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DMark
04-30-2006, 01:29 AM
Was talking with my elderly aunt and she mentioned gas wars back in the day...I had to laugh, as I immediately though of Iraq, but then remembered what she was talking about.

Back in the late 50's and early 60's, gas stations would sometimes have too much gas on stock and start lowering prices to sell it. Suddenly, in a small town, there would be a "gas war"...one station would lower the price, and the others would lower it more until a normal 50 cent per gallon would suddenly be 30 cents or less at several, if not all, of the gas stations....everybody would get in their cars and quickly drive to those stations and fill up their tanks.

It didn't happen often, and it was usually just a day or two, but enough for the phrase "gas war" to be common and once word got out, every car in town had a full tank. Of course, this was in the days when there was no self-serve. A man would come out, fill your tank and wash your windows while the car was being filled. If you asked, he would also check your oil and tire pressure for no charge. After your tank was filled, you handed him the cash, he went in and then brought you back your change.

Yeah, that really was the way people used to get gas back then.

Hilarity N. Suze
04-30-2006, 03:09 AM
Ah, those were the days. I could fill up my '57 Chevy for $2.

Seriously, 50-cent gas would have been very expensive. People where I lived would cross the street to get gas at 22 cents instead of 23 cents, and they'd drive to the outskirts of town to get it at 19 cents. The people I knew called these "price wars" and not "gas wars." But the regular price was not that much more. I don't think I paid more than 50 cents a gallon until the early '70s (which was also when the 55mph speed limit went into effect where I lived--before that, it was 70).

flickster
04-30-2006, 07:12 AM
Those were the days indeed. 19.9 is the cheapest I ever remember it getting as well ( This was East Tennessee - not exactly the oil patch). Was driving a VW at the time - could go forever on less then $2.00 :p

Spavined Gelding
04-30-2006, 07:59 AM
For about a week one summer in the early 60s, Foreacre Shell at the corner of Burlington and Dubuque in Iowa City was selling gas for $0.139–essentially the tax plus two cents. Regular price was, I think, about 32 cents. You actually drove into those places and asked for “A dollar’s worth of regular.”

TokyoBayer
04-30-2006, 08:06 AM
And with a full take of gas, you could get a glass on the corner gas station. I remember gas in the 32 cents a gallon range, but it was the mid to late 60s before I was old enough to understand the concept. My Mom told us about the gas wars, which were just a few years before.

DrMemory
04-30-2006, 08:30 AM
Did you have a bunch of those NFL glasses from Shell. too?.... :D

eleanorigby
04-30-2006, 08:46 AM
I recall gas wars, but I don't recall them being real cut throat. I also remember seeing gas for 34 cents a gallon as a child.


Related topic: the experts now say that the oil companies have no control over their pricing-that it is strictly market forces* (they also say that high gas prices reflect a robust economy), but back in the '70's, the higher prices were all blamed on OPEC. Those nasty Middle Easterners were showing their dislike of America and exercising their global political clout by upping the price, supposedly. There were runs on gas, lines at the pump, some stations ran out of gas, thereby fueling (sorry, bad pun) the hysteria. That is what I remember as a girl.

So, whatever happened to OPEC and it's monopoly of the oil market? I thought it was THE arbiter when it came to this market. Or am I hopelessly out of date and should go back to gardening?

sorry for hijack.



*which really doesn't explain record profits to me, but it's been a long time since Econ class.

Zeldar
04-30-2006, 09:04 AM
I recall a few noteworthy things from that era:

1) Daddy would take all the coke bottles to the grocery store for the refund and would have enough to fill the tank on our '49 Nash Ambassador.

2) He would drive 20 miles out of his way to get gas for 1c per gallon cheaper.

3) He would rock the car to be sure the gas filled the spout all the way to the cap.

4) I can remember "price wars" (may have been "gas wars" but the "price wars" were more common) where the price went below 20c.

5) In the early '60's I had an MGB and I could fill it up for $3.

6) I could make $5 serve an entire weekend's fun with a movie and a dinner at Shoney's.

7) Daddy considered any brand of gas but Gulf, Pure, Shell, Sinclair, Texaco, and Esso (later Exxon) to be "off brand" and wouldn't buy things like Tan-Kar, Cities Service (later Citgo), unless he was about to run out, and then just enough to get to a "real gas" station.

