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View Full Version : TiVo Owners: Convince Me to Join You.


Frostillicus
11-30-2006, 08:52 PM
I have come to the point that I am now officially sick of dealing with the endless commercials that pollute prime-time TV, especially sporting events. (I'm looking at you, Monday Night Football.) I figure that getting a DVR such as TiVo would make my life much easier. They have them at Best Buy starting at $249 for up to 80 hours of recording time, which seems like plenty to me. So, TiVo owners, is it really the greatest thing since penecillin? Would would ever go back to your non-TiVo days? Thanks in advance for your responses.

Turek
11-30-2006, 09:17 PM
I never watch TV "realtime" any more. Even when I'm going to watch something when it's on, I'll wait 10 or 15 minutes into the show before I start watching it. For sporting events, I wait longer.

You can have my Tivo when you can pry the remote from my cold, lifeless grip. Watching TV the old-fashioned way annoys me now.

You can skip commercials. You can watch shows when you want, without having to fool with a VCR or tapes or worrying about taping over something. You can tell it via the internet to record something. You can stop a show or game mid-play when your mom calls and just wants to chat.

What's not to love?

GingerOfTheNorth
11-30-2006, 09:22 PM
I love my Tivo. You will take it from me when you pry it from my cold, dead hands. And even then, you're not getting the remote. I don't ever watch live TV anymore.

Mama Tiger
11-30-2006, 09:26 PM
Just having that pause button available is the best thing in the entire universe. Or, like tonight, watching one show that airs from 8-8:30 and then switching immediately to the beginning of another show that started recording from 8-9, and watching it without having to wait for 9 to roll around, and of course zipping through the commercials of both.

We just finally got one (dual-tuner) last summer, and I honestly don't know how we managed all these years without it.

friedo
11-30-2006, 09:40 PM
How cool is TiVo?

TiVo is cooler than Def Leppard defeating the forces of tyranny with nothing but the raw power of Rock.

TiVo is cooler than the rumored offspring of The Fonz and David Hasselhoff if he was zapped with a coolness ray.

TiVo is so rad it has to be monitored with a Geiger counter.

You know that really hot supermodel? The one who you daydream about at work and you can't pronounce her name? Yeah, that one. TiVo is sexier than that.

TiVo is so awesome, it's the kind of awesome from before when pizza could be called "awesome."

TiVo tastes better than the finest Beluga caviar spread lightly over a slice of sweet, sweet victory.

You remember that news story from a few months ago about a guy who battled a giant deer to the death in his house with only his bare hands? Well, it turns out he only used one hand. Because his TiVo remote was in the other one.

TiVo is so boss it can totally fire your boss.

One time I was nervous about asking out a girl. I consulted the TiVo and within seconds I was participating in an orgy with hot female porn stars. There's a chance that the TiVo simply recorded something from the Playboy channel but I'm pretty sure it was real.

A friend of mine named his cat TiVo. The next day, the cat got run over by a Hummer. Serves him right for calling something a TiVo that isn't actually a TiVo.

TiVo is so slick, it has a negative coefficient of friction.

Using a TiVo is like shooting heroin but without the side-effects. Also, it's twice as addictive.

Some people may tell you that your cable company's DVR is just as good as a TiVo. These people are Al-Qaeda terrorists.

TiVo can be used as a floatation device in the event of a plane crash.

Also, I really like my TiVo, so it has that going for it.

GingerOfTheNorth
11-30-2006, 09:47 PM
Also, I really like my TiVo, so it has that going for it.
I really like you.

percypercy
11-30-2006, 10:01 PM
Some people may tell you that your cable company's DVR is just as good as a TiVo. These people are Al-Qaeda terrorists.

Also, I really like my TiVo, so it has that going for it.

Everything Friedo said, and these two double.
-Lil

Nars Glinley
11-30-2006, 10:02 PM
I would give up the internet before Tivo.

KGS
11-30-2006, 10:17 PM
Make no mistake -- if you go with TiVo, or even with a much-maligned Comcast DVR, it will change the way you watch television. Forever.

