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View Full Version : Speaking of Brett Favre.


mangeorge
12-10-2006, 07:59 PM
It still escapes me why, or how, his name is pronounced "f-a-r-v-e".
A lot about professional sports escapes me, but that one I just don't get.
Peace,
mangeorge

garygnu
12-11-2006, 10:50 AM
It's French, like "hors d'oeuvres."

DSYoungEsq
12-11-2006, 11:52 AM
It's French, like "hors d'oeuvres."
It has nothing to do with the fact it is French. In French, you would pronounce it Favr, with just the hint of the idea of an unstressed vowel at the end.

It's pronounced Farv because English speakers cannot easily save Favr. We prefer words that have full vowels in our syllables. And, I believe, you will find that the Louisiana area, where Cajun (Acadian) French is mixed in with southern American English, they have come to pronounce this consonant combination in this fashion. :)

mangeorge
12-11-2006, 03:44 PM
I tried pronouncing it that way, and it is a little awkward. But not really difficult.
Funny thing is, if a sports announcer were to pronounce the name "Favre" he'd likely catch hell.
Strange world, eh?

Leaffan
12-11-2006, 04:47 PM
Strangely enough, we don't seem to have much difficulty in Canada pronouncing it "Favre."

BobT
12-11-2006, 06:03 PM
Yes, but you're Canadian. There are a lot of regional dialects of English in North America with many different pronunciations of similar words. It happens. The correct way for Brett Favre to pronounce his surname is how he pronounces it.

Recent retired baseball player Bill Mueller pronounced his last name "Miller." He was from the St. Louis area. Another St. Louis area player from the 1950s, Don Mueller, pronounced his surname as "myooler" (think of the animal "mule" and add "er"). Who was "right"?

Snooooopy
12-11-2006, 06:14 PM
Baseball player Dale Sveum -- if I remember correctly -- was once asked what his name means.

He replied, "It means a lot of people are going to mispronounce my name."

Gangster Octopus
12-11-2006, 06:19 PM
There was a hockey player form the Czech Republic who's name was Stanislav Neckar. His last name was pronounced NETS-kash

John DiFool
12-11-2006, 09:16 PM
Kjell Samuellson, where the first name comes out as "Shelf" somehow...

mangeorge
12-11-2006, 10:19 PM
There is the classic "Sade", the most excellent jazz singer. I think even she pronounces two or three different ways.

Hippy Hollow
12-11-2006, 10:28 PM
Mike Krzyzewski owns this thread. (Shuh-shef-skee)

Great old English names like Featherstone (fan-shaw) and St. John (sin-jin) also qualify.

Walloon
12-12-2006, 12:17 AM
Recent retired baseball player Bill Mueller pronounced his last name "Miller." He was from the St. Louis area. Another St. Louis area player from the 1950s, Don Mueller, pronounced his surname as "myooler" (think of the animal "mule" and add "er"). Who was "right"?And my high school English teacher Mr. Mueller pronounced his name MOY-ler.

My own mother and her twin brother pronounce their family name differently!

Snooooopy
12-12-2006, 12:22 AM
Mike Krzyzewski owns this thread. (Shuh-shef-skee)

A guy I went to high school with wound up working at the Duke student newspaper. He said that the keyboards had been set up with special function keys -- probably CTRL-K or something -- so that the coach's name was rendered properly.

John DiFool
12-12-2006, 12:51 AM
Had a prof named "Meagher", pronounced "Marr" (I guess so that he doesn't sound like the stingy type...).

Hippy Hollow
12-12-2006, 12:54 AM
Had a prof named "Meagher", pronounced "Marr" (I guess so that he doesn't sound like the stingy type...).
Gaelic names are notoriously difficult.

Johnny Marr was born John Martin Maher... but changed it to the phonetic.

Bill Maher, however, successfully has Americans pronouncing his name correctly.

And I have no idea how you get "Shuv-von" out of Siobhan!

bob_loblaw
12-12-2006, 02:55 AM
tony hrkac; pronounced "her-cuss" - a former nhl journeyman.

miroslav satan, pronounced "sh-tan" - current & decent left winger, (un?)fortunately has yet to play for the devils.


and then there was zarley zalapski -- his name is pronounced exactly how it is spelled, but fuck, that's a name.

pulykamell
12-12-2006, 03:22 AM
Mike Krzyzewski owns this thread. (Shuh-shef-skee)



In Polish, it would be pronounced "Kshih-SHEF-skee." The initial "k" would not be silent. There are a few Krzyzewskis we know (unrelated to Coach K, so far as I know.)

Re: Mueller. In the German, the pronunciation would be "MÜ-ler." The vowel is an umlaut-u. To make the sound, round you lips as if you were saying "oooo," but make an "eeee" sound. Neither "myooler" nor "miller" is "correct" in the sense that that would be the way the original Germanic name was pronounced. However, families are free to Americanize/Anglicize a pronunciation as they see fit.

bob_loblaw
12-12-2006, 03:26 AM
kjell samuellson, where the first name comes out as "shelf" somehow...

it's pronounced "schell" and the surname is samuelsson (1 l, 2 s's for those who wanna google it.)

also, ulf (pronounced "oolleff") samuelsson; aka 'knees mcgee' is not (contrary to widespread belief) kjell's brother... though how closely they may be actually related is, afaik, still up in the air.

pulykamell
12-12-2006, 03:30 AM
And I have no idea how you get "Shuv-von" out of Siobhan!

"Bh" = "v" (or "w," depending on the the vowels). Kinda like "ph" = "f" in English.
And "Sio" shouldn't be too much a stretch, we have combinations like "sion" in English.

pulykamell
12-12-2006, 03:35 AM
it's pronounced "schell" and the surname is samuelsson (1 l, 2 s's for those who wanna google it.)

Actually, the "kj" letter combination is pretty interesting (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kjell), as the "proper" pronunciation in Norweigian is like the "ch" in German "ich," but is being replaced by the English "sh" among many speakers.

Albert Rose
12-12-2006, 03:43 AM
Luxury Yacht/Throatwobbler Mangrove anyone?

bob_loblaw
12-12-2006, 03:55 AM
Actually, the "kj" letter combination is pretty interesting (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kjell), as the "proper" pronunciation in Norweigian is like the "ch" in German "ich," but is being replaced by the English "sh" among many speakers.

... which is why the most common english equivalent is "sch" ... sorta halfway between.

Hostile Dialect
12-12-2006, 04:00 AM
His last name was pronounced NETS-kash

Seems only appropriate for a professional hockey player, though, doesn't it?

pulykamell
12-12-2006, 04:13 AM
... which is why the most common english equivalent is "sch" ... sorta halfway between.

How is "sch" halfway in between? Spelling-wise or pronunciation-wise? "Sch" is pronounced the same as "sh" in English. At least in my dialect, "shell" and "schell" would be the same.

DSYoungEsq
12-12-2006, 10:44 AM
How is "sch" halfway in between? Spelling-wise or pronunciation-wise? "Sch" is pronounced the same as "sh" in English. At least in my dialect, "shell" and "schell" would be the same.
School? ;)

Crotalus
12-12-2006, 11:59 AM
My favorite name pronunciation is Tallifiero, which in the sourthern US is pronounced Tolliver.

lieu
12-12-2006, 12:39 PM
Strangely enough, we don't seem to have much difficulty in Canada pronouncing it "Favre."You mean putting an "eh" in it?

Trunk
12-12-2006, 12:51 PM
Havre de Grace, Maryland is typically pronounced

Havver dee grayce

Shame too, because ahhve duh grahss sounds much nicer.

Also, knew a Des Jardins growing up who pronounced it dess JAR dins. Ugly.

Stuffy
12-12-2006, 01:54 PM
There is the classic "Sade", the most excellent jazz singer. I think even she pronounces two or three different ways.


I've only ever heard it pronounced Sha-Day! What other ways have you heard it?

mangeorge
12-12-2006, 02:23 PM
I've only ever heard it pronounced Sha-Day! What other ways have you heard it?
Sar-day and Shar-day. Also Sa-day.
The first two on PBS concerts. They usually attempt to get it right.
I wonder if there's anything on wikpedia?

Diogenes the Cynic
12-12-2006, 02:32 PM
Golfer, Jose Maria Olazabal's last name is pronounced "O-la-THA-Bul" for some reason.

pulykamell
12-12-2006, 02:55 PM
Golfer, Jose Maria Olazabal's last name is pronounced "O-la-THA-Bul" for some reason.

I don't know who he is, but I'm guessing by that pronunciation that he's Spanish, as "c" (before "e" & "i") and "z" are pronounced close to English "th" in Castillian Spanish (the Spanish in Spain).

Hippy Hollow
12-12-2006, 03:12 PM
Sar-day and Shar-day. Also Sa-day.
The first two on PBS concerts. They usually attempt to get it right.
I wonder if there's anything on wikpedia?
"Sade" is a nick for Folasade. It's Nigerian, and I know a few. They're all "Sha-day" or "Shar-Day." I think the cassette of her first album had "Pronounced Shar-Day" on the spine.

Diogenes the Cynic
12-12-2006, 03:18 PM
I don't know who he is, but I'm guessing by that pronunciation that he's Spanish, as "c" (before "e" & "i") and "z" are pronounced close to English "th" in Castillian Spanish (the Spanish in Spain).
Yep, he is a native Spaniard. I guess that explains it. Thanks.

mangeorge
12-12-2006, 03:33 PM
"Sade" is a nick for Folasade. It's Nigerian, and I know a few. They're all "Sha-day" or "Shar-Day." I think the cassette of her first album had "Pronounced Shar-Day" on the spine.
Yeah, that fits with what I've heard on radio stations too. It is a stretch, though, for someone who doesn't know.
I think I have that cassette somewhere.
Thanks for the "horses mouth" report. :cool: That's the best explanation I've heard.
mangeorge