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jimbeam
10-18-2006, 02:54 AM
goddamnit I hate this fucking state's one horse fucking towns... talk about getting railroaded
profiling motherfuckers...crooked assed lawyers, corrupt fucking judges and chickenshit juries
sorry assed cock sucking cops and laws that mean whatever the fuck the day requires..
you might say I'm just a little bit pissed off about gettin a DUI and having a steeep fucking fine and the rest of the book thrown at me.
I was going to a BBQ for the weekend and was passing through CROCKETT fucking TEXAS. It was 5AM and I was in a convertible Z28 w/ the top down, smoking a cigar and drinking a coke.
BUT according to the prick ass cop... he saw the "blunt" I was smoking, I was wearing a Nascar windbreaker and cap, had a beard and long hair. The car had plates from McAllen Tx. (on the Tx/Mex border) and he immediately thought dope runner.
He pulled me over, ran the plates, insurance driver license and everything was clean. Like I said, it was 5AM and the top was down so my eyes were watery. BUT I swear to GOD I was not drunk.
He did a breath test, I passed. I did field sobriety tests and passed. He searched the vehicle without permission or a warrant. He called in backup and arrested me for suspicion of DUI. There were no open or unopen containers in the car. He claimed to smell alcohol. I was NOT drinking!
They took me down to the jail and interrogated me without miranda. They videotaped the sobriety tests which I passed again. We had an extensive "conversation" which I was very obviously sober. Then I took a "breathalyzer" which the fucking idiot rookie cop fucked up the results and had me take it again, until he finally decided the results were positive. He said that he couldn't swear I was intoxicated but was according to the machine I was "under the influence". I asked him what the results were and he hesitatingly said, "point 25"
WHAT?
yeah you heard me.... .25 I was legally UNCONSCIOUS

I said this to him and he kinda shrugged and said, well, that's what the machine says.
Meanwhile.... my car had been taken to the local cop shop where it was taken apart piece by piece to find the nonexistant drugs. Goddamnit people I DON'T FUCKING DO DRUGS. I don't take'em, I don't sell em, I don't have anything to do with em.

So... I finally get out and get a lawyer and go to court.

The fucking prosecuting attorney has "lost" the tapes. No tapes nowhere.. not from the roadsite or from the jail.. nothing, nada, ZIP... they existed in pretrial but not now.

They WERE my defense! The corrupt fucking judge says the trial can proceed without them because the prick prosecutor says he can "prove" his case without the tapes.
No fucking shit! I thought. What about my defense?
The cocksukers cops couldn't recall anything but "well, I thought I smelled alcohol and he failed the intoxilyzer".

The pecilnecked geek who works on the intoxilyzer5000 admits the machine had been fucking up but these results were valid according to the test. WTF?
The fact that IT5000 has a history of errors when acetone is present on the subject was disallowed. I had rebuilt a carb and did a complete tuneup and worked all evening on an old car the night before and hadn't showered since then.
This evidence was NOT admitted by the fucking judge.
BTW for those that don't know. Carb cleaner is basically a mix of acetone and MEK or tolulene. We couldn't even bring up the study. The geek actually testified the machine COULD NOT make a mistake.

So based on testimony that "I smelled like alcohol" even though the cops admitted my driving was not erratic, I wasn't slurring my speech or staggering in the least. Evidence was that I passed the field sobriety tests and "filed" the breath test. However he screwed up the breathalyzer was never mentioned because when the results came back to court they "miraculously" had been reduced to .14
That and the tapes disappeared! The jury was not allowed to know about the tapes or the screwup on the breath test. So, they came back with guilty and now it's gonna cost me over three grand, 80 hours of community service plus two years probation and I've got AA 3 nights a week.
No good motherfuckers!

I should appeal this case but now I'm afraid they'd put me on death row. Seriously, the prick prosecutor said, "we need to make an example out of this man, he needs to do some time. I want to send a message to people."
Folks I've had a pretty damned bad time lately, since I lost my wife and kids in the car wreck, but GODDAMNIT enough is enough.
This is too fucking much already.

Apos
10-18-2006, 03:15 AM
Texas is well known as one of the most corrupt justice systems in the country, especially when it comes to drug cases. It seems like every other week some Texas officer gets arrested for planting evidence or some case thrown out on appeal because of gross misconduct.

But who are the names of the folks involved? Did you file civilian complaints against them for misconduct? Counter-sue?

They can't do anything more on the charges they already convicted you of.

jimbeam
10-18-2006, 03:24 AM
Shit man, I'm just fucking scared now. They got me on their probation good for shit list and say if I do anything to violate the "rules" they'll throw me in jail for who knows how long. I just wanna get the fuck away from here and disappear. I swear if I could afford a sailboat nobody'd ever see my ass again. I really tired of this shit. The finacial burdens have left me bankrupt, I'm broken hearted and NOW this has broken my spirit. I really can't take this shit anymore.

Mince
10-18-2006, 03:27 AM
Texas is well known as one of the most corrupt justice systems in the country, especially when it comes to drug cases. It seems like every other week some Texas officer gets arrested for planting evidence or some case thrown out on appeal because of gross misconduct.

But who are the names of the folks involved? Did you file civilian complaints against them for misconduct? Counter-sue?

They can't do anything more on the charges they already convicted you of.


Cite? Evidence please?

Seven
10-18-2006, 03:33 AM
America: Land of the free.

Yup, I'd say get the hell out of dodge while you still can.

Mince
10-18-2006, 03:35 AM
America: Land of the free.

Yup, I'd say get the hell out of dodge while you still can.


Help youself. It's way too crowded here anyway. But where will you go? Choices, choices.

mhendo
10-18-2006, 03:45 AM
Cite? Evidence please?Well, Apos's "every other week" comment was, i'm sure, intentional hyperbole, and as such requires no cite.

But if you want evidence of fucked-up small-town justice, Texas style, you could do worse than start with the Tulia case.

jimbeam
10-18-2006, 03:52 AM
I was looking at a 35 foot ketch the other day. It needed a motor but the boat was in pretty good shape and had new sails. I could fuckoff in the Carribean for a long fucking time and then just cruise. Up the east coast and across to Greenland UK and Europe. Take a few more months or longer in the Med and cruise some more. Around the Cape and across to Sri Lanka, down Indonesia and Oz. Eventually winding up in the South Pacific. That could take years.
Where to go? Shit, where NOT to go? I just gotta come up with the boat.

BTW this being the pit, cites aren't really required and I guarantee there's plenty of cases. I don't need more evidence. I just need to fucking vent a little. Better than using a shotgun. They'll lock you ass up here and throw away the keys for being drunk in a bar. I'm not talking about shitfaced drunk either. Just whatever the cop thinks IS intoxicated. No tests required. No complaints necessary.
WTF do ya think about that?

Darth Nader
10-18-2006, 05:12 AM
Originally Posted by Apos
Texas is well known as one of the most corrupt justice systems in the country, especially when it comes to drug cases. It seems like every other week some Texas officer gets arrested for planting evidence or some case thrown out on appeal because of gross misconduct.
Cite? Evidence please?


But this week's winner is the nearby Donna, TX, Police Department, where old habits apparently die hard. The Associated Press reported Wednesday that Donna Police Chief Abel Partida and former officer Gerardo Vigil were indicted and arrested on federal drug trafficking and bribery charges. The indictment accuses the two men of taking payoffs to allow vehicles transporting marijuana to proceed unimpeded. Four counts of the indictment accuse Partida and Vigil of taking bribes ranging from $500 to $2200 to provide protection to drug trafficking vehicles, while a fifth count accused them of conspiring to transport 300 pounds of pot in November 2001. If convicted, Partida and Vigil could face 40 years in federal prison and a $2 million fine.

Partida and Vigil were following in some familiar footsteps. Five years ago, the feds arrested and convicted five former Donna police officers, including two police chiefs, of both stealing from and providing assistance to drug dealers. All of those men went to prison. Donna, located 15 miles from the Mexican border, bills itself as "the heart of the Rio Grande Valley," but a better slogan might be: "Where the drug war makes corruption a way of life."

Yep.

Mince
10-18-2006, 05:23 AM
Yep.


It seems like every other week some Texas officer gets arrested for planting evidence or some case thrown out on appeal because of gross misconduct.


Every other?

Keep going.



**emphasis added.

LouisB
10-18-2006, 05:27 AM
"If I owned Hell and Texas, I'd rent out Texas and live in Hell."---General William Sherman said it, I believe.

I believe the best thing I ever did in life was to leave Texas and never look back.

dalej42
10-18-2006, 05:46 AM
I"m afraid it is actually worse. You're also going to have to pay a $1000 surcharge (http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/director_staff/public_information/pr081903c.htm) every year for the next three years.

Elenfair
10-18-2006, 07:30 AM
Honestly? Appeal. Find yourself a pitbull lawyer (so to speak) and fight it with all your might. The record itself is worth fighting. Make an example out of THEM. Go to the media if you have to. If you're 100% confident in your position, fight it, man.

They couldn't pay me to live in Tex-Ass. ;)

yBeayf
10-18-2006, 10:02 AM
Every other?

Keep going.

It seems like every other week some Texas officer gets arrested for planting evidence or some case thrown out on appeal because of gross misconduct.

Bolding mine.

Eonwe
10-18-2006, 10:10 AM
Honestly? Appeal. Find yourself a pitbull lawyer (so to speak) and fight it with all your might. The record itself is worth fighting. Make an example out of THEM. Go to the media if you have to. If you're 100% confident in your position, fight it, man.

They couldn't pay me to live in Tex-Ass. ;)

Yeah. I agree with Elly. Frankly, this can either break your spirit, or you can use it as a 'cause worth fighting for,' find a good lawyer, and turn it around on them. Make it a goal and a purpose. In life we have to accept when circumstance deals us a shitty hand, but there's no way we have to sit back when other people clearly and unjustly beat us down.

Honestly. Fight this. Not only will you possibly (a lawyer would tell you how likely) recoup your record, your money and then some, but it will put you in the driver's seat of your life, so to speak.

What Exit?
10-18-2006, 10:17 AM
Shitty thing all the way around. You should appeal. It sounds like you got railroaded.
This won't help you but South Dakota's is trying to pass an amendment to hold Judges in better accountability. See this thread if you are interested (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=392619). Warning, very long.

Good Luck,
Jim

Ike Witt
10-18-2006, 10:35 AM
Keep going.

It isn't just small towns in BFT either. Dallas police frame and deport Hispanics (http://www.november.org/razorwire/rzold/27/page03.html).
The Dallas Police Department arrested 39 Hispanic people for possession and distribution of a white, chalky substance that field-tested positive for cocaine. Two undercover cops and a paid informant reported that drugs had been sold or shown to them, which led to the arrests. But in lab tests that police hoped would not be conducted, it was determined the "drugs" were powdered wallboard gypsum.

Trunk
10-18-2006, 10:40 AM
A little while back there was a series of articles in the Times about small town courts. You need Times Select (btw, the best money I've ever spent) to access it but I'll include a snippet.

It's the kind of thing that makes you realize just how little justive can be found in some places.

Stories like the OPs are one of the most upsetting in America, and even if it's not happening every other week in Texas (and it probably is), it's happening somewhere all the time.

NYT story:


Some of the courtrooms are not even courtrooms: tiny offices or basement rooms without a judge's bench or jury box. Sometimes the public is not admitted, witnesses are not sworn to tell the truth, and there is no word-for-word record of the proceedings.

Nearly three-quarters of the judges are not lawyers, and many -- truck drivers, sewer workers or laborers -- have scant grasp of the most basic legal principles. Some never got through high school, and at least one went no further than grade school.

But serious things happen in these little rooms all over New York State. People have been sent to jail without a guilty plea or a trial, or tossed from their homes without a proper proceeding. In violation of the law, defendants have been refused lawyers, or sentenced to weeks in jail because they cannot pay a fine. Frightened women have been denied protection from abuse.

These are New York's town and village courts, or justice courts, as the 1,250 of them are widely known. In the public imagination, they are quaint holdovers from a bygone era, handling nothing weightier than traffic tickets and small claims. They get a roll of the eyes from lawyers who amuse one another with tales of incompetent small-town justices.