If you're an archivist, TiVo is a dream come true. I used to record lots of television programs "live", resulting in really crappy edits where I tried to cut out the commercials. No problem with TiVo...even if you fudge up an edit, you can always back up and start over.

It's even better when you upgrade to a DVD Recorder. I've got 73 2-hour DVDs of music videos from VH1 Classic (I can scan through an entire day's worth of programming in under 30 minutes!), 29 DVDs of Iron Chef (4 eps per disc) and over 100 DVDs of miscellaneous stuff, from Mythbusters to obscure foreign films on the Sundance Channel.

Be sure you get a unit with the most recording space available -- trust me, you will use ALL of it.

Also, when recording sports programs, be sure to record an extra 60-90 minutes (yes, there's a setting to do that) since most games tend to run long. (Come to think, I have a feeling that TiVo is what killed my interest in NASCAR...those five-hour races get so boring, I wound up fast-forwarding through the whole event, stopping only for crashes and pit stops. Eventually I said to hell with it...)

AuntiePam
11-30-2006, 10:27 PM
There's no downside.

We got ours from DirecTV. No upfront cost, but there's an addition to the monthly bill. I think it's $5 plus $6 for the warranty/maintenance thingie. We get confused with cords and plug-ins, so the extra cost is worth it.

If they ever offer a DVD recorder, I'm on it. I'd get one, but I don't trust myself to hook it up right.

jsgoddess
11-30-2006, 10:27 PM
I have come to the point that I am now officially sick of dealing with the endless commercials that pollute prime-time TV, especially sporting events. (I'm looking at you, Monday Night Football.) I figure that getting a DVR such as TiVo would make my life much easier. They have them at Best Buy starting at $249 for up to 80 hours of recording time, which seems like plenty to me.

TiVo was offering a free 80 hour box when you bought 1 year of service. Check out their site for good deals.

I love our TiVos. We have 2 and they talk to each other and live in peace and harmony. His and hers TiVos. Life doesn't get much better than that.

TimeWinder
11-30-2006, 11:13 PM
... for up to 80 hours of recording time, which seems like plenty to me...

Note that tje "up to" time on the box really is a maximum. You get to choose the quality from 3-4 different levels for each show, and you'll only get close to the spec number if you choose "basic," which is moderately bad.

However, if you have a wireless computer network that the Tivo can be on, you can use Tivo Desktop to cache shows "offline," in which case it matters less. In any event, my wife and I have the 80-hour, watch a fair amount of TV, and have never filled it to the point where it failed to record something we wanted, or tossed something we were interested in seeing too early.

panache45
11-30-2006, 11:46 PM
Here are just two examples of why I love my Tivo:

1. I'm interested in travel, and want to watch just about anything travel-related. So I just tell Tivo to watch anything travel-related. Now, if Tivo were dumb, it would simply record everything on the Travel Channel. But Tivo is smart. It knows that some shows on the Travel Channel have very little to do with travel (e.g. Vegas, poker playing, haunted houses, etc.) and it doesn't record these. And of course, it records travel-related shows on other channels.

2. I'm a big fan of Adrien Brody, and I told this to my Tivo. So it records everything Adrien Brody is in: Movies, Talk shows, SNL appearances. Regardless of the channel or time, it just automatically records them.

When I first got Tivo, about a year ago, I got the unit and the service directly from Tivo. I got my first year free, and a unit that will record up to 300 hours.

Typo Negative
12-01-2006, 12:09 AM
I do not know if I could live without it again.

The coolest things are wish lists and season passes. You set a season pass for a a show on a channel and it records that show no matter when it plays.

If you set up a wish list for a show, actor, director or even a keyword (like ballroom dancing) and it will record any show that has it, no matter what time or channel.

And it records stuff it thinks you will like.

It's too cool for mere words.

Campion
12-01-2006, 12:28 AM
I tend to watch tv when I don't have other things to do; that is, I don't make time for tv shows, but if I feel like watching tv, I'll watch tv. Which generally consists of me flipping channels for an hour looking for something to be on.

With a dvr, when I feel like watching tv, it's collected stuff for me to watch. So I can be more efficient in my tv watching, which means I actually spend less time watching tv now than I did before dvr. And, as others have said, the pause button is an incredible thing -- you can get up for a cup of tea whenever you want. I can't stand watching tv in real time anymore, because you have to sit through commercials!

