-17-2005, 04:05 PM
My gripe also. :)

I don't think considering how high their singles got is a measure of their importance. They were on the cover of Time, after all! It isn't a measure of their importance: they were once of the top groups of their time, and their music hasn't dated a bit. However, because they didn't have any hit singles, their songs are not played on today's Classic Rock radio (which concentrates on singles). Thus, people don't get exposed to them and they are nowhere near as well known as they should be.

Baal Houtham
11-17-2005, 04:48 PM
I read Helmís book two years ago, and tried to figure out why he seemed so pissed at Robertson. Like Sam Stone wrote, a lot of the resentment was about writing credit (and money).

My memory is not perfect, and Helmís was not a model of cogency, these are some of the issues the book touches on:

1. The members all made important contributions to all the songs and didnít really understand the financial implications of Robertson receiving most of the writing credit.

2.The record company wanted the band to have a more visible front man, and encouraged Robertson to be THE songwriter. (While record companies do like to develop ďstarsĒ, especially females, I didnít think Helm offered much evidence of pressure from above.)

3. Helm and the other band memberís later sold the rights to the songs that they had co-written to Robertson. This was after Helm understood the importance of writing credit, but contends that he was pressured to do so by the groupís manager and the record label because they wanted to simplify royalty payment.

In the book he seemed to have mixed emotions toward the Bandís manager (Albert Grossman?) and sometimes portrayed him as an ally, and also as conspiring with Robertson to screw the rest of the group.

4. And as Loach said, the members other than Robertson didnít really want to retire after ďThe Last WaltzĒ. When the money starting getting tight, they resented Robbie's refusal to do reunions.

Overall, I felt that Helm didn't come up with any strong reasons for his strong resentment. Robertson came away with most of the money, but it seemed that the other members could have had their own writing credits if they had tried as hard --and written as well-- as Robbie.

Revtim
11-17-2005, 05:06 PM
Robbie Robertson did not stop making music, he just doesn't tour. He put out one of my favorite records of all time (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000000OQL/qid=1132250887/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-6503629-9270553?v=glance&s=music&n=507846) many years ago. You may have heard Rod Stewarts shitty version of Broken Arrow. The album also features U2 as a backup band with Bono as a backup singer (on a couple of tracks).I'm not a big Robbie Robertson fan, but Showdown At Big Sky is one of my favorite songs of all time.

Sam Stone
11-17-2005, 08:10 PM
Btw, if you've seen the great movie The Right Stuff, that's Levon Helm playing the part of Ripley. And he did a fine job of it, too.

BobLibDem
11-17-2005, 08:21 PM
"The Night..." was a hit for Joan Baez, not for the Band. "Up on Cripple Creek," though I personally remember it as a heavy airplay item back in the day, was only a minor hit, reaching #25 on the singles chart.

Why Baez had more commercial success with that song, in which she successfully removed every trace of depth and soul, is one of life's great mysteries. The Last Waltz version of The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down is a masterpiece. Definitely Van the Man was the guest with the best performance, though he appeared stoned out of his gourd. Emmylou Harris was a treat as was the surreal treatment of her studio number Evangeline. Scorsese deserved a lot of credit for the work that went into this film, done well before videos and MTV were heard of.

I never heard of the Helm-Robertson feud. Helm's gritty voice was my personal favorite of the bunch. Robbie's one of the underrated geniuses of the era- how unfair that an artist of his ability just can't sing worth a hoot.

bmoak
11-17-2005, 11:28 PM
I think the beef with Robbie Robertson is that various members of the Band believed they made legitimate contributions to some of the songs that Robertson claimed for himself.

I think it would go something like this: Robbie would come in with a piece of a song, or melody, or whatever. He'd say "Guys, I'm working on a new song, and this is what I've got. What do you think?" And then they'd all sit around and talk about it, and maybe come up with a lyric or a melody change or whatevre. Finally, Robbie would go away, write up the song, and take full credit.

Lyrically, Robbie's songs were Robbie's songs. Richard Manuel was the only other serious songwriter in the group (although everyone got a little songwriting action in the first two albums), and he had real trouble with lyrics. The arguments mostly occur over the credits for the music and whether they should be shared. The Band was VERY collobarative, especially in the early years in Woodstock, and would often spend hours together working out the arrangements for a song. For example, Robbie wrote "Rag, Mama, Rag" as a straightforward rock number, but it didn't work until the other guys changed the tempo, and switched instruments, transposing Robbie's guitar lead to Rick Dankos's fiddle and having Garth Hudson play syncopated ragtime style on an old upright piano (among other changes)

Also, having seen The Last Waltz a couple of times, Robbie's demeanor sure is off-putting. He comes across as very arrogant at times and almost condescending. It may just be that he's a jerk. I know almost nothing about him personally, so I don't know if that's the case.

