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View Full Version : Songs where the studio version is made to sound like it was recorded live


Argent Towers
12-01-2006, 02:40 PM
I can think of two examples of this kind of song off the top of my head are Hanginaround by Counting Crows and, many decades earlier, The Rapper by the Jaggerz. Both of these songs end with a small amount of clapping and cheering that makes it sound like they were recorded in a small club or bar in front of a live audience - however, these are the album versions of the songs, and I'm assuming that they were recorded in a studio and the crowd noise was added in.

I know there are other songs like this. Can you name some?

DooWahDiddy
12-01-2006, 02:48 PM
"Bennie and the Jets", by Elton John.

fishbicycle
12-01-2006, 02:48 PM
Elton John - Bennie And The Jets
The Beatles - Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (& its reprise)
Focus - Hocus Pocus (the studio version has overdubbed applause on it)
David Clayton Thomas - Walk That Walk
The Kingsmen - Louie Louie (on the LP version, there is applause overdubbed, very badly, out of phase, over the studio version. In fact the whole album is like that.)

divemaster
12-01-2006, 02:50 PM
Many Ray Stevens songs have a studio laugh track. Makes it sound like audience laughter at a live show. Well, not really.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
12-01-2006, 03:00 PM
"Release Release" by Yes and "Power Failure" by Procol Harum both contain drum solos that are greeted by overdubbed applause at their conclusions.

The entire Mingus Presents Mingus album by Charles Mingus is a make-believe club date, with Mingus introducing each tune and asking the non-existant audience, bartenders, and waitresses to maintain perfect silence.

TLDRIDKJKLOLFTW
12-01-2006, 03:07 PM
Tom Waits - "Nighthawks at the diner" - whole album
the Beach Boys - "Beach Boys Party" - whole album

fishbicycle
12-01-2006, 03:27 PM
Well, to be fair to Tom Waits, the whole "Nighthawks" album was recorded in a studio with an invited audience, so it was live, but in a controlled environment.

Tanbarkie
12-01-2006, 03:39 PM
I can think of two examples of this kind of song off the top of my head are Hanginaround by Counting Crows and, many decades earlier, The Rapper by the Jaggerz. Both of these songs end with a small amount of clapping and cheering that makes it sound like they were recorded in a small club or bar in front of a live audience - however, these are the album versions of the songs, and I'm assuming that they were recorded in a studio and the crowd noise was added in.

It's possible that those tracks really were recorded live. It's not unheard of- Radiohead's "My Iron Lung" is a concert recording; only Thom Yorke's vocals were re-recorded for the album mix.

fishbicycle
12-01-2006, 03:47 PM
The entire Paul McCartney "Get Back" concert movie was re-recorded in a studio, with looped speech and crowd reaction. It looks live, but the looping is terrible. and often the sound coming out of the speakers doesn't match the frets the musicians are playing on. Paul will be saying something to the audience, meanwhile he steps away from the mic and his voice is still coming out of the speakers. Shoddy, shoddy workmanship.

Similarly, when The Beatles appeared on ABC-TV (US) "Shindig", the producers must have thought the girls in the audience weren't enthusiastic enough. The final program had many hundreds more hands clapping and voices shrieking than could have fit in the studio. This was only brought to light when audio tape of the unadulterated soundtrack before post-production was unearthed in the 1990s.

"The Beatles At Shea Stadium" is full of studio overdubs to cover lousy playing and singing.

Enginerd
12-01-2006, 03:57 PM
Well, to be fair to Tom Waits, the whole "Nighthawks" album was recorded in a studio with an invited audience, so it was live, but in a controlled environment.
The Chris Smither album "Another Way to Find You" was recorded this way as well.

JKellyMap
12-01-2006, 04:02 PM
Two examples from antipodes of the rock world:

The last song on Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention's second album, Freak Out , has cabaret-lounge background noise dubbed in.

The album version of Ricky Martin's song "Maria" has a crowd sound dubbed in for a few seconds after the otherwise studio-clean song is over. Why, I don'k know; it sounds idiotic.

woodstockbirdybird
12-01-2006, 04:06 PM
"Farmer John" by The Premiers also had crowd noise and an emcee dubbed on to a studio recording. This was apparently a popular process in the 60s.

mamboman
12-01-2006, 04:41 PM
Two examples from antipodes of the rock world:

The last song on Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention's second album, Freak Out , has cabaret-lounge background noise dubbed in..

Freak Out was their second album? I thought it was their first...

mm

Wee Bairn
12-01-2006, 04:49 PM
I don't know for a fact, but "The Rapper" sounds too well made to have been done live. Judging from the quality of the album it came from, It would be a big shock to me if Donnie Iris and co. could have done that well live. Unless they played the song 20 times a show and this is the 20th take.

Don Draper
12-01-2006, 04:50 PM
I read a biography of Janis Joplin in which the recording engineer for the "Cheap Thrills" record (that she did with Big Brother & the Holding Co.) had fake live cuts - all the tracks were done in a studio and the 'racous cheering' on the supposedly llve cuts was just the producer, the engineer & a few odd studio folks whooping it up.

Patti Smith has one song on the Lp "Easter" that has a lot of hooting & hollering from 'fans.' But when you listen closely, it's obviously prerecorded SFX on a tape loop with the same guy going "Yeah! Yeah!" over & over again.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
12-01-2006, 05:15 PM
Freak Out was their second album? I thought it was their first...

It was. JKellyMap meant to refer to the Mothers' second album Absolutely Free, and the track "America Drinks and Goes Home."

Exapno Mapcase
12-01-2006, 05:16 PM
The Neil Young song "Broken Arrow" on Buffalo Springfield Again starts with what sounds like a bit of the group in concert singing "Mr. Soul." However, the whole song was done in the studio including the "live" part and the screaming fans.

Yorikke
12-01-2006, 05:19 PM
Freak Out was their second album? I thought it was their first...

mm

Correct. This isn't complete, I don't think, but...

Zappa Discography (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Zappa_discography)

Joe

interface2x
12-01-2006, 05:21 PM
Erasure mixed in some live noise to make "Love To Hate You" sound like it was recorded in a packed arena.

MovieMogul
12-01-2006, 05:44 PM
The Beatles - Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (& its reprise)I would tack on "With a Little Help from My Friends" onto this, too.

dwc1970
12-01-2006, 05:52 PM
I don't know how well this fits into the OP, but in Rush's "The Spirit of Radio" you hear a brief burst of recorded crowd cheers after Geddy sings, "...concert hall!"

NailBunny
12-01-2006, 05:52 PM
Take Me Away - Ween. Sounds like a nightclub gig with some half-hearted applause. Great song.

"Take me away to some other land...Thank you!"

Archeonomist
12-01-2006, 06:43 PM
[slight hijack] This made me think - I recently watched a bootleg of Pink Floyd The Wall live, and you could hardly hear any audience noise. The sound, presumably, was taken from the board. So, when actual live recordings are made, do they blend in random noise from the audience or what?

Early recordings were made live in the studio, but I assume you mean recordings that try to give you the feeling of an audience being present?

interface2x
12-02-2006, 12:06 PM
[slight hijack] So, when actual live recordings are made, do they blend in random noise from the audience or what?

I can't speak for every band, but on a recent Depeche Mode tour they recorded every show for a series of live cd's and the mic set-up includes mounted mics in the audience to record both crowd noise and the sound of the music in a live setting.

blondebear
12-02-2006, 01:01 PM
Beatles: "You Know My Name (Look Up the Number)"
Who: "The Punk Meets the Godfather", "Mirror Door"