Having said all that, I think that if you're a tv junkie, this thing could be a tool of satan. It does record what you tell it to, but it also records other things it thinks you'll like. Which, I understand, has been the ruination of many people.

My tivo is set to record Grey's Anatomy for a friend; but it also records, say, Oprah, when a Grey's Anatomy cast member is on; or Rachel Ray, when they're on there. So a simple hour of Grey's Anatomy can become almost 2 hours of tv.

SenorBeef
12-01-2006, 04:36 AM
I don't think I've ever heard of someone who got TiVo and just said "meh".

Almost all TiVo users are like people on this thread. The endorsement doesn't get any greater.



I'd probably stop watching TV if I couldn't have Tivo. I might get 3-5 shows per week off the internet, but that's it.

Ximenean
12-01-2006, 05:17 AM
I don't have a TiVo but I have something similar. With any hard disk based DVR, you get some major benefits over VCRs, such as not having to mess around with tapes or remember what you recorded where, ease of setting timers, and the ability to pause and rewind live TV.

But smart PVRs like TiVo take things to another level. It's like having an invisible friend who knows what TV shows you like and automatically records them without you having to do anything. If they move to a different time or day, or come back after being off the air for a while, it doesn't matter.

DianaG
12-01-2006, 05:26 AM
I have the much maligned Comcast DVR, and while I can't say it's as good as Tivo, it's good enough for me. Like many have mentioned, I never watch anything in real time anymore, even if I'm home. Why watch commercials if I don't have to? My DVR doesn't have the feature where it indpendently records everything I might like, but I don't really want that, since I already watch too much television! A girl's gotta leave the house every once in a while!

What's not to love about being able to settle in on a Sunday afternoon, and watch all your favorite shows right in a row? Never again will I be the woman trying to break up the PTA meeting so that I don't miss Veronica Mars!

El Perro Fumando
12-01-2006, 05:32 AM
Just now, my husband was making a big loud noise upstairs while the traffic report was on the news. Because of my headache and the early morning hour, I didn't want to turn up the tv too loud (so as to disturb my neighbors). I simply hit rewind when he was done and watched the traffic report again (this time with sound).

The other day, I started watching a rerun of the Simpsons on our local Fox affiliate (which doesn't put episode-specific descriptions into the TiVo system). About a minute in, I realized it was the "Blinky" episode, one of my favorites. So I simply hit record and it recorded from then on, PLUS the part of the episode I had already seen. So now my saved copy of the episode is complete. With a VCR, it would be missing the first part.

There are so many little wonderful things about it. You just need to buy one to discover the joy that is TiVo ownership.

Walloon
12-01-2006, 05:40 AM
Another very cool thing about TiVo: you can program it over the Internet! Say you're going to be working late, but you wanted to record a show you just heard about at lunchtime that you will otherwise miss. As long as TiVo has an hour's notice ahead of time, you can go to the TiVo website and program your TiVo from there. Even if you know only the name of the program, and you don't know the exact time or the channel.

Turek
12-01-2006, 07:36 AM
[QUOTE=Campion]It does record what you tell it to, but it also records other things it thinks you'll like. Which, I understand, has been the ruination of many people.[QUOTE]

I consider it an advantage of TiVo that I can turn this feature off. I watch enough TV; I don't want it telling me what it thinks I would like. I turned this feature off when I first got TiVo and it's been off ever since.

Cheesesteak
12-01-2006, 08:29 AM
DVR is probably the technological advancement that will have the biggest overall impact on the television watching experience. Color is more realistic than Black and White. Cable/satellite gives you more channels than broadcast. HDTV is a marvelously sharp picture.

None of these advances actually change what watching TV means, DVR does. Watching TV now means watching the show you want, when you want. Not just for one or two shows, but for ALL the shows you regularly enjoy. You don't ever have to miss a show, you don't ever have to change your schedule to catch a show, they will always be waiting for you.

Hampshire
12-01-2006, 08:56 AM
How much do I love my DVR?
Let's just say it may be one of the reasons I can handle being married and have a 6 month-old in the house.

You'd think maybe once a week I'd be able to watch a show like The Office for a half hour on Thursdays at 7:30 without interruption? No way. If the wife needs help in the kitchen, the phone rings, the dogs want to go out, the baby is crying, etc. etc. etc. I'm pretty much screwed. Then what are my options if I miss it? Wait for it to come out on DVD a year later and fork over $40 just to see an episode I missed?
Now if I get interrupted I can just "PAUSE" and go take care of things, come back and resume where I left off. If the dog barks, baby cries, wife calls and I miss the punch line to a joke I can just rewind a few seconds and see what was said.
Or if the house is in chaos and I miss the show completely I can watch it later at 9:30 when the house is quieter and nothing is on TV anyway.
And of course there is the added + of watching shows at a later time. "SKIP THE COMMERCIALS!!!" You'll soon learn that a 30 minute show is actually 20 minutes of show and 10 minutes of commercials. An hour show is 40 minutes of show and 20 minutes of commercials. And commercials are either 30 or 60 second spots. With the 30-second jump button (programable on the Comcast DVR) you just tap-tap-tap through the ads. How awesome to watch 2 hours worth of TV in an hour and 20 minutes!!?

I have become so adapted to the thing that I start to wish I had some of the features on my car radio. "What did that guy say?","When did they say band X is coming to town?","What did they just say about the weather/traffic?" I always reach for the rewind then realize "crap, this ain't my TV."

Geobabe
12-01-2006, 09:06 AM
I consider it an advantage of TiVo that I can turn this feature off. I watch enough TV; I don't want it telling me what it thinks I would like. I turned this feature off when I first got TiVo and it's been off ever since.I also turned the auto-record off; I find that, for me, the suggestions aren't always stuff I really want to see--it tends to assume, for example, that because I liked Firefly that I also want to watch Angel, and I mean no disrespect to the many loyal fans of that show, but I'm not into it. I do browse through the list of suggestions from time to time, though, and manually pick shows to record, so it's still a very useful feature, one that I can use in the way I want to.

As others have said, it's spoiled me for watching live TV. I love being able to run to the bathroom or get a drink without having to try to time it to a commercial break. I constantly find myself wishing I could pause and replay the radio in the car.

I don't think anybody's mentioned some of the minor, but still cool, features not having to do with watching and recording TV shows. If you've got your box networked, you can look at pictures from your computer on the big TV screen, listen to music (very nice if you also have a home theater setup) either from your hard drive or certain stations and Podcasts on the web (a limited selection, but still pretty good), see Yahoo traffic and weather on the TV...TiVo rocks my socks.

Diddledog
12-01-2006, 10:12 AM
Ditto all the Tivo endorsements here. It really does change how you watch TV.

The only downside I've encountered is this: I often use the pause button when my wife says something to me, my intent being to silence the tv and give her my full attention while we're talking. Then when we're done talking, I unpause and go back to watching my show.

Now my intent -- honestly -- is to be polite and give her my attention without us having to talk over the tv. But she interprets this the opposite way and sometimes snarks "Oh, you don't want to miss even a second of your precious tv program, huh?" I've tried explaining why I pause it, but she still says it means the tv is my priority instead of her. That's not true, of course, because I could always rewind and go back to whatever I missed while we talked.

Not looking for marriage counseling, just wondering if anyone else has encountered this Tivo-based rift before.

Turek
12-01-2006, 10:17 AM
I did think of one drawback to TiVo: there is a slight, albeit noticable, degradation of picture quality, even when you're watch "live" TV. It's most noticable to me during sporting events where there are lots of things changing on the screen at once.

SenorBeef
12-01-2006, 10:45 AM
You guys who turn suggestions off - you know that the feature doesn't interfere with anything at all, right?

I rarely look at suggestions, but I never turned it off. There's no reason to. It never pre-empts anything you want to record a suggestion, it never deletes anything you've recorded for a suggestion, and suggestions don't really have any negative impact at all.

Occasionally I don't want to watch what I have recorded, so I'll glance over the suggestions box, and sometimes maybe I'll find seinfeld or something and watch it.

Gangster Octopus
12-01-2006, 11:01 AM
I don't know how vital Tivo is. I mean honestly, I think it comes in no higher than fourth on my list of essentials: 1) air; 2) water; 3) food & 4) Tivo.

Skammer
12-01-2006, 11:02 AM
My wife was skeptical when I bought it, but now she frequently says that it saved our marriage. Because I can't watch TV and talk to her (or listen to her) at the same time. But now I can pause what I'm watching, give her my full attention, and pick up where I left off.

Also, if I'm up early in the morning and there is nothing on but a bunch of infomercials, I've got 50 hours of shows I like recorded that I can watch with the push of a few buttons.

Is my team playing on TV this Saturday but I have to go to my nephew's birthday party? No problem. In fact, TiVo will record the game even if I didn't know it was going to be televised.

I can watch an entire football game in about an hour and a half, without fast forwarding through any plays. Just skip the commercials and halftime show, FF through the timeouts, and watch each play from snap to tackle in real time. And I don't have to rush home from church to see the opening kickoff.

I had an early 60-hr model for four years that died recently, and I went out and bought a dual tuner 80-hr machine. It came with a $150 rebate so it ended up costing me less than $100.

silenus
12-01-2006, 11:24 AM
Just buy the freaking thing already! How much more convincing do you need? :D

-silenus, unrepentant Tivo-lover

Geobabe
12-01-2006, 11:41 AM
You guys who turn suggestions off - you know that the feature doesn't interfere with anything at all, right?

I rarely look at suggestions, but I never turned it off. There's no reason to. It never pre-empts anything you want to record a suggestion, it never deletes anything you've recorded for a suggestion, and suggestions don't really have any negative impact at all.

Occasionally I don't want to watch what I have recorded, so I'll glance over the suggestions box, and sometimes maybe I'll find seinfeld or something and watch it.No, it doesn't interfere, but I still prefer to not have it record everything--maybe it's just my quirky tastes, but when I go through the list manually, maybe a fourth of what it suggests is something I truly want to watch. Letting it auto-record only to delete most of it seems a waste to me, so I like that I can choose whether to have it record or not.

MovieMogul
12-01-2006, 11:53 AM
I like it for 2 reasons:

(1) My wife, who was hopeless with the VCR, can use our DVR (Comcast) very easily, so doesn't have to phone me to walk her through what remote does what and which tape has which.

(2) I watch a lot more shows, particularly on PBS, that do not have regularly scheduled hours. I love catching up on American Experience and American Masters reruns I've been missing these past years, so that's helped me diversifying my viewing.

Only $10/month more than our previous cable package.

SenorBeef
12-01-2006, 11:53 AM
I can watch an entire football game in about an hour and a half, without fast forwarding through any plays. Just skip the commercials and halftime show, FF through the timeouts, and watch each play from snap to tackle in real time. And I don't have to rush home from church to see the opening kickoff.


The 30 second skip is almost perfect for skipping the time between plays, if you want to watch a football game in a hurry. As soon as the play ends, hit skip, and you're now about 5 seconds before the next snap. Very efficient.


No, it doesn't interfere, but I still prefer to not have it record everything--maybe it's just my quirky tastes, but when I go through the list manually, maybe a fourth of what it suggests is something I truly want to watch. Letting it auto-record only to delete most of it seems a waste to me, so I like that I can choose whether to have it record or not.

Waste of what, though? The tivo is recording 24/7 anyway - it's either being recorded to the live buffer, or stored in a longer lasting fashion. It doesn't require any extra power, or resources, or anything whatsoever to record a suggestion instead of just recording live TV.

Geobabe
12-01-2006, 12:05 PM
Waste of what, though? The tivo is recording 24/7 anyway - it's either being recorded to the live buffer, or stored in a longer lasting fashion. It doesn't require any extra power, or resources, or anything whatsoever to record a suggestion instead of just recording live TV.A waste of my time to either delete it or extra scrolling through the Now Playing list to find the stuff I want to see. Not a huge amount of time, sure, but as I said, I like that I have the choice to turn it on or off as I desire (I'm one of those people who also likes to turn off most of the Windows automatic features; I just like to have control over my electronic devices). It's nice that they designed that feature to make everybody happy, y'know?

