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View Full Version : What is the most 'walked out of' movie ever?


blinkingblinking
05-23-2006, 05:39 PM
Is there anyway to find this out ? Rather than just get people's opinions? Are there any statistics on this kind of thing?
I am talking about people going to the cinema and paying for tickets and then walking out while the movie was still playing. Not changing channels on a movie on TV or even deciding not to finish watching a video or DVD.

I worked at a cinema complex from 1993-1995 in Auckland ,NZ. Pulp Fiction was hugely popular. But it had a huge number of walkouts. I would estimate about 10%(no exagerration). Most of the people walked out at the scene where someone injects another person in the heart.
This is just my opinion of what the most walked out on movie is. But are there any real stats on this kept?

BobT
05-23-2006, 05:54 PM
People got upset at the scene where Uma Thurman gets an injection in the chest? But they didn't get as upset as John Travolta accidentally blowing a guy's brains all over the back seat and window of a car?

blinkingblinking
05-23-2006, 05:58 PM
People got upset at the scene where Uma Thurman gets an injection in the chest? But they didn't get as upset as John Travolta accidentally blowing a guy's brains all over the back seat and window of a car?
It seemed to be the straw that broke the camel's back. The people were thinking one more horrible part and we are out of here.

Thanks for your reply. Anyone have any answers for my OP ?

Cat Fight
05-23-2006, 06:09 PM
When I went to see the remake of The Hills Have Eyes, it ended with about half the audience it began with (I have a no walk-out policy, but I sure as hell wanted to...)

wolfman
05-23-2006, 06:13 PM
The Blair witch project had a huge number according to my Movie theater friends. However it was mostly due to the camera style causing violent sea-sickness in a lot of people.

Exapno Mapcase
05-23-2006, 06:14 PM
I'm trying to picture what central authority collects these statistics.

"Hey, Jack, another couple just walked out of The Da Vinci Code."

"Quick, call headquarters. Mr. Waverly will want to know!"

No. No statistics. Of any kind, any time, any where.

An Arky
05-23-2006, 06:14 PM
Probably not a specifically measured statistic, but my WAG might be The Cook the Thief His Wife & Her Lover (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0097108/#comment). Lotta ugliness I had to sit through just to get to some Hellen Mirren sex scenes. I walked after she was done.

pinkfreud
05-23-2006, 06:14 PM
I saw Gremlins in a theater that was chock full of parents, many of whom had very young children with them. There were a large number of walkouts because the movie was way too dark and scary for the little kids.

Cunctator
05-23-2006, 06:15 PM
It was said that lots of people walked out of The Exorcist. That may or may not have been true.

I've walked out of quite a few films due to boredom. Revulsion has driven me from only one film though: The Witches of Eastwick and that scene with the cherries.

Ukulele Ike
05-23-2006, 06:21 PM
Revulsion has driven me from two films.

The first was Eraserhead (http://imdb.com/title/tt0074486/), at the point where the Singing Lady in the Radiator started stomping on those writhing slug-like creatures.

The second was An Unmarried Woman (http://imdb.com/title/tt0078444/), at the point where Jill Clayburgh and her daughter sit banging away at the piano and singing "Maybe I'm Amazed."

Push You Down
05-23-2006, 06:42 PM
Well anaecdotally "Battlefield Earth". Of the ten or so people (myself included) who I know who went to it at the theater all but two walked out after 15 minutes.

I had to fight to get the money back. The manager tried to argue that the 15 minute/refund policy included the previews.

lissener
05-23-2006, 06:50 PM
I have walked out on exactly one movie: Good Morning, Viet Nam.

But I could hardly see the screen for the walkouts during Salo. Similar audience response to Henry, Portrait of a Serial Killer.

Roadfood
05-23-2006, 06:52 PM
My wife and I went to Pulp Fiction. We found out later that we both wanted to walk out, starting at the brain scene, but both sat stoically through the rest of that dung heap of a movie because we each thought the other wanted to see it. Worst piece of cinema trash I've ever seen in forty years of movie-going. I can easily believe it would be the most walked-out on, simply because if you go in with the expectation that it's a great comedy, and then are confronted with the reality of it, any sane person would walk out.

interface2x
05-23-2006, 06:54 PM
People got upset at the scene where Uma Thurman gets an injection in the chest? But they didn't get as upset as John Travolta accidentally blowing a guy's brains all over the back seat and window of a car?

To be fair, the injection happens first, so anyone who left after the injection likely never saw the headshot. And if the type of people who walk out all left after the injection, there would be no leave-types left for the headshot.

And I just want to say that everytime I see the name BlinkingBlinking, I always think it says BlingBlingKing.

HubZilla
05-23-2006, 07:09 PM
South Park, especially when Saddam pulls out that penis-dildo.

Gozu Tashoya
05-23-2006, 07:17 PM
I don't know if this counts as leaving "during" the movie, but a fairly large number of Lords of the Rings fans bought tickets for Thirteen Days just to watch the LotR trailer. After the trailer, many of them left.

So technically, a lot of them left before the movie even started, but that's my nomination.

twickster
05-23-2006, 07:19 PM
Back in the '70s, Caligula (see the recent thread on it) got a lot of walkouts -- including me. It's the only movie I've ever bailed on.

bonzer
05-23-2006, 07:32 PM
Two cases of mass walkouts stick in my mind. Both involved Chicago audiencies and in both cases about half the audience bailed. Peter Greenaway's The Falls cleared a good chunk of the crowd at the interval. Personally it might just be my favourite out of his films, but it ain't necessarily the one to watch merely on the basis of thinking that The Cook, The Thief ... was fashionable. The other instance was Triumph of the Will, which was more a case of people dribbling out as the repetitiveness of it gradually sunk in.

Savannah
05-23-2006, 08:36 PM
Back in the '70s, Caligula (see the recent thread on it) got a lot of walkouts -- including me. It's the only movie I've ever bailed on.

I came in to post that, Caligula, as my best guess.

I walked out of Saturday Night Fever when it was in theatres. Long ago and far away... I hated it.

Miller
05-23-2006, 08:41 PM
I can easily believe it would be the most walked-out on, simply because if you go in with the expectation that it's a great comedy, and then are confronted with the reality of it, any sane person would walk out.

What on Earth made you think it was going to be a comedy?

DxZero
05-23-2006, 08:49 PM
What on Earth made you think it was going to be a comedy?

I gotta ask that question too. Did the commercials make it seem like a comedy? I can't quite recall.

And I never quite could understand why people would walk out of a movie, especially nowadays when with reviews and the internet, you can get a sense of what a movie is going to be like.

dalej42
05-23-2006, 08:55 PM
Didn't the Passion of the Christ have a lot of walkouts? I can imagine this movie having quite a large number of walkouts.

MsWhatsit
05-23-2006, 09:09 PM
I think The Aristocrats had a lot of walkouts from people with children who got confused and thought they were going to see a Disney cartoon. At least, I've heard that anecdotally from a couple of people.

Skammer
05-23-2006, 09:25 PM
The only movie I've walked out of was Lost in Space, just from the sheer idiocy. But I didn't see hordes of people following me.

Argent Towers
05-23-2006, 09:48 PM
I think The Aristocrats had a lot of walkouts from people with children who got confused and thought they were going to see a Disney cartoon. At least, I've heard that anecdotally from a couple of people.

I'm highly skeptical of this. The AristoCATS had already been made - did people think it was being remade? From the previews to the reviews to the damn movie posters inside the theater, you would have to be literally of subhuman intelligence to not know that the Aristocrats was not a Disney cartoon.