Even though gas was cheap in those days, it wasn't all that much cheaper by comparison to other consumables like milk, bread, coffee, and even cigarettes and beer. I can remember checking out groceries that would fill two carts and being amazed when the total came to over $30. Nowadays you can carry $30 worth of groceries in one hand.

samclem
04-30-2006, 09:06 AM
I was born in 1944, so I have great memories of gasoline which was normally 29.9/gal. in the late 40's and all through the 50's being cut to 19.9/gal. when individual stations in individual towns had "gas wars."

Lest we think this is some modern phenomenon, go back and read about the same thing happening first in the mid-1920's. Gasoline at that time was about .26/gal. Then some of the Western States decided this was highway(sorry) robbery. And South Dakota unilatterally dumped tons of gasoline into the market, forcing the price below .16/gal. Other states followed suit and the price cutting spread to the EAst, with many refineries being forced out of business due to the price cuttting.

The up and down wars continued on a State/regional basis into the 1930's. By this time the wars were fuled(sorry again) by competition between national refiners. Most of the wars ended in the mid-1930's when the refiners decided they were better off agreeing to keep prices stable.

The concept of individual stations cutting prices to help their business in a small location really didn't start until the late 1940's/early 1950's.

By 1963, regular prices in the L.A. area were 31.9/gal. They "surged" in the mid-1960's to 33.9/gal. By 1969 it was 38.9/gal.

Rick
04-30-2006, 11:51 AM
By 1963, regular prices in the L.A. area were 31.9/gal. They "surged" in the mid-1960's to 33.9/gal. By 1969 it was 38.9/gal.
When I started working in a Mobil station in 1967 regualar was 29.9/ and premium was 34.9/. My station was in LA, and all the brand name stations around us were also at this price point. When a gas war hit*, we put out a sign that said "GAS WAR" and dropped the price to 24.9/ and 29.9/. **
When I moved to central California to go to college (1970) gas got very expensive, it was 34.9/ for regular, and 39.9/ for premium.
All of these prices were full serve.
When the '73 gas crunch hit, prices went over 0.50/ gallon in LA for the first time. I remember seeing a cartoon with two guys waiting in a gas line. One guy says to the other "If you told me a year ago that I would wait in line to pay 50 cents per gallon for gas I would have told you you were nuts." :D
Those were the days.



* We would get a phone call from the marketing department saying that they were cutting the price, so we were to cut our prices and try to up our gas sales.
**And yes we gave out glasses or mugs with a fill up sometimes.

Johnny L.A.
04-30-2006, 12:29 PM
The cheapest gas I remember was when I was driving around with my sister. She would buy regular for 29.9˘/gallon. When I got my first motorcycle, which was street legal though I would not be old enough for a license for a few years, gas was 49.9˘/gallon. I carried fifty cents in my tool box in case I needed a gallon of gas. This was after the oil embargo, so I never saw an actual 'gas war'.

But I do remember a bumper sticker that said GAS WAR PRICES. GAS WON.

silenus
04-30-2006, 03:42 PM
I remember being able to fill my van for a five. I still have a bunch of the old glasses, too. Shell, Atlantic Richfield, the works. $29.9 seems to be the price that sticks in my mind. I clearly remember telling myself that I'd stop driving before I'd pay a dollar a gallon for gas! :eek:

LouisB
04-30-2006, 04:27 PM
I remember gas wars; when I was a kid, prices were in the $0.25-$0.29 range. I remember buying gas at $0.17 in a small town in Oklahoma in the mid 1950s. Like someone said earlier, other things were not all that expensive, compared to gasoline. The cost of living was like a $1.50 per six pack, cigarettes were less than $0.30 a pack, etc., etc.

samclem
04-30-2006, 05:04 PM
I remember gas wars; when I was a kid, prices were in the $0.25-$0.29 range. I remember buying gas at $0.17 in a small town in Oklahoma in the mid 1950s. Like someone said earlier, other things were not all that expensive, compared to gasoline. The cost of living was like a $1.50 per six pack, cigarettes were less than $0.30 a pack, etc., etc.
And, you were making how much per week at that point? :)

picunurse
04-30-2006, 06:07 PM
I remember a driving trip from Amarillo Tx to Kansas City Mo when I was first married. (1965) there was a gas war in a small town in northern TX where gas was 13.9c per gal. We'd filled up when we left town so weren't in need. On the return trip, it was back up to 26.9c. Of course, you might remember, minimum wage then was less than $1.00.

LouisB
04-30-2006, 07:31 PM
And, you were making how much per week at that point? :)Probably $50.00-$60.00 per week; somewhere in that range. As it happens, my darling Marcie is watching some sort of documentary re the Cuban missile crisis at the moment. While that was ongoing, I was buying a 3bdrn/2bath house in Plano, Texas for $14.5K. Interest rate was "about" 3% and my payments were $88.88 per month. It was hard to save anything on my salary.

Freddy the Pig
04-30-2006, 10:05 PM
I'm too young to remember much in the way of price wars, but Oh Lord I remember the brand loyalty campaigns. Every other commercial on the radio baseball broadcasts was for one or the other brands of gasoline.

And to keep you coming back, each station had some kind of contest, where if you filled in a complete row you won a prize. It was either International Flags, or coins with presidents on them, or animal stamps or some such. I'd be giddy every time we bought gas, not because I expected (or even cared) that we'd win anything, but because I thought the tokens were cool.

kunilou
05-01-2006, 10:43 AM
The cheapest gas war I can remember was sometime in 1962 or 1963 when the price got down as low as 16.9 cents. But it only lasted over a weekend.

By the time I got my license in the late 60s, gas prices were between 30 and 36 cents and would stay that way until the 1973 oil embargo.

Point of reference. The house we live in right now was built in 1957 and originally sold for something like $16,000-$19,000. Our last tax assessment had it right at $250,000.

suzieq.penn
06-19-2014, 06:21 PM
In 1963 my friends and I would get a gallon of gas in Palo Alto, Ca in our English Ford. It only used $.25 worth or less to go to Berkeley where the gas wars drove pries from $,15 to $.19. We would fill up and drive for weeks on the cheapest gas I ever bought. Those were the days!

johnpost
06-19-2014, 06:35 PM
i'd like 2 bits worth of gas.

not as good as it sounds, cars were mostly bigger cept a bug.

handsomeharry
06-19-2014, 06:50 PM
As late as the early 70s, the gas around my home was averaging 25 cents per gallon. I remember, when I was a teenage driver in 1972, the local gas wars brought it down to 17 cents per. Somewhere in my head, i remember it being 11-14 cents, gas war-wise, around 1969.

silenus
06-19-2014, 07:33 PM
There is a reason the Allman Brothers titled an LP "Wipe the Windows, Check the Oil, Dollar Gas."

Today, 8 years after the OP, gas is $3.99/gal at the cheapest station in town.

Baker
06-19-2014, 08:04 PM
I graduated from high school in 1973. In 1983, at a ten year reunion, I had my yearbook with me and pointed out an ad in the back, for a local gas station. It showed the station sign, with a gas price of 23.9. It was that summer after graduation that the "energy crisis" started, and people were gasping at gas prices of almost seventy cents a gallon.

Oh, the good old days of zombie gas prices.

seal_cleaner
06-19-2014, 08:10 PM
There is a reason the Allman Brothers titled an LP "Wipe the Windows, Check the Oil, Dollar Gas."

I believe that's a lyric from a Chuck Berry song, "Too Much Monkey Business."

Doug K.
06-19-2014, 09:34 PM
I got my first car in 1976 not long after I turned 16. It was a VW and had a 10 gallon tank. If I ever had to put over $4.00 worth of gas in it I knew I had come uncomfortably close to running out of gas. I still remember my shock when overnight the price jumped from around $.509 to $.759

Gatopescado
06-19-2014, 10:21 PM
Sorry. Only old enough to remember "rock wars".

(But I used to buy gas around .49, so not too long off)

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
06-19-2014, 11:59 PM
I wasn't driving until 1974, so I do remember gas costing between $.60 and $.70 per gallon. That was after the first oil crisis and everyone considered that expensive by comparison. But for nearly everyone, it wasn't enough to stop you from driving where you wanted to go.

Flyer
06-20-2014, 01:09 AM
I remember gas wars; when I was a kid, prices were in the $0.25-$0.29 range. I remember buying gas at $0.17 in a small town in Oklahoma in the mid 1950s. Like someone said earlier, other things were not all that expensive, compared to gasoline. The cost of living was like a $1.50 per six pack, cigarettes were less than $0.30 a pack, etc., etc.

