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View Full Version : How do you say 'very delicious' in Italian?


Elza B
01-29-2007, 02:53 PM
I've checked Babelfish AND another translation site, and they're both giving me different answers :rolleyes: . So now I'm not sure what to believe.

Can someone tell me how you say 'very delicious' in Italian?

E.

Elza B
01-29-2007, 03:00 PM
Okay, never mind. I was getting two different words, but they were both appropriate - we just decided to go with the more recognizeable word.

E.

Stainz
01-29-2007, 03:01 PM
.. and the answer is ...?

Elza B
01-29-2007, 03:14 PM
.. and the answer is ...?

I was getting from Babelfish:

'molto squisito'

and from another translation site:

'molto delizioso'

Looked both up in an Italian dictionary, and they both work, but we figured people would recognize 'delizioso' a little easier.

The things I do at work some days...

E.

Rigamarole
01-29-2007, 03:25 PM
Actually, I would say deliziosissima.

Liberal
01-29-2007, 03:28 PM
Actually, I would say deliziosissima.That's the absolute superlative, isn't it? Wouldn't that be more like "most delicious"?

Rigamarole
01-29-2007, 03:31 PM
That's the absolute superlative, isn't it?

Yes. It's just a way of putting extreme emphasis on something. You can still say 'molto deliziosa', but it just doesn't have the same ring to it, IMO.

Evil Joe
01-29-2007, 06:47 PM
And then make sure you give a sharp kiss to your finger tips.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
01-29-2007, 06:55 PM
I used to tell my little sister, when the Mama Celeste pizza commercial would come on, that abbondanza! was Italian for "toxic."

twickster
01-29-2007, 07:33 PM
I used to tell my little sister, ...that abbondanza! was Italian for "toxic."

So when my suitor describes my figure thusly, I should kick him in the nuts?

CookingWithGas
01-29-2007, 08:29 PM
Yes. It's just a way of putting extreme emphasis on something. You can still say 'molto deliziosa', but it just doesn't have the same ring to it, IMO.To clarify, adding "issimo/a" at the end is an intensive but not an absolute superlative.

I believe the gender has to match, it would be La pasta stato molta deliziosa; le verdure sono stato molte deliziose; di fatto, il tutto pasto stato molto delizioso.

CookingWithGas
01-29-2007, 08:30 PM
'molto squisito'I don't have my dictionary in hand but this is almost certainly "very exquisite" which would be appropriate but not a direct translation.

Derleth
01-29-2007, 08:43 PM
CookingWithGas: Hey, at least it doesn't mean "very squishy". ;)

On a related note, the TV series title "Molto Mario" is actually really stupid.

Johanna
01-29-2007, 09:00 PM
To clarify, adding "issimo/a" at the end is an intensive but not an absolute superlative.

I believe the gender has to match, it would be La pasta statoNo--La pasta stata molta deliziosa.le verdure sono stato Le verdure sono statedi fatto, il tutto pasto stato molto delizioso....tutto il pasto....

It totally makes sense that a thread about Italian language would revolve around food... Mangia, mangia!

Frylock
01-29-2007, 09:18 PM
In English you say it as follows: "Real good."

-FrL-

Sapo
01-30-2007, 04:10 AM
il yummo!

Would a regular Joe use "deliziosissima"?. It is not something I would say in spanish. How about "ricchissimo" or "divino" (forgive my spelling, I am just italianizing spanish)?

Themenin
01-30-2007, 04:39 AM
If you're referring to a meal, I'd say era veramente delizioso (with all the usual caveats for regions, eras and personal ignorance). Veramente seems more natural to me in the context than molto.

In context I'd just say Che buono !

Liberal
01-30-2007, 04:57 AM
To clarify, adding "issimo/a" at the end is an intensive but not an absolute superlative.According to this source (http://www.learn-to-speaker.com/Italian/italian30.htm):

The Absolute Superlative expresses an extreme degree or absolute state of something without comparison. This can be expressed in several ways in Italian.

Drop the last vowel of the adjective and add -issimo, -issima, -issimi, or -issime.
Le fragole sono dolcissime. Strawberries are very sweet.

Place the words molto, troppo, or assai before the adjective.
Questa arancia molto buona. This orange is very good.

Repeat the adjective or adverb.
Lei parla piano piano. She speaks very softly.

gigi
01-30-2007, 09:14 AM
So when my suitor describes my figure thusly, I should kick him in the nuts?Hey, if that's what he's into.

CookingWithGas
01-30-2007, 10:20 AM
No--La pasta stata molta deliziosa.Le verdure sono state...tutto il pasto....

It totally makes sense that a thread about Italian language would revolve around food... Mangia, mangia!Whoa, you'll have to give me a little refresher course here, I don't remember that. I thought that the past participle agreed only if you have an object contracted with the auxiliary, like this:

Hai vista l'orologio?
Si, l'ho visto.

Is that rule specific to the past participle for stare?

CookingWithGas
01-30-2007, 10:24 AM
According to this source (http://www.learn-to-speaker.com/Italian/italian30.htm):
The Absolute Superlative expresses an extreme degree or absolute state of something without comparison. My mistake, I misunderstood what "absolute superlative" means. I retract my earlier statement.

Bippy the Beardless
01-30-2007, 10:38 AM
I found an enfusiastic "bella, bella!" got the message accross when on holiday in Italy, though whether that would seem strange if I were not obviously a tourist I don't lnow.

Johanna
02-01-2007, 09:26 PM
Whoa, you'll have to give me a little refresher course here, I don't remember that. I thought that the past participle agreed only if you have an object contracted with the auxiliary, like this:

Hai vista l'orologio?
Si, l'ho visto.

Is that rule specific to the past participle for stare?
It applies to all past participles, which have to agree in the same way adjectives do. In the case of composite tenses using the participle, when the compound is formed with essere, the past participle has to agree with the subject, e.g. L'ora era venuta (the hour had come). Capisci?

But conjugations with avere do not make the participle agree with the subject.

Although, depending on the sentence construction, the participle conjugated with avere may have to agree with the direct object, e.g. Dove sono andate le verdure? Le ho mangiate tutte. (Where'd the vegetables go? I ate 'em all.)

To take your example, sorry, hai vista doesn't mean 'have you seen', it means 'you have a view', in which vista can only be parsed as a noun. To make it a verb conjugation, you'd have to say "hai visto [direct object]" regardless of gender. Even if the speaker is female.

Reflexive verbs are always conjugated with essere for the past participle, which always agrees with the subject as to gender and number. So I would say Mi sono vista (I saw myself) because I'm a woman, while a man would say Mi sono visto.

CookingWithGas
02-04-2007, 01:49 PM
Phew, time to go back to the books. I've never taken a class but I studied out of books profusely to prepare for a business trip to Italy, and then loved it so much I've been back three more times. I hope to go to Florence this summer, so I'd better get to work!

Johanna
02-05-2007, 09:08 AM
Bellissimo. Contact me privately, vicino, I'll help you practice Italian before you go. (I need the practice too.)