A woman in Malone, N.Y., was not amused. A mother of four, she went to court in that North Country village seeking an order of protection against her husband, who the police said had choked her, kicked her in the stomach and threatened to kill her. The justice, Donald R. Roberts, a former state trooper with a high school diploma, not only refused, according to state officials, but later told the court clerk, ''Every woman needs a good pounding every now and then.''

Here's a link if anyone has Times Select.


http://select.nytimes.com/search/restricted/article?res=FB0C11FF34550C768EDDA00894DE404482

Daithi Lacha
10-18-2006, 10:53 AM
Shoot, with what was recently signed into law, they might as well of called you an illegal enemy combatant and not even bothered with the farcical trial, jimbeam! At least you were told what you were getting railroaded for ...

I'm with the others who say "fight it," for what it's worth. We have the power to make our own hell; don't let these morons make it for you.

Mince
10-18-2006, 11:15 AM
by Apos

It seems like every other week some Texas officer gets arrested for planting evidence or some case thrown out on appeal because of gross misconduct.

Bolding mine.


As mhendo indicated above, this a bit of hyperbole. I get that. However, for it to merely seem like it happens every other week, it still must happen quite frequently.

Slypork
10-18-2006, 11:21 AM
Fight it! Go to the media, call the ACLU, scream it from the mountaintops. You got royally screwed and you can’t let Sherriff Buford T. Justice get away with it. Then, to really get them back, run for sherriff!

mhendo
10-18-2006, 12:14 PM
As mhendo indicated above, this a bit of hyperbole. I get that. However, for it to merely seem like it happens every other week, it still must happen quite frequently.Well, you've already been given three examples in this thread, and it seems that those came with almost no effort whatsoever.

Of the three cases offered, i knew about two of them already (the Tulia and Donna cases). The fact that i knew about both of these places off the top of my head, without even needing to Google "Texas police corruption" or anything like that, is suggestive in and of itself, don't you think?

I can't speak for Apos and what he may or may not have read about the Texas justice system, but as someone who reads quite a lot of news, i know that i've seen numerous mentions of Texas police and courts in unflattering circumstances during the six years i've lived in the US. Maybe not every couple of weeks—which you've already acknowledged as hyperbole—but often enough for me not to be surprised when i read a story like the OP.

Shayna
10-18-2006, 01:10 PM
jimbeam, my heart breaks for you. What you've been through and what you face ahead must be both terrifying and infuriating. I, too, think you need to fight this. I wish I knew a good Texas attorney who could help you. Perhaps someone else here knows of someone and can give you a referral. Minty Green, are you still around?

That said, I hope you won't mind if I giggle just a little at your screen name in relation to your story? :)

As for Mr. Defensive Mince, is the frequency of these examples of police corruption in Texas enough to support the (acknowledged) hyperbolic statement Apos made? * McAllen, October 2005: Immigration Customs Enforcement inspector arrested for allegedly taking bribes to let drug shipments through his lane (http://gritsforbreakfast.blogspot.com/2006/04/border-corruption-runs-amok-new-cash.html) at a border checkpoint.
* McAllen, October 2005: Three Rio Grande Valley City cops arrested for allegedly taking bribes to escort drug runners (http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/407/thisweek1.shtml) through their jurisdiction.
* Brownsville, December 2005: Cameron County Sheriff convicted of accepting bribes and using deputies to escort drug runners (http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/txs/releases/December2005/051213-Cantu.htm) through the county.
* Laredo, March 2006: Senior Border Patrol Agent and his brother sentenced to 20 and 17-1/2 years respectively for accepting bribes to allow drugs through a border checkpoint (http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/389/thisweek1.shtml).
* Harlingen, March 2006: A state corrections officer (prison guard) was caught at a border patrol checkpoint with 21 pounds of marijuana in his spare tire (http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/428/thisweek1.shtml).
* El Paso, March 2006: US authorities announced they will extradite rather than prosecute (http://gritsforbreakfast.blogspot.com/2006/04/snitch-whose-crimes-were-tolerated-by.html) an informant who murdered 12 people in Juarez while working for Immigration Customs Enforcement.
* Zapata County, April 2006: Deputy commander of the Laredo Multi-Agency Narcotics Task force was indicted (http://gritsforbreakfast.blogspot.com/2006/04/on-texas-side-too-corrupt-cops-operate.html) for allegedly directing agents (http://gritsforbreakfast.blogspot.com/2006/04/drug-enforcement-broken-down-on-border.html) away from trafficking routes, helping smugglers store drugs, and giving out confidential police information.
* El Paso, April 2006: Former Special Agent in Charge of the entire El Paso FBI division (2001-2003) indicted (http://gritsforbreakfast.blogspot.com/2006/04/cartels-corrupted-top-fbi-official-in.html) for allegedly taking bribes from a cartel-affiliated Juarez racetrack owner who was his informant.
* Edinburg, April 2006: Five brothers including one current Edinburg police officer and a former McAllen police officer arrested on drug trafficking charges (http://gritsforbreakfast.blogspot.com/2006/04/dea-sting-nabs-nuther-valley-cop.html). Here's a nice little story: JUSTICE DEPARTMENT INDICTS FORMER FRIO COUNTY, TEXAS
DEPUTY SHERIFFS ON CORRUPTION AND CIVIL RIGHTS VIOLATIONS

<snip>

The indictment alleges that the three former deputy sheriff's conducted unlawful traffic stops of motorists in an attempt to extort money and steal property from individuals. Additionally, the government alleges that the defendants set fire to a mobile home and stole firearms from an evidence room of a local police station. (http://www.usdoj.gov/opa/pr/2001/October/528cr.htm) More: In 1997, six former law officers from Texas were indicted on drug trafficking and corruption charges for smuggling more than 1700 pounds of marijuana into the country. In July 1994, Hidalgo County Sheriff Brig Marmolejo Jr. was sentenced to seven years in federal prison for taking $151,000 in bribes for allowing a drug trafficker to have special privileges in jail. Also that year, a federal investigation in nearby Zapata County resulted in drug-related convictions of the former county judge, sheriff and county clerk. In 1995, former Hidalgo County Judge J. Edgar Ruiz and several other county officials were indicted on charges of awarding county business to favored companies for more than $30,000 in kickbacks. (Arrillaga, 1997)

<snip>

In Houston, Texas, internal affairs Sgt Adres Reza and his girlfriend were arrested and charged with the kidnapping of a Pasadena businesswoman. She was the wife of another Houston police officer. Reza stated that he could get away with the kidnapping because he was a police officer (http://www.civiliansdown.com/copcrimes%20page%201.htm (http://www.iejs.com/Policing/police_corruption.htm), 2002). In 1992 Lorraine Adams and Dan Malone of The Dallas Morning News won a Pulitzer Prize for their series of reports on the extensive misconduct and abuses of power of police in Texas. And while I'm sure these examples could be said to be exceptions to the rule, given the vast number of police there are in the entire state of Texas, I do believe that they appear with enough frequency to justify the feeling that it seems like a bi-weekly occurrence.

BwanaBob
10-18-2006, 01:48 PM
Shit like that makes me think Texas ought to be cut loose from the Union, and put on the Axis-of-Evil nation list.

BTW, how did they know your plates were from McAllen,TX? Do you have one of those stupid license plate frames (actually illegal in many jurisdictions) that says McAllen on it?

Ditch it.

Apos
10-18-2006, 02:15 PM
Others have said it better than I have. No, I can't provide a cite for every single week going back several years, but not only have I read countless stories of a basically corrupt and non-functional justice system, but I've ever read Texans and former Texans describe it as such. Texas is also notorious for "drunk or sleeping" (i.e. completely incompetant) defense attorneys. Real due process is just not as respected as much in Texas as elsewhere.

For all we know, jimbeam could be leaving out key facts about his case (no offense to jimbeam, but none of us have the ability to confirm any of it). But it certainly rings true with other stories I've heard. These small town police forces make a lot of money on railroading out of towners, in part to justify their own salaries. They basically pull people over for no reason and try to find some way to make money off of it asap. It's absolutely no surprise that key evidence exonerating him mysterious disappeared. And I'll bet there isn't even any hint of IAB or recrimination over that sort of misconduct.

Ike Witt
10-18-2006, 02:18 PM
Shit like that makes me think Texas ought to be cut loose from the Union, and put on the Axis-of-Evil nation list.

Did you read the link in Trunk's post? Cut loose New York and add them to the axis of evil?

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
10-18-2006, 02:18 PM
You have to go to A.A.? You have to give up three evenings out of every week to deal with your "alcohol problem"? What do you say when there's nothing to talk about?

Unless you're not telling the whole story, it's beyond ridiculous.

zamboniracer
10-18-2006, 02:19 PM
Shit like that makes me think Texas ought to be cut loose from the Union, and put on the Axis-of-Evil nation list.

BTW, how did they know your plates were from McAllen,TX? Do you have one of those stupid license plate frames (actually illegal in many jurisdictions) that says McAllen on it?

Ditch it.


I don't know about Texas, but many states license plates are designed so that that it is apparent what county the car is from. In Ohio they use number coded stickers on each plate. In Indiana they use the plate number themselves, so that the first 2 digits of the plate number indicate what county the car is from.

What Exit?
10-18-2006, 02:24 PM
You have to go to A.A.? You have to give up three evenings out of every week to deal with your "alcohol problem"? What do you say when there's nothing to talk about?

Unless you're not telling the whole story, it's beyond ridiculous.
I have a large problem with this. My Brother had to go through AA meeting for his DUI and AA is seriously tinged with religion. The whole Court ordering you to AA meeting seems to violate the "spirit" of separation of church and state.

Jim

Ike Witt
10-18-2006, 02:27 PM
I don't know about Texas, but many states license plates are designed so that that it is apparent what county the car is from.
Texas plates do not indicate where the vehicle is from, but the registration sticker placed in the window does indicate what county the vehicle is registered in.

Seven
10-18-2006, 02:50 PM
Help youself. It's way too crowded here anyway. But where will you go? Choices, choices.

Way ahead of you.

I left the US about 45 days ago. I do not plan on returning.

Apos
10-18-2006, 03:27 PM
You most certainly have grounds to sue. Requring people to go specifically to AA has many times over been found to be a violation of SOCAS.

We've had this debate before, but I think AA's approach to alcohol treatment is criminally flawed anyway, and further compromised by the fact that it accepts such forced membership.

jimbeam
10-18-2006, 03:29 PM
The car has a dealer's sticker on the trunk. You can't legally have anything that covers the plate in Texas. The car IS gone now. I just had it for a little while and it was a cop magnet.
I should've just outran the little bastard. It had a huge fuel injected IROQ Z28 monster under the hood. BUT I was legal so I just pulled over like a good boy and let em fuck me in the ass. I even blew the breath test because I was sober and new it was all a mistake. Said so on the interrogation video and the cop actually agreed it was possible. Guess why the tape HAD to vanish?
I had a lawyer (court appointed) but like I said, I'm busted. The shit I went through with my wife's accident (ie:medical and legal expenses) took everything we worked for. I've got a couple of acres of land left but the rest is gone. This is just icing on the cake.

Also for whatever reason and not allowed in court was the fact that the chickenshit little cop has gone through three or four jobs in as many years. When asked why, the prosecution objected and it was considered not relevant. He had been with Crockett PD for 8 months at that time (thus the "rookie" reference)

Yeah, I've left some shit out. Like when the jailer asked why I was arrested and he said I didn't look or act drunk to him. How about the fact that my car was inventoried and shit was destroyed in the search. How about the fact that despite the scant testimony of the two officers at the scene they contradicted each other on some aspects and simply forgot or denied other points. Cop number two was following the senior officers lead. Yep you heard me, the backup cop had less time than the arresting officer. He clearly didn't want to be there and absolutely perjured himself on the stand. But then both of them did. Without the tape, it was just my word against theirs. How about Crockett has a strict NO DRUGS campaign and my profile was just what they were looking for. A big bust would've exonerated the little prick for whatever reasons he can't keep a job.

Oh, Shayna I get the joke.. but the usename came in honor of my father. He passed away this summer after a long bout with cancer. I had been caring for him (feeding tubes, giving meds, baths, etc) he was a longtime, 32 years, member of AA and Jim Beam was his favorite. When he drank of course.
Personally, I prefer Cuervo Gold but not at 5 o'clock in the morning.

I don't know how long I have to appeal. I need to find out. But in a little hick fucking town what makes anyone think it'd be any different next time. Change venue? How do I present possibly destroyed evidence? Like I said earlier, the tapes were referred to in pretrial, so it'd be in the minutes.. My lawyer viewed the tapes but didn't get copies. The prosecutor claimed they NEVER existed. The judge wouldn't allow reference to them, since they "never existed". Despite the evidence from pretrial. My lawyer couldn't testify of course.
It's just fucked up all the way around.

I agree we can make our own hell... But, I didn't start this fucking curse. I just want it to end and every time I try gettin back up on my feet... SHIT lookout... the fuckin sky is falling. That's how I feel. It's NOT imagined, it's fucking real. All this shit has happened and just recently. Fuck Job, he had an easy time IMHO. There's more but damn, I didn't mean for this to be a rant about other crap. Anyway, y'all might want to stay clear. Just in case this shit is contagious. It seems to affect everyone close to me.
There's nothing I can do about all the "natural" shit out there BUT this illegal fucking shit is what's eating at me. I've always been a fucking standup and be counted, speak out and help others kind of guy. I've always been part of the community and never took shit from nobody but I swear it's plied up pretty deep lately. These cocksukers and their gestapo fucking tactics are just wrong. But then I think our rights have pretty much gone out the fucking window since 911.
Although, this small town shit has been around forever. It didn't just start. I just don't get how a jury can not see reasonable doubt at least. I know people are often lazy and it was late in the day when they left to decide. The fucking prosecutor drug it out to the last damned minute . Started out first thing in the morning and closed at nearly 6pm. Everyone was fucking wore out and wanted to go home. They took less than ten minutes. AND I know at least one jury member saw WTF was going on. She kept shaking her head whenever the prosecution's BS started.
Shit, I better stop before y'all get the butterfly net.

Duke of Rat
10-18-2006, 03:41 PM
You guys will love this (http://www.monsterfm.com/justice/roach.htm).

It's the story of a hard on drug offenders Texas DA.

jimbeam
10-18-2006, 03:42 PM
and YES the AA 3 times a week was absolutely court ordered. My higher power GOD as I understand HIM and Our Father who art in Heaven etc, etc, are ALL aspects of AA. Even though it claims to be "non-religious" it is absolutely a spiritual organization and constant referrals to GOD and prayer is at every meeting. Not that there's anything wrong with folks and their religions or people's belief in GOD either BUT
BUT
BUT
BUT
WTF makes the court think it's got the right to ORDER me to church/AA or else I go to jail?

BTW, AA isn't crazy about the idea either.

Apos
10-18-2006, 03:49 PM
It doesn't have the right. If you contact the ACLU, they will sue the judge on your behalf.

jimbeam
10-18-2006, 04:08 PM
Oh and to clear up any confusion about the plates...YES the car had a dealer tag on the trunk BUT
I had recently got the car and had NOT transferred the title yet. So, the plates came back on the police radio from McAllen, Tx. not in my name (red flag to law enforcement) I explained all this to them at the time and it wasn't a problem.

Zabali_Clawbane
10-18-2006, 04:22 PM
Go the the ACLU, fight this with everything you've got. Also, after consulting the ACLU, maybe start the red tape to move out of Texas depending on what they say if they take up your case. (They most likely will...) At the least, find a counselor that actually listens and go to them regularly to help you deal with the added stress so you don't implode. Good luck, I'll send some good thoughts your way.

Mince
10-18-2006, 05:54 PM
As for Mr. Defensive Mince, is the frequency of these examples of police corruption in Texas enough to support the (acknowledged) hyperbolic statement Apos made?

Absolutely. Leastwise it's a very good start. But there is no defense here. You are being presumptuous. I merely asked for evidence supporting his claim. Turns out it wasn't so hyperbolic afterall.

Ensign Edison
10-18-2006, 06:16 PM
This guy's style seem a little...familiar to anyone else?

kaylasdad99
10-18-2006, 09:03 PM
Yeah, he kinda does... (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Btfsplk)