Mama Tiger
05-23-2006, 09:51 PM
Many years ago, had I not been warned, I would have walked out of A Clockwork Orange during the first ten minutes. Fortunately, a good friend had already seen it and told me that if I made it through that, the rest of the movie was totally worth it. He was so right.

WOOKINPANUB
05-23-2006, 09:58 PM
I too have a no walk out policy, but if I sure wanted to walk out of The Matrix. Luckily I saw it at the drive-in so I wasn't too embarassed to fall asleep.

Argent Towers
05-23-2006, 10:02 PM
I have gathered, from many conversations, that women do not like A Clockwork Orange because of the rape scenes (and by "not like" I mean cannot watch it.) This doesn't stop men from liking American History X, or The Shawshank Redemption, or Deliverance. Is there something else about A Clockwork Orange that would turn women off, perhaps something subconscious? Is it the fact that there are no primary female characters?

Miller
05-23-2006, 10:04 PM
I'm highly skeptical of this. The AristoCATS had already been made - did people think it was being remade? From the previews to the reviews to the damn movie posters inside the theater, you would have to be literally of subhuman intelligence to not know that the Aristocrats was not a Disney cartoon.

Every so often, Disney re-releases some of their cartoons for theatrical runs, although usually its something much more high-profile than The Aristocats. I can see a parent seeing the name in the listings when looking for something to take the kids to, and assuming it's the cartoon from their own childhood without ever seeing an actual advertisement for it. Which wouldn't be hard, as it was a pretty small release.

CalMeacham
05-23-2006, 10:15 PM
I'd bet that it's some art flick like Andy Warhol's Empire. 485 minutes -- Eight Freakin' Hours and Five Minutes of black and white silent unmoving imagery of the Empire State Building. It's not static -- you see the light change as the sun moves -- but it's a real test of your dedication. I'll bet the vast majority of film buffs give up long before the end, no matter how committed. The Spirit is Willing, but the Flesh is Weak, and I wouldn't blame it.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0196530/

You could always watch his Sleep. It's only five hours long:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0187513/

WOOKINPANUB
05-23-2006, 10:15 PM
I have gathered, from many conversations, that women do not like A Clockwork Orange because of the rape scenes (and by "not like" I mean cannot watch it.) This doesn't stop men from liking American History X, or The Shawshank Redemption, or Deliverance. Is there something else about A Clockwork Orange that would turn women off, perhaps something subconscious? Is it the fact that there are no primary female characters?

I've noticed the same thing, and I don't know why either. I haven't seen ACO. Is it particularly graphic? I mean, as in gory? Horror movie gore, as in "make believe " doesn't bother me, but if it's a real type of situation then that's another story. I had a much harder time watching the other movies you cited, and I'm a woman(who has been raped).

Alan Smithee
05-23-2006, 10:38 PM
On the DVD commentary, Penn Jillette talks about a woman with kids walking out of a showing he was at after about 10 minutes. He points out that this is after George Carlin has spent most of that time describing in florid, Baroque detail shitting diarrhea into his wifes's open mouth and a variety of unnatural sex acts. He wonders what it was at the ten minute mark that finally pushed her over the line and made her realize that maybe this wasn't a children's movie.

Oregon sunshine
05-23-2006, 10:46 PM
Alan, what movie was that!?

WhyNot
05-23-2006, 10:55 PM
I have gathered, from many conversations, that women do not like A Clockwork Orange because of the rape scenes (and by "not like" I mean cannot watch it.) This doesn't stop men from liking American History X, or The Shawshank Redemption, or Deliverance. Is there something else about A Clockwork Orange that would turn women off, perhaps something subconscious? Is it the fact that there are no primary female characters?
I actually quite like A Clockwork Orange, but those scenes are hard to watch. It's hard to articulate, but it's the incongruity of Alex's cheeriness with the utter helplessness of the couple. MacDowell is playing it in such a huge, over the top comedic way, and the couple is playing a very naturalistic terrified way - mixing the two styles just ups the WTF factor and belittles the woman's pain and terror in a very discomfiting way. Added to that is the absurdity of the Huge Porcelain Cock being used as a weapon...it's just bizarre. (It's been decades since I've seen it, so I might be conflating scenes.) I find the whole thing very unsettling (though there are other rape scenes in other movies which are far worse.) But something about Bizzare+comedy+terror+rape=really hard to watch. And no, WOOKINPANUB, it's not particularly graphic - certainly not in a horror movie type way.

I have never seen Deliverance, so I can't comment on that, but I found the rape scene in Shawshank Redemption uncomfortable, but because it's played out naturally, it doesn't have the same sense of bizzaro-world of Clockwork Orange, of course.

I don't actually remember the rape in American History X. The thing that stands out for me in that movie is the curb scene. THAT was horrific.

stegon66
05-23-2006, 11:04 PM
I've never walked out of a theatrical showing.

I do watch a boatload of movies on DVD and the last one I couldn't make it through was i am sam. Seriously - I thought I was gonna puke. :rolleyes:

I have however, successfully made it through Salo and The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover without a problem. Go figure. :D

Rhubarb
05-23-2006, 11:05 PM
Alan, what movie was that!?
That would be The Aristocrats I'm sure.

The only movie I saw anyone walk out on was The Rocky Horror Picture Show. He lasted to maybe the end of Frank N. Furter's first song - Sweet Transvestite. I don't remember exactly what he said when I asked him why he left, but the answer involved the phrases "I thought it was a horror movie" and "goddamned faggots".
Interestingly, his wife stayed for the whole film and enjoyed it immensely. :)

Baine
05-23-2006, 11:07 PM
I saw the Aristocrats with some friends who thought it was just some kind of documentary about comedians and didn't know anything else about it. They walked out in the middle and I followed since they were my ride.

Alan Smithee
05-23-2006, 11:10 PM
Alan, what movie was that!?
Oops!

Yep, that was The Aristocrats. Sorry!

SmackFu
05-23-2006, 11:23 PM
I have heard from many people who didn't bother watching all of Napoleon Dynamite (on DVD). It is rather interminable if you don't find it funny.

Not the same as walking out of a movie, but who watches movies in the theater anymore?

jackelope
05-23-2006, 11:27 PM
I and probably five or ten others walked out of the showing I attended of What the #$*! Do We (K)now!? (http://imdb.com/title/tt0399877/). There may have been others after me, of course; I made it about 45 minutes in.

For what it's worth, I've also walked out of Van Helsing (http://imdb.com/title/tt0338526/) and Nothing in Common (http://imdb.com/title/tt0091653/) (the latter when I was 15 or so).

lissener
05-23-2006, 11:47 PM
I'd bet that it's some art flick like Andy Warhol's Empire. 485 minutes -- Eight Freakin' Hours and Five Minutes of black and white silent unmoving imagery of the Empire State Building. It's not static -- you see the light change as the sun moves -- but it's a real test of your dedication. I'll bet the vast majority of film buffs give up long before the end, no matter how committed. The Spirit is Willing, but the Flesh is Weak, and I wouldn't blame it.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0196530/

You could always watch his Sleep. It's only five hours long:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0187513/
My favorite is Blowjob. Much shorter.

