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levdrakon
07-23-2006, 04:00 PM
I was watching a DVD last night and this guy was being put under and the anesthesiologist say's, "now count back from ten."

When I was a teenager I had all my wisdom teeth pulled at once. They put me under. The anesthesiologist said, "count back from one hundred." I started counting, "100, 99, 98, zzzzzzzzzzz."

But why do they have you count backwards? What purpose does that serve? You're about to get knocked out no matter what.

Captain Carrot
07-23-2006, 04:14 PM
Well, IANAA, but I imagine it does at least one useful thing: it lets them know if the anesthesia is working or not. I once had stitches taken out with anesthesia to which I was immune. Counting wouldn't have worked anyway for a local, but you see me point. And you can't necessarily count on a medical history for that information either because this surgery might be the patient's first contact with that specific kind of anesthesia.

As for counting backwards, maybe they figure that it would be less boring than counting forwards. I, for one, count forwards a heck of lot more often than backwards.

When I had my wisdom teeth pulled Thursday before last, I got general in a nose tube, with no counting. If I had counted, I think it would have been a lot like your experience.

Wallenstein
07-23-2006, 04:18 PM
WAG time... it can be a bit unsettling to be put under.

Counting up from 0-10 is something most people do without thinking.

Counting down requires concentration, and helps take the mind of an anxiety.

Plus (as noted) it gives an idea of how long the drugs take to work... someone who makes it from 100 to 88 on a standard dose may need a bit extra later on, as they'd appear more resistant to its effects?

Tuckerfan
07-23-2006, 04:18 PM
Counting backwards is harder for most people than counting forwards so the docs can get an idea if you're starting to go under by how many mistakes you make.

levdrakon
07-23-2006, 04:31 PM
Counting backwards is harder for most people than counting forwards so the docs can get an idea if you're starting to go under by how many mistakes you make.

So what would happen if the anesthesiologist said, "count backwards from 100," and I said, "42, 76, 25..."

Would everyone freak out, abort the procedure and revive me? Or would they just think, "this guy must have been educated in the California school system..." ;)

Shagnasty
07-23-2006, 05:14 PM
I always thought that it was the same idea as "Hey, check this shit out" from the anesthesiologist. Most people don't remember it of course but, before every surgery, someone has pointed out that I will have to count back from 100 and won't even make it past 87 or something. It always made me feel better. It also keeps the patient from panicking at the wrong time.

Chronos
07-23-2006, 05:20 PM
The only time I was ever under general anęsthesia was when I had my wisdom teeth taken out. I asked the anęsthesiologist, "Aren't you going to ask me to count backwards from 100 by sevens, or something?". It turns out, no, she wasn't. She just talked with me, and judged my state from my conversational responses. I was rather disappointed... I had psyched myself up for a display of mental accuity, and was vaguely hoping to reach "two... Negative five... Negative twelve..."

Little Plastic Ninja
07-23-2006, 06:11 PM
I'm kind of anxious about this myself. I'm about to go in for a procedure (August 11, I'm counting the days) that requires a general anesthetic.

Who else has gotten one recently? I'm utterly terrified by the prospect. I don't like being knocked out, I hate and fear those horror stories of people waking up on the table. I once nearly fainted when giving blood and that goes down as one of the more frightening moments of my life.

What's it feel like when you're going down?

levdrakon
07-23-2006, 06:22 PM
I'm kind of anxious about this myself. I'm about to go in for a procedure (August 11, I'm counting the days) that requires a general anesthetic.

Who else has gotten one recently? I'm utterly terrified by the prospect. I don't like being knocked out, I hate and fear those horror stories of people waking up on the table. I once nearly fainted when giving blood and that goes down as one of the more frightening moments of my life.

What's it feel like when you're going down?

If it's anything at all like my experience, you should look forward to it. They put an IV in your arm, ask you to count backwards and you're out. Like a light switch. You feel nothing at all. When I woke up I was stoned. In a good way. Woo, hoo! Life is good! I love you doctor! Did I mention I love you? Let's go party!

FilmGeek
07-23-2006, 06:24 PM
When I had my tonsils out (age 9) they said "count back from 10". I said "teh..." and woke up in the recovery room.

Musicat
07-23-2006, 06:25 PM
What's it feel like when you're going down?It feels like you're falling thru a tunnel, with a light at the end. When you reach the opening, there is a Christ-like figure (your father? mother?) beckoning you. It's a feeling of peacefulness.

A lot like a NDE (Near-Death Experience).

anson2995
07-23-2006, 06:28 PM
What's it feel like when you're going down?

I had an emergency appendectomy. I started counted backwards, and I honestly dont think I made it to 97. When I came to in the recovery room, I had no sensation that any time had passed. It took me a while to figure out that I wasn't still in the operating room waiting for them to start.

The operation took a little more than an hour, but it took about four or five hours for the stuff to wear off. My wife and daughter came to see me and I kept drifting off to sleep.

There's always a worst case scenario, but I think for the vast majority of people, the experience of anasthesia is completely uneventful. Just like flying in an airplane.

Ferret Herder
07-23-2006, 06:30 PM
Who else has gotten one recently? I'm utterly terrified by the prospect. I don't like being knocked out, I hate and fear those horror stories of people waking up on the table. I once nearly fainted when giving blood and that goes down as one of the more frightening moments of my life.

What's it feel like when you're going down?
Not recently, but the last time I had general anesthetic, they gave me some kind of relaxing-type medication first (Versed or something similar, I assume), which also causes some memory loss after the fact. Apparently I was carrying on a conversation perfectly well with my mother and the anesthesiologist, but don't recall doing so. From my point of view, I got the first medication, I was chatting, I got sleepy, and woke up in recovery.

Canadjun
07-23-2006, 06:30 PM
Unless I've had completely screwed up memories from immediately before my several operations, I've never been asked to do anything except lay there. Prior to my most recent surgery they put an IV in my arm, they just made some light conversation, my arm felt strangely warm where the IV was (I assume that's when they injected the drugs), and I woke up in recovery.

susan
07-23-2006, 06:54 PM
FWIW, counting backward by 7s is part of a mini-mental status examination. Counting backward by 1s is the check for anesthesia.

levdrakon
07-23-2006, 06:57 PM
FWIW, counting backward by 7s is part of a mini-mental status examination. Counting backward by 1s is the check for anesthesia.

I already know counting backwards from 1s is for anesthesia. What's a mini-mental status examination? If someone asked me to count backwards by 7s I'm guessing I'd end up in a straight-jacket, unless they let me count on my fingers.

lisacurl
07-23-2006, 07:21 PM
What's it feel like when you're going down?
It's like falling asleep very very quickly. As others have noted, you wake up and you don't feel like any time has passed. I actually said, "Is it over?" even though I knew it had to be because they were wheeling me out of the operating suite.

Anesthesia for a planned operation is a LOT different than for emergency surgery. They've had time to personalize your dose for planned surgery so that you wake up very shortly after the surgery and (if it's outpatient) are able to go home very shortly after that. After my wrist surgery, I came home and checked email and went about my day until the pain meds kicked in.

susan
07-23-2006, 07:41 PM
A mini-mental status exam (also, "min-mental state exam") is a quick way to screen for confusion, cognitive problems, and possible gross neurological trouble. It's used in part to help determine whether more specific inquiry and testing should be performed. If you're in pretty good shape, it just seems a little weird. If you're not in good shape, it's very difficult. Tasks include spelling a word backward, copying a geometric figure, saying where you are, remembering three items for several minutes, and the like. "Serial 7s" wasn't part of the MMSE per se, but is sometimes tacked on or substituted for a different item. If you can't do serial 7s, you may be asked to try serial 3s.

In some circumstances, much of information sought by the MMSE can be gleaned in the context of a basic intake interview. If a person's answers are impoverished or odd in certain ways, they might then be asked formal MMSE questions. If a person's cognition and memory appear grossly intact, there's no need for that. The intention is not to trick anybody, but rather to have an easy triage tool for situations where the person may not be able to tell you what's happened--a person with dementia, for example, or somebody who's fallen off a ladder.

Runs With Scissors
07-23-2006, 09:43 PM
I'm kind of anxious about this myself. I'm about to go in for a procedure (August 11, I'm counting the days) that requires a general anesthetic.

Who else has gotten one recently? I'm utterly terrified by the prospect. I don't like being knocked out, I hate and fear those horror stories of people waking up on the table. I once nearly fainted when giving blood and that goes down as one of the more frightening moments of my life.

What's it feel like when you're going down?

I had a cyst removed from my wrist (in a house with a mouse on a box eating bagels and lox) about five months ago.

They kept me kinda below radar for most of it, but I was awake some of the time. The surgeon numbed the SHIT out of my wrist and hand, so being awake during the surgery was kinda cool.

I'm kind of a wuss when it comes to drugs, so I was worried about anxiety. Not to worry. One minute I was watching the pretty designs dance on the ceiling, the next minute I remember telling everyone, "Wait, I can feel that." Meaning, I could feel the pressure of the surgeon digging around (or maybe he was closing).

Then I was in the wake up room. I went home and played Nintendo for the rest of the day. (They sure don't let you rest any more.)

I thought it was kinda fun. And a day off work!

Asimovian
07-23-2006, 09:56 PM
The one time I was put under, while having my teeth pulled, I got as far as 97. But the kicker was that I woke up during the surgery and have a very vivid memory of it (I was 11 years old).

I opened my eyes and noticed a number of people standing over me and a number of...instruments coming out of my mouth. A couple of seconds passed as I looked around until someone noticed my eyes were open. She said, "Go back to sleep" and I just said "OK." Next thing I knew, the operation was over.

As a side note, trust your doctor when he tells you it will take a while to recover from the effects of the anesthetic. When I woke up, I sat up and felt fine. The doctor and my mom wanted to help me down and walk me over to a couch they had so that I could recover enough to go home. I told them that I felt perfectly fine and was ready to go home, and they finally relented because I insisted. So I hopped off the table...

...and fell flat on my face. My legs weren't quite working properly. They carried me over to the couch, and apparently I slept another 90 minutes or so.

Trust the adults, I always say. :)

Dr_Paprika
07-23-2006, 10:00 PM
I'd agree with the answers given. I've done my share of surgical assisting and emergency anesthesia -- maybe one quarter of the anesthesiologists I know ask the patient to count backwards.

If the patient can talk and follow directions, their airway is intact, they are breathing, they have circulation, they are not comatose. Their higher brain functions are still working.

If the patient is concentrating on something, they are less anxious. I have heard that you can check reflexes and whether a given area is numb more accurately if the patient is distracted -- maybe it's true.

Having regular routines and rituals can also be a source of comfort for the anesthesiologist. I'll bet every doctor has a little talk they give everyone with a given problem; when you're tired it's sometimes just easier to say the same thing the same way.

Foldup Rabbit
07-24-2006, 01:47 AM
I've been under twice, but I have never been asked to do anything other than relax. I suppose it might have helped, since my usual internal monologue while going down goes something like, "Oh, dear. Oh, gosh. Oh, help. Oh, this isn't working. This isn't working and they're going to cut me open and it's going to hurt. Oh, no. Oh, help. Oh, rats. Oh, f--"... And then I wake up in recovery.

ambushed
07-24-2006, 02:59 AM
What's it feel like when you're going down?Immediately after administration, you feel very comfortably warm -- the first seconds are quite pleasant. Then you start to feel so incredibly great it's almost orgasmic. Like levdrakon said, you're filled with a profound sense of love and good will towards everyone everywhere; if you felt coordinated enough, you'd want to get up and warmly embrace everyone in the room and dance.