I don't remember where I read it, but I really like this--
"Nostalgia is the ability to remember yesterday's prices while forgetting yesterday's wages."

Here's a chart that shows the price of gas since WWI in today's dollars.

http://inflationdata.com/Inflation/Inflation_Rate/Gasoline_Inflation.asp

Senegoid
06-20-2014, 05:01 AM
The young-uns probably also aren't aware of this: The gas pumps in those days had mechanical wheels (like a mechanical odometer) that toted up the number of gallons pumped and the total price, and there was a separate mechanical setting to set the price per gallon.

Those pumps were physically, mechanically only able to sell gas up to $0.999 per gallon -- they literally didn't have a $1 digit position to set the price per gallon. When prices exceeded 0.999/gal, all those pumps became obsolete. It took a while for pumps everywhere to get upgraded (actually, replaced), and gas stations all had to somehow "wing it" in totalling up the price of a sale.

kayaker
06-20-2014, 07:05 AM
I got my first car in 1976 not long after I turned 16. It was a VW and had a 10 gallon tank. If I ever had to put over $4.00 worth of gas in it I knew I had come uncomfortably close to running out of gas. I still remember my shock when overnight the price jumped from around $.509 to $.759

I had a VW in 76, but I was 17. Worked overnight weekends at a self serve gas station. After each sale I drained the hose into my gas can. Drove home with a full tank after most shifts. I remember customers bitching about our $.559 price for self serve!

Zeldar
06-20-2014, 07:14 AM
Ah, those were the days. I could fill up my '57 Chevy for $2.

Seriously, 50-cent gas would have been very expensive. People where I lived would cross the street to get gas at 22 cents instead of 23 cents, and they'd drive to the outskirts of town to get it at 19 cents. The people I knew called these "price wars" and not "gas wars." But the regular price was not that much more. I don't think I paid more than 50 cents a gallon until the early '70s (which was also when the 55mph speed limit went into effect where I lived--before that, it was 70).

This squares with my memory, down to the numbers. My dad would drive 30 miles to save 2c a gallon. And when the guy was filling the tank (Oh, Yes, this was way before you got to pump your own) he would lean against the side of the car and rock it back and forth to get that last spoonful into the tank.

And it wasn't just gas. You could eat out, go to a movie, hit the concession stand at least twice and fill up your tank and have spending money left over out of a $20. I remember writing checks for $5 to fund a weekend's fun and games.

Earlier on, mid 50's maybe, movies cost 11c.

ETA: Damn! I didn't see this was a zombie until I saw I had already posted in it years ago! Now I'll check to see if I lied!

Andy L
06-20-2014, 07:44 AM
The young-uns probably also aren't aware of this: The gas pumps in those days had mechanical wheels (like a mechanical odometer) that toted up the number of gallons pumped and the total price, and there was a separate mechanical setting to set the price per gallon.

Those pumps were physically, mechanically only able to sell gas up to $0.999 per gallon -- they literally didn't have a $1 digit position to set the price per gallon. When prices exceeded 0.999/gal, all those pumps became obsolete. It took a while for pumps everywhere to get upgraded (actually, replaced), and gas stations all had to somehow "wing it" in totalling up the price of a sale.

Stations would set the pump to 1/2 of the real price and double the number that came up on the dials, as I recall.

kayaker
06-20-2014, 08:12 AM
Stations would set the pump to 1/2 of the real price and double the number that came up on the dials, as I recall.

Yep.
And I remember the first time I filled the tank of my rental car in the Caribbean. I thought the gas was super cheap, only to realize it was in liters.:smack:

kopek
06-20-2014, 09:39 AM
I remember price wars getting downright odd sometimes. $.27.4 vs $.28.1 Since all three gas stations for our area were within sight of each other it could get interesting.

Esso though had my loyalty --- I could get all the cool free stuff even though I rode a motorcycle. The other 2 (Texaco and Sinclair) required at least a 8 gallon purchase at that visit and the dude who owned the Esso would slap me the gift every other fill-up. (Big Harley -- took about 4 gallons or better if I ran it to reserve.) I'm still using some of it; the coffee cup next to me has a tiger looking me down.