Robbie sure did mug for the cameras and play up to Scorsese, didn't he? Robbie was somewhat alienated from his bandmates by that time (notice how often he seems to be standing apart from them), and was stressing from trying to put together the concert and the movie (the other guys weren't that interested, especially in the movie side of things, ad were rather ambivalent about the whole idea of The Last Waltz).

Outside of Levon Helms' book (which I haven't read) , the book on the Band is Barney Hoskyn's Across the Great Divide: The Band and America. Robbie Robertson was very driven. Without him, the Band would probably have never broken out of the bar band circuit. But he also had a very cold calculating side. For example, he didn't want Ronnie Hawkins to be at the Last Waltz, thinking his former mentor was too small time to be on that stage with him.

bmoak
11-18-2005, 06:11 PM
My highlights from The Last Waltz:

Van Morrison high-kicking his stumpy little legs thorugh the closing to "Caravan"
Paul Butterfield and Levon storming through "Mystery Train"
Muddy Waters nearly giving himself a heart attack grinding out "Mannish Boy"
The Staples Singers and the Band combining to creat multipart harmony in the last verse of "The Weight"
Robbie picking up Clapton's solo in "Further Along Up the Road" after Clapton's strap broke
Ronnie Hawkins, big time at last, hamming it up in front of his former sidemen.
Levon, Rick, and Robbie yodelling through "Up on Cripple Creek"
Garth's greasy sax solo in "It Makes No Difference"
Levon singing the immortal lines 'Vrigil Caine is the name, and I worked on the Danville Train." for what was presumable the last time.

Robot Arm
11-18-2005, 06:59 PM
Btw, if you've seen the great movie The Right Stuff, that's Levon Helm playing the part of Ripley. And he did a fine job of it, too.Ridley, Yeager's flight engineer; he of the broomhandle and Beeman's. I don't know The Band's music very well, but I'm willing to cut Levon Helm a lot of slack for being in the best damn movie ever made.

vl_mungo
11-18-2005, 07:17 PM
<snip> the last time I saw Levon Helm on TV he looked really terrible.

Richard Manuel, Rick Danko...let's hope Levon Helm holds on.

Mr. Helm appeared recently in a fine movie, The Life and Hard Times of Guy Terrifico (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0408993). He looked and sounded about a million years old, but he was still very entertaining.

Sam Stone
11-18-2005, 08:35 PM
Ridley, Yeager's flight engineer; he of the broomhandle and Beeman's. I don't know The Band's music very well, but I'm willing to cut Levon Helm a lot of slack for being in the best damn movie ever made.

Right. Jack Ridley. The movie depiction of Ridley was a little wrong. The real Ridley was killed in an aircraft accident in 1957, but he was shown helping Yeager prep for the NF-104, which Yeager crashed. The NF-104 wasn't delivered until 1963, and that's the year of the accident.

Great movie. One of my favorites, but with some flaws. Like the mystical 'fireflies' with the aborigines.

What the .... ?!?!
11-19-2005, 10:21 AM
Levon came down with a nasty case of throat cancer a few years back. He can't sing anymore, but can speak well enough to give interviews. He still plays gigs, doing the drumming while his daughter, Amy, handles the singing chores.

I thought he did some singing when I last saw him on Imus sometime this past summer.

Rilchiam
11-29-2005, 06:16 AM
And IMO I don't think Neil Young ever sang prettier than he did at The Last Waltz.


Maybe not, but he sure couldn't play his guitar! He'd done a couple of lines before going onstage, and claimed later, "I was fried...I barely knew where I was." You can see Robertson and Danko exchange a glance and then move closer to their mikes, apparently realizing that it's up to them to make up the difference for Young, who, while still making chords with one hand, is unable to hit the strings with the other. He did sing well, though; I'll give him that.

China Guy
11-29-2005, 07:04 AM
I haven't seen the Last Waltz since it was in the theaters :eek: also had a college buddy that was at the Last Waltz.

I just popped in to say that legendary bluesman (for those that don't know who he was) Muddy Waters sang beautifully in the film. Caldonea and Mannish Boy.

Dr. Rieux
11-29-2005, 11:30 AM
Mr. Helm appeared recently in a fine movie, The Life and Hard Times of Guy Terrifico (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0408993). He looked and sounded about a million years old, but he was still very entertaining.
Levon also played the coal miner in Coal Miner's Daughter.

Raph
08-02-2011, 02:34 AM
I've just been reading down the list of comments - some interesting stuff here.

