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Wee Bairn
12-04-2006, 08:34 AM
For example, Ferris Bueller address the audience directly several times, acknowledging that he is in a movie. Also, in Goldmember, Micheal York
tells the audience something to the effect of "don't think about continuity
errors, just enjoy the movie". Are there many other examples of this?

Giles
12-04-2006, 08:39 AM
Do you count movies about the characters making a movie, e.g., Silent Movie and Ma Femme est une Actrice?

Corporate Hippie
12-04-2006, 08:49 AM
In Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, the whole movie is narrated by a self-referencing narrator that makes several allusions to the fact that it's a movie. He even apologizes for sloppy narration, plot cliches, and and a drawn out ending ("I promise this movie won't end like Lord of the Rings").

In Fight Club, at the end, the main character makes a subtle allusion to the fact. Since most of the movie is a flashback prompted by Tyler Durden asking the protagonist at gunpoint if he has anything to say, at the end when the movie returns to the present the protagonist answers that he still can't think of anything, Durden chuckles and says "ah, flashback humor."

There are a bunch more, I just can't think of them at the moment.

silenus
12-04-2006, 09:01 AM
Top Secret! - As Nick and Hillary are floating to earth in parachutes, there is a bit of dialogue that goes like this:

Nick Rivers: Listen to me Hillary. I'm not the first guy who fell in love with a woman that he met at a restaurant who turned out to be the daughter of a kidnapped scientist only to lose her to her childhood lover who she last saw on a deserted island who then turned out fifteen years later to be the leader of the French underground.
Hillary Flammond: I know. It all sounds like some bad movie.
[Long pause. Both look at camera]

Peter Morris
12-04-2006, 09:03 AM
Hope/ Crosby Road To movies. Frequent references.


Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure. At the end, hearing their awful playing, the time traveler turns to the audience and says "They do get better."

Ethilrist
12-04-2006, 09:03 AM
The Blair Witch Project.

Kizarvexius
12-04-2006, 09:03 AM
Blazing Saddles
Wayne's World
The Great Muppet Caper

Stranger On A Train
12-04-2006, 09:24 AM
For example, Ferris Bueller address the audience directly several times, acknowledging that he is in a movie. Also, in Goldmember, Micheal York
tells the audience something to the effect of "don't think about continuity
errors, just enjoy the movie". Are there many other examples of this?This is called "breaking the fourth wall." One of my favorites (even if it does take you out of the film) is in the Bond movie On Her Majesty's Secret Service. This was the first time that Bond was played by an actor other than Sean Connery (George Larzanby), and in the pretitle sequence he spots and follows a beautiful woman (Diana Rigg) who drives down on the beach and then tries to drown herself in the ocean. Bond chivalrously goes to rescue her, only to be attacked by several mysterious henchmen. While he's fending them off, she steals Bond's car, drives back up to her own car, and disappears into the night. Bond holds up a slipper that she dropped (making him Prince Charming) turns to the camera, and slyly intimates his status as the new James Bond by saying, "This never happened to the other fella."

Stranger

Loach
12-04-2006, 09:34 AM
Even though Ray Liotta is narrating during the whole movie, at the end of GoodFellas he talks directly to the camera.

Jim Carrey accepts an "Oscar" for his performance in The Mask.

What Exit?
12-04-2006, 09:35 AM
Was there a Marx brother movie that did not break the fourth wall?

Not movies but George Burns and Gary Shandling took breaking the fourth wall to a high art. Flawlessly going in and out of the show.

Jim

cmkeller
12-04-2006, 09:40 AM
Spaceballs. When Dark Helmet wanted to find out where the heroes had fled to, he had his underlings put a tape of Spaceballs: the Movie into a VCR.

cmkeller
12-04-2006, 10:01 AM
Also, there was a point in the movie where the heroes stunt doubles got captured.

PaperBlob
12-04-2006, 10:12 AM
In Sixteen Candles, when Ted is driving around with the prom queen in the Rolls Royce, and she goes down on him, he turns to the camera and says "This is getting good!"

flight
12-04-2006, 10:14 AM
Airplane, at one point the protagonist turns to the camera and says something like, "What a pisser!"

Otto
12-04-2006, 10:19 AM
For whatever reason there stikes me as being a difference between simply breaking the fourth wall and explicitly acknowledging that one is in a movie.

That being said, in "The Pirate Movie" Mabel breaks the fourth wall pretty continuously (as does the Pirate King I think, and possibly Frederic) and toward the end she starts demanding a happy ending for her story (which, since it's a dream, may not actually indicate awareness of being in a movie as much as being in the dream within the movie).

hey alright
12-04-2006, 10:25 AM
More than once in Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, the actors acknowledge the audience and how they were suckered into paying to see a crappy movie.

Beadalin
12-04-2006, 10:27 AM
The tail ends of Ferris Bueller's Day Off and The School of Rock both tell the audience that it's time to leave the theater.

The Sweetest Thing also had a scene where the women decide they have time "for a movie montage," and proceed to have one. It's bizarre.

RealityChuck
12-04-2006, 10:42 AM
The Last Action Hero -- Danny Madigan goes into a move, and thinks he's the hero and can't be harmed, but realizes at the last second he's only the comic relief. (It's kind of hard to figure out what layer this is, of course -- he knows he's in the Jack Slater movie, but probably not in The Last Action Hero).

In one Monty Python skit, the Pythons discover they're on film.

There's also Duck Amuck and other Warner Brothers cartoons that referred to the fact that they were in a movie.

The clearest example of the OP in the Marx Brothers -- where's it's acknowleging it's a movie instead of just breaking the 4th wall -- is in Horse Feathers, where Chico starts playing the piano and Groucho says to the audience, "I have to stay here, but there's no reason you can't go into the lobby until this all blows over."

The actors in the film within a film in The Purple Rose of Cairo realize they're in a movie.

garygnu
12-04-2006, 11:08 AM
Spaceballs. When Dark Helmet wanted to find out where the heroes had fled to, he had his underlings put a tape of Spaceballs: the Movie into a VCR.
Even before that, the plot summary is given during the Mr. Radar sequence, and Dark Helmet makes sure the audience gets it.

brewha
12-04-2006, 11:42 AM
More than once in Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, the actors acknowledge the audience and how they were suckered into paying to see a crappy movie.


There's also the part when Ben Affleck and Matt Damon are filming Good Will Hunting II (Hunting Season) and they are talking about how sometimes you have to take a crappy role in a movie to pay back a friend.

Earthworm Jim
12-04-2006, 11:42 AM
Also, there was a point in the movie where the heroes stunt doubles got captured.

"Merchandising! Merchandising! Where the real money from the movie is made!"

"God willing, we'll all meet again in Spaceballs 2: The Search for More Money"

Or, during their epic Schwartz-saber duel, Lonestar and Dark Helmet accidentally whack one of the camera crew. "Ahh....he did it!"

Rocketeer
12-04-2006, 12:29 PM
The Ape Man (1943)

From an earlier thread:

...And the ending was wild. After the usual thriller-type ending, the movie goes on to completely explode the fourth wall.


A rather goony-looking character, who has appeared at odd moments to provide hints and guidance to our hero, turns to the camera and reveals himself to be the Author!!!!!!!!

tdn
12-04-2006, 12:34 PM
Did someone call for a pedant?

Top Secret! - As Nick and Hillary are floating to earth in parachutes, there is a bit of dialogue that goes like this:
You're conflating two scenes. They were on the ground when that dialog took place.

That being said, in "The Pirate Movie" Mabel breaks the fourth wall pretty continuously (as does the Pirate King I think, and possibly Frederic) and toward the end she starts demanding a happy ending for her story (which, since it's a dream, may not actually indicate awareness of being in a movie as much as being in the dream within the movie).
It's called The Pirates of Penzance, and is taken from the operetta of the same name. It's pretty standard in operas, operettas, and plays to break the 4th wall. G&S did this as a matter of course.

Unless you're thinking of something else.

sciurophobic
12-04-2006, 12:34 PM
In the Wayne's World movies Mike Myers frequently addressed the audience.

Beadalin
12-04-2006, 01:01 PM
In the Wayne's World movies Mike Myers frequently addressed the audience.
Not only that, but there's an extended gag about product placement.

want2know
12-04-2006, 01:09 PM
In the beginning of Mel Brooks' To Be Or Not To Be , Mel and Anne Bancroft are speaking in Polish. A voice-over then announces that, from this point on, the rest of the film will be in English (and Mel and Anne react to it).

This is driving me crazy: Wasn't there a recent comedy where one of the characters pulls out the film's shooting script and begins reading from it? I remember this, but can't place the film.

garygnu
12-04-2006, 01:09 PM
...
It's called The Pirates of Penzance, and is taken from the operetta of the same name. It's pretty standard in operas, operettas, and plays to break the 4th wall. G&S did this as a matter of course.

Unless you're thinking of something else.
Otto is referring to a movie loosely based (http://imdb.com/title/tt0084504/) on Penzance. I don't recall a 4th wall break in the Kline/Lansbury/Smith/Ronstadt movie version (http://imdb.com/title/tt0086112/).



Not quite the same, but in Kate & Leopold, Meg Ryan, playing Kate, says at one point "Well, I'm not a character in a romantic comedy."

garygnu
12-04-2006, 01:12 PM
In the beginning of Mel Brooks' To Be Or Not To Be , Mel and Anne Bancroft are speaking in Polish. A voice-over then announces that, from this point on, the rest of the film will be in English (and Mel and Anne react to it).

This is driving me crazy: Wasn't there a recent comedy where one of the characters pulls out the film's shooting script and begins reading from it? I remember this, but can't place the film.
In Brook's Robin Hood: Men in Tights, much of the cast does this when Robin checks the script to find that he does get another shot.

madmonk28
12-04-2006, 01:13 PM
In The Opposite of Sex Christina Ricci is a character in the movie and narrating the story. At one point it looks like she has died, when she says something like, "use your head, I didn't die. I'm narrating the story dumb ass."

tdn
12-04-2006, 01:20 PM
Otto is referring to a movie loosely based (http://imdb.com/title/tt0084504/) on Penzance.
Ah. I was wondering about that. Thanks.

In Mel Brooks' High Anxiety, the 4th wall is broken -- literally -- by the camera crew during a zoom in. Then later while zooming out.

yellowval
12-04-2006, 01:24 PM
In High Fidelity John Cusack's character addresses the camera several times.

tanstaafl
12-04-2006, 01:24 PM
In George of the Jungle (the Brendon Fraiser movie, not the cartoon), two of the bad guys get into an argument with the narrator.

NDP
12-04-2006, 01:28 PM
Ah. I was wondering about that. Thanks.

In Mel Brooks' High Anxiety, the 4th wall is broken -- literally -- by the camera crew during a zoom in. Then later while zooming out.
In the same movie there's also a scene shot looking up through the top of a glass table where the characters keep putting things on the table until it's all covered up.

Spoons
12-04-2006, 01:40 PM
Yet another Mel Brooks film: Blazing Saddles.

When the chaos of Blazing Saddles gets out of control and escapes its sound stage on the studio property. It spreads to another sound stage where a musical is taking place, and the musical's tuxedoed dancers end up fighting with the cowboys.

Shortly after that, Harvey Korman's character ducks into a theatre showing--naturally--Blazing Saddles.

RealityChuck
12-04-2006, 01:48 PM
Another TV show: Eerie Indiana. In one episode, Marshall discovers he's on the set of a TV show "Eerie Indiana" and that his family are just actors. It was written by Vance DeGeneris, Ellen's brother.

Movies: The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle, the characters interact with the narrator, just like they did in the cartoon.

Stuffy
12-04-2006, 01:52 PM
[QUOTE=Earthworm Jim
Or, during their epic Schwartz-saber duel, Lonestar and Dark Helmet accidentally whack one of the camera crew. "Ahh....he did it!"[/QUOTE]:

This is also done in the Mel Brooks movies Blazing Saddles, Robinhood: Men in Tights.

Not sure if it counts but in Wayne's World , Wayne and Garth are talking about how they don't want to do product placements in their movie just before doing product placement.


Whoopi Goldberg and Tim Curry does it in Loaded Weapon telling the audience to pay attention because they're discussing the plot.

Several characters in I'm Gonna Get you Sucka. First when Kim Wayans is singing and again when Keenan Wayans, John Vernon and Kaddeem Hardison are discussing Blackploitation films.

silenus
12-04-2006, 02:25 PM
Not a movie, but the TV show Moonlighting was rife with this sort of stuff.

Hypno-Toad
12-04-2006, 02:35 PM
This is driving me crazy: Wasn't there a recent comedy where one of the characters pulls out the film's shooting script and begins reading from it? I remember this, but can't place the film.

The Insurance Sketch in Monty Pythons Flying Circus had this joke. Graham Chapman playing the Straight Man (Ha!) asks if he has any more lines. They check the script and see that he's done. So he leaves.

el_nombre
12-04-2006, 05:30 PM
In Coming to America, after Eddie Murphy talks his new bride into barking like a dog and hopping on one leg, he looks into the camera for a second because he knows everyone in the audience are having dirty thoughts.

teela brown
12-04-2006, 05:40 PM
My vote: Any Laurel & Hardy flick. It's when Oliver Hardy makes eye contact with the audience and rolls his eyes in that well-known gesture of exasperation over Stan's stupidity. I don't recall a time when he actually spoke to the audience, but that non-verbal expression spoke volumes.

Chronos
12-04-2006, 05:56 PM
How about M*A*S*H? Every so often through the movie, there's an announcement over the camp PA system, saying, among other things, what the movie will be that night in the mess tent. At the end of the movie, the PA comes on again, to say "Tonight's movie has been M*A*S*H, starring..." and starting the credits. At least, so I remember... It's been a long time since I've seen it.

Stuffy
12-04-2006, 06:08 PM
I've got more:

There's a Body Count scene wiith pinball like sound effects in Hot Shots Part Deux that takes place with Charlie Sheen and a .50 cal machine gun.

In Student Bodies, the action cuts away to one of the actors (or maybe the director) talking to the censors for the PG saying "F$%K You! Then the rating is switched to R. Come to think of it, it also had a body count.

kaylasdad99
12-04-2006, 06:56 PM
In Student Bodies, the action cuts away to one of the actors (or maybe the director) talking to the censors for the PG saying "F$%K You! Then the rating is switched to R. Come to think of it, it also had a body count.Dignified-looking man in sitting at a desk in a fancy office. He remarks on the fact that "R" rated movies make the most money. Then he explains that in order to get an "R" rating there has to be frontal nudity, explicit violence, or certain dirty words. Because this movie has noe of these things, the producers have hired him to come on at this point and ays "Fuck you."

That's his only appearance.

In The Muppet Movie, when Kermit and Fozzie first meet up with Dr. Teeth and the Electric Mayhem, they bring the rockers up to speed on the plot by hauling out a copy of the script. Fozzie hands Dr. Teeth the script, and says, "Start here, on page, uhhh, one."

tanstaafl
12-04-2006, 07:15 PM
Speaking of the Muppets, in one of the Muppet movies there is a scene with Diana Rigg speaking to (I think) Miss Piggy. Diana Rigg has just finished a long speech and Miss Piggy asks "Why are you telling us this?" Rigg responds "Oh, this is just character development and plot exposition; it has to go somewhere."

kaylasdad99
12-04-2006, 07:33 PM
That was The Great Muppet Caper, one of several fourth-wall-busting scenes.

Notable others: Kermit and Piggy arguing in the park about Piggy's overacting (Piggy: I'm TRYING to save this picture! Kermit: Oh, yeah? Why don't you start by trying to save your part?);

Piggy reacting to her betrayal by Charles Grodin's character (Piggy: You're such a jerk! And you were lip-synching your song!);

In a daring prison escape, Piggy has commandeered Peter Ustinov's lorry, by throwing Ustinov into a gang of rubbish bins at the side of the road. The lid pops off one of the bins, and Oscar the Grouch sticks his head out and stares at Ustinov (Ustinov: What are you doing here? Oscar: A very short cameo. Ustinov: [very morose] Me, too.).

Morbo
12-04-2006, 07:48 PM
My favorite one of all-time: Animal House. When Bluto realizes that his peeping-tom-on-the-ladder efforts are going to pay off.

sturmhauke
12-04-2006, 08:32 PM
The British show A Bit of Fry and Laurie ("starring bits of Stephen Fry and bits of Hugh Laurie") basically demolishes the fourth wall at every opportunity, sometimes literally. The actors often stop midsketch and argue about the delivery of lines or whether they are even the correct lines. They may address the audience directly and solicit opinions from them. Sometimes camera operators, costume designers, or other crew are deliberately included in the scene.

Voyager
12-04-2006, 09:50 PM
Hellzapoppin from 1941 is full of this. The movie starts in hell. When Olsen and Johnson arrive in a cab, Johnson blows on it and makes it explode. Olsen then tells the projectionist (Shemp Howard) to rewind the film. Shemp say that he can't be talking to him and to the audience, and Olsen says "I am, aren't I?" Shemp then rewinds the movie, and everone goes backward.

Then they walk off the set, and through about five other sets, with costume changes as they move. (Blazing Saddles wasn't the first to do this.) They wind up with the director and the scriptwriter. Olsen and Johnson say they want the movie to be just like their Broadway show, but the director tells them that Hollywood changes everything. They then sit down and start watching the movie, doing the lines, until they show up in the movie, which is when we get into the story.

It's what Tristram Shandy should have been.

DataZak
12-04-2006, 10:27 PM
Annie Hall - Woody Allen thinks the noisy pretentious snob queuing behind him is full of BS. Woody walks over to the far side of the room, picks out a guy who turns out to be the author the pretentious guy was talking about and the author says to him that his arguments are all wrong. Woody looks to the camera and says something like, "Isn't it great if real life were like this?"

JKellyMap
12-05-2006, 12:46 AM
In The Muppet Movie, when Kermit and Fozzie first meet up with Dr. Teeth and the Electric Mayhem, they bring the rockers up to speed on the plot by hauling out a copy of the script. Fozzie hands Dr. Teeth the script, and says, "Start here, on page, uhhh, one."
There is also an "intermission" when the film we (and an audience of Muppets) are watching breaks. The Swedish Chef, who is manning the projector, repairs the film, announcing that "der flim [sic] is okey-dokey" -- still a catch phrase in the KellyMap household.
I love that -- "flim". It's the only Swedish word I know ;)

sturmhauke
12-05-2006, 02:45 AM
When it first breaks, doesn't he say, "Der flim it goes der floop der floop"?

gonzomax
12-05-2006, 09:08 AM
Tom Jones did it subtlety. Blazing Saddles not so much.

Scuba_Ben
12-05-2006, 09:34 AM
The tail ends of Ferris Bueller's Day Off and The School of Rock both tell the audience that it's time to leave the theater.The Producers (2005) does the same thing. So stay all the way through the credits.

The Scrivener
12-05-2006, 11:54 AM
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (the original) -- at the end.

Monty Python & the Holy Grail -- the "Book of the Film," the historian interview, the arrests at the end...

Man on the Moon -- the fake intro, followed by Jim Carey (as Andy Kaufman)'s apology to us in the audience.

The Kentucky Fried Movie -- the skit in which a couple is making love in bed with their TV showing the late-night local news broadcast; the studio people can see the couple in bed. This is thus a skit about the breaking of the fourth wall that in itself doesn't [IIRC] break the fourth wall with respect to the movie's audience.

The Twilight Zone [the original Serling series] ep. "To Serve Man" -- Lloyd Bochner addresses us at the very end, asking us who's going to be served next for dinner.

Voyager
12-05-2006, 12:10 PM
There is also an "intermission" when the film we (and an audience of Muppets) are watching breaks. The Swedish Chef, who is manning the projector, repairs the film, announcing that "der flim [sic] is okey-dokey" -- still a catch phrase in the KellyMap household.
I love that -- "flim". It's the only Swedish word I know ;)
Another borrowing from Hellzapoppin. In the middle of the movie, Shemp, who has a woman in the projection room with him, has a fight with her because he is paying too much attention to running the movie. Film reels get messed up, and our heros wind up in the middle of a Western. After things get sorted out. an Indian from the Western and his horse wander through the Long Island estate where the film is set, somewhat lost.

They also have to keep reminding the camera to follow them, not linger on the girls around the pool.

kaylasdad99
12-05-2006, 02:05 PM
There is also an "intermission" when the film we (and an audience of Muppets) are watching breaks. The Swedish Chef, who is manning the projector, repairs the film, announcing that "der flim [sic] is okey-dokey" -- still a catch phrase in the KellyMap household.
I love that -- "flim". It's the only Swedish word I know ;)
My favorite exchange from that interlude is from Statler and Waldorf:

Statler: What do you think of the film so far?
Waldorf: I've seen detergents that leave a better film than this.

:D

cactus waltz
12-05-2006, 03:14 PM
The Sex and the City TV series had Carrie speaking directly to the viewer in the first half of season one. It was then abandoned permanently. For the better, I'd say.

OpalCat
12-05-2006, 04:01 PM
In George of the Jungle (the Brendon Fraiser movie, not the cartoon), two of the bad guys get into an argument with the narrator.
Several of the characters interact with the narrator. Remember the "awwww" vs "awe" part? Cracked me right the hell up.

Dr. Rieux
12-05-2006, 04:37 PM
In George of the Jungle (the Brendon Fraiser movie, not the cartoon), two of the bad guys get into an argument with the narrator.
When Gorge is trying on a suit, admiring himself in the mirror, the narrator says, "It turned out that George looked good in Armani."
George turns to the camera snd says, "Pretty darn good."

Gangster Octopus
12-05-2006, 04:44 PM
Not the same thing, of course, but in Apoloclypse Now there is a scene of Francis Ford Coppola as a doumentray/news crew filming Robert Duvall, et al.

RealityChuck
12-05-2006, 08:49 PM
A rare instance of a serious film doing something like this: halfway through Ingmar Bergman's Persona, the film appears to break in the middle of a tense scene. The characters don't say anything, but it was Bergman's way of saying to the audience that this was a movie.

waterj2
12-06-2006, 12:18 AM
Quite a bit of 24 Hour Party People has explicit references to the fact that it is a movie. Sure, it's mainly just the main character narrating, but he does so in character, talking to the camera when other characters aren't looking.

astorian
12-06-2006, 12:34 AM
Actually, breaking the wall is an ancient device that long predates movies.

I mean, even Aristophanes' plays (I'm thinking of "The Clouds" in particular) have numerous moments in which characters step out of the action to crack jokes directly to the audience.

Voyager
12-06-2006, 01:36 AM
Several of the characters interact with the narrator. Remember the "awwww" vs "awe" part? Cracked me right the hell up.
Right from Rocky and Bullwinkle. One of the things I liked about George is that it was the only one from a Ward cartoon that got this kind of thing right.

In the end, Ape interrupts the closing to do his Vegas act also.

Asgardking
12-06-2006, 04:41 AM
Gremlins II At one point, the film seems to break and you see silhouettes of gremlins on the white screen. They cut to the theater lobby and patrons are screaming and running out. The theater manager goes into the theater and finds Hulk Hogan who threatens to kick some gremlin ass if they don't get the film back on. Then the film starts again.

Just a fourth wall break

Volunteers with Tom Hanks and John Candy. The film takes place in Cambodia. There is a Cambodian woman who speaks with such a thick accent that she has subtitles. In one scene, John Candy can't understand what she's saying, so he looks over and reads the subtitles.

Marlitharn
12-06-2006, 05:23 AM
Re: Gremlins II, I swear I'm not insane, but the first time I ever rented this movie the film-breaking interlude was much different. It had Gremlins popping up in other movies (John Wayne: "What do we have here?" Gremlins: "Duke!") and cartoons. When I bought it on DVD, it had the Hulk Hogan bit. I liked the first one better.

Wasn't there a bit in the Muppet "Wizard of Oz" where Gonzo bounces up to the camera and says, "If you have Dark Side of the Moon cued up, push play now!"?

Dunderman
12-06-2006, 05:35 AM
Re: Gremlins II, I swear I'm not insane, but the first time I ever rented this movie the film-breaking interlude was much different. It had Gremlins popping up in other movies (John Wayne: "What do we have here?" Gremlins: "Duke!") and cartoons. When I bought it on DVD, it had the Hulk Hogan bit. I liked the first one better.You're not insane. The Hulk Hogan version is the cinema version, the John Wayne version is the video version. Why they put the Hulk Hogan bit on the DVD (and I've seen it on TV too), I don't know.

Malacandra
12-06-2006, 05:53 AM
Not from the movies but from stage shows I have seen:

In a performance of The Mikado, Pooh-Bah and Ko-Ko receive a message from the Mikado warning them that unless an execution is forthcoming, the post of Lord High Executioner will be abolished. Pooh-Bah begins reading the letter in Japanese, and is interrupted crossly by Ko-Ko ordering to read him so "they" can understand it. (Not in W S Gilbert's original libretto.)

In a performance of The Pirates of Penzance, the Sergeant of Police sings: "They {the Pirates} come in force, with stealthy stride; Our obvious course is now to hide" - and the police quickly go and sit in among the audience.

Peter Morris
12-06-2006, 11:38 AM
You're not insane. The Hulk Hogan version is the cinema version, the John Wayne version is the video version. Why they put the Hulk Hogan bit on the DVD (and I've seen it on TV too), I don't know.

Guess: The movie version makes it look like the Gremlins are playing around with the cinema equipment, changing the reels on the projector, etc. The TV/ video version makes it look like they are messing with your TV set, changing channels, etc.

Dunderman
12-06-2006, 11:46 AM
Guess: The movie version makes it look like the Gremlins are playing around with the cinema equipment, changing the reels on the projector, etc. The TV/ video version makes it look like they are messing with your TV set, changing channels, etc.Exactly. So why do we get the cinema version on DVD and TV?

flight
12-07-2006, 08:34 AM
Exactly. So why do we get the cinema version on DVD and TV?
You get both versions on DVD. One of them is an Easter Egg.

Rilchiam
12-28-2006, 06:28 AM
Clueless: Alicia Silverstone's character addresses the audience in voiceover several times. As the montage sequence in the beginning winds down, "Okay, you're probably thinking, is this a Noxema commercial or what?" Shortly afterwards, walking past a portrait of her late mother (with unfortunate early-80s hair) "Wasn't my mom a Betty?" And almost at the end, after she and whatsisname kiss, "Well, you can probably guess what happened next! [cut to wedding couple at altar] Tsh! As if! I'm sixteen, and this isn't Kentucky!"

Woody Woodpecker:

-- Con artist says, "Is there a Mrs. Oleander Twinklebop in the audience? I have a billion-dollar check for her!"

-- Woody is snowbound and completely out of food. "Er...Would one of you care to step into the lobby and get me a candy bar?"

-- Fourth wall breakage in reverse: Shadow audience a la MST. One figure stands up and says, "Whatever happened to that last firecracker?"

Holy Grail: Very end. "All right, now shut that off, sonny..." [hand over lens]

scotandrsn
12-28-2006, 06:47 AM
Hope/ Crosby Road To movies. Frequent references.