Moonlitherial
06-20-2014, 10:34 AM
I worked at a gas station in the early 80's while I was in high school and one of our jobs was to drive around town and get the prices from the other stations and update ours.

We regularly had sub $.10/l prices during one of the "wars" and then things jumped back up to $.60/l range. In a moment of high school drama during one of the major rises in price I was heard to declare "I'll quit driving if gas ever goes over $1/l" Clearly I have gotten over my high school dramatics ;)

Shodan
06-20-2014, 12:11 PM
I remember paying $0.279 per gallon, but that's not much less than today in constant dollars. But I think my 2002 Toyota Corolla gets better mileage than my dad's station wagon did, so I am probably coming out ahead.

Regards,
Shodan

lieu
06-20-2014, 12:38 PM
I remember in the early 70s when gas was usually around .27 to .29. During one particular gas war the SelLo station dropped to 19.9. That's the lowest I can remember. Friday nights we'd chip in $2 and cruise until midnight.

Gas lines weren't uncommon in '73 when OPEC cut production. That was a royal pita.

A lot of H.S. friends drove muscle cars and there were two in particular, a Hurst Olds and a GTO Judge, that both sold their beloved cars because they could no longer afford it when gas got up to .69.

It was a big deal when gas finally hit $1.00 because most of the pumps to that time could only display .00. In fact a lot of small independent stations closed rather than purchase new pumps, in part I suspect also out of uncertainity since prices were climbing so quickly.

Doug K.
06-20-2014, 01:03 PM
I remember paying $0.279 per gallon, but that's not much less than today in constant dollars.

I keep hearing this claimed, but it sure doesn't match my experience. From the time I started driving in the mid 70s until at least the late 90s a gallon of gas nearly always cost roughly double the cost of a candy bar and roughly half the cost of a gallon of milk. Right now candy bars cost around $1.10 in convenience stores, less in most grocery stores, and a gallon of milk is around five bucks. To be the same in constant dollars gas would need to be around $2.50 now.

dougie_monty
06-20-2014, 01:48 PM
The gas war is over. Gas won.

cochrane
06-20-2014, 02:08 PM
I keep hearing this claimed, but it sure doesn't match my experience. From the time I started driving in the mid 70s until at least the late 90s a gallon of gas nearly always cost roughly double the cost of a candy bar and roughly half the cost of a gallon of milk. Right now candy bars cost around $1.10 in convenience stores, less in most grocery stores, and a gallon of milk is around five bucks. To be the same in constant dollars gas would need to be around $2.50 now.

Where are you buying your milk? In Tucson I can buy the cheap milk for $2.74. Even the premium milk is no more than about $3.39 a gallon. Gas prices here range from $3.23 to about $3.33, so milk and gas are roughly the same price per gallon.

Andy L
06-20-2014, 03:05 PM
Yep.
And I remember the first time I filled the tank of my rental car in the Caribbean. I thought the gas was super cheap, only to realize it was in liters.:smack:

I remember a gas station in the States that advertised its price in liters on the sign out front - my father was quite annoyed...

razncain
06-20-2014, 06:59 PM
I remember it as low as 18 cents a gallon around late 60's, it may have been 1970 or so. During the earlier US oil boom years, oil had fell to as low as 3 cents a BARREL. ( http://www.innovateus.net/earth-matters/what-texas-oil-boom) (not a misprint)

slowlearner
06-20-2014, 08:34 PM
There was a little station on US80 just west of East Fork Rd outside of Dallas in the early 70's that often had gas for 13.9. I sold the owner a broke down old truck once and he offered ten bucks extra for my dog.
Stations used to sell single cigarettes, too, they were called "loosies." A guy would walk in and pay for his gas and say, "Gimmee a loosie, too."
Those were good times.

Gatopescado
06-21-2014, 12:42 AM
Stations used to sell single cigarettes, too, they were called "loosies."

Ahhh, but do you know what a "ChickenHead" is?

dougie_monty
06-21-2014, 12:48 AM
I remember a gas station in the States that advertised its price in liters on the sign out front - my father was quite annoyed...

I wonder if he knew that the metric system was the only system of weights and measures that ever had official sanction in the United States--the "law of 1866" (See Wikipedia).

Rick
06-21-2014, 12:53 AM
I keep hearing this claimed, but it sure doesn't match my experience. From the time I started driving in the mid 70s until at least the late 90s a gallon of gas nearly always cost roughly double the cost of a candy bar and roughly half the cost of a gallon of milk. Right now candy bars cost around $1.10 in convenience stores, less in most grocery stores, and a gallon of milk is around five bucks. To be the same in constant dollars gas would need to be around $2.50 now.

In early 1970 I worked in a gas station. Regular gas was 29.9/ gal, milk was $2./gallon and minimum wage was $1.50/hr.
Today I bought gas for $4.14, mile for $3.99/gallon and minimum wage is $7.50.
seems like gas has gone from about 1/5 of an hour of minimum wage and not quite 1/7 of the cost of a gallon of milk to about the same as a gallon of milk, and 2/3 of an hour at minimum wage.

Magiver
06-21-2014, 01:00 AM
25 cents a gallon, they pumped the gas, checked the oil, washed the windshield, AND gave away commemorative coins (http://byemylife.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/shellcoins1.jpg) that kids liked.

tracer
06-21-2014, 11:42 AM
25 cents a gallon, they pumped the gas, checked the oil, washed the windshield, AND gave away commemorative coins (http://byemylife.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/shellcoins1.jpg) that kids liked.

Those commemorative coins look an awful lot like the modern U.S. presidential dollar coins (http://www.coinsofamerica.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/a/l/all-dollar-coins_2_1.jpg).

The mint clearly plagiarized the Shell Oil company.

Johnny L.A.
06-21-2014, 12:04 PM
I don't remember 'gas wars', but I remember in the '70s hearing about 'gas war prices'. I think the idea was that older people in their 20s or older would remember the 'gas wars', and induce them to buy gas that was ostensibly cheaper than the competitors' brands.

One thing I remember was possibly from Mad: 'The Gas Wars. Gas won.' (This would have been in the early-'70s when I rode around the desert on my Enduro and was saddened that I had to pay 50˘ for a gallon of gas.)

Siam Sam
06-21-2014, 10:55 PM
I remember gas wars in the '60s and agree that 50 cents would have been very expensive as a regular price anyway.

I started driving in the early 1970s and like many others became outraged when Opec got blamed for pushing the price up to 50 cents. Outrageous! Unheard of! I even remembering my personal vow that I would never pay more than 50 cents for a gallon of gas, because there were still stations over on the poor side of town selling it for less than that.

GusNSpot
06-21-2014, 11:41 PM
$5 was a great weekend of driving and going about with friends if I didn't get carried away with impressing the girls. ( I thought )

Johnny L.A.
06-21-2014, 11:47 PM
I didn't read the thread before I posted, and I didn't notice it is a zombie thread. I basically posted the same thing eight years ago.

tracer
06-22-2014, 10:41 AM
At the beginning of the OPEC oil embargo of 1973, when gasoline prices first started going up, my dad said, "If it goes over 35 cents a gallon I'm not driving any more!"

He's still driving.

Johnny L.A.
06-22-2014, 11:07 AM
At the beginning of the OPEC oil embargo of 1973, when gasoline prices first started going up, my dad said, "If it goes over 35 cents a gallon I'm not driving any more!"

There was a country song by Bobby 'Sofine' Butler called Cheaper Crude Or No More Food that warned we might end up paying 'a buck and a half for a gallon of gas'. I think it came out in the late-'70s or early-'80s, when gas was still under $1/gallon.





.

septimus
06-22-2014, 12:14 PM
... early 60's ... a normal 50 cent per gallon ...

I knew this was wrong! Gas passing 49.9 cents a gallon was a big crisis in 1974 (http://newspaperarchive.com/us/ohio/lima/lima-news/1974/01-19/page-9):

15 per cent of the nation's 1.3 million gasoline pumps, cannot count beyond the rate of 49.9 cents a gallon. The rest, manufactured in recent years, go up to 99.9 cents.

Many meters also allowed a maximum $9.99 for total price. For a while, meters were set to half price (31 cents for 62 cent gas) with signs "Pay double price shown on pump."

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Pity me in Thailand. 17 years ago I was paying the equivalent of about 45 cents per gallon for (government-subsidized) diesel fuel. (Despite this there was a big smuggling racket to get even cheaper diesel from Malaysia.) Now I'm paying almost $3.50 for the same gallon. (The junta has promised price controls for products including diesel!)