Levon Helm also played Lorreta Lynn's father in the excellent film Coal Miner's Daughter, with Sissy Spacek as Lynn - it was made in the late 1970s.

I became an instant fan of The Band when I was 17 - watching Easy Rider on late nigth TV, first time I'd ever seen it. I watched it again recently and my favourite scene is still the one where they're riding across the desert (Monument Valley, Colorado?) at dusk with 'The Weight' playing on the soundtrack. Is there a better image of total freedom in any film? I can't think of one - that song just encapsulates it all.

I bought their greatest hits on CD 20 years ago but for some reason it just didn't quite grab me. Then a few months back I saw The Last Waltz DVD for sale for $10 and thought 'what the hell...'
I put it on after a few drinks one night, with my headphones on - and in 20 minutes I realised all that I'd heard about it was true - the best damned rock'n'roll movie ever made! I became an instant fan, have watched it 10 times since and am now a huge fan again after they dropped off my radar for a long time.

What a great bunch of guys, and the esteem in which they were held is in evidence with all the incredible guest stars. Van the man is my favourite - but I also love Dr John's performance, and Neil Young, Eric Clapton and more.

Yeah Robbie comes across as a bit of a tosser, but he was good mates with Scorsese long before the film was made. But you do get the impression Robbie treats the band as if they're his band. It's a shame about he and Levon falling out - but that sort of shit will happen in a band that's been together as long as those guys "16 years on the road!"
Focus on the legacy - some of the best damned music of the entire 20th century - the very best of Americana - and I'm an Australian...

The Tooth
08-02-2011, 02:44 AM
Is it Americana if most of the members weren't American?

Bridget Burke
08-02-2011, 08:06 AM
Last time I checked, Canada was in North America.

Le Ministre de l'au-delŗ
08-02-2011, 09:57 AM
Last time I checked, Canada was in North America.

Yes, but we're not American. If you're speaking about people connected with the USA, 'American' has become the default term. If you're speaking about things connected with Canada, you need to say 'Canadian'.

Peremensoe
08-02-2011, 01:50 PM
Is it Americana if most of the members weren't American?

Yes. And it has nothing to do with them being Canadian, either. "Americana" here refers to musical characteristics.

WordMan
08-02-2011, 01:55 PM
Yes. And it has nothing to do with them being Canadian, either. "Americana" here refers to musical characteristics.

Heck the current UK band Mumford & Sons is Americana....

purplehorseshoe
08-02-2011, 02:13 PM
My highlights from The Last Waltz:

Van Morrison high-kicking his stumpy little legs thorugh the closing to "Caravan"
Paul Butterfield and Levon storming through "Mystery Train"
Muddy Waters nearly giving himself a heart attack grinding out "Mannish Boy"
The Staples Singers and the Band combining to creat multipart harmony in the last verse of "The Weight"
Robbie picking up Clapton's solo in "Further Along Up the Road" after Clapton's strap broke
Ronnie Hawkins, big time at last, hamming it up in front of his former sidemen.
Levon, Rick, and Robbie yodelling through "Up on Cripple Creek"
Garth's greasy sax solo in "It Makes No Difference"
Levon singing the immortal lines 'Vrigil Caine is the name, and I worked on the Danville Train." for what was presumable the last time.

Ah, what the heck, as long as this has been resurrected, here's something I've wondered idly but not enough to start a separate thread:

Is it just me, or does Baez look incredibly uncomfortable standing next to Neil Young onstage? He seems to be leering at her, and she seems to be edging away, but again, maybe it's just me - Neil Young, musical talent aside, looks .. scary.

The Tooth
08-02-2011, 02:52 PM
Ah, what the heck, as long as this has been resurrected, here's something I've wondered idly but not enough to start a separate thread:

Is it just me, or does Baez look incredibly uncomfortable standing next to Neil Young onstage? He seems to be leering at her, and she seems to be edging away, but again, maybe it's just me - Neil Young, musical talent aside, looks .. scary.

Scarily drunk, yeah. Doesn't he blow the intro to "Helpless" and have to start over?

Bridget Burke
08-02-2011, 04:31 PM
Yes. And it has nothing to do with them being Canadian, either. "Americana" here refers to musical characteristics.

Yes. "Americana" is a musical genre, not a nationalistic label. With their eponymous album, The Band practically defined the genre. It struck many of us like a bolt of lightning.

The next year, the Grateful Dead's Workingman's Dead & American Beauty continued in the vein of Something New that sounded like Something Really Old. (Some of the folk rockers & country rockers had been mining the same rich vein. Things aren't simple. Labels aren't that important. Borders suck.)

MPB in Salt Lake
08-02-2011, 04:43 PM
Levon Helm is one of the most beloved, well respected American musicians alive today, while Robbie Robertson is a self-absorbed, preening peacock who doesn't have one true friend left in this world, due to his ego and narcissistic personality....