I once saw a clip (maybe Road to Morrocco, but who knows), that ran something like this:

Hope: A fine, thing, you get me kidnapped, ... (etc., basically rattles off all the major plot points thus far)

Crosby: I know all that!

Hope: Yeah, but the people who came in in the middle of picture don't!

Crosby: (distressed) You mean they missed my song?

Cracked me right up.

Clothahump
12-28-2006, 10:07 AM
Young Frankenstein.

Marty Feldman broke the fourth wall repeatedly. As an example:

Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: Damn your eyes.
Igor: [to camera] Too late.

Troy McClure SF
12-28-2006, 10:35 AM
Not a character, but Arrested Development has once or twice, not counting the Save Our Bluths episode (which doesn't count anyway, I don't think). One example I remember is either Michael or George saying something to the effect of "We have to be careful; you never know if someone's listening in." At that moment you see the boom mike "accidentally" drop into frame for a few seconds as the character continues talking.

There was also the product placement gag with Burger King, but I don't think the fourth wall was explicitly broken.

Little Nemo
12-28-2006, 11:33 AM
Citizen Kane broke the fourth wall but it was subtle. In an early scene there's a tracking shot that moves from the exterior of a building up on to the roof and then into the interiro of the building through a skylight. Later in the movie, the shot is repeated. But this time the glass in the skylight is broken - from the camera going through it in the original scene.

Cartooniverse
01-01-2007, 12:14 AM
No offense, but that shows the passage of time. That glass is in the ceiling of a club long closed.

Sunrazor
01-01-2007, 10:25 AM
No offense, but that shows the passage of time. That glass is in the ceiling of a club long closed.
You're right, of course, but I like Little Nemo's interpretation, too. Who knows what Welles might have been thinking? It's not unheard of for directors to put inside jokes in their films.

Cartooniverse
01-01-2007, 10:54 AM
True dat. I didn't mean to imply knowledge of what The Great One was thinking.......

The second "Airplane" movie also has a great shot where the camera bumps into a wall? Or, keeps dollying out to show the edge of the set? Can't remember.

Dr. Rieux
01-01-2007, 11:38 AM
In the second Austin Powers movie, Basil Expostion explains the time-travel gimmick to Ausitn, who complains that trying to follow the explanation is making his eyes cross.
Basil says somehting like, "Don't think about it, just sit back and enjoy the ride.' Then he turns to the camera and adds, "And that goes for all of you, too."

SCSimmons
01-01-2007, 11:46 AM
You know, reading over this thread, I get the feeling that Mel Brooks could really shock people by not breaking the fourth wall in his next movie ...

postcards
01-01-2007, 11:49 AM
Yet another Mel Brooks film: Blazing Saddles.

When the chaos of Blazing Saddles gets out of control and escapes its sound stage on the studio property. It spreads to another sound stage where a musical is taking place, and the musical's tuxedoed dancers end up fighting with the cowboys.

Shortly after that, Harvey Korman's character ducks into a theatre showing--naturally--Blazing Saddles.
Well before that there's a scene with Cleavon Little riding through the desert while a Count Basie song is playing. The camera pans to reveal....the entire Count Basie Orchestra, on a bandstand, in the desert. ISTR Cleavon and the Count nod to one another.

I love that scene.

postcards
01-01-2007, 12:06 PM
The Producers (2005) does the same thing. So stay all the way through the credits.
Actually, that was the last song in the Broadway musical as well.

Walloon
01-01-2007, 03:49 PM
From the screwball comedy Hi Diddle Diddle (1943):[Looking at hat check girl]
Senator Simpson: You know, I've seen that girl somewhere before.
Liza Prescott: She's a very particular friend of the director who's making this picture. He sticks her in every scene he can.
Janie Prescott: Mother, shh! Somebody might hear you!

sturmhauke
01-02-2007, 04:00 AM
In Trading Places, there's a scene when the Dukes are explaining to Billy Ray Valentine about commodities trading as if he were 5 years old. Billy Ray looks straight into the camera with a "gimme a fuckin' break" sort of expression.