XaMcQ
05-23-2006, 11:49 PM
I have a no walk-out policy myself, because I paid for the movie, and no matter how bad it is I usually want to know how it ends. I do wish that I had made exceptions for 'Howard the Duck' and 'Star Trek VI' to this day. Blegh. Yuck.

lissener
05-23-2006, 11:53 PM
My favorite is Blowjob. Much shorter.
Although, come to think of it--in reference to A Clockwork Orange--which I think is a great movie--there are times when I prefer the original version, Warhol's Vinyl. Hard to track down, but worthwhile if you can.

Lakai
05-24-2006, 12:06 AM
If you read the trivia at IMDB for Irreversible (http://imdb.com/title/tt0290673/trivia) it says:

-Newsweek stated that this was the most walked out of movie of the year.

-The first 30 minutes of the film has a background noise with a frequency of 28Hz (low frequency, almost inaudible), similar to the noise produced by an earthquake. In humans, it causes nausea, sickness and vertigo. It was the main cause of people walking out of the theaters during the first part of the film in places like Cannes and San Sebastian. In fact, it was added with the purpose of getting this reaction.

Jebus H. Christ
05-24-2006, 12:13 AM
I have no cite to back this up but I remember hearing that Woody Allen films in the early 90's had a lot of walkouts. But it was due to the handheld camera work. I think Husbands and Wives was considered the worst.

Voyager
05-24-2006, 12:14 AM
We walked out of The Story of O. We knew what it was about, and weren't offended, but decided that it wasn't at all interesting - and we figured the end was going to be worse.

Marley23
05-24-2006, 12:28 AM
I don't know if this counts as leaving "during" the movie, but a fairly large number of Lords of the Rings fans bought tickets for Thirteen Days just to watch the LotR trailer. After the trailer, many of them left.

So technically, a lot of them left before the movie even started, but that's my nomination.
I bet the same was true for The Phantom Menace, whatever movie that trailer appeared with.

outlierrn
05-24-2006, 12:29 AM
lets see, I have a don't walk out policy, but I don't make a religion out of it, thus:

The Basketball Diaries in sheer boredom.

I think I saw more people walk out of Aristocrats than any other movie I been in, the theatre was pretty clear about what people were getting themselves into, so I don't get that.

I've turned off/fallen asleep a lot of dvds.

Jebus H. Christ
05-24-2006, 12:31 AM
I bet the same was true for The Phantom Menace, whatever movie that trailer appeared with.

Meet Joe Black

blinkingblinking
05-24-2006, 01:17 AM
If you read the trivia at IMDB for Irreversible (http://imdb.com/title/tt0290673/trivia) it says: -Newsweek stated that this was the most walked out of movie of the year.

Okay . Now we are getting somewhere. Did Newsweek actually make this up, or are stats actually kept on 'The most walked out movie of the year'. Why not say 'most hated movie of the year' or something like it ? Is it just anecdotal evidence of being 'The most walked out of movie of the year' ?
Can anyone find a cite from newsweek? Because I cannot.

drm
05-24-2006, 01:52 AM
A group of friends and I went to see Vampires (James Woods) back in University and by the time we left most of the theatre was gone.

That's the only movie I've walked out of.

sleeping mud
05-24-2006, 02:01 AM
I do not know the answer to the OP, but I walked out of Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

Larry Mudd
05-24-2006, 02:03 AM
I have walked out of exactly three movies.

One was Unfaithfully Yours (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088326/) which insulted my intelligence at 13. (I haven't screened it since, but I think at the point I gave up on it, a man was running around the house Benny Hill-style wearing a pig mask with a woman on his back. I'm pretty sure I wasn't missing anything.)

A couple years later I walked out on Jean-Luc Godard's Je vous salue, Marie (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0089366/), because it was simply boring the tits off me, and I opted to walk across the street to see Robert Altman's butchering of National Lampoon's O.C. & Stiggs (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0089715/). Not even a lobster! The only thing that kept me from walking out was that I didn't want to pay for two movies and not get through any. I went back to Je vous salue, Marie a few years after that, and enjoyed it immensely.

The last movie I walked out of was Lars von Trier's Dancer in the Dark (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0168629/). I hasten to add that it was certainly not my choice to walk out of it -- my date couldn't take it, and although there are many, many things for which I could choose to harbour a grudge against that woman, that one incident is really the only one that still puts a hair up my ass now that I've managed to get shut of her. Grrrr! (Lars von Trier is among my favourite directors and Dancer in the Dark has become my favourite film by him.)

One bonus: When I was very young, I was driven out (in a car, not with firebrands and clubs) of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. It was a double feature, and my parents had sat through the Ramones' Rock & Roll High School thinking that we were in for a proper Horror Show. To their way of thinking, a semi-naked Jamie Lee Curtis gauging Michael Meyers' eyes out with a knitting needle was just fine for an eight-year-old, but a sweet transvestite from Transsexual, Transylvania was Simply Not On. Go figure.

If I had to make any conclusion based on my limited experience with walking out of movies, I guess it would be that it often has more to do with the ambulators than it does with the movie.

2MuchTrivia
05-24-2006, 02:16 AM
I also have a no walk-out mentality. I, however, wanted to walk out on Sideways at least 3 times. I fell asleep the first time I saw Predator. I also almost walked during Pink Flamingos (the original "chicken fucker" re: South Park), the last scene made me gag, but I stayed.

mobo85
05-24-2006, 03:36 AM
Every so often, Disney re-releases some of their cartoons for theatrical runs, although usually its something much more high-profile than The Aristocats. I can see a parent seeing the name in the listings when looking for something to take the kids to, and assuming it's the cartoon from their own childhood without ever seeing an actual advertisement for it. Which wouldn't be hard, as it was a pretty small release.

Disney hasn't re-released their old films to theaters for at least ten years. They re-release them briefly on VHS (now DVD), then place them on moratorium for a ten-year period.

ambushed
05-24-2006, 04:31 AM
I've walked out of a fair number of movies, but the only two that come to mind right now are the bottomlessly awful Evolution (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0251075) and the excruciatingly "arty" Moon in the Gutter (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0085878), which I wanted to hurt and hurt badly.

In a similar vein as the latter, I would most certainly have walked out of Godard's Alphaville (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058898) if I had seen it in a theater. I tried to find some value within, but the dialogue was quite pretentious and it grated tremendously that he didn't even try to provide reasonably futuristic sets or props. For example, to go from one "galaxy" to another, the hero simply drives his ridiculous CitroŽn there!


One thing that has disturbed me somewhat upon reading this thread is the large number of people who proclaim -- quite proudly it seems to me -- that they have a "no walkout policy". What the Holy Jumping Fuck??? If someone starts shooting at you, do you have a "no ducking policy", too? What, are you masochists or something? Get up off your ass and get your money back! Such feedback may well help ensure that fewer bad films are made.

blinkingblinking
05-24-2006, 05:21 AM
One thing that has disturbed me somewhat upon reading this thread is the large number of people who proclaim -- quite proudly it seems to me -- that they have a "no walkout policy". What the Holy Jumping Fuck??? If someone starts shooting at you, do you have a "no ducking policy", too? What, are you masochists or something? Get up off your ass and get your money back! Such feedback may well help ensure that fewer bad films are made.

Do cinemas have a money back policy?

At the cinema I worked out there was such a policy. But almost nobody knew it. If a customer complained to the manager that they did not like the movie the manager gave that person 2 free tickets to any movie. Probably less than 1% of people knew this and probably only 1 in a thousand actually took advantage of it. Obviously it would have changed if everyone knew about this.

pseudotriton ruber ruber
05-24-2006, 05:25 AM
Disney hasn't re-released their old films to theaters for at least ten years. They re-release them briefly on VHS (now DVD), then place them on moratorium for a ten-year period.

Speakling of Disney, the only film I can remember walking out of (early too!) is THE LION KING. (I tolerated CALIGULA just fine.)

I took my daughters to see it when they were maybe 7 and 3. During the stampede in the film's first 10 or 15 minutes, my 7-year-old announced that she was leaving, "It's too scary, Dad." The 3-year-old concurred, and I was outvoted (Also out 21 dollars, less than a minute per buck.)

The part that kills me is the next time the subject of Disney films came up, two or three years later, both daughters claimed they didnt like Disney because it was too bland and boring, and now I understand my older girl (at age 19) is an advocate of edgy, raw films that I might consider tasteless or sexually provocative, which is going some because I'm considered hard to shock or offend.

Sublight
05-24-2006, 05:49 AM
One thing that has disturbed me somewhat upon reading this thread is the large number of people who proclaim -- quite proudly it seems to me -- that they have a "no walkout policy". What the Holy Jumping Fuck??? If someone starts shooting at you, do you have a "no ducking policy", too? What, are you masochists or something? Get up off your ass and get your money back! Such feedback may well help ensure that fewer bad films are made.

I can't speak for others, but my 'no walkout' policy is because, in a perverse way, I like sitting through a bad movie. When I'm with friends, we intentionally seek out the worst possible movies to rent. It's like people who use Dave's Insanity Sauce. They aren't hoping that it will start tasting different in a few minutes, they want the bragging rights of having survived it.

Trunk
05-24-2006, 06:20 AM
Sorry, OP, no "stats". Gonna have to go with anecdotes.

My folks tell me they walked out of A Clockwork Orange. It's not just the rape of the suburban couple, but there's also the rape scene of the naked girl on the stage.

When I saw Aristocrats, people walked out. I also saw Fargo 3 times in the theater, and people walked out of that every time I saw it.

Also, City of God had some walkouts. Some of that art house crowd just doesn't DO violence in movies, I think.

Most recent walkout: Must Love Dogs.

Dunderman
05-24-2006, 06:26 AM
I've only ever walked out of one movie: Swing Kids. This wasn't in a cinema, though, it was at this film club and they were supposed to show another movie that night but something went wrong. I don't remember what movie I was supposed to see, just that Swing Kids definitely wasn't it.

FriarTed
05-24-2006, 06:40 AM
I actually quite like A Clockwork Orange, but those scenes are hard to watch. It's hard to articulate, but it's the incongruity of Alex's cheeriness with the utter helplessness of the couple. MacDowell is playing it in such a huge, over the top comedic way, and the couple is playing a very naturalistic terrified way - mixing the two styles just ups the WTF factor and belittles the woman's pain and terror in a very discomfiting way. Added to that is the absurdity of the Huge Porcelain Cock being used as a weapon...it's just bizarre. (It's been decades since I've seen it, so I might be conflating scenes.) I find the whole thing very unsettling (though there are other rape scenes in other movies which are far worse.) But something about Bizzare+comedy+terror+rape=really hard to watch. And no, WOOKINPANUB, it's not particularly graphic - certainly not in a horror movie type way.

I have never seen Deliverance, so I can't comment on that, but I found the rape scene in Shawshank Redemption uncomfortable, but because it's played out naturally, it doesn't have the same sense of bizzaro-world of Clockwork Orange, of course.

I don't actually remember the rape in American History X. The thing that stands out for me in that movie is the curb scene. THAT was horrific.

Just to note- Alex's gang's home invasion of the writer & his wife did not have the HPC. The HPC ("a very important work of art!") is used when they go in to rob the Exercising Cat Lady.

And I think you are totally correct in your analysis of ACO.

fessie
05-24-2006, 06:44 AM
I'd read Clockwork Orange and thus wanted to watch it when a group of us got together at a friend's place about 20 years ago. It was when he slapped her - I still remember this - it was the way he slapped her, as if she was less than human, that made me leave the room. It truly made me sick.

Jaws and The Exorcist were reputed to have a lot of walkouts.

The only movie I've walked out of was the first Star Trek - I was so bored, I went out to the lobby to play video games while I waited for my ride.

FriarTed
05-24-2006, 06:49 AM
I have a no walk-out policy myself, because I paid for the movie, and no matter how bad it is I usually want to know how it ends. I do wish that I had made exceptions for 'Howard the Duck' and 'Star Trek VI' to this day. Blegh. Yuck.

I hope you mean Star Trek V.

BMalion
05-24-2006, 07:01 AM
I'd bet that it's some art flick like Andy Warhol's Empire. 485 minutes -- Eight Freakin' Hours and Five Minutes of black and white silent unmoving imagery of the Empire State Building. It's not static -- you see the light change as the sun moves -- but it's a real test of your dedication. I'll bet the vast majority of film buffs give up long before the end, no matter how committed. The Spirit is Willing, but the Flesh is Weak, and I wouldn't blame it.


But when that bird flies in front of the camera you never heard such cheering in your life.

BMalion
05-24-2006, 07:07 AM
The only movie I've walked out of was the first Star Trek - I was so bored, I went out to the lobby to play video games while I waited for my ride.

Me too, my girlfriend and I decided to go see the rest of Moonraker, out of the frying pan...

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
05-24-2006, 07:15 AM
My folks tell me they walked out of A Clockwork Orange. It's not just the rape of the suburban couple, but there's also the rape scene of the naked girl on the stage.
But that doesn't even happen. Billy's gang drags the girl up onto the stage and gets her clothes off, but Alex's gang interrupts before things can go any further.

Sir Prize
05-24-2006, 07:32 AM
Probably not a specifically measured statistic, but my WAG might be The Cook the Thief His Wife & Her Lover (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0097108/#comment). Lotta ugliness I had to sit through just to get to some Hellen Mirren sex scenes. I walked after she was done.
I walked out on this one. I don't think I made it to the Hellen Mirren sex scenes.

Wallenstein
05-24-2006, 07:43 AM
Had to leave the Blair Witch Project because the jerky camerawork made me feel carsick :o

Came v. close to leaving The Royal Tenenbaums - read a load of reviews which said it was "comedy of the year" but in reality it was a boring dire waste of 2hrs.

jali
05-24-2006, 07:51 AM
I left Dante's Peak. What a waste of time!

snorlax
05-24-2006, 07:59 AM
I saw Reservoir Dogs in New York when it first came out and the audience was particularly lively, especially during the
ear-cutting scene. One guy shouted at the screen "What's your point?" and several people were gagging. A number of people dashed for the exits. Probably the strongest reaction to a film scene I've ever seen in a cinema.

Absolute
05-24-2006, 08:12 AM
I walked out of Hollow Man.

I don't really care about blood, violence and gore in movies (although some of the movies mentioned here certainly tested my limits), but this one was just so mind-blowingly awful I couldn't stand wasting any more of my time in there.

A few months later, it was on HBO, and I tried to watch it again, but had the same reaction.

Mangetout
05-24-2006, 08:26 AM
I'm highly skeptical of this. The AristoCATS had already been made - did people think it was being remade? From the previews to the reviews to the damn movie posters inside the theater, you would have to be literally of subhuman intelligence to not know that the Aristocrats was not a Disney cartoon.
Heh. Today; this very morning I sat opposite someone in an office; she was on the phone; her side of the conversation went something like this:

Sorry, say again?
...
The AristoCRATS?
...
Don't you mean The AristoCATS?
...
Yeah, but...
...
I've never heard of that. What the hell is an aristoCRAT?

(at this point, I had to leave to avoid laughing)

Steve MB
05-24-2006, 08:42 AM
The only reason I didn't walk out of The Triplets of Belleville and The Skeleton Key was that there was nothing else to do while waiting for my ride.

robby
05-24-2006, 09:11 AM
I actually liked The Cook the Thief His Wife & Her Lover. I saw it in the theater, and even bought the soundtrack on CD. :)

The only movie I ever walked out on was Highlander II: The Sickening Quickening (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0102034/).

Beware of Doug
05-24-2006, 09:29 AM
I actually liked The Cook the Thief His Wife & Her Lover.This one intrigued me enough to skim through the IMDb ( ) comments about it. Whether it's "most walked out on", who knows, but it may well qualify as "inspiring the most contempt toward the walker-outers as puritans, philistines, simpletons and ninnies."

My favorite comments were along the lines of, "Some may not care for this film because it makes you think." Of course, no one said what it made them think about.

Beware of Doug
05-24-2006, 09:30 AM
:smack: Empty link.
IMDb reviews of The Cook (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0097108/usercomments)

Larry Mudd
05-24-2006, 09:48 AM
...What the hell is an aristoCRAT?

(at this point, I had to leave to avoid laughing)Bwahahaha! I've definitely run into my fair share of Aristocrats/Aristocats confusion, but the idea of someone for whom the actual word "Aristocats" carries meaning while "Aristocrats" is just some kinda weird mispronunciation absolutely slays me.

Mama Tiger
05-24-2006, 10:02 AM
It's interesting to see all the other reactions to A Clockwork Orange, since to this day I'm still not sure why it made me so uncomfortable. But after that grotesque opening, the rest of the movie proved that it was a perfect setup to deliver such a powerful message and thus artistically well worth it. Even if personally I wanted to either crawl under my seat or run screaming from the theater. To this day it's still on my list of favorite movies, even though I'm not all that anxious to see it again.

Rebecca DiMwitter
05-24-2006, 10:21 AM
I've no stats for the Op either, but I do have to say that personally, out of sheer revulsion, I walked out of "Jackass--The Movie" at the "snowcone" scene. It made me convulsively gag (the closest I have ever been to "throwing up a little bit in my mouth"), and I get nauseous just thinking about it after all this time. WHY I waited so long to leave (the snowcone scene is actually near the end of the movie, if I recall correctly) when so many of the segments of that movie disturbed and nauseated me is beyond me, except I had taken my teenage sons and I wanted to prove to them that I could stomach it. Apparently I could not.

A Clockwork Orange is one of my favorite movies of all time. I too found the juxtaposition between L'il Alex's cheerfully ultraviolent acts and the extreme terror of his victims to be disturbing, but not at all gratuitous. Had the acts not been extreme, the punishment would have seemed even more horrible than it was---I don't think we were meant to completely sympathize with Alex's plight , do you?

--Beck

BwanaBob
05-24-2006, 11:04 AM
When I saw The Crying Game a huge amount of people walked out
when we found out the "twist" in the plot.

Also, I saw John Carpenter's The Thing in an "urban" movie house and when the dog split open a good portion of the audience literally ran out of the theatre. It was a sight that still sticks with me 24 years later.

alice_in_wonderland
05-24-2006, 11:30 AM
Well, I have no idea what this says about me, but The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover, A Clockwork Orange and Pulp Fiction are all in my top 5 movies of all time with Five Corners and Tie Me Up, Tie Me Down rounding out the top five.

I own all of them on either DVD or tape. Apparently, I'm a weirdo. This would not be the first time that had been made clear to me.

More to the OP, I've never walked out of a movie, but I returned White men can't jump to the video rental place and demanded a refund after about 15 minutes. When that stupid cow Rosie Perez started in about the frikin' water, I just HAD to shut if off, lest I throw a brick through my TV screen.

Raza
05-24-2006, 11:36 AM
I've only actually walked on one movie, but I think it was more about my mood at the time (recently divorced) than the movie.

But I effectively walked out (DVD) of Lost in Translation. I know I am supposed to like it, but I....just don't get it. I generally like Bill Murray's films, but I just wasn't prepared for a 100-minute character study.

Anaamika
05-24-2006, 11:40 AM
I've never walked out on a movie.

I fell asleep during Seven though.

I wish we had walked out of Crying Game, but we stayed until the bitter end.


And as for Clockwork Orange, I saw it at home. Possibly it's because I saw it so far after the fact, but a good deal of it was much too over the top and actually kind of silly to me. Bright, garish colors, combined with brutal scenes of rape...it just didn't seem real.

Mahaloth
05-24-2006, 11:43 AM
I'm surprised no one has mentioned 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Fantastic movie, but I can see some people back in 1968 leaving during the opening with the apes.

Roadfood
05-24-2006, 12:39 PM
What on Earth made you think it was going to be a comedy?Um, the previews? And the reviews? And that ad-nauseum repeated clip of the Big-Mac-in-France conversation? So you're saying it was NOT intended to be a dark comedy? The Big-Mac-in-France conversation was NOT supposed to be funny? All those people in the theater that laughed their asses off just didn't get the movie correctly? The scene of accidentally blowing the guy's face off in the back of the car, and then talking about cleaning up the mess, was NOT supposed to be laughed at? And, again, all those people rolling in the isles were horribly missing the point of that scene?

vibrotronica
05-24-2006, 12:40 PM
I have walked out of three movies (not counting film festivals, where walkouts are more common because there are often two movies playing at once that one wants to see):

Peggy Sue Got Married (http://imdb.com/title/tt0091738/) because it was borning and I was a teenager on a date. We had more fun after we left.

Manhattan Murder Mystery (http://imdb.com/title/tt0107507/) because it everybody talked like Woody Allen, and it wasn't funny at all. I can't stand Woody Allen after that movie.

Waiting (http://imdb.com/title/tt0348333/) is a horrible, horrible insulting movie. Insulting to the audience, and insulting to its subjects. In fact, to give you an idea of the kind of person this movie appeals to, here's a quote from the only review at imdb.com :

For what I think, it was weird as ass and even though it was so screwed up and stupid with its pervertedness and just plain out weirdness, I thought it was effin hilarious.

For the record, I didn't walk out of either Battlefield Earth (which I knew was going to suck and I went to laugh at) or Highlander II: The Suckening (which I stared at in abject horror, like watching a train wreck unfold). The movie that I saw the most walkouts on (not counting film festivals) was The Aristocrats. But the theater where I saw it had warnings posted at the box office and on the door of the theater about the language. What did these people think the movie was going to be about?

The strangest walkout I ever saw was a couple who walked out of American Beauty during the first five minutes, when Kevin Spacy makes the joke about jerking off in the shower.

Lakai
05-24-2006, 12:41 PM
-Newsweek stated that this was the most walked out of movie of the year.

Okay . Now we are getting somewhere. Did Newsweek actually make this up, or are stats actually kept on 'The most walked out movie of the year'. Why not say 'most hated movie of the year' or something like it ? Is it just anecdotal evidence of being 'The most walked out of movie of the year' ?
Can anyone find a cite from newsweek? Because I cannot.
Well, more trivia for that movie indicates that 200 out of 2,700 people at the Cannes film festival walked out of the movie. I can see how they might have kept track of that.

As for the Newsweek claim, I think they might have done a survey of movie theaters and figured it out that way. After all, there really is no accurate way to measure this stuff.

Max Torque
05-24-2006, 01:25 PM
I bet the same was true for The Phantom Menace, whatever movie that trailer appeared with.Meet Joe Black
Another was Wing Commander. cite (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0131646/trivia)

fessie
05-24-2006, 01:39 PM
More to the OP, I've never walked out of a movie, but I returned White men can't jump to the video rental place and demanded a refund after about 15 minutes. When that stupid cow Rosie Perez started in about the frikin' water, I just HAD to shut if off, lest I throw a brick through my TV screen.


Shoot, if you wanna talk about videos, I didn't even make it through the opening credits of City Slickers. Something about it just irritated the crap out of me, although I don't think I requested a refund.

Don Draper
05-24-2006, 02:33 PM
What? No hate for Pink Flamingoes (http://imdb.com/title/tt0069089/). A film that includes a rape scene with a live chicken crushed between the participants, Divine eating dog turds and the very presence of Edith Massey (http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.cbgb.com/shrine/photos/ebetroberts/Edith%2520Massey.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.cbgb.com/shrine/shriners/edithmassey.htm&h=588&w=424&sz=51&tbnid=mlqOYugi2_Ak6M:&tbnh=132&tbnw=95&hl=en&start=1&prev=/images%3Fq%3DEdith%2BMassey%2BCBGBs%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26sa%3DG) certainly must have caused riots to get to the exit.

Amok
05-24-2006, 02:41 PM
What? No hate for Pink Flamingoes (http://imdb.com/title/tt0069089/).

I don't know about hate, but it's the only movie I've ever walked out of. My freshman roommate and I went to see Very Bad Things at a cheap screening on campus, and Pink Flamingoes was shown after it. We knew nothing about it other than it was rated X (or maybe it had been reclassified NC-17 by that point, I don't remember). I think we lasted about 20 minutes before we were said it wasn't for us and left.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
05-24-2006, 02:45 PM
I don't know about hate, but it's the only movie I've ever walked out of.
Ditto. I had actually gone to the theater to see Quadrophenia, but my then-girlfriend surprised me by wanting to stick around for the midnight showing of Pink Flamingos. Eventually she got sick of me sitting there with a "who needs this shit?" look on my face and we left. She was weird.

Kalhoun
05-24-2006, 02:51 PM
We walked out of Eyes Wide Shut about 3/4 through it.

But I loved Pink Flamingos!

KGS
05-24-2006, 02:53 PM
The Last Temptation of Christ (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0095497/) had a very high number of walkouts, all six times I saw it in the theater. The Jesus/Mary slash pairing was a big trigger (naturally) but so was a later scene where Paul says to Jesus: "So what if what I say isn't the truth? I created the truth based on what people want to hear! You don't understand how many people NEED God."
Larry Clark's Kids (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113540/) had a fair number of walkouts as well.

So you're saying [Pulp Fiction] was NOT intended to be a dark comedy? The Big-Mac-in-France conversation was NOT supposed to be funny? All those people in the theater that laughed their asses off just didn't get the movie correctly? The scene of accidentally blowing the guy's face off in the back of the car, and then talking about cleaning up the mess, was NOT supposed to be laughed at? Pulp Fiction WAS a comedy! Especially the scene where the 4th guy jumps out of the bathroom and screams: "DIE MOTHERFUCKER!!!" BLAM! BLAM! BLAM! BLAM! BLAM! BLAM! click click click...(oh shit...) I never laughed so hard in my freakin' life.

For what it's worth, I thought "The Cook, The Thief, His Wife & Her Lover" was a comedy too...but that's just me. :D

Larry Mudd
05-24-2006, 03:02 PM
Waiting (http://imdb.com/title/tt0348333/) is a horrible, horrible insulting movie. Insulting to the audience, and insulting to its subjects. In fact, to give you an idea of the kind of person this movie appeals to, here's a quote from the only review at imdb.com...Huh? There are 152 reviews (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0348333/usercomments), and they're pretty much uniformly positive, leaning toward the superlative.

:confused:

Push You Down
05-24-2006, 03:03 PM
Since we are moving into the world of at home 'walks outs'... I bought Zombi 3 sight unseen from Blcokbuster. I love zombie movies.... This one....

After the third five minute sequence of characters wandering around and zombies jumping out from around corners.. I just shut it off. The breaking point was when they showed a zombie on top of a flag pole just hanging out apparently just hoping some human would happen by and not look up in time. I returned it and said "This movie is terrible, give me another one." I think I ended up with House of the Dead (which is brillantly awful).

Malienation
05-24-2006, 03:07 PM
Normally, I'm a "hang in 'til the bitter end" sorta guy. However, I have my limits...

What About Bob. To my knowledge, Bill Murray's only serious misstep.

The Stupids. What were we thinking? I dunno, don't ask (at least we got our money back)

vibrotronica
05-24-2006, 04:05 PM
Huh? There are 152 reviews (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0348333/usercomments), and they're pretty much uniformly positive, leaning toward the superlative.

:confused:I apologize for my imdb incompetence, but I stand by my statement that Waiting is one of the worst movies I've ever seen. It's mean-spirited and insulting.

But don't take my word for it. Rent it and see for yourself. You'll regret it.

Gozu Tashoya
05-24-2006, 04:31 PM
But don't take my word for it. Rent it and see for yourself. You'll regret it.
Seriously, they should add that to the DVD cover. :D


One of the few movies I wanted to walk out of was The Good Son. The only reason I didn't is because my then-girlfiend (typo, but I'm leaving it) was willing to put forth an incredible amount of making out to keep me in my seat.

Oh, and during Armageddon, I went out to the lobby about halfway through to see if the theater we were in had video games. (They didn't. :( )

Scupper
05-24-2006, 04:40 PM
What About Bob. To my knowledge, Bill Murray's only serious misstep.




Charlie's Angels
Garfield 2
Garfield
Osmosis Jones
The Man Who Knew Too Little
Meatballs


Sorry, but I get a little weary of the Bill Murray deification that seems to be going on these days.

BwanaBob
05-24-2006, 04:52 PM
I don't know about hate, but it's the only movie I've ever walked out of. My freshman roommate and I went to see Very Bad Things at a cheap screening on campus, and Pink Flamingoes was shown after it. We knew nothing about it other than it was rated X (or maybe it had been reclassified NC-17 by that point, I don't remember). I think we lasted about 20 minutes before we were said it wasn't for us and left.

My freshman roommate at college said to me, "I just have to see a movie where someone eats shit". I felt compelled to join him. I actually got a laugh out of that trainwreck.

PS He went on to be a doctor.

iamthewalrus(:3=
05-24-2006, 05:00 PM
Just anecdotal, but a friend of mine reported that a group of four middle-aged women left 28 Days Later in a bluster about 15 minutes in. Prior to that, they had apparently been wondering when Sandra Bullock was going to appear, mistaking the zombie movie for a sequel to the romantic comedy 28 Days.

Push You Down
05-24-2006, 05:09 PM
Just anecdotal, but a friend of mine reported that a group of four middle-aged women left 28 Days Later in a bluster about 15 minutes in. Prior to that, they had apparently been wondering when Sandra Bullock was going to appear, mistaking the zombie movie for a sequel to the romantic comedy 28 Days.


Yeah.. I heard that story related probably even before 28 Days Later was released stateside. It was probably a Leno joke.


Re: Bill Murray.

Counting Meatballs as a misstep is like faulting Tom Hanks for Bachelor Party. It's super early in their careers and are what they are- Dumb comedies.
Osmosis Jones is a pretty good kids movie though.
The first Charlie's Angels isn't bad.
The Man Who Knew Too Little is very very funny.

Garfield sucks though.

Petey
05-24-2006, 05:14 PM
I've never walked out of a movie, but came very close with the worst movie ever: Nightfall (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0095738/)
I think 90% of the theater emptied when

A crow plucks out and eats a woman's eyes

The only reason that I didn't walk out: I would have always wondered if there was something redeeming in the film, and I wasn't going to watch it again to find out.

jsc1953
05-24-2006, 05:18 PM
Charlie's Angels
Garfield 2
Garfield
Osmosis Jones
The Man Who Knew Too Little
Meatballs


Sorry, but I get a little weary of the Bill Murray deification that seems to be going on these days.

You're forgetting one (the only movie I ever walked out of): Where the Buffalo Roam (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0081748/)

vivalostwages
05-24-2006, 06:39 PM
I considered walking out on The New World a few months ago. I wish I had.

Mangetout
05-24-2006, 08:30 PM
We walked out of Eyes Wide Shut about 3/4 through it. I think I'd have walked out on that one, if I'd been to see it at the cinema; it was on TV the other day and I stayed up late to watch it, keeping on waiting, thinking that something was about to happen to tie the whole thing together into a coherent whole, then the end titles went up, but I was still waiting.

It could be summed up as:
1: Tom goes somewhere and does something
2: Tom goes somewhere else and does something else
3: repeat from 2

Then again, maybe I'd have sat there to the end in the cinema, stupidly waiting for the story to start.

vivalostwages
05-24-2006, 09:36 PM
A Sound of Thunder would have had a lot more walkouts if people had actually walked in. Fortunately, most were not so foolish as I was.

ambushed
05-24-2006, 09:48 PM
The Last Temptation of Christ (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0095497/) had a very high number of walkouts, all six times I saw it in the theater. The Jesus/Mary slash pairing was a big trigger (naturally)...What does the phrase "slash pairing" mean? What are you referring to? (I didn't see the movie).

... but so was a later scene where Paul says to Jesus...What? The movie contained a scene between Jesus and the Paul of the Epistles, who certainly never knew each other? I mean, I knew the movie was horrible, but WTF?

jackelope
05-24-2006, 09:57 PM
I don't know about hate, but [Pink Flamingoes is] the only movie I've ever walked out of. My freshman roommate and I went to see Very Bad Things at a cheap screening on campus, and Pink Flamingoes was shown after it.You sat through the execrable, rotten-to-its-soul Very Bad Things, but couldn't take the essentially good-natured Pink Flamingoes?

Scupper
05-24-2006, 11:52 PM
Walked out of The Curse with Wil Wheaton because it was just sickeningly gross. (I have a problem with larvae.)

Turned off The Ladykillers (remake) when I'd rented it on DVD. God that was crap.

Omniscient
05-25-2006, 12:15 AM
One more anecdote from a recent movie: When I went and saw Sin City there was a pretty high number of walkouts. Probably a bunch of people expecting your standard action movie and/or gratuitous Jessica Alba scenes. I don't suppose it was at record levels, but certainly the most I've seen since Cool World.

Talon Karrde
05-25-2006, 12:48 AM
What? The movie contained a scene between Jesus and the Paul of the Epistles, who certainly never knew each other? I mean, I knew the movie was horrible, but WTF?
I'm too tired to answer your first question, but I'll address this. The scene in question occurred on an alternate timeline. I'm not exactly what you mean by horrible, but I liked it a lot. It wasn't supposed to be historically accurate.

Q.N. Jones
05-25-2006, 03:23 AM
When I saw Bad Santa, the theater was packed when the movie started. By the midpoint, half the moviegoers had walked out.

South Park had a lot of walkouts. I went with my mom (librarian type in a tweedy sweater) and my little sister, who was underage and looks even younger than her years. They were both laughing uproariously, and a lot of the people leaving glared at her on the way out for her apparent moral turpitude.

Kalhoun
05-25-2006, 05:35 AM
I think I'd have walked out on that one, if I'd been to see it at the cinema; it was on TV the other day and I stayed up late to watch it, keeping on waiting, thinking that something was about to happen to tie the whole thing together into a coherent whole, then the end titles went up, but I was still waiting.

It could be summed up as:
1: Tom goes somewhere and does something
2: Tom goes somewhere else and does something else
3: repeat from 2

Then again, maybe I'd have sat there to the end in the cinema, stupidly waiting for the story to start.
That's EXACTLY how we felt! When the hell was it going to come together? By the time they got to the weird party with all the naked people and statues, we were completely lost (though at least there was a sense of artsy in that scene).

And I didn't believe for one second that there was any heat between those two. Evah.

Engineer Dude
05-25-2006, 07:28 AM
If I had seen Freddy Got Fingered in the theaters instead of on video, I probably would've walked out of that.

That movie did irreversible psychological damage [shudders].

vibrotronica
05-25-2006, 10:32 AM
It could be summed up as:
1: Tom goes somewhere and does something
2: Tom goes somewhere else and does something else
3: repeat from 2.I can sum it up shorter than that:

"Manhattan doctor flees troubles with the wife and accidentally stumbles across sex magic cult. Nothing much comes of it."

I actually like the first half of Eyes Wide Shut, but the wheels come off the wagon after the orgy scene. At least in the first half you get to see Kidman acting circles around Cruise. In her underwear. That was worth the price of admission for me.

Kalhoun
05-25-2006, 11:01 AM
I can sum it up shorter than that:

"Manhattan doctor flees troubles with the wife and accidentally stumbles across sex magic cult. Nothing much comes of it."

I actually like the first half of Eyes Wide Shut, but the wheels come off the wagon after the orgy scene. At least in the first half you get to see Kidman acting circles around Cruise. In her underwear. That was worth the price of admission for me.I'm a straight chick and she kinda turned ME on. If there were awards for Underwear Scenes, she would easily take first place.

Zakalwe
05-25-2006, 11:05 AM
The first movie that came to my mind when I saw this thread was "Saving Private Ryan". As I recall, there were news reports about large numbers of people walking out during the D-Day sequence. In fact, when I went to see it, half of the row in front of me walked out.

NailBunny
05-25-2006, 11:41 AM
You sat through the execrable, rotten-to-its-soul Very Bad Things, but couldn't take the essentially good-natured Pink Flamingoes?

Thank you! Gods I hate that movie! I didn't walk out of it, but I should have. Me and the other two people who saw it with me just sat around ranting furiously about how awful it was for hours afterwards.

The only movie I've ever walked out of was Congo. I didn't notice a lot of other people leaving, but they really, really should have.

Now movies I've turned off because they were so godawful? I got tons!

Push You Down
05-25-2006, 12:14 PM
What does the phrase "slash pairing" mean? What are you referring to? (I didn't see the movie).

What? The movie contained a scene between Jesus and the Paul of the Epistles, who certainly never knew each other? I mean, I knew the movie was horrible, but WTF?


I'll do both.

"slash" fiction is a fan fiction term used to inform potential readers that this story is about "x" getting it on with "y". It comes from Trek fanfiction originally. A story titled "Transporter Malfunction" doesn't tell you who is in it and who they will be doing. So the title would be "Transporter Malfunction Kirk/McCoy". So if you really wanted to read how some bored hausfrau would write a gay sex scene between those particular characters you could look for Kirk and McCoy SLASH fiction.

Second question. in the movie and the book (I assume i haven't read it.), Jesus opts out of divinity and is allowed to lead a humdrum life with Mary M. But the legend of Jesus still exists. Paul comes to the town in which non-God Jesus lives and tells stories about how Jesus was resurrected... Jesus confronts him for telling lies. Paul gives the whole "It don't matter to me. People need something to believe in regardless if it is true" line. If memory serves this prompts Jesus to beg God into letting him go back and die on the cross and accept divinity.

Amok
05-25-2006, 12:23 PM
You sat through the execrable, rotten-to-its-soul Very Bad Things, but couldn't take the essentially good-natured Pink Flamingoes?

Actually, it wasn't Very Bad Things we saw. I got the titles confused when I was thinking back. We saw some horror movie, based upon a Stephen King book, I think. Hmm... (checks imdb.com). OK, it was Needful Things. Which sucked, and I barely remember it, but it was pretty standard horror movie fare. It was basically what we were expecting to see, only not as good.

But as for Pink Flamingoes, we were a pair of 18 year old guys, and all we knew about it was that it was rated NC-17. Neither of us had ever heard of it before. So you can imagine what we were thinking. Instead we got Divine, and the chicken fucking scene, and whatever else was in the beginning... Wasn't there a dude in a diaper? I don't remember it so well either. But anyway, it was pretty gross, and not really something we were interested in seeing, so we left.

RogueRacer
05-25-2006, 12:41 PM
The ticket person asked us if we were sure when we asked for tickets to Open Water. She went on to tell us that it was having an extremely high number of walk outs. We didn't walk out, but I didn't find it to be all that good (other than the very gratuitous nude scene).

This is a movie that still has a 73% rating at Rotten Tomatoes. I take this as more anecdotal evidence that movie reviewers are a different species.

jackdavinci
05-25-2006, 07:30 PM
And I never quite could understand why people would walk out of a movie, especially nowadays when with reviews and the internet, you can get a sense of what a movie is going to be like.

I second that! I've never voluntarily walked out of a movie (My ride home walked out of "Perfect" so I was obliged to follow. Not counting some popular movies that people walked out of 5 minutes early to avoid the rush, the only movie I've been to with noticable walk outs was Fahrenheit 911. Surely these people must have known what kind of movie they were walking into. (That goes double for Pulp Fiction!). Although I guess its possible to grossly misjudge a movie. My Mom took me to see Alien when I was a little kid, thinking it was going to be like E.T. She "watched" the entire movie with her hand over her face. I took it all in stride.

E. Thorp
05-25-2006, 09:49 PM
I'm probably forgetting a couple, but I remember walking out on:

All That Jazz
Au Hasard Balthasar
The Return of the King
Broken Flowers

Zebra
05-26-2006, 12:27 AM
People got upset at the scene where Uma Thurman gets an injection in the chest? But they didn't get as upset as John Travolta accidentally blowing a guy's brains all over the back seat and window of a car?


We had a similar problem at the theatre I worked at in NYC, but slightly different. No mass walkouts, but for the first few weeks, during the sold out shows, everytime right after that scene, someone would walkout to the lobby and faint. All and all we had about 20 -25 faintings during the run.


Natural Born Killers had some walkouts.

In my expierence, Fantasia has a fair number of walkouts. "When do they talk? It's just music?!?!"


Of course the place a movie plays could affect this. What people walk out of in Arkansas is different from what people walk out of in L.A.

Zebra
05-26-2006, 12:35 AM
Oh and something I forgot.

When I saw the remake of House of Wax, quite a few people walked out after Paris Hilton died. They came to see her die a horrible death and after that, they left. I imagine that went on in quite a few theatres.

Tamryne
05-26-2006, 09:04 AM
Only movie Ive ever walked out of was Kung Pow. I was with a huge group of friends going to see something else, but they met up with another huge group of friends going to see this. I lasted until the old woman threw the baby down the hill, then insisted on a refund from the manager and bought ice cream while I waited for everyone else to finish the movie. All in all, less than a quarter of our group (almost 50 people, if your curious) stayed for the whole thing. God awful movie.

iamthewalrus(:3=
05-26-2006, 12:54 PM
Yeah.. I heard that story related probably even before 28 Days Later was released stateside. It was probably a Leno joke.I kinda thought that that friend was full of shit. And now I have confirmation from the internet!

Voyager
05-26-2006, 03:06 PM
I'm surprised no one has mentioned 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Fantastic movie, but I can see some people back in 1968 leaving during the opening with the apes.
Back in 1968, I read everything I could about 2001, and I don't remember anything about people walking out. Not understanding, yes, walking out, no. Certainly no one did in the showings I went to.

We were more civilized back then, perhaps. :)

Antinor01
05-26-2006, 03:18 PM
Oh and something I forgot.

When I saw the remake of House of Wax, quite a few people walked out after Paris Hilton died. They came to see her die a horrible death and after that, they left. I imagine that went on in quite a few theatres.

That was the only scene worth watching. In fact, was the only reason I agreed to even see the movie. :D

rowe
05-26-2006, 03:22 PM
My wife & I walked out of Dreamcatcher during the scene where one character literally craps out an alien. It was a bit too much for her to handle. I hadn't read the book so I didn't know what to expect going in. A few other people left during the earlier explosive farting bits too. I don't remember all the gory details though.

5que
05-26-2006, 03:56 PM
(Kids, go ask grandpa about this movie if you've never heard of it)

The only movie I ever walked out of was What do You Say to a Naked Lady (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066559/) (circa 1970). I was disappointed that you couldn't see "enough" of the naked lady. But I walked out when Allen Funt was interviewing the prostitute and she talked about how she liked to get beat up. Too much for me, even with naked ladies potentially in later reels.

even sven
05-26-2006, 05:28 PM
One thing that has disturbed me somewhat upon reading this thread is the large number of people who proclaim -- quite proudly it seems to me -- that they have a "no walkout policy". What the Holy Jumping Fuck??? If someone starts shooting at you, do you have a "no ducking policy", too? What, are you masochists or something? Get up off your ass and get your money back! Such feedback may well help ensure that fewer bad films are made.

I find value and things to learn even from films I hate.

Miller
05-26-2006, 05:48 PM
I can sum it up shorter than that:

"Manhattan doctor flees troubles with the wife and accidentally stumbles across sex magic cult. Nothing much comes of it."


I can do better than that:

"Tom Cruise can't get laid."

bluetrust
05-26-2006, 06:10 PM
Disney hasn't re-released their old films to theaters for at least ten years. They re-release them briefly on VHS (now DVD), then place them on moratorium for a ten-year period.

Well, that's sort of right, and sort of not. For special occasions, Disney sometimes releases classic animated feature films on Imax (like Beauty and the Beast (http://www.infoplease.com/movies/50351) a few years ago) and there's also short runs of classics at the El Capitan theatre (http://disney.go.com/disneypictures/el_capitan/) in Hollywood. Right now they're playing Dumbo if I remember correctly.

Ludovic
05-26-2006, 06:18 PM
My mind tells me I stayed for all of it, but logically, I must have walked out on Return of the King, because I never saw the Scouring of the Shire.

Jennshark
05-26-2006, 07:48 PM
"Out of Africa." It was sooooooooooooooooo looooooooooooooooong and boooooooooooooooooring

ambushed
05-26-2006, 08:30 PM
I find value and things to learn even from films I hate.I can see that. I find value and things to learn when I get hit over the head with rocks, too. :D