Unfortunately, you're asleep within a matter of seconds. If you were still awake when this wonderful feeling went away, you'd cry and cry like a baby for its loss.

Unlike Musicat, I experienced nothing like a NDE is supposed to be like. YMMV, of course, but I've never heard anyone else describe it that way.


Oh, and Little Plastic Ninja, when my sister-in-law was studying to be a nurse-anesthesiologist, she did research and polling among those tiny few who "woke up" or were otherwise conscious during their operation. Most of them still felt no pain and described it as if they were dreaming. Trauma is, according to her, very rare even among the tiny 0.1-0.2% who are either conscious or have an apparent recall of the procedure. But to assuage your obvious (if almost certainly unfounded) fears, why not ask your surgeon/anesthesiologist to use what they call a "BIS monitor"? If your surgical team does not have or use them, why not try to find one that does?

Charlie Tan
07-24-2006, 03:01 AM
What's it feel like when you're going down?
I think it depends on what kind of surgery you're gonna have. I had a kidney removed a little over a year ago and sport a 10" scar across the left flank of my stomach.
The ananesthetic was not pleasant. going under wasn't a problem, but...
1. I wasn't allowed to drink anything since the night before. Believe me, that morning was hell, just from thirst.
2. It was a big procedure, with tubes going in and out everywhere, one of them down my. It was inserted while I was under, but the days after, I was extremely sore in my throat and around my lips. Not getting enything to drink for two days after didn't help matter.
3. I took the longest time to wake up, about four hours, and even after I woke up, I was extremely drowsy the rest of the evening. Not a pleaant feeling.

Part of my non too pleasant experience was the nature of the procedure, of course, but the anesthetic was no walk in the park by itself.

YMMV (And probably depending on what type of surgery you're getting, but I'm sure some of our resident (heh!) MDs can confirm if anesthetics change depending on why they put you under.)

Charlie Tan
07-24-2006, 03:04 AM
Ahem.
one of them down my throat.

gabriela
07-24-2006, 05:25 AM
A mini-mental status exam (also, "min-mental state exam") is a quick way to screen for confusion, cognitive problems, and possible gross neurological trouble. It's used in part to help determine whether more specific inquiry and testing should be performed. If you're in pretty good shape, it just seems a little weird. If you're not in good shape, it's very difficult. Tasks include spelling a word backward, copying a geometric figure, saying where you are, remembering three items for several minutes, and the like. "Serial 7s" wasn't part of the MMSE per se, but is sometimes tacked on or substituted for a different item. If you can't do serial 7s, you may be asked to try serial 3s.

In some circumstances, much of information sought by the MMSE can be gleaned in the context of a basic intake interview. If a person's answers are impoverished or odd in certain ways, they might then be asked formal MMSE questions. If a person's cognition and memory appear grossly intact, there's no need for that. The intention is not to trick anybody, but rather to have an easy triage tool for situations where the person may not be able to tell you what's happened--a person with dementia, for example, or somebody who's fallen off a ladder.

This was a clear, concise, and enlightening answer. Thanks, Shoshana, I didn't know that.

As a resident I was taught to ask confused patients three orientation questions: 1) Who are you, 2) Where are you, 3) What day is it. If they didn't pass #1 you didn't have to ask them #s 2 and 3. If they pass all three of them you get to write in the chart, "A&Oxiii", which is jargon for "Alert and oriented times three", which means mentally normal. Not as precise as the exam Shoshana described, is it?

The knowledge of your own name is said to be very deep, and a person must be really sick or have something very seriously wrong with the brain to lose it. Where are you can be lost with mild dementia or moderately severe illness. What day is it can be lost by perfectly normal physicians writing to the Straight Dope.

"Normal" in quotes, of course.

When I was a surgical resident (before switching to pathology) I was once sent over to Major Medical Receiving in the ER to consult on a pancreatitis patient. This was in Kings County, the city or charity hospital of Brooklyn. Those of you who have worked in major charity hospitals, you know what I'm talking about. Those of you who haven't, can never imagine. There was a serious largest cockroach contest once... took a month... some guy won it with a three-incher from the basement. And this was not in Florida. This was in New York.

