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View Full Version : What happens if your kid gets expelled?


sdguy
02-18-2007, 07:08 PM
What happens if you're kid gets tossed out of school and is in a public school. I guess you could put them in a private school, but what if you can't afford that or don't want to pay for a private school.

Since the law states kids under a certain age, HAVE to go what about them? They on one hand would be violating the law but on another hand, they were thrown out?

silenus
02-18-2007, 07:11 PM
Depends on the district and the situation. There is usually Adult Ed or continuation schools available. Otherwise, an inter-district transfer might be necessary. Unless they are repeat offenders or attacked a teacher, they can usually petition for re-admittance to the school the following semester.

Manda JO
02-18-2007, 07:21 PM
In Dallas, you are generally sent to an alternative education program, a strict school-like atmosphere. I say "school like" because they don't offer anything beyond the most basic forms of the most basic four classes. It's possible to get kicked out of these facilities as well, but the sorts of things that get you kicked out also get you arrested.

sdguy
02-18-2007, 07:42 PM
Can some moderation change "you're" to "your" sorry I typed to fast

:)

BlakeTyner
02-18-2007, 07:44 PM
When I was in high school ('95-'99) we had one guy who got expelled. He had a "kill list" of students and teachers, so he was out. He never set foot in our high school again.

What the district did was assign him to the Special Assignment Center (SAC), located off-campus. Each of his teachers sent his assignments to the office at the beginning of each week, and they were picked up by the SAC teachers. SAC had, IIRC, two certified teachers who handed out the assignments and helped with them when needed. One was certified in the humanities, one in the sciences. The papers were turned in to the regular homeroom teacher and graded; the regular teacher still had him in her gradebook.

In other words, he was treated like a regular student, he just wasn't allowed to actually come to our school. If he'd have done something to get kicked out of there, I can only assume his parents would have had to homeschool or figure out another option.

BobT
02-18-2007, 07:45 PM
Public schools have plans in place for dealing with students expelled from school. A lot depends upon the reasons for the expulsion.

Public schools can even, under certain circumstances, arrange for a student to be transferred to a private school at the school district's tab. My girlfriend is a special ed teacher and had to arrange this once for a student.

He had ... issues ....

Chronos
02-18-2007, 09:41 PM
It's also possible to get kicked out of a school, without getting kicked out of the school district. At the end of my sixth grade year, I got kicked out of one school in the Cleveland Public School system, but still ended up going for seventh and eighth grade in a different Cleveland Public School. Although I think I wasn't actually officially expelled from the first school: As I recall, it was something along the lines of "If you don't voluntarily leave this school, we will expell you.". I suspect that this approach was taken because it would require less red tape, and red tape might have ended up raising the question higher up of whether I should have been expelled.

Frylock
02-18-2007, 09:45 PM
It's also possible to get kicked out of a school, without getting kicked out of the school district. At the end of my sixth grade year, I got kicked out of one school in the Cleveland Public School system, but still ended up going for seventh and eighth grade in a different Cleveland Public School. Although I think I wasn't actually officially expelled from the first school: As I recall, it was something along the lines of "If you don't voluntarily leave this school, we will expell you.". I suspect that this approach was taken because it would require less red tape, and red tape might have ended up raising the question higher up of whether I should have been expelled.

Oh now come on, you know what many of us now want to know.

So... tell! :p

-FrL-

Santo Rugger
02-18-2007, 10:00 PM
Than thell prolly speel like u whan thay growe up.

panache45
02-18-2007, 10:17 PM
What happens if you're kid get's expelled?The kid never learns to use apostrophes correctly.

Chronos
02-18-2007, 10:41 PM
Oh now come on, you know what many of us now want to know.I think I've mentioned it on the boards before, but the short version: I got kicked out of sixth grade when a kid bit me (I was charged with fighting, the other kid wasn't charged with anything), and I got kicked out of ninth grade when I got frustrated trying to work within the system to appeal a detention, and tore up the detention slip in front of the Dean of Men (guy in charge of discipline) (I didn't mention that one before, because it was a private school). In both cases, I think the school was trying to deal with a bully problem by getting rid of the kid who was getting picked upon. I don't think I deserved either one, but I'm honestly not at all bitter about them, since in both cases, I ended up in the best possible school I could have gone to. If anything, I regret that I spent a full year at that high school, when I could have been at Benedictine for four years instead of three.

MLS
02-18-2007, 11:46 PM
I think I've mentioned it on the boards before, but the short version: I got kicked out of sixth grade when a kid bit me (I was charged with fighting, the other kid wasn't charged with anything), and I got kicked out of ninth grade when I got frustrated trying to work within the system to appeal a detention, and tore up the detention slip in front of the Dean of Men (guy in charge of discipline) (I didn't mention that one before, because it was a private school). In both cases, I think the school was trying to deal with a bully problem by getting rid of the kid who was getting picked upon. I don't think I deserved either one, but I'm honestly not at all bitter about them, since in both cases, I ended up in the best possible school I could have gone to. If anything, I regret that I spent a full year at that high school, when I could have been at Benedictine for four years instead of three.
I think the OP was discussing public schools; yours sounds like a private one.

In NJ there are very few things that can lead to outright expulsion. One is assault on a teacher. Another -- believe it or not -- is pulling a false fire alarm. I learned this from our attorney when I was on our local school board.

Expulsion is so rare as to approach zero, since unless the offender is convicted of a crime and incarcerated, the local school district still has to provide and pay for the youngster's education up until, I believe, the age of 16. One option is to provide an in-home tutor. Another is to deem him/her in need of special education and find an appropriate school to address his emotional or other problems.

Our school system at one time had an "alternative high school" for the problem teens. In theory it would educate them in small groups and address special needs; in practice it did at least keep the violent ones out of the mainstream. Opponents of the school believed it was actually a reward for the offenders, since they got to hang out all day and play games, and never really got any kind of basic education at all. Most, if not all, of those in the alternative HS were black males, and it was also felt to be a type of discrimination. It was also quite expensive, and it was eventually disbanded.

Chronos
02-18-2007, 11:59 PM
I think the OP was discussing public schools; yours sounds like a private one. Sorry if I was unclear about that. There were two completely separate incidents, separated by three years. The first was a public school (actually, two, since the school I transferred to was another public in the same district). The second was private schools, and I only included it because Frylock seemed interested.

SandyHook
02-19-2007, 01:01 AM
Can some moderation change "you're" to "your" sorry I typed to fast

:)

Shouldn't that be, "I typed too fast?"

I got tossed for a week when I was a junior in high school. Got slobbering drunk and decided to go to the basketball game and root the ole home team on. As best I remember I may have over-rooted.

cckerberos
02-19-2007, 02:47 AM
In NJ there are very few things that can lead to outright expulsion. One is assault on a teacher. Another -- believe it or not -- is pulling a false fire alarm. I learned this from our attorney when I was on our local school board.
Interesting. The only student that was expelled from my high school (in MA) while I was attending had brought a gun to school in his backpack. That wouldn't result in an expulsion in NJ?

monica
02-19-2007, 08:06 AM
I only know of 2 kids who got expelled from my school. The reason? Sex on school premises. They simply got switched to other (separate) high schools in the district. The guy was immensely popular- "You got kicked out for what?!? Dude, that's so cool!" :rolleyes:

Spectre of Pithecanthropus
02-19-2007, 08:17 AM
Can some moderation change "you're" to "your" sorry I typed to fast

:)

And while they're here, how about changing "get's" to "gets"?

Jonathan Chance
02-19-2007, 08:26 AM
I can attest that there are several options for kids in some systems. In the district I in which I was a high school student one could end up first at a high school with very tight discipline...sort of a high school heavy thing. Regular building and classes but with strict schedule and stern disciplinary policies like time outs and isolation and such. Suspension there didn't get one a vacation but rather schoolwork without other students or shifting classes and such.

Beyond that was a school (a small one) for kids the system thought were bright but fixable. Locked doors, half overnight kids and half day kids. Mandatory sessions with therapists and huge testing schedules along with a level system that controlled where you could go during lunch/breaks and what priviliges you could have (vending machines, time in private, etc)

Lastly was essentially a lockdown school for truly criminal youth (short of actual jail). Completely regimented classes, all overnight kids, etc.

And, of course, just play juvenile jail. But we won't go there.

rbroome
02-19-2007, 09:06 AM
What happens if you're kid gets tossed out of school and is in a public school. I guess you could put them in a private school, but what if you can't afford that or don't want to pay for a private school.

Since the law states kids under a certain age, HAVE to go what about them? They on one hand would be violating the law but on another hand, they were thrown out?
while strictly true, no court around here (Louisiana) would touch such a case since they might be asked to come up with a solution. Most if not all districts have special schools for expelled kids, but the student has to apply to get in. If the parents don't apply, then the student is on his/her own. And this school is very strict. They have few discipline problems because the students have so little leeway to get in trouble. Strict schedules, very specific uniforms, no talking in class or in the hall, security guards in most halls, special buses, etc. Not much different than prison. But as I said, they have few discipline problems. Many kids report they appreciate it. After all, some of the "enrollees" have a violent background and can be intimidating. Not being able to talk to they bully in the next desk is often a good thing. Sometimes private school, sometimes out of state. Expulsion in one public school district means expulsion from all. You can't move to another county and start over. It does cause some dropouts, but from what I have seen, those students that don't take advantage of the programs in place for them aren't likely to finish school anyway. Expulsion is just defining a date for when the student stops going to school.

Oh, in Louisiana it is quite easy to get expelled. By state law, bringing drugs to school for any reason in any way is an automatic expulsion. That includes OTC drugs. If a student is found with one aspirin in their backpack, they can get expelled for the first offense. Usually a teacher will tell a student to get rid of an honest mistake, but if the student is unpopular with the administration, it doesn't take much. Worse, a student's car on campus is considered part of the student. The administration can't search the car without cause (bookbags can be searched), but if they hear a rumor that the kid has any pills, they can demand to search. Doesn't happen often, but it can. So, we have learned to live with the contradiction. Keeps the debate about the dropout problem down to a low level though.

yBeayf
02-19-2007, 04:32 PM
In grade 9 (freshman year of high school) I got kicked out for pulling a box cutter on someone who richly deserved it. I got sent to what was called ALC ("Alternative Learning Center") for a semester (this was in Houston in the mid '90s). It was basically like a combined junior high and high school, with all of the core classes and many of the electives that would be offered at a normal school, just with much tighter regulations on behavior. We had to go through metal detectors and be searched every morning, for example, only had one minute between classes, and one class period of every day was devoted to a group therapy-type session with a bunch of other students and a counselor.

It wasn't that bad -- most people there were for drug-related offenses, and it seemed that more class time was spent sitting back and bullshitting with the teachers than actually working on the material.

Tamryne
02-19-2007, 08:55 PM
In grade 9 (freshman year of high school) I got kicked out for pulling a box cutter on someone who richly deserved it. I got sent to what was called ALC ("Alternative Learning Center") for a semester (this was in Houston in the mid '90s). It was basically like a combined junior high and high school, with all of the core classes and many of the electives that would be offered at a normal school, just with much tighter regulations on behavior. We had to go through metal detectors and be searched every morning, for example, only had one minute between classes, and one class period of every day was devoted to a group therapy-type session with a bunch of other students and a counselor.

It wasn't that bad -- most people there were for drug-related offenses, and it seemed that more class time was spent sitting back and bullshitting with the teachers than actually working on the material.

Thats the exact same system they had in place when I went to public school in Houston. A friend of mine's father was a teacher/administrator at our ALC, and talked about the hasle of having to scan everyone. They also had uniforms, and bars on the windows. When you were admitted you had to go through an orientation of some sort with your parents and the principal. Since it is a public school system, they had to send the expelled kids somewhere until they were 18, at which point they could be expelled from the district completely if they messed up badly enough.

yBeayf
02-19-2007, 10:23 PM
Thats the exact same system they had in place when I went to public school in Houston. A friend of mine's father was a teacher/administrator at our ALC, and talked about the hasle of having to scan everyone. They also had uniforms, and bars on the windows. When you were admitted you had to go through an orientation of some sort with your parents and the principal. Since it is a public school system, they had to send the expelled kids somewhere until they were 18, at which point they could be expelled from the district completely if they messed up badly enough.
Hmmm... what school district it was for? I was in Cy-Fair, and am wondering if it's possible that I passed through there during his tenure. I still remember a lot of the cooler teachers there. We didn't have window bars or uniforms, though, and even had some classes in outside trailers, but those could have been implemented after I left. We did have the orientation and the "here's how we will control your kids" presentation given to the parents.

ouryL
02-20-2007, 03:38 PM
Depends on the reason for expulsion. In my state, there usually is a punishment portion in which the child must remain out of school, usually a month to six months (a suspension) and that after a suitable time period, the child might be eligible to return to school or if the infraction was worse, to another school, or if the infraction was worser still, to a remedial type school or tutoring. Because the state is mandated to make sure each child is suitably educated.

CC
02-20-2007, 05:03 PM
As one who has been in the edu-biz for many years, I can tell you that in most cases, a kid can miss part or all of a year at most levels - until high school, anyway - and will essentially miss nothing significant. If s/he can read and do basic arithmetic, s/he'll be just fine. Most of us make it through school despite what happens there, not because of it. And, the more competent and literate the student is (i.e. parents are) the more likely it will be that the event will be a learning experience worth far more than the weeks or months in school would have been.

Tamryne
02-20-2007, 05:23 PM
Hmmm... what school district it was for? I was in Cy-Fair, and am wondering if it's possible that I passed through there during his tenure. I still remember a lot of the cooler teachers there. We didn't have window bars or uniforms, though, and even had some classes in outside trailers, but those could have been implemented after I left. We did have the orientation and the "here's how we will control your kids" presentation given to the parents.

Yep, Cy-Fair ISD. Do you remember a short guy by the name of Mr. Bunn?

I think the bars were added later, I never noticed them until I started going to an after school class at Windfern and drove by every day. I know there was a uniform requirement, everyone I saw wore khaki's and polo shirts.

yBeayf
02-20-2007, 06:06 PM
Yep, Cy-Fair ISD. Do you remember a short guy by the name of Mr. Bunn?
I'll be damned if that name doesn't sound familiar, though I can't quite place it with a face. Did he have a mustache?

I think the bars were added later, I never noticed them until I started going to an after school class at Windfern and drove by every day. I know there was a uniform requirement, everyone I saw wore khaki's and polo shirts.
Uniforms were definitely after my time there. Heck, we didn't even have the daily metal detectors until halfway through my semester there. Sounds like it got quite a bit stricter there after I left.

Tamryne
02-20-2007, 08:21 PM
I'll be damned if that name doesn't sound familiar, though I can't quite place it with a face. Did he have a mustache?

He has, on and off. Kinda short, medium skin, dark hair and a round-ish face. Really jolly guy, but not afraid to put people in their place if need be.


Uniforms were definitely after my time there. Heck, we didn't even have the daily metal detectors until halfway through my semester there. Sounds like it got quite a bit stricter there after I left.

The district itself has gotten a bit tougher, rougher neighborhoods and rapid development out west along 290. If I remember correctly (I intervewed the current Superintendent when I was a senior a few years ago), the Superintendent was actually thinking of adding another ALC center or expanding the current one sometime in the near future, because of how crowded it has become.