SenorBeef
12-01-2006, 12:25 PM
A waste of my time to either delete it or extra scrolling through the Now Playing list to find the stuff I want to see. Not a huge amount of time, sure, but as I said, I like that I have the choice to turn it on or off as I desire (I'm one of those people who also likes to turn off most of the Windows automatic features; I just like to have control over my electronic devices). It's nice that they designed that feature to make everybody happy, y'know?

Well, I'm not knocking you, I just didn't understand.

There's no need/reason to delete the stuff, and it's always grouped as the very last item on the now playing list (maybe it's different if you don't group it), so you never have to scroll past it.

If it makes you happy, that's cool.

Turek
12-01-2006, 12:55 PM
Waste of what, though? The tivo is recording 24/7 anyway - it's either being recorded to the live buffer, or stored in a longer lasting fashion. It doesn't require any extra power, or resources, or anything whatsoever to record a suggestion instead of just recording live TV.

And spam doesn't really take away from your ability to receive email. But you've still got to wade through it and delete the stuff you don't want. I've never seen a recomendation for a show that I A) wanted to watch and B) didn't plan on watching or recording already.

I'm not trying to be argumentative. I'm just saying why I have it disabled.

Gangster Octopus
12-01-2006, 01:07 PM
You guys may be talking past one another. A Series 1 Tivo does not have folders, all the recorded programs are just a long list. So, suggestions need to be waded through. A Series 2 Tivo has folders and suggestions go in the folder at the bottom and can pretty much be ignored.

SenorBeef
12-01-2006, 01:12 PM
Aha, I hadn't considered that.

Yeah, I would absolutely turn off suggestions if they appeared chronologically intermixed with my recorded shows. I thought the software between tivos was more standardized, and that suggestions appeared in their own little folder at the bottom.

Cervaise
12-01-2006, 04:22 PM
TiVo is Television Jesus.

I was excited when I first got it, and yet, even then, I had absolutely no idea what it would do. Within a week, I knew that it had gone from Extremely Cool to Absolutely Essential.

You ask whether or not I could live without it. Let me put it this way.

If somebody broke into my house and stole all of my electronics, the first thing I would replace, the first thing, is the TiVo. Before even having a screen to use it with. ;)

Here's the thing. Having TiVo doesn't mean I watch more television. It means I watch less. Because when there's something good at 8pm and something good at 10pm, I'm not sitting there during the 9:00 hour just killing time between shows. I watch only what I want to watch, when I want to watch it. I watch less total, but what I watch is immeasurably better.

TiVo has had a tangible positive effect on my quality of life.

Get it now. Don't wait. Now. Now! Go NOW! :D

ASAKMOTSD
12-01-2006, 08:21 PM
So what about those of us that did not get one with the built in DirecTv tuners? Do we have to go to cable or could I survive with just the DirecTv DVR?

AWB
12-01-2006, 08:39 PM
There's no downside.

We got ours from DirecTV. No upfront cost, but there's an addition to the monthly bill. I think it's $5 plus $6 for the warranty/maintenance thingie. We get confused with cords and plug-ins, so the extra cost is worth it.

If they ever offer a DVD recorder, I'm on it. I'd get one, but I don't trust myself to hook it up right.

I've got the DirecTV unit too. A few bugs, but that's in the channel "sorting"; you can't sort by channel name. (If anyone knows how, let me know.)

Also, it keeps reminding me of how many episodes of "Dr. Who" I've yet to watch. But I've got all the new ones since October. :)

Frostillicus
12-01-2006, 09:21 PM
You guys had me by post #3.

I went to Best Buy today and bought the $249 Tivo I had looked at yesterday. Bonus: I received a $180 mail-in rebate, so it only ended up costing $69. I hooked it up this afternoon and told it to slap a season pass on Scrubs and The Simpsons. The first few episodes it recorded came out VERY poor quality and I was starting to get pissed about it until I realized that I had accidently pressed a wrong button on my cable box. Now, the picture looks perfect. Thanks for all the input, especially the hilarious ones.

MaxTheVool
12-01-2006, 09:50 PM
Ditto all the Tivo endorsements here. It really does change how you watch TV.

The only downside I've encountered is this: I often use the pause button when my wife says something to me, my intent being to silence the tv and give her my full attention while we're talking. Then when we're done talking, I unpause and go back to watching my show.

Now my intent -- honestly -- is to be polite and give her my attention without us having to talk over the tv. But she interprets this the opposite way and sometimes snarks "Oh, you don't want to miss even a second of your precious tv program, huh?" I've tried explaining why I pause it, but she still says it means the tv is my priority instead of her. That's not true, of course, because I could always rewind and go back to whatever I missed while we talked.

Not looking for marriage counseling, just wondering if anyone else has encountered this Tivo-based rift before.

That is the most baffling thing I've ever heard in my entire life. You are watching something. She wants to talk to you. So instead of telling her to wait, or trying to listen to her and still pay attention to the TV at the same time, you pause the show so that you can give her your full attention... and somehow that is a BAD thing?

Bambi Hassenpfeffer
12-02-2006, 12:48 AM
I bought my first TiVo in 2001. A large, warm box that I only sorta wanted. Within a week, I was completely unable to live without it. When that TiVo died, it was 2 in the morning on a Tuesday -- by 3a, I had a new one from Wal-Mart. My TiVo is absolutely essential.

I spent the last year traveling -- 3 days home, 4 days away weekly. My TiVo didn't miss a single thing I wanted, and it was all waiting for me, at my convenience, when I wanted it. From my cellphone's web browser, I programmed it several times when I saw a commercial for a show I wanted to watch while sitting in my hotel room halfway across the state. The show would be waiting when I came home.

I work a crazy retail schedule, with shifts that start between 6a and 2p and wrap up between 3p and midnight. If I didn't have my TiVo, I'd never see anything I want to, cause I'm usually at work during primetime. On top of that, the cable networks run shows several times a week at varied hours, which means that I can always find one that doesn't conflict with something else.

With the TiVo Desktop software, I can look at photos and listen to my desktop PC's music on my TV. In addition, the TiVo supports something called "series transfers"; this means that any episode of that series I record will be automatically transferred to my PC for use there, where I can watch it again or burn it to DVD (Who wants a Galactica boxset?) My brother and I can move stuff back and forth to/from our TiVos so we can watch it where we want it.

I actually watch less TV than I did previously, but it's all stuff I want to watch. I also like the suggestions feature, but I'm conscientious about thumbs-downing the stuff I don't want to watch before I delete it. The folders do make all the difference, though, cause I do remember scrolling through the suggestions mainlined with the requests on my old Series1.

I see the OP already bought his TiVo, but I think any other readers on the fence should join us. TiVos (as was previously stated) will actually change the way you look at TV. I know I sound like a damn commercial, but everyone I know with a TiVo feels exactly the same way.

AWB
12-02-2006, 03:58 PM
Not looking for marriage counseling, just wondering if anyone else has encountered this Tivo-based rift before.


Not specifically with our DVR, but other situations arise where my wife presents a no-win dilemma.

For example: if my wife asks me to pick our daughter up after work, I could ask, "From your office?" She would then exasperatedly reply, "Of course from my office!"

Or, I could assume she meant from her office. Then when I arrive at her office, she'd say, "Where is she!? You were supposed to pick her up from school!"

This is from a woman who will, after 20 minutes' silence in the car, will just state, "That was really a really stupid movie."

"What movie's that?" I'll ask confusedly.

"'There's Something About Mary.' I can't believe you took me to that!"

"That was eight years ago! And I've apologized for that."

Stratocaster
12-02-2006, 05:41 PM
I don't think I've ever heard of someone who got TiVo and just said "meh".:: raises hand ::

My wife loves TiVo. For me it is no big deal, but mainly an aggravation. It slows down everything. It's a several-second lag to change channels, for example. And it produces these "blips," these hiccups on the screen where everything flashes and freezes, then starts back to normal after a second or two. Usually right at the point in a show where something important is happening. It seems like we gave the TV more than it can handle. Maybe we have it hooked up wrong.