Steophan
08-02-2011, 04:49 PM
Ah, what the heck, as long as this has been resurrected, here's something I've wondered idly but not enough to start a separate thread:

Is it just me, or does Baez look incredibly uncomfortable standing next to Neil Young onstage? He seems to be leering at her, and she seems to be edging away, but again, maybe it's just me - Neil Young, musical talent aside, looks .. scary.

I remember reading that Neil Young was coked up to his eyeballs at this gig, and that they had to rotoscope obvious powder from his nose in the film. No idea how true this is, but he certainly looks like he's on cocaine.

ETA Wiki agrees with me (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_Waltz#Drug_use), for what it's worth.

Ogre
08-02-2011, 05:06 PM
I've had this performance on repeat recently.

Levon Helm performs "Ophelia" at Ryman Auditorium in 2009. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcgxuGiI7wU)

He still rocks. :) I just try to ignore the intro by Billy Bob Thornton.

Jim's Son
08-03-2011, 08:31 AM
Do ANY of these 1960s rock groups ever have members that get along? The Four Tops were together for 44 years before members started dying off but look at the ones with infighting. Beatles, Cream, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Temptations, Supremes, Jefferson Airplane, Allman Brothers, Kinks. The Rolling Stones survive with some members leaving but Keef and Mick were sniping in the 1980s. Pink Floyd blew up after years of being anonymous.

Bridget Burke
08-03-2011, 08:39 AM
I remember reading that Neil Young was coked up to his eyeballs at this gig, and that they had to rotoscope obvious powder from his nose in the film. No idea how true this is, but he certainly looks like he's on cocaine.....

Weren't they all?

Le Ministre de l'au-delŗ
09-01-2011, 04:12 PM
This month's Acoustic Guitar has an interesting interview and article (http://www.acguitar.com/article/default.aspx?articleid=26890) about Robbie Richardson.

digs
09-01-2011, 05:27 PM
Do ANY of these 1960s rock groups ever have members that get along?...

Yeah, I wish I played well enough to have Levon Helm or Roger Waters mad at me...

MPB in Salt Lake
09-01-2011, 05:43 PM
I've had this performance on repeat recently.

Levon Helm performs "Ophelia" at Ryman Auditorium in 2009. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcgxuGiI7wU)

He still rocks. :) I just try to ignore the intro by Billy Bob Thornton.

I am flying out to Boston to hear Levon perform in a couple of weeks, and I absolutely can't wait; The last time (in fact the only other time) I have seen him play live before was way back in 1994, with The Band, at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, so after all these years, and with all the personal and professional travails Levon has faced recently, to be able to witness his triumphant artistic Renaissance should be truly momentous.

"Take a load off, Annie..."

waits
09-03-2011, 12:22 AM
There's a great (probably apocryphal) story about the Canadian premiere of The Last Waltz. At the end of the movie, invited guest Ronnie Hawkins stands up and drawls, "Well, that was pretty good. The only thing that movie needs is a couple more close-ups of Robbie."

cjepson
09-06-2011, 01:24 PM
There's a great (probably apocryphal) story about the Canadian premiere of The Last Waltz. At the end of the movie, invited guest Ronnie Hawkins stands up and drawls, "Well, that was pretty good. The only thing that movie needs is a couple more close-ups of Robbie."

Levon Helm himself says, in his book, that that's what Ronnie said to him after the two of them saw the movie.

glovemonkey
01-06-2013, 08:54 AM
"Up on Cripple Creek" got to #25 on the Billboard Charts. It was their most successful single.

Their version of "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" never charted. (Joan Baez's version did get to #3.)

So, no. They didn't have any hits. A single song just barely making the top 25 hardly qualifies, and they are criminally overlooked by "Classic Rock" stations, who tend to stick with groups that had successful singles (the the exception of Traffic).

They were primarily an album group: The Band reached #9 and Cahoot hit #5.

Dont forget "before the flood" although released as a Dylan album the band did more than back hisbobness and the album had great commercial sucsess

glovemonkey
01-06-2013, 09:04 AM
Levon Helm himself says, in his book, that that's what Ronnie said to him after the two of them saw the movie.

Yup 20 minutes of Robbie singing into a switched off mic nearly ruined it for me!!
Best bits for me - the Weight, first time ive seen the staples and nearly shat myself they were so good.
Danko on bass the entire movie his energy was just electric
Up on cripple creek 3 words - LEVON FUcKING HELM!!!!!

Missed - Richard singing i shall be released

Anyway the band were and are amazing music from the big pink has been in my cd changer for 4 years!!