Poor pancreatitis guy was really deranged from the dehydration and electrolyte disturbances (and may not have been all that clear mentally beforehand, because of the chronic alcoholism). He wasn't exactly raving, but he wasn't okay either. He had just answered "Who are you" correctly. The medical resident taking care of him asked him, "Where are you?" The patient looked around at the other patients, the instruments, the linoleum, and the tacky ceiling, and said, "I dunno! I think it's a hospital, but I'm not sure!'

The medical resident looked at me sourly and said, "He's oriented. I'm not sure it's a hospital either."

Gawd, I loved that remark.

rhiannon777
07-24-2006, 09:45 AM
Who else has gotten one recently?

What's it feel like when you're going down?

I had surgery in May. I was really nervous beforehand as well, but everything turned out fine.

By the way, I have never known of anyone who woke up during a surgery. My mother works with a lot of elderly people, so I've heard about a LOT of surgeries.

Here's how mine went. After I arrived at the hospital, they had me put on the gown (actual cloth, not paper, which was exciting to me). I waited around in my own bed-cubicle and the surgeon and anesthesiologist came to talk to me and make sure everything was good to go. A nurse brought me some pills to swallow (an anti-naseau thing as a preventative measure for later and something else). Another nurse came and hooked up my IV. I think I got a bag of saline for hydration, then ten minutes or so before they wheeled me into the OR, she gave me an injection into the IV line of a tranquilizer. Since it went right into my veins through the IV, I felt instantly relaxed. So relaxed that I giggled a little as they were wheeling me in.

I remember thinking that it was weird being in the OR because everything was cold and metallic and there are a lot of people standing above you in scrubs and masks. They gave me another injection of the actual anasthesia into the IV line. My personal paranoia was about waking up during the surgery. To make myself feel sure that they'd really have to knock me out good, I tried my hardest to stay awake after they administered it. I'd say I was out in two minutes at the most. At least that kept me occupied instead of nervous!

It just felt like going to sleep when you're REALLY, REALLY tired. It's not at all unpleasant or scary.

One thing to be aware of so you don't get scared when it happens....they have to wait for you to wake up to give you painkillers. So, when you first wake up, you will be in some pain (you're still under the effects of anasthesia, though, so it's not terrible). As soon as I woke up and told them I was hurting, they gave me an injection into my IV line and it took effect immediately. After that, I felt uncomfortable but not in pain.

One thing I learned the hard way...avoid anything acidic for four or five days afterward. My throat was a little sore from the breathing tube, but I didn't think much of it...until I had some mustard.

Good luck...it will all turn out fine!

Lynn Bodoni
07-24-2006, 12:36 PM
I've awakened twice when I was under anesthesia. The first time, I was having a lump removed from my knee. I could feel the doctor tugging at it, but there was no pain. I heard him say that it was bigger than he'd thought, and I asked to see it. Instead of seeing it (I didn't have my glasses on anyway) I got more anesthesia, and soon back in lala land. The second time, I woke up just as the doctor was stitching up my nipple. Again, I felt no pain, just a tugging sensation. I told the anesthetist that I was awake and that my nose itched horribly. He kindly scratched my nose for me with a gauze sponge. He asked if I was in pain, and I replied no, I could feel sensations but not pain. He said that he didn't want to put me back under, the surgeon was nearly done. I was fine with this, as I'd had Versed, which makes me very mellow and co-operative.

I did NOT wake up in the middle of my hysterectomy, and I'm glad of it.

myrnajean
07-24-2006, 02:18 PM
Sounds like everyone is describing different drugs. I've had all of these various experiences, depending on which drug the doctor was using.
The 100, 99, 9zzzzzzzz, was always liquid valium (at least that's what they called it at the dentist )

The one where you feel sooooo comfortable and everything is perfect, that was demerol. (appendix removal) wheeeeee!

And the one where you supposidly relax and have amnesia, well, that one doesn't work on me. I remember the entire procedure (colonoscopy) and I was talking through the entire thing ("HEY! whats that on that screen?blaha bla blah blah". I think they just kept giving me more and more of the drug to make me shut up, and afterwards I was puking for hours!

Ethilrist
07-24-2006, 02:28 PM
What's it feel like when you're going down?
I had a Nitrous Oxide general anesthetic when I had my wisdom teeth pulled. They hooked me up and went off to work on other things. As I was lying there, I didn't feel any different. I lifted my arm, and it left a trail of blackness behind it. I tried to touch the arm of the nurse next to me, and everything I touched turned to blackness. I tried to reach up and grab the light with both hands, but the blackness consumed everything I touched, until there was nothing left.

This remains one of the most terrifying experiences I have ever had.

For those of you facing operations, I'm sure your experiences will be different. :D

FlyingRamenMonster
07-24-2006, 02:44 PM
I'm kind of anxious about this myself. I'm about to go in for a procedure (August 11, I'm counting the days) that requires a general anesthetic.

Who else has gotten one recently? I'm utterly terrified by the prospect. I don't like being knocked out, I hate and fear those horror stories of people waking up on the table. I once nearly fainted when giving blood and that goes down as one of the more frightening moments of my life.

What's it feel like when you're going down?

Well, first, you're lying on the operating table. Then, suddenly, you're in the recovery room feeling slightly disoriented, and your kidneys are missing you might hurt a bit where they cut you. It's not like falling asleep at all, it's more like if you imagine your life is a film reel and they cut out part of the film and joined the ends back together. It's kind of neat, really. Oh, and they give you a tranquiliser, so even if you're freaked out now you'll probably be less so once the time comes.

dangermom
07-24-2006, 03:20 PM
When I had my wisdom teeth out, I didn't realize at all that I'd fallen asleep. I started trying to tell the nurse that I wasn't asleep yet, don't do anything! I did this through a mouth full of cotton, and she had to point out that they were done. Then I giggled all the way home; whatever drug they gave me was one where you either laugh or cry while it's wearing off.

I had surgery a few years back and the anesthesiologist didn't ask me to count, he just asked how I felt and chatted a bit. I was feeling a bit dizzy by then but couldn't think of any way to describe it except by saying, "I'm feeling vertiginous! Is that a word?" I knew I'd been out when I woke up after that one, but I don't remember much.

gigi
07-24-2006, 04:07 PM
Tasks include spelling a word backward, copying a geometric figure, saying where you are, remembering three items for several minutes, and the like.Sun, Saturn, basketball. I still remember them from nine years ago when I went to the psych clinic with panic attacks. Of course then I couldn't remember the therapist's name (I said Mr Friedman because I must have been thinking of M*A*S*H) but I am terrible with names even on my best day.

Charlie Tan
07-24-2006, 04:17 PM
and your kidneys are missing you might hurt a bit where they cut you.

HEY :eek:
:eyes the Pastafarian suspiciously:


see post #24

norinew
07-24-2006, 04:37 PM
What's it feel like when you're going down?
To me, it feels like someone found my off-switch. Versed (the relaxing/amnesia drug) doesn't work for me, so I always remember everything right up to the last second.

I've had general anesthesia more than a dozen times, most recently just last June. My only two complaints are these: once, when the anesthesiologist was "oxygenating" me (his terminology) by feeding me oxygen through the mask, I had a panic attack, and felt like I couldn't breathe at all; but that was just me. Also, if the IV is in a particularly small vein, the anesthesia can burn (but it only burns for a couple of seconds, then you're out).

As for the sore throat from the breathing tube, that's happened to me maybe three times. It's certainly not an every time thing, at least for me. YM, of course, MV.

Dunderman
07-24-2006, 04:51 PM
Well, first, you're lying on the operating table. Then, suddenly, you're in the recovery room feeling slightly disoriented, and your kidneys are missing you might hurt a bit where they cut you. It's not like falling asleep at all, it's more like if you imagine your life is a film reel and they cut out part of the film and joined the ends back together. It's kind of neat, really. Oh, and they give you a tranquiliser, so even if you're freaked out now you'll probably be less so once the time comes.This describes my experience pretty much exactly, although I did feel pleasantly stoned after waking up.

They say you can't get addicted to drugs when you take them for a good medical reason, but damnit, I often miss some of the stuff they gave me in the hospital.

flex727
07-24-2006, 07:28 PM
My one experience with general anesthesia is a little different than the others in this thread. Some years ago I had my gallbladder removed via laproscopy (may the inventor of laproscopy have a special place in heaven - bless him or her). My memory of going under is a bit muddled because I thought I was asked to count backwards, but I remember discussing the weather. In any event I was out, like a light switch, in a matter of 3-5 seconds. I remember dreaming the most pleasant dream, don't remember the subject, but do remember that it was extremely pleasant, when someone asked me to wake up. I did, instantly, and also instantly felt the most extreme pain of my life. Someone asked me how I was doing and all I could say was "PAIN!!!". All this took place while still in the operating room. They probably gave me something, but it was pretty ineffectual. Mrs. Flex said I was very surly for the next several hours. This was day surgery and I had to go home that day. All in all, a successful surgery (pain from the gallstones was immediately and completely gone!). I don't miss my gallbladder a bit.

ASAKMOTSD
07-24-2006, 07:42 PM
What's it feel like when you're going down?

I am surprised no one mentioned this - for me, I experience a loud buzzing sound - it gets louder & louder very rapidly & then I am waking up after the procedure. Am I the only one to get a literal buzz? :cool:

Bill Door
07-24-2006, 07:58 PM
I was one of those who woke up during surgery. I remember being in pain, but that the pain didn't seem to be important. When the doctor asked for a certain instrument I said, "I downloaded an article from "Ocular Surgery News" and they recommended a #11." The surgeon said, "Well, we're using a #14", and then told the anesthesiologist to "take him down a little more". Next thing I knew, I was in recovery.

I remember it happening, and my wife said the surgeon told her about it when he spoke to her while I was on my way to recovery, plus, I had downloaded an article from "Ocular Surgery News", which had recommended a #11, so I'm pretty sure it wasn't a dream.

susan
07-24-2006, 07:58 PM
They say you can't get addicted to drugs when you take them for a good medical reasonUh, which "they" says this? Iatrogenic addiction is a huge issue. State 'o California requires in its licensing requirements that psychologists be trained on iatrogenic addiction.

norinew
07-24-2006, 08:48 PM
They probably gave me something, but it was pretty ineffectual.
IME, the anesthesiologist orders very small doses of pain relievers to be given in the recovery room, to allow for room for adjustment. I've had as many as five or six doses in about an hour, in order to reach an effective dose. If they give me a dose, and it doesn't do the trick (and the first dose is almost never enough for me), I always ask for more.

Klaatu
07-25-2006, 02:01 AM
Having had a couple of traumatic injuries, (and in extreme pain) going to the ER and then going to an OR for surgery, my experiences have been:

"Everything is ok, just breathe into this mask" or "We are giving you an anesthetic now (IV) just relax" and I got woozy, but both times I swear I could see the docs waving scalpels, and I wanted to scream "I am not out yet, STOP!" but I could not move or speak, and then as other posters said, nothingness, and I woke up in recovery with no problems.

Dunderman
07-25-2006, 06:08 AM
Uh, which "they" says this?You know, "they". Like "everybody" in "everybody knows".

Joking aside, I may have expressed myself badly. I'm not talking about patients who take drugs regularly for an extended period of time - obviously I'm aware that can cause addiction. When I was in the hospital I got a shot of morphine when I asked for it and I asked my mother, who is a nurse, why nobody seemed to worry that I'd get hooked. She said that you don't get addicted under those circumstances.

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