The main effect is has for me is that I find myself cursing and looking for the remote a couple of times every game I'm watching, so I can tell the @#$%ing thing not to switch channels to record CSI or Scrubs or some stupid reality show. The disagreeable machine assumes that what I'm actually watching is less important than some other show and will switch automatically. My wife and TiVo are in league against me.

Frostillicus
12-02-2006, 09:21 PM
I see the OP already bought his TiVo, but I think any other readers on the fence should join us. TiVos (as was previously stated) will actually change the way you look at TV. I know I sound like a damn commercial, but everyone I know with a TiVo feels exactly the same way.

If the Tivo people were smart(er), they would take this thread and turn it into a TV commerical.

Bambi Hassenpfeffer
12-02-2006, 11:23 PM
The disagreeable machine assumes that what I'm actually watching is less important than some other show and will switch automatically. My wife and TiVo are in league against me.
Well, in its defense, it has no idea whether you're watching its output or not. It's always sending a signal to the TV; whether anyone's viewing that signal is beyond its ken.

Your other problem -- with the channel change delay -- is just the nature of the beast. But why are you watching live TV anyway? That's what you have a TiVo for.

Stratocaster
12-02-2006, 11:30 PM
Well, in its defense, it has no idea whether you're watching its output or not. It's always sending a signal to the TV; whether anyone's viewing that signal is beyond its ken.Nonsense, the machine is being deliberately rude. No other explanation.Your other problem -- with the channel change delay -- is just the nature of the beast. But why are you watching live TV anyway? That's what you have a TiVo for.I, um, don't work well with machines. I'm not sure how to use it, and I'm not particularly interested in learning. So, in fairness, I'm probably not the right acid test for determining the value of TiVo. I still can't work the VCR, and that's obsolete. A whole generation of TV viewing technology has expired without my having mastered any significant portion of it. And that's fine with me. The rest of you can carry on. I'll be over here with my buggy whip, reading a book.

Stratocaster
12-02-2006, 11:35 PM
Well, in its defense, it has no idea whether you're watching its output or not. It's always sending a signal to the TV; whether anyone's viewing that signal is beyond its ken.Nonsense, the machine is being deliberately rude. No other explanation.Your other problem -- with the channel change delay -- is just the nature of the beast. But why are you watching live TV anyway? That's what you have a TiVo for.I, um, don't work well with machines. I'm not sure how to use it, and I'm not particularly interested in learning. So, in fairness, I'm probably not the right acid test for determining the value of TiVo. I still can't work the VCR, and that's obsolete. A whole generation of TV viewing technology has expired without my having mastered any significant portion of it. And that's fine with me. The rest of you can carry on. I'll be over here with my buggy whip, reading a book.

larsenmtl
12-04-2006, 12:59 PM
It's a several-second lag to change channels, for example.

This annoyed me to no end with our old TiVo using IR blasters on our cable box. It made channel surfing live TV just too slow and frustrating to do (yes, I still love channel surfing live TV instead of watching recording programs). Our new dual-tuner TiVo solved this problem, though. Tuner 1 handles non-cable box available chanels (1 to 80 or so), tuner 2 handles those above. It'll now change the lower channels as quick that the TV could do.

The other dual-tuner awesomeness, is the ability to watch two live shows at once. Turn on something on both tuners, pause one, go watch the other, when your hit a commercial pause it, flip to second tuner, watch to commercial, pause it, flip over, fast-forward through commercial, watch it, repeat, repeat, repeat....

JohnT
12-04-2006, 01:02 PM
I would give up the internet before Tivo.

Now that's a bold statement!

Give up the net? :eek: :scared: :(

Iggins
12-04-2006, 03:18 PM
That is the most baffling thing I've ever heard in my entire life. You are watching something. She wants to talk to you. So instead of telling her to wait, or trying to listen to her and still pay attention to the TV at the same time, you pause the show so that you can give her your full attention... and somehow that is a BAD thing?

It's a passive aggressive way to tell you that she's bored and all the two of you do any more is watch TV. Not that I hear that from my wife every day, or anything.... :rolleyes: