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Left Hand of Dorkness
04-28-2006, 02:16 PM
This is really a suite of questions, but I'm asking them together because they follow a theme: I'm interested in knowing what public education in other countries looks like.

I'm primarily interested in data points from industrialized nations, but any data points would be interesting. Note, however, that I'm interested in cited stats, not in anecdotes about what you've noticed about your kid's experience: while those anecdotes can be cool, I'm afraid that they might confuse the issue here.

1) How many students comprise a typical classroom?
2) How many days a year do students typically attend school?
3) How many hours of homework do students typically have each night?
4) What sort of education must teachers have?
5) How does teacher pay compare to the pay of other careers with similar education requirements?

That ought to get us started :).

Daniel

GorillaMan
04-28-2006, 02:36 PM
For England:

1) How many students comprise a typical classroom?
Averages of the high 20s for primary school, low 20s for secondary. http://www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000457/index.shtml
2) How many days a year do students typically attend school?
190

3) How many hours of homework do students typically have each night?
The government has guidelines, which IIRC start at an hour a week for 5-7 year olds, up to two hours a night for 14-16s. However, this isn't obligatory, and it varies a lot in either direction, depending on the school.

4) What sort of education must teachers have?
Qualified Teacher Status (http://www.tda.gov.uk/Recruit/becomingateacher/qualifiedteacherstatus.aspx). Most commonly, a bachelor's degree plus a one-year teacher training course, or a BEd.

5) How does teacher pay compare to the pay of other careers with similar education requirements?
http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/management/payandperformance/pay/
Difficult to compare 'similar education requirements'. An economics teacher is probably losing out, but an art teacher has better pay and job security than most of their peers.

Throatwarbler Mangrove
04-28-2006, 02:42 PM
1) How many students comprise a typical classroom?
2) How many days a year do students typically attend school?
3) How many hours of homework do students typically have each night?
4) What sort of education must teachers have?
5) How does teacher pay compare to the pay of other careers with similar education requirements?

Daniel


I guess this is sort of anecdotal, but I still think it is useful.

I attended some elementary school and Jr. High school in urban China.

1) In elementary schools, typically 50-70. the class sizes get bigger in Jr High and Highschool, around 70-90.

2) I can't put down an exact number, but most likely many more days that US students. e.g. when I was at school, we had nationally mandated holidays (National day, etc) off, but were required to "make up" these days on subsequent saturdays and sundays. I don't ever recall getting any days off because of snow or teachers strikes or such. Otherwise the academic schedule is similar (maybe a bit longer) to that of the US.

3) A fair amount, typically 2 or 3 hours per night.

4) I have never really looked seriously into this, but I understand that there are teacher's colleges and acadamies which are the source of most teachers.

5) Again, I'm not certain, but i get the imression that it is a reasonably well paying job for the most part. It depends very much on the location and the school.

I also attended elementary school in the UK. Over there,

1) In my school, around 20 or so, although I understand that it is typically larger than that.

2) Similar to that of the US.

3) Very, very little, if at all, but this is for grades 2 to 6 only.

I have no idea about 4 or 5, I was too young then to notice.

Charlie Tan
04-28-2006, 06:45 PM
I don't think cites in Swedish is gonna help you, so you'll just have to take my word for the following, seeing that I'm working as a HS teacher:

1) How many students comprise a typical classroom?
Primary and secondary school: ~30

2) How many days a year do students typically attend school?
194

3) How many hours of homework do students typically have each night?
In primary school, this of course varies greatly if you compare a 7 y.o. and a 15 y.o. for the equivalent of junior high and HS I'd say 1-2 hr, depending on the type of education.

4) What sort of education must teachers have?
Under the law - none, really.
In practice, you won't get hired if you don't have the formal teacher training from college/university. Typically for HS, a teacher have two subjects (say may and Science) and must have 2 years full time study @ university level in each subject, plus 1.5 year of education for teaching, making it 4.5 years.

5) How does teacher pay compare to the pay of other careers with similar education requirements?
Crappy. But then, the hours are short and the holidays are long. A teacher fresh from the university in the first temp job will take home about $2.000 after tax per month.

Charlie Tan
04-28-2006, 06:47 PM
(say may* and Science)
That would be math....
:sigh: