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View Full Version : What the hell is wrong with Hershey's chocolate?


Tibidabo
05-14-2007, 07:35 AM
Is Hershey's typical of American chocolate in general? Whats wrong with it?? It tastes like (ahem! what I imagine) a dog treat (would taste like, were I to taste one).
Seriously, Its gross. Somebody told me that chocolate is similarly... challenged... in Australia and that it might be additives, to stop it melting? Any other theories?

Do people like it?

CalMeacham
05-14-2007, 07:46 AM
I seem to always hear about how terible American chocolate is -- especially Hershey's. I have to admit, I don't understand it. Hershey's was the chocolate I was raised with, and to me it tastes fine. I like it better than Nestle, at any rate. I admit that I like Dove somewhat better.


Aha! you say -- the poor fool was raised with inferior products, and it's stunted his appreciation and his taste buds. But in other cases, where what I've grown up with is the inferior product, once I've tasted betterm it's pretty obvious. I can understand WHY people put down what I'm familiar with, and I prefer the better product (although I may have a nostalgic love for the old stuff).


But not with chocolate. I've traveled. I've had Swiss chocolate and real Cadbury's and Ghirardelli chocolate from Ghirardelli square. I've had gournet chocolates from around the world.

And Hershey's still tastes fine to me.

OneCentStamp
05-14-2007, 07:57 AM
Hershey's is the quintessential American chocolate. It isn't horrible (to this American, at least), just sweet and kind of bland, if indeed chocolate can be bland. It's the Bud Light of chocolate: bland, inoffensive and formulated for mass appeal.

Amp
05-14-2007, 08:00 AM
Another vote for the "I Like Hersey's" camp. I've never understood the hatred and disgust for it. FTR, I do like Dove's chocolate just a bit more.

Tibidabo
05-14-2007, 08:02 AM
But you do notice the difference in texture and flavour? I mean, some chocolates have more cocoa, some are sweeter etc. but those just seem.. unnatural somehow

moreso than the blandness I hate the texture, its too soft! And I can do bland when I know it's because its simpler and healthier but I've a sneakin' suspicion that ain't the case with the Hershey bar.

I dunno. Maybe the one I got (Dublin) spent years on a shelf or something...

Sorry to rag on your cord, man! I just don't get them

scotandrsn
05-14-2007, 08:11 AM
moreso than the blandness I hate the texture, its too soft! And I can do bland when I know it's because its simpler and healthier but I've a sneakin' suspicion that ain't the case with the Hershey bar.

A good fresh Hershey bar has a nice crisp snap to it. I think you got an old one.

CalMeacham
05-14-2007, 08:11 AM
But you do notice the difference in texture and flavour?

Of course! Every chocolate differs from every other.


But I don't find Hershey's appallingly bad. I find it quite a bit better than many other chocolates (especially the ones used for most of the chocolate Easter bunnies sold in the US). It's not as good as Dove or Lindt or others, but not an order of magnitude's difference anywhere.

As for texture, I find that varies considerably with all chocolates, depending on temperature and humidity. At STP, I don't find Hershey's any more objectionable than any other.

jjimm
05-14-2007, 08:12 AM
The essentials for chocolate, to me, are:

1. Smooth texture
2. Not overly sweet
3. Slight bitter undernote from the cocoa
4. Tastes remotely of chocolate

Sadly, Hershey's fails on the above.

That said, it's not bad candy. Hershey's Kisses are nice, and Reese's Peanut Butter Cups (which incorporate Hershey's, I believe) are food of the gods.

But it's not chocolate in any normal definition of the word.

lieu
05-14-2007, 08:17 AM
Did you maybe get baking chocolate? Someone help me here but I'm thinking it's a completely different beast altogether, unsweetened and not particularly pleasant by itself.

Uncommon Sense
05-14-2007, 08:20 AM
I hate it.
I mildly like their dark chocolate, but won't go out of my way to get it.
You're right, it doesn't melt, I think it's actually made in the fires of hell and therefore used to the heat. :D
And Hershey's Kisses are the worst candy foisted on humans, ever. Yuck.
And I'm a big fan of candy and chocolate so that says alot when a guy can't stand a certain brand.

Tibidabo
05-14-2007, 08:26 AM
It's the Bud Light of chocolate: bland, inoffensive and formulated for mass appeal.

Ok, I think you nailed it there. And it also seems the one I ate was probably stale :D Fine, but can we all agree at least on the nastiness of Budweiser?

And although I'm too lazy to back up the following statement at the present time; I'm not just picking on American stuff for the sake of it!

Sattua
05-14-2007, 08:28 AM
I do like Hershey's, the same way I like Kraft Macaroni and Cheese--maybe not as a sterling example of the product it claims to be, but for its own special qualities. If I want chocolate, I eat some Michel Cluizel 85%.

Having said that, you haven't had bad chocolate until you've tried Russian "aerated" chocolate. It's the pale color of school-cafeteria-chocolate-milk and tastes of cocoa butter and hair oil

Indygrrl
05-14-2007, 08:37 AM
I had no idea that people didn't like Hershey chocolate. I think it's fab. But then, I have rarely met a chocolate I didn't like. :D

fessie
05-14-2007, 08:44 AM
I think it's all about the timing.

A friend of mine visited Hershey's amusement park and brought back a fresh, we're talking fresh bar of their chocolate. Incredible. It truly rivaled the Lindt chocolates I ate in Europe, years ago.

OTOH, I remember returning from my trip and looking for Lindt chocolates here - sure, you can find them. They're usually old and the fruit syrup has generally turned to grains. Crunchy filling, yuck!

WordMan
05-14-2007, 09:01 AM
I lived in Scotland for a year during college and was surprised to realize how different-tasting the chocolate was there. In particular, because it was local, I really enjoyed Cadbury's.

I got back to the states, and the Cadbury's didn't taste the same - it was more bland. Being the action-oriented guy that I was, I wrote Cadbury and asked why. They actually wrote back and said that the FDA in the U.S. required things like parafin added to the ingredients to extend shelf life, which changed the flavor.

Just thought I would add this direct data to the discussion. I enjoy Hershey's and other chocolates in the U.S. - but they are formulated differently for this market. I am not sure about chocolate you can buy at specialty stores, etc...

Mangetout
05-14-2007, 09:06 AM
It tastes like (ahem! what I imagine) a dog treat (would taste like, were I to taste one).Speaking as someone who has eaten both Hershey's chocolate and dog treats, I can confirm this is a reasonably apt comparison.

DianaG
05-14-2007, 09:11 AM
They actually wrote back and said that the FDA in the U.S. required things like parafin added to the ingredients to extend shelf life, which changed the flavor.

I was just writing that Hershey's tastes like parafin. I'll eat it if I've got PMS from hell and it's all I've got, but it's not chocolate. At best, it's a (barely) reasonable facsimile.

CalMeacham
05-14-2007, 09:13 AM
I lived in Scotland for a year during college and was surprised to realize how different-tasting the chocolate was there. In particular, because it was local, I really enjoyed Cadbury's.

I got back to the states, and the Cadbury's didn't taste the same - it was more bland. Being the action-oriented guy that I was, I wrote Cadbury and asked why. They actually wrote back and said that the FDA in the U.S. required things like parafin added to the ingredients to extend shelf life, which changed the flavor.

Just thought I would add this direct data to the discussion. I enjoy Hershey's and other chocolates in the U.S. - but they are formulated differently for this market. I am not sure about chocolate you can buy at specialty stores, etc...


Pepper Mill REALLY likes UK Cadbury, but doesn't like the US version, for precisely the reason you give. Whenever we or I go abroad, I stockl up on it, and dole it out to her afterwards. I've also found a nearby store that sells British goods, where I can get UK-type Cadburys.



That said, I've never heard that Hershey's (or any American chocolate) has paraffin in it. The idea sounds bizarre.

Tapioca Dextrin
05-14-2007, 09:32 AM
Just out of curiosity, does anyone have an ingredients list from the back of a Hershey Bar? The web seems to be silent on the subject.

Miss Purl McKnittington
05-14-2007, 09:42 AM
Speaking as someone who has eaten both Hershey's chocolate and dog treats, I can confirm this is a reasonably apt comparison.
Oh my god, you really will eat it all.

I always thought the username was a joke, but I guess not.

Quiddity Glomfuster
05-14-2007, 09:44 AM
I've eaten Hershey's in Canada and in the US and it's all similarly awful. It's got a bitter taste, but not cocoa-bitter; it's more like some wierd chemical-y bitter. And this gal's a bigtime chocolate fan.

As for Lindt in the US - you must've gotten stale ones because the ones I've had have been fine. You have to look for expiry dates - not all chocolate has 'em but Lindt tends to.

Stuffy
05-14-2007, 09:49 AM
Just out of curiosity, does anyone have an ingredients list from the back of a Hershey Bar? The web seems to be silent on the subject.


From the back of a Hershey's Milk Chocolate with Almonds

Ingredients: Milk chocolate (sugar; milk; chocolate; cocoa butter; lactose; milk fat; soy lecithin and PGPR, emulsifiers; and vanillin;, artificial flavor) and almonds (roasted in cocoa butter and sunflower oil).

Ellen Cherry
05-14-2007, 09:49 AM
Oh my god, you really will eat it all.

I always thought the username was a joke, but I guess not.


Oh pshaw! My brothers and I tried dog treats as kids! We were curious. Even today I'll pretty much taste anything, as long as it's not wiggling or something.

I'm with indygrrl on this one. Chocolate? I'm in!

What Exit?
05-14-2007, 09:55 AM
Just out of curiosity, does anyone have an ingredients list from the back of a Hershey Bar? The web seems to be silent on the subject.
Here you go:
Sugar, Chocolate, Cocoa Butter, Peanuts, Cocoa Processed with Alkali, Crisp Rice, Contains 2% or less of Milk Fat, Lactose (milk), Soy Lecithin, PGPR (Emulsifier), Salt, Malt, Vanillan, artificial flavor and milk.

I do like the Hersey Special Dark Chocolate, I am not a fan of any milk chocolate. We have a local chocolate factory that makes great chocolate. IMHO, far superior to Hershey's, Godiva, Cadbury or any other well know brand. The local factory is Criterion Chocolates (http://www.criterionchocolates.com/index.html).

Jim

mobo85
05-14-2007, 09:56 AM
I recall reading in a biography of Milton Hershey that Hershey's chocolate has a sort of bitterness to the taste that most chocolates don't.

Your Ad Here
05-14-2007, 09:59 AM
*shrug*

I get exactly what I expect from a 55 cent candy bar...

kelly5078
05-14-2007, 09:59 AM
I loathe the stuff. Even as a kid, I couldn't eat a Hershey bar. It feels really lousy in the mouth, as if it were made of clay. But the main thing is that it just tastes yucky.

Nestle's isn't so great either, but at least it's edible.

NAF1138
05-14-2007, 09:59 AM
Pepper Mill REALLY likes UK Cadbury, but doesn't like the US version, for precisely the reason you give. Whenever we or I go abroad, I stockl up on it, and dole it out to her afterwards. I've also found a nearby store that sells British goods, where I can get UK-type Cadburys.



That said, I've never heard that Hershey's (or any American chocolate) has paraffin in it. The idea sounds bizarre.

Bizarre but true. I only have annectotal evidence, but my Father in Law used to work for Gadiva as a product buyer and can quote off the top of his head the percentage of parafin in different brands of chocolate. He says Hershey's has by far the most wax in it (something like 80% of the bar is food grade parafin wax) with American Cadbury and Nestle following at a close second.

He refuses to eat these brands of chocolate these days because he say all he can tast is the wax now that he knows. He says the companies will claim that this is done to prolong shelf life, but in reality it is a cost cutting measure.

Purly annectodal I know, but I trust the guy.

Revtim
05-14-2007, 10:02 AM
Isn't Hershey's part of that group that lobbied the FDA to allow the industry to market the stuff that has vegetable oil instead of cocoa butter as genuine chocolate? Their new motto could be "Hershey's. We'd sell you shittier chocolate, but it's against the law."

CalMeacham
05-14-2007, 10:12 AM
Bizarre but true. I only have annectotal evidence, but my Father in Law used to work for Gadiva as a product buyer and can quote off the top of his head the percentage of parafin in different brands of chocolate. He says Hershey's has by far the most wax in it (something like 80% of the bar is food grade parafin wax) with American Cadbury and Nestle following at a close second.


Not if you believe the ingredients roster, quoted twice above. They're required by law to list the ingredients in the product, and in order by their relative presence.

Ingredients: Milk chocolate (sugar; milk; chocolate; cocoa butter; lactose; milk fat; soy lecithin and PGPR, emulsifiers; and vanillin;, artificial flavor) and almonds (roasted in cocoa butter and sunflower oil).

Even if they slipped "paraffin" in there under some unexpected by barely-allowable heading (like "emulsifiers"), it's still a relatively small proportion of the bar. No WAY is a Hershey bar 80% paraffin -- you'd be able to wax skis and surfboards with it. I still find it hard to believe there's any paraffin in the bar.

ralph124c
05-14-2007, 10:13 AM
Hershy extracts a lot of the cocoa butter from the cacao beans it uses. The cocoa butter is what makes the chocolate soft and creamy-but Hershey's makes more money by extracting it and selling it to cosmetics mfgs. (makeup, lipstick, skin creams, etc.). They replace the cocoa butter with cheap edible oils (whatever the market has)-stuff like soybean, safflower, peanut oils, etc. that is why the chocoate is hard and has an "off" taste.
capitalism at work! I like the Belgian chocolates-or buy from a small local firm (like Lake Champlain Chocolates)-much better!

iluvurmom
05-14-2007, 10:22 AM
Well, personally, I don't eat a lot of hershey's chocolate but i definitely will eat it and have known to eat a lot of it :) As chocolate goes, I've always liked it and have never really noticed that it's not good. That said, I've had Cadbury's chocolate abroad...and that is the BEST. But I don't think Hershey's is a bad next choice.

Pleonast
05-14-2007, 10:23 AM
Hershy extracts a lot of the cocoa butter from the cacao beans it uses. The cocoa butter is what makes the chocolate soft and creamy-but Hershey's makes more money by extracting it and selling it to cosmetics mfgs. (makeup, lipstick, skin creams, etc.). They replace the cocoa butter with cheap edible oils (whatever the market has)-stuff like soybean, safflower, peanut oils, etc. that is why the chocoate is hard and has an "off" taste.
capitalism at work! I like the Belgian chocolates-or buy from a small local firm (like Lake Champlain Chocolates)-much better!Unless you're willing to accuse Hershey's of fraud in it's ingredient lists, your claim seems hollow.

I wonder how many people are misremembering some cheap chocolate as Hershey's, because theirs's the ubiquitous chocolate in the U.S. The ingredients are right on the wrapper. You may not like their exact formulation, but don't claim stuff that's not in there is.

,Pleonast, chocolate junkie

Edit: pronouns!

NAF1138
05-14-2007, 10:28 AM
Not if you believe the ingredients roster, quoted twice above. They're required by law to list the ingredients in the product, and in order by their relative presence.



Even if they slipped "paraffin" in there under some unexpected by barely-allowable heading (like "emulsifiers"), it's still a relatively small proportion of the bar. No WAY is a Hershey bar 80% paraffin -- you'd be able to wax skis and surfboards with it. I still find it hard to believe there's any paraffin in the bar.

I believe it does fall under the heading of emulsifiers, and I may be way off about the percentage. Like I said this is second hand info from someone who worked at a competing chocolate company, so take that for what it is worth.

ETA: Also, some of the food grade wax might have been replaced with the soy extracts etc that you list.

gotpasswords
05-14-2007, 10:34 AM
Ingredients: Milk chocolate (sugar; milk; chocolate; cocoa butter; lactose; milk fat; soy lecithin and PGPR, emulsifiers; and vanillin;, artificial flavor) and almonds (roasted in cocoa butter and sunflower oil).
PGPR? Yum, yum! Cheaper chocolate through chemistry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PGPR).

For the time, at least, they're not putting junk like that into the "premium" chocolate. From their 65% "Cacao Reserve"
Ingredients: semi-sweet chocolate (chocolate, sugar, cocoa, milk fat, cocoa butter, organic soy lecithin, vanilla beans) milk.

Mangetout
05-14-2007, 10:36 AM
Even today I'll pretty much taste anything, as long as it's not wiggling or something.Lightweight!

jjimm
05-14-2007, 10:43 AM
Just a thought: are ingredients in brackets required to be in order of proportion? Furthermore, how is the proportion measured? Mass? Volume? (Genuine q. as I don't know how we do it in Europe either).

Philster
05-14-2007, 11:00 AM
I like Hershey's and I've tasted many chocolates from around the world. It's Hershey's. Good, but that's it. Hershey's is also starting to market more 'upscale' Chocolates, and they are noticably softer, more fragile and higher quality.

I think the comparison to bad beer is unfair. People eat Hershey's and enjoy it as a snack, knowing there are other more gourmet-type chocolates, and most people get to enjoy them from time to time.

Piss poor beer like Budweiser, Coors Light and others are truly embarrassing examples that we in the USA should be completely ashamed of. Why? Because one could walk into a pub with his five best buddies, and have 32 beers on tap (draft/draugth) available, and his buddies will order, Bud Light or Coors Light in a bottle!. This is embarrassing.

If one were to go out for a night of Chocolate, and there were 32 different chocolates to be had fresh in hand, I doubt anyone would be asking for a freakin' Hershey bar in a wrapper!

Well, I'd hope not.

delphica
05-14-2007, 11:01 AM
Even if they slipped "paraffin" in there under some unexpected by barely-allowable heading (like "emulsifiers"), it's still a relatively small proportion of the bar. No WAY is a Hershey bar 80% paraffin -- you'd be able to wax skis and surfboards with it. I still find it hard to believe there's any paraffin in the bar.

I wasn't sure if you meant you didn't believe 80% (which also seems crazy to me) but I would definitely believe any paraffin, er, some paraffin. It's not at all uncommon to add paraffin to chocolate when making candy or other desserts at home - adding a small amount of paraffin helps melted chocolate "set" nicer - less sticky and more glossy. I would say that most people have probably eaten chocolate with some paraffin added without even knowing it -- very common on chocolate-covered strawberries, for example. Too much, of course, gives it an unpleasant waxy taste. I don't know if paraffin is one of the emulsifiers used by Hershey, but it can be used that way for chocolate.

EDIT - oh, I wanted to add that I like Hershey's just fine. I also like imported, high end, and small, locally-produced boutique chocolates as well. I do think some of my enjoyment of Hershey's comes from having grown up with it -- I like how it's a little gummy and clay-like.

panamajack
05-14-2007, 11:17 AM
Just a thought: are ingredients in brackets required to be in order of proportion? Furthermore, how is the proportion measured? Mass? Volume? (Genuine q. as I don't know how we do it in Europe either).

In the US, it's done by weight, as far as I know. I don't know if bracketed ingredients are ordered, but they usually seem to be. The Hershey's bar list makes sense - mostly sugar in it.

Also, there really doesn't seem to any case for paraffin - the 'emulsifiers' is clarifying what soy lecithin and PGPR are. It's hard to believe that Hershey's would fail to list that while being upfront about PGPR.

Wax or processed castor oil, I still don't like Hershey's chocolate.

little*bit
05-14-2007, 11:37 AM
My question is this...
The third ingredient in Milk Chocolate is "chocolate". What exactly is it made of?
It seems you could hide a lot of questionable materials under that generic title.


Ingredients: Milk chocolate (sugar; milk; chocolate; cocoa butter; lactose; milk fat; soy lecithin and PGPR, emulsifiers; and vanillin;, artificial flavor) and almonds (roasted in cocoa butter and sunflower oil).

Jeep's Phoenix
05-14-2007, 11:43 AM
And Hershey's Kisses are the worst candy foisted on humans, ever. Yuck.
Not quite...I can't access it from here, but there used to be a Bad Candy website where the authors sampled foreign (mostly Mexican) candies. Products containing/flavored like tamarind consistently rated as the worst.

Telemark
05-14-2007, 12:19 PM
My question is this...
The third ingredient in Milk Chocolate is "chocolate". What exactly is it made of?
It seems you could hide a lot of questionable materials under that generic title.
Not true. The definition of "chocolate" is rather exacting.
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/candy.html

BrainGlutton
05-14-2007, 12:29 PM
What the hell is wrong with Hershey's chocolate?


The prevailing theory is that it loses something indefinable on its trip down the Hershey Highway.

What?

CalMeacham
05-14-2007, 12:32 PM
I wasn't sure if you meant you didn't believe 80% (which also seems crazy to me) but I would definitely believe any paraffin, er, some paraffin. It's not at all uncommon to add paraffin to chocolate when making candy or other desserts at home - adding a small amount of paraffin helps melted chocolate "set" nicer - less sticky and more glossy.

Both. The 80% figure is ludicrous -- it would act more like a block of paraffin than like chocolate.

And, while I know that people add paraffin (and odder things) tio cjocolate for such uses as you describe, I find it hard to believe that they add it to Hershey's chocolate bars.



And, yes, my understanding is that the ingredients must be listed on the label in decreasing order of constituency. I don't know if it's weight or volume.


And, on looking at the list of ingredients, it seems clear that they're saying "soy lecithin or PGPR as emulsifier. That wouldn't seem to leave you with much wiggle room for paraffin. (Although I grant that PGPR doesn't sound inviting, but there shouldn't be a lot of e,mulsifier in a bar.)

TLDRIDKJKLOLFTW
05-14-2007, 01:34 PM
I've had chocolate from all over the world, and I've had "designer" chocolate bars like those by Dagobah and Vosges. Hershey's is still one of my favorites for good, basic milk chocolate.

Now Lindt and Dove, that's some soapy bullshit... :D

CalMeacham
05-14-2007, 01:39 PM
I've had chocolate from all over the world, and I've had "designer" chocolate bars like those by Dagobah and Vosges.




You can get chocolate from the Star Wars universe?



Cooooool!


..

Swallowed My Cellphone
05-14-2007, 01:52 PM
I hate Hershey's chocolate. I think of it as "brown wax" with sugar.

TLDRIDKJKLOLFTW
05-14-2007, 02:14 PM
You can get chocolate from the Star Wars universe?



Cooooool!


..

Oops, it's Dagoba, no H. But I still make Yoda jokes whenever I eat it.

pizzabrat
05-14-2007, 02:46 PM
The secret behind Hershey's is that it's an early-in-life acquired taste. Its unique flavor is intentional. Unfortunately for Hershey, its country of origin isn't high on the international roster in terms of culinary respect, so no one outside of our borders is going to take the pains to cultivate a tongue for the sour milk twang of Hershey's in their adulthood (like they probably would if it were a French product) - you'd get no social cache for doing so.

Least Original User Name Ever
05-14-2007, 02:47 PM
Hershey's is the quintessential American chocolate. It isn't horrible (to this American, at least), just sweet and kind of bland, if indeed chocolate can be bland. It's the Bud Light of chocolate: bland, inoffensive and formulated for mass appeal.


I think that's it right there. Hershey's is fine. There's certainly better chocolate out there. Hershey's would probably be in the middle of the pack.

A person I used to work with swore that the Wonka bar was the best of the mass-produced chocolate he ate. He said that the paraffin content was much lower in that bar than others. I don't know if that's true (with the paraffin, at least), but there ya go.

I also wish to say that Godiva has gone downhill in the past 10 years as well.

pizzabrat
05-14-2007, 02:57 PM
Hershey's is the quintessential American chocolate. It isn't horrible (to this American, at least), just sweet and kind of bland, if indeed chocolate can be bland. It's the Bud Light of chocolate: bland, inoffensive and formulated for mass appeal.But it IS offensive. These people aren't having such a strong reaction over something that's merely uninspiring. The classic recipe of Hershey's purposefully exhibits a sour milk aftertaste. If you didn't grow up with that, it's easy to find it "nasty".

Acsenray
05-14-2007, 03:08 PM
I am an American and I get a strong ... I don't know how to describe it ... gamey (?) taste from Hershey's chocolate. It tastes like it was made from spoiled milk. Horrible. Horrible. Horrible.

In my experience, any other chocolate is better than Hershey's. I don't get a similar flavor from M&M Mars or any other company's chocolate.

TimeWinder
05-14-2007, 03:14 PM
The authoritative cite link is dead, unfortunately, but according to this page:

http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=31004

Not only does Hershey's not use paraffin in their chocolate, but the FDA has not even approved it as a food additive. A search on "FDA paraffin additive food" shows that in fact it is approved for gums, but it's not clear about chocolate.

None of these are as authoritative as I'd like, but combined with the ingredient list, it seems to be a myth that Hershey's uses paraffin in their products.

Acsenray
05-14-2007, 03:24 PM
In The Emperors of Chocolate, author Joel Glenn Brenner quotes rival chocolate makers as saying things such as --

-- "Everyone knows Hershey used spoiled milk to make his chocolate. That's what makes it so raunchy."

-- "Milton Hershey completely ruined the American palate with his sour, gritty chocolate."

Common Tater
05-14-2007, 03:39 PM
There are some things one doesn't mess with - ice cream and chocolate are two examples. The manufacturers are ever wanting to define them down and use ersatz to cheapen them.

Milk Chocolate is different because the cocoa butter is first removed from the chocolate nibs and then returned to the finished product. I think current definition must be at least 15 per cent cocoa butter.

Next, in a process called conching, the chocolate is ground in huge containers with large ball bearings. This takes hours and time=money, the finer chocolates are ground down to silky smooth but lesser quality brands are not.

CalMeacham
05-14-2007, 04:00 PM
I'm astonished by all these claims that Hershey's chocolate is gritty. It seems to be a given.

I grew up on Hershey's, as I've stated, and I would never have thought of using "gritty" to describe its texture. I cannot imagine it being at all accurate now.

I had a Hershey bar at lunch today, so the experience is fresh in my mind (and mouth). Gritty? Have you people ever actually eaten a Hershey bar?

jjimm
05-14-2007, 04:07 PM
Hershey's would probably be in the middle of the pack.I think you'd have a hard time finding anything below it - certainly from the larger manufacturers.

ETA: "Gritty" is exactly how I describe it.

awldune
05-14-2007, 04:19 PM
I'm astonished by all these claims that Hershey's chocolate is gritty. It seems to be a given.

IMO the grit is much more noticable in Hershey's Kisses, especially when they aren't very fresh. Nothing is worse than the 6-month-old Kisses in the candy dish at my Grandparents' house.

Actually I would say 'grainy' is a better description than 'gritty'. It's like the chocolate is cut with gypsum.

I think you'd have a hard time finding anything below it - certainly from the larger manufacturers.

I wouldn't say that M&Ms are any better.

Shirley Ujest
05-14-2007, 05:14 PM
I have three friends, none of who know each other, that are from England, Sweden and Germany.

Every one of them has said that Hershey's smells like dog shit.


After three independent and vigorous comments like that, I cannot touch the stuff anymore.

Gangster Octopus
05-14-2007, 05:18 PM
While I don't hate Hershey's, all it tok was my english roommate to introduce me to Flake to realize how inferior it is.

Delly
05-14-2007, 05:29 PM
Ive grown up eating Cadburys UK choclate and I didnt notice that much of a difference between it and Hersheys.

That being said Lindt and Galaxy chocolate are soo much nicer!

Anyone ever hear of the Henry bar? Who makes it?

Rubystreak
05-14-2007, 05:36 PM
I had a Hershey bar at lunch today, so the experience is fresh in my mind (and mouth). Gritty? Have you people ever actually eaten a Hershey bar?

Yes, it's gritty, compared to quality chocolate. OR maybe a better way to say it is, it's not as smooth as really good chocolate, where is feels silky and gives no resistance in the mouth. Hershey's is definitely an inferior chocolate in both flavor and texture. There's really no denying it. That's not to say people can't like and enjoy it for what it is, but what it is... ain't Godiva or Lindt or Ghirardelli.

gladtobeblazed
05-14-2007, 05:38 PM
I grew up near the Hershey factory in Oakdale, California and used to go on the tours. They give out fresh candy and it was sublime.

TimeWinder
05-14-2007, 05:38 PM
Hershey's is definitely an inferior chocolate in both flavor and texture. There's really no denying it.

Seems to be plenty of folks denying it in this very thread.

eleanorigby
05-14-2007, 05:44 PM
There's chocolate and then there's chocolate. I dont' mind a Hershey with Almonds bar, but dislike plain Hershey's. I do like H in s'mores (a summer ritual over here), but not for anything else. Hershey choc chips are also bad for choc chip cookies, IMO. There is a graininess to it, but also a waxiness, too.

I have found that chocolate in Europe (or at least UK) is not as sweet, but is smoother and melts more in the mouth--perhaps a reflection of the butterfat content? Or the conching?

But when I need chocolate--I'll take Hershey's, if nothing else is available. What I won't take is Godiva or Fannie Mae etc--I dislike fruit filling/ liquer and chocolate together.

Telemark
05-14-2007, 06:20 PM
Seems to be plenty of folks denying it in this very thread.
And the sales figures are pretty persuasive as well. Same with Bud. It's pretty easy to look down your nose at them and say it's for the people who don't know any better, but it's wicked popular and they make lots of money selling it. Both companies know their market and sell to it.

CalMeacham
05-14-2007, 06:24 PM
Pepper Mill agrees with you about the grittiness of Hershey's (but not about the taste -- she likes it), and suggested I try some of her Mother's Day Hershey's kisses alongside Dove promises.

So I did.

I swear that I don't taste any grittiness -- even with Hershey's kisses, supposedly the worst of the lot.

pizzabrat
05-14-2007, 06:31 PM
And the sales figures are pretty persuasive as well. Same with Bud. It's pretty easy to look down your nose at them and say it's for the people who don't know any better, but it's wicked popular and they make lots of money selling it. Both companies know their market and sell to it.Like I said, if Hershey's were French, people would be aspiring to acquire a palate for it. And those who appreciated it would be snobs for it.

ryobserver
05-14-2007, 06:47 PM
In The Emperors of Chocolate, author Joel Glenn Brenner quotes rival chocolate makers as saying things such as --

-- "Everyone knows Hershey used spoiled milk to make his chocolate. That's what makes it so raunchy."

-- "Milton Hershey completely ruined the American palate with his sour, gritty chocolate."

She doesn't just quote rivals. She reports that the process Milton Hershey developed to condense milk (milk must be condensed before it can be mixed with chocolate) does, indeed, allow "the lipase enzymes in the milk to break down the remaining milk fat and produce flavorful free fatty acids. In other words, it was slightly soured." (p. 109) Milton Hershey may never have noticed the problem; by the time he retired his sense of taste was shot (his staff realized this, if he didn't), and no one knows how early the deterioration began.

Brenner's book should be read by all chocolate freaks.

Oh, and I like Hershey bars, too. Even knowing they're made with sour milk, I like them. De gustibus non est disputandum, and if there's room in the world for coffee and chile peppers (both of which I loathe), there's room for sour chocolate. If it was introduced as a new product by some high-end chocolatier it would probably be hailed as "piquant" and "provocative".

pizzabrat
05-14-2007, 07:06 PM
I'm so easily influenced I had to go out and get a beautiful bloomless classic Hershey's bar after reading this and relish my fortune of American bred taste buds.

I must admit, its signature twang does get a bit trying by the end of the bar. Maybe they should sell half-sizes somewhere.

Catamount
05-14-2007, 07:10 PM
What the hell is wrong with Hershey's? As many others have said before I came here, it's American. "Everyone" knows Americans have no taste for the gourmet. If it were Swiss or French, people would be paying umpteen dollars per bar for it's "piquant" taste.

Or maybe the problem is Hershey's doesn't charge enough. The price seems to be what convinces some people that a chocolate is première quality. I present Noka Chocolates (http://www.dallasfood.org/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=78) as an example.

Rubystreak
05-14-2007, 07:28 PM
Seems to be plenty of folks denying it in this very thread.

I don't see how they can. Maybe it's not gritty like sand in the mouth, but it's got a clay/dirt feel to it. Empirically, it's not as smooth in the mouth as better quality chocolates. I'd imagine it was quantifiable somehow, but that's out of my area. Hershey's is better than those hollow chocolate Easter bunnies and stuff like that, but it's 55 cents a bar and doesn't taste as good as the higher-quality stuff made with better ingredients. You get what you pay for.

I'm not saying it can't be enjoyed if you like the texture and taste. It's a matter of preference. I use them for s'mores, but I wouldn't sit down and eat one, because to me, it's not eatin' chocolate. I'd rather pay more for better flavor and texture.

ouryL
05-14-2007, 07:35 PM
Hersey's chocolate is made with sour milk, hence the flavor.

Your Ad Here
05-14-2007, 08:42 PM
I have three friends, none of who know each other, that are from England, Sweden and Germany.

Every one of them has said that Hershey's smells like dog shit.


After three independent and vigorous comments like that, I cannot touch the stuff anymore.
Honest question, to which I'd appreciate an honest answer:

Surely (heh) you'd consumed a Hershey bar or two in your youth and young adulthood, before you'd met these folks. I'm also assuming you're an adult now. Before these comments were made by your friends, how'd you feel about the simple run of the mill Hershey bar?

Also, to anyone caliming it, is there any actual evidence that Hershey uses sour milk in there product? Wouldn't the milk "sour" through the heating process in all chocolates? I'm not necessarily disputing the claim, I'm just having a hard time swallowing it, unlike some of you and a Hershey bar...

Thanks in advance.

Malienation
05-14-2007, 08:54 PM
Best candy bar ever: Three Musketeers. And it's nice and big to boot! What more do you want out of a candy bar? Not only that, the local Safeway has them on sale, 3 for $.99 through tuesday. Get 'em while they last.

El_Kabong
05-14-2007, 09:35 PM
I think whoever said something about the texture of your common- or garden- variety Hershey Bar was right on: it's weird, and I don't like it. I don't mind the almond versions, however, and Hershey's Kisses are all right with me, as they seem to be a bit firmer than the standard bar.

The gold standard for commercial chocolate bars for me, however, is Cote d'Or, natch, especially the hazelnut variety. Every time I go to Europe (which this year, looks to be several times) I stock up.

Quiddity Glomfuster
05-14-2007, 09:36 PM
Like I said, if Hershey's were French, people would be aspiring to acquire a palate for it. And those who appreciated it would be snobs for it.
Pshaw. The only Hershey plant I knew about for a long time was the Canadian one. Were I to be the sort of person to be favourably inclined towards a food based on its origin, then I'd like Hershey. I'm not, and the stuff is horrible.

This isn't about sociology; it's just about what tastes good and what doesn't; Hershey chocolate falls into the second category.

MrFantsyPants
05-14-2007, 09:39 PM
Well, I've been to the original Hershey Factory in Hershey, PA, and to the original Cadbury factory in Birmingham, UK. To me, a fresh-off-the-line Hershey bar was still 'meh'. Not really good enough to justify the calories. A fresh UK Cadbury Dairy Milk bar was utterly brilliant. The best chocolate i've had anywhere.

Apparently, in addition to the ingredients added to prolong shelf life in North America, in the UK, they are allowed to have more milk ingredients in there, and still call it chocolate.

And let me say, getting access to the Cadbury employee store was a happy time. 200g bars of dairy milks for 20p, one could easily go a little nuts.

pizzabrat
05-14-2007, 09:43 PM
Best candy bar ever: Three Musketeers. And it's nice and big to boot! What more do you want out of a candy bar? Not only that, the local Safeway has them on sale, 3 for $.99 through tuesday. Get 'em while they last.
Wha?! It's just a log of puffy brown stuff covered with a thin veneer of solid chocolate. It feels like a cheap dupe.

Rubystreak
05-14-2007, 10:23 PM
Like I said, if Hershey's were French, people would be aspiring to acquire a palate for it. And those who appreciated it would be snobs for it.

Are you seriously suggesting that people who don't like Hershey's and think there's better tasting, better textured chocolate are only saying that because it's cheap and they're snobs? I assure you, if I could love Hershey's as much as Lindt, for the price, I'd gladly just eat Hershey's. It's simply not as good IMO. Trust me, I'm a cheapskate quite thrifty, but when I want some good chocolate, it's worth it to get the good stuff. I feel the same way about coffee.

Cluricaun
05-14-2007, 10:46 PM
While I don't hate Hershey's, all it tok was my english roommate to introduce me to Flake to realize how inferior it is.

I don't really eat much candy, but when I'm in the mood for chocolate, I'd step over my mother for a Flake. God they're messy, but damn they're good.

pulykamell
05-14-2007, 10:59 PM
Best candy bar ever: Three Musketeers. And it's nice and big to boot! What more do you want out of a candy bar? Not only that, the local Safeway has them on sale, 3 for $.99 through tuesday. Get 'em while they last.

I always wondered who ate 3 Musketeers...Can't stand the things myself. Gimme a Snickers bar any day.

CairoCarol
05-15-2007, 03:41 AM
When I moved to the Caroline Islands and started consuming dairy products from Australia instead of the US, they tasted a little odd to me. Whether or not it was true, we all believed that Australian cows ate different feed from American cows, and thus the resultant milk was different in flavor. This was said to affect the taste of milk chocolate as well.

We got Cadbury's milk chocolate from Australia and at first I didn't like it so well as a good old American chocolate bar like Hershey's ... now I much prefer Cadbury's, period, wherever it was produced.

Whether the feed-affecting-the-taste-of-the-milk story is true or not I have no idea, and even if it is, this should have no bearing on what sort of dark chocolate you like.

jjimm
05-15-2007, 04:38 AM
Like I said, if Hershey's were French, people would be aspiring to acquire a palate for it. And those who appreciated it would be snobs for it.Yes, just like they do for horse meat and fromage de tête...

Sometimes, you know, things can actually be dismissed or liked on their own merits. At the low-budget end, for example, I find Californian wine way more palatable than French. Not everyone's an idiot.

Alessan
05-15-2007, 05:09 AM
So... no love for Milka?

Ceejaytee
05-15-2007, 08:49 AM
So... no love for Milka?

I was just going to mention Milka. Yum! I grew up with Hershey's (with almonds, the only good kind). Then I lived for 6 months in Germany with a host family, and the lady of the house put these giant Milka milk chocolate bars on our beds to welcome us to her house. That was great stuff! I ate Milka the entire time I was there and I brought some home. (I just went to their website to discover they are owned by Kraft Foods, but they have no US website.)

I'm not a chocolate connoisseur; I like milk chocolate and hate dark chocolate, but as milk chocolates go, Hershey's pretty much sucks. I prefer the creamier chocolates like Milka, Dove, and Cadbury. My husband, who IS a chocolate connoisseur, thinks the Hershey's new special dark chocolates are okay but not particularly special. These days I buy the dark chocolate kisses, because my kids like them and my husband will eat them if he has a severe chocolate craving and he hasn't been baking recently. Neither one of us will eat milk chocolate kisses anymore.

I wish Hershey's was better. Their Symphony chocolates are much better than their regular chocolate, but not as good as Dove.

Liberal
05-15-2007, 09:01 AM
I like Hershey's chocolate. I like Campbell's condensed soups. And I like American cheese. So there! :p

CalMeacham
05-15-2007, 09:13 AM
I like Hershey's chocolate. I like Campbell's condensed soups. And I like American cheese. So there!



See, I eat American cheese and Campbell's soups, especially if they're what's there and we're in a hurry or something. I recognize their limitations, though, and given my druthers I'd eat real cheese instead of a bland and/or somewhat artificial substitute, or homemade/better quality soup.


But Hershey's doesn't taste in any way to me inferior as chocolate. And I still don't get the "gritty".





(And I like New York wines, even over California wines.)

Harmonious Discord
05-15-2007, 09:32 AM
Hersey's is only good for coloring in a book. It's so god awful waxy. Almost any other brand is better. Don't judge American chochlate by one cheap ass brand.

Mangetout
05-15-2007, 09:45 AM
Hmmm. If Hershey's were French....

I think if Hershey's were French, the French public would have burned the factory to the ground.

Quiddity Glomfuster
05-15-2007, 09:56 AM
I don't really eat much candy, but when I'm in the mood for chocolate, I'd step over my mother for a Flake. God they're messy, but damn they're good.
At the risk of being branded a heretic for all time, I dislike Flake even more. Same sour/bitter/chemical-y taste plus all the charming mouth feel of sawdust. I bought a couple because of all the raves here, eagerly bit into the first, and thought 'wow is that ever nasty!' I don't know what the appeal is.

Liberal
05-15-2007, 10:17 AM
See, I eat American cheese and Campbell's soups, especially if they're what's there and we're in a hurry or something.Mmm... Campbell's tomato soup and a grilled cheese sammich. Mmm...

CalMeacham
05-15-2007, 10:19 AM
Mmm... Campbell's tomato soup and a grilled cheese sammich. Mmm...


With a Hershey Bar for dessert?

Liberal
05-15-2007, 10:22 AM
With a Hershey Bar for dessert?:D With almonds!

Catamount
05-15-2007, 10:32 AM
I will say this for Hershey's: it's better than the chocolate-oatmeal drop cookies in my fridge right now. I either didn't add enough butter or too much oatmeal or both, but those are the dryest lumps I've ever made. And I have to eat them because I made them and it's the only sweet in my house right now.

And Duplin County wine (http://www.duplinwinery.com/) is better than both NY and California wines. :p

Philster
05-15-2007, 10:42 AM
Hershey's now offers "Hershey Whole Bean" Chocolate and "Cacao [sic] Reserve" Signature line of chocolate, which appears to be a series of four high-end chocolates. So that's five seperate chocolates they are making and marketting as more sophisticated.

Based on their ads, they appear to be more pure, more upscale, etc. Taste will tell.

Hershey's knows the deal. The make Chocolate candy that Americans are used to, but they know the chocolate industry and all that goes into growing, buying and using the ingredients and whay kind of product can be had and at what price. They know they make candy, and they know that they need a different chocolate if they want to talk about real chocolate and the market creep by other brands. With mega-supermarkets everywhere in the USA, American consumers are finding all sorts of variety...and showing they are willing to pay a little more for real chocolate.

Tibidabo
05-15-2007, 10:47 AM
At the risk of being branded a heretic for all time, I dislike Flake even more. Same sour/bitter/chemical-y taste plus all the charming mouth feel of sawdust. I bought a couple because of all the raves here, eagerly bit into the first, and thought 'wow is that ever nasty!' I don't know what the appeal is.


:eek: Wiiittcchh!!!!

nah i'm not the biggest fan of Flakes either, but they're still in a different league. I'd eat a Flake.

I suppose I'd eat a Hershey in some sort of survival situation. Probably slightly more nutritious than eating clay, even if they taste the same :)

nevermore
05-15-2007, 11:16 AM
just popping in to say

1) Hershey's is "normal" chocolate. Not mouthwatering orgasm chocolate like the great majority of foreign chocolates I have tasted; just plain, ordinary chocolate. Sometimes, I want ridiculous, complex, indescribable chocolate. Sometimes, I want something I don't have to think about.

2) If you decide to join (and by all means, do), please don't pick that username :(

CairoCarol
05-15-2007, 11:21 AM
Originally posted by Alessan:
So... no love for Milka?

Actually, I was blissfully eating a Milka chocolate bar produced in Germany when I wrote my first post in this thread. Didn't mention it in the name of brevity. But I found it good.

Acsenray
05-15-2007, 11:47 AM
1) Hershey's is "normal" chocolate. Not mouthwatering orgasm chocolate like the great majority of foreign chocolates I have tasted; just plain, ordinary chocolate.

It seems to me that the testimony here tends to show that to anyone who did not become accustomed to eating Hershey's as a child, it's not just "normal," unexceptional chocolate. There's something unusual about its flavor, what Brenner quotes as being described as a "raunchy" flavor.

Sometimes, I want ridiculous, complex, indescribable chocolate. Sometimes, I want something I don't have to think about.

And I think that much of the chocolate mentioned here, including M&M, Cadbury's, etc. is run-of-the-mill, downmarket chocolate that doesn't have Hershey's "raunchy" character.

Liberal
05-15-2007, 12:02 PM
2) If you decide to join (and by all means, do), please don't pick that username :(Very funny! :D I've seen sequential threads, but maybe a sequential users would be interesting!

For those who missed it, Nevermore responded to Quoth the Raven. :)

pulykamell
05-15-2007, 12:19 PM
just popping in to say

1) Hershey's is "normal" chocolate.

Well, no. Hershey's is milk chocolate which, IMHO, is an abomination onto the chocolate loving world. OK, I exaggerate and I will eat milk chocolate and even enjoy it from time to time, but it's not the yardstick under which other chocolates should be judged. For me (and I suspect a lot of the world), chocolate without milk is normal chocolate, and milk chocolate is a variation on this.

nevermore
05-15-2007, 01:01 PM
well, I should have said normal MILK chocolate, then. anyway, to me it is. I know it's not top shelf even of that category, but to my humble tongue, it doesn't taste weird at all.

Very funny! :D I've seen sequential threads, but maybe a sequential users would be interesting!

For those who missed it, Nevermore responded to Quoth the Raven. :)

multiply your reaction by hundreds of posters in hundreds of threads, and you see why I requested of this person that he/she not keep the name.

(...dammit, I existed first!)

Count Blucher
05-15-2007, 01:29 PM
I've had the full spectrum of chocolates. Most chocolate (especially that disgusting imported stuff) is so sickly sweet it needs to be chased with a shot of insulin. That or you can hear the person's teeth rotting out of their heads afterwards. I prefer Hershey's to others exactly because its not so sickeningly sweet. I've been to Hershey, PA many times and yes it does taste better fresh. I eat much less chocolate now than I used to, but when I do, I have a Hershey bar (with almonds). I smile afterwards with all 32 of my adult American teeth. :D

(PS- as for the 'powdery' coverings on chocolate, that doesn't happen unless the chocolate bar has gone stale. According to this website (http://www.romolochocolates.com/news/goodchocolate.htm) (last two sentances) that can happen in less than a year. Still, that's the retailer's fault, not the factory's fault.)

lowbrass
05-15-2007, 02:33 PM
I think Hershey is every bit as good as any snooty European brand of chocolate. The fact that the criticisms are all over the map should tell you something: It's waxy (proven false), it has no flavor, it has too much flavor, it's too soft, it's too gritty, it's not soft, it's not gritty....

I think people just want to hate it.

Harmonious Discord
05-15-2007, 03:34 PM
No it is waxy, that's the reaction my tounge has to it. It's a texture thing. It's tasty as those Holloween wax lips. I could live without chocolate if a Hershey bar was the only option.

goldenmean1975
05-15-2007, 04:08 PM
I'm glad to see someone agree with me!!! It sucks. I think it smells and tastes like what I imagine dog sh*t tastes like.

Especially Hershey kisses. I call them hershey squirts for the above stated reason.

lowbrass
05-15-2007, 04:12 PM
No it is waxy, that's the reaction my tounge has to it. It's a texture thing. It's tasty as those Holloween wax lips. I could live without chocolate if a Hershey bar was the only option.
What brand of chocolate do you like?

Quiddity Glomfuster
05-15-2007, 04:26 PM
Especially Hershey kisses. I call them hershey squirts for the above stated reason.
And you have to be nice to people who give them to you to be nice to you. I always tell them I'm saving the goodies for later and then give them to someone who doesn't know the person who gave them to me.

I will say, though, that the Cookies 'n Cream bar is kinda tasty every once in a long while - but then it's white chocolate so doesn't have any of the gritty bitter effect.

Tibidabo
05-15-2007, 06:30 PM
multiply your reaction by hundreds of posters in hundreds of threads, and you see why I requested of this person that he/she not keep the name.

(...dammit, I existed first!)



Ahahaha nice to meet you, nevermore! :) Believe it or not I actually wanted to be nevermore but it was taken, so i chose the next best thing. Which was actually a bit stupid in hindsight, it somehow escaped me that if it was taken then you obviously existed, and my alternative was still quasi identity-theft. :smack:

You'll have to put up with me for another two weeks or so, but if and when I join, I'll change, I promise :)

And I understand that it would get annoying eventually, but it was kinda fun to see nevermore quoting quoth the raven :D

Anyway, to summarize, I'm not a stalker, just slow-witted. Sorry!

Harmonious Discord
05-15-2007, 07:15 PM
What brand of chocolate do you like?

Cadbury, Russell Stovers, even Sams Club Dutch chocolate. I like most brands unless made by Hershey or Palmers (Easter Candy). There is worse than Hershey, there is Palmer.

Common Tater
05-15-2007, 07:40 PM
For a mass produced (Kraft anyone?) chocolate, Milka is pretty good. I like the plain milk chocolate "alpine"; and the "happy cow" version - combination "white" and milk chocolate. One thing - I've always thought it a crime to add certain items to chocolate. Almonds are an improvement, while Raisins are an abomination - they detract from the chocolate, and if I wanted Raisins, I'd get a box.

Sapo
05-15-2007, 08:31 PM
Hershey's is not chocolate. Sorry. It is nasty, crumbly, sweet, unchocolatey, sweet and turd coloured. *shudders* I wouldn't have it after a year without chocolate.

Give me some dark venezuelan chocolate any day.

Intravenus De Milo
05-15-2007, 11:17 PM
I hate it.
And Hershey's Kisses are the worst candy foisted on humans, ever. Yuck.
Oh, come now. What about Circus Peanuts? Twizzlers? (gecchhh, I hate those things, and even if I liked licorice, I don't think it's supposed to taste like THAT) Now & Laters? (Starburst's inedible cousin) Pixy Stix? (it's just glorified sugar, after all) Well, I suppose everyone has a different opinion, but if you've really never experienced anything worse than a Hershey's kiss, then consider yourself lucky.

Personally, I think Nestle chocolate on its own tastes worse than Hershey's. It seems stale to me for some reason even if it's freshly bought. Hershey's is a little grainy, but it has a certain bite to it that I find appealing. I prefer the taste of Lindt, but that stuff melts way too fast, so it's hard to keep some for later unless you stick it in the fridge. Then again, I prefer the truffles, which may be pre-disposed to melting. Cadbury (the British import kind) is pretty good as well, but only one or two stores in my area carry the real stuff, so I don't get it often.

Tibidabo
05-16-2007, 03:57 AM
Has anybody here had a Cadbury's Creme Egg in both the Uk/Ireland and the US? Apparently in the states it's made under licence by Hershey. Not sure if I'd trust them with the goo on the inside

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadbury_Creme_Egg

Count Blucher
05-17-2007, 09:24 AM
Personally, I think Nestle chocolate on its own tastes worse than Hershey's.

Nestles is like brown solidified bacon grease; its too soft and formless, which feels disgusting on the tongue. That, and it gets on everything, much like paint. It has no character and no originality (and if it had any less cohesiveness, it could be sucked up through a straw).

Mangetout
05-17-2007, 10:32 AM
To me, the reason it seems gritty is because it's waxy (at least in part) - it just doesn't seem to melt in the mouth, leaving you to chew it up into gritty little unmelted pieces.

ralph124c
05-17-2007, 11:00 AM
Aero Chocolate bars are cheap, but they avoid the grittiness (by blowing air into the chcolate). The result is a decent-tasting chocolate-which is mostly air! But tastes better than hershey's.

nevermore
05-17-2007, 11:13 AM
Ahahaha nice to meet you, nevermore! :) Believe it or not I actually wanted to be nevermore but it was taken, so i chose the next best thing. Which was actually a bit stupid in hindsight, it somehow escaped me that if it was taken then you obviously existed, and my alternative was still quasi identity-theft. :smack:

You'll have to put up with me for another two weeks or so, but if and when I join, I'll change, I promise :)

And I understand that it would get annoying eventually, but it was kinda fun to see nevermore quoting quoth the raven :D

Anyway, to summarize, I'm not a stalker, just slow-witted. Sorry!

hehehe, no harm done. and if you're really attached to the name, keep it! actually, you're probably better-known on these boards than I am already, and I've been here nearly seven years. I don't consider it identity-theft or anything, it's just... a little too cutesy. It's like having the screenname Barbie, and then someone named Ken joins, and then you have to put up with bad jokes for the rest of your membership. but even if that's the case, it's not THAT big a deal. :)

ftr, now Quoth the Raven has actually quoted nevermore, too :p

Scumpup
05-17-2007, 11:53 AM
I think people just want to hate it.

I think you're right.

Tibidabo
05-17-2007, 03:57 PM
ralph124c , yes they still make Aero, I had a mint Aero this morning!! :) hardly the finest of chocolate, I mean you're sick of it by the end, but it's alright.

lowbrass, maybe some people do love to hate it, but I honestly had no reason to! I paid €2 for the bloody thing, I'd have preferred if was good! And I was completely unbiased; to my knowledge the only time I had ever even heard of a Hershey bar was in the film Empire of the Sun!

"Hey kid wanna Hershey bar?
- Yes please
- So would I kid, ya got one?"

There, see? Two people wanting a Hershey Bar. I was lead to believe it would be good :mad:

And thank you nevermore, downright decent of you to offer but you're right about the cutesy, I will change it

Mangetout
05-18-2007, 06:13 AM
I second QtR - I paid a premium price for my imported Hershey products and I wanted to like them, but they just seemed awful to me. I don't want to hate Hershey chocolate, but the product itself makes me dislike it. I wouldn't even bother mentioning it if not for the perplexity characterised by people who seem to like it.

CalMeacham
05-18-2007, 07:04 AM
I wouldn't even bother mentioning it if not for the perplexity characterised by people who seem to like it.


Yep -- color me "perplexed". And don't hedge with them weasel words -- I don't "seem" to like it, I do like it. Just had a bar yesterday. What I don't understand are the people who seem to hate it.

TimeWinder
05-18-2007, 09:54 AM
With all due respect, would this thread still be going on if we were talking about rutabagas? It's a food: some people like it, some don't. How that can be such a befuddlement to folks escapes me.

CalMeacham
05-18-2007, 09:55 AM
With all due respect, would this thread still be going on if we were talking about rutabagas? It's a food: some people like it, some don't. How that can be such a befuddlement to folks escapes me.

We might, if it was European rutabagas vs. the Giant American conglomerate rutabagas.

Jeep's Phoenix
05-18-2007, 11:52 AM
With all due respect, would this thread still be going on if we were talking about rutabagas? It's a food: some people like it, some don't. How that can be such a befuddlement to folks escapes me.
I guess rutabagas don't hold such sentimental value for some people. ;)

While I enjoyed Hershey's as a child, I haven't had a Hershey bar in seven years or so, and have no desire for one. My favorite chocolate now is Wilbur's (a small company in Maine). When it gets too hot for that to be shipped, I rely on Lindt. Harry & David chocolate is pretty good too, but I have to drive to Smithfield to find it.

tim314
05-18-2007, 01:30 PM
PGPR? Yum, yum! Cheaper chocolate through chemistry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PGPR).
Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate (PGPR), E476, is an emulsifier made from castor beansRicin poisoning can be had from eating castor beans, the source of castor oil — the symptoms build slowly and gruesomely (basically your arteries plug up), culminating in death in a week or so. If injected or inhaled, a bit of ricin the size of a pin head could kill you.today's column (http://www.straightdope.com/columns/070518.html)

(Bolding mine in both cases.)

I guess this gives a whole new meaning to the phrase "Death by Chocolate." :D

pulykamell
05-18-2007, 02:11 PM
We might, if it was European rutabagas vs. the Giant American conglomerate rutabagas.

With all due respect, I don't think that has anything to do with it. I've had mass produced Eastern European (especially Russian) chocolates that were far worse than Hershey's. For me, Hershey's is pretty low on the totem pole of chocolate quality. Both the mouthfeel and taste are off, and, for me, mouthfeel is a big part of what makes great chocolate great.

Mk VII
05-18-2007, 02:29 PM
When my friend worked in Oman Hershey chocolate was the only one they could get out there and when he bit into it the taste took him right back to the war and the candy bars they (as children) used to cadge off the GIs. Quite unlike domestic chocolate.

lowbrass
05-18-2007, 03:32 PM
lowbrass, maybe some people do love to hate it, but I honestly had no reason to! I paid €2 for the bloody thing, I'd have preferred if was good! And I was completely unbiased; to my knowledge the only time I had ever even heard of a Hershey bar was in the film Empire of the Sun!

O.K., fair enough. Just seems odd. I like Cadbury chocolate, but I would say Hershey's is less bland, not more. It actually has quite a strong flavor. It's also more firm in texture, so I don't understand the "too soft" criticism. And someone else actually complained about the color, for crying out loud. Last time I checked, it was brown, which I believe is the color of chocolate. I've had cheap, crappy chocolate, which tends to be waxy and gooey in texture and have no flavor. Hershey's isn't like that, IMO.

elfkin477
05-18-2007, 04:00 PM
Hershey's chocolate is about my least favorite brand; cadbury's and dove are much better, and even nestle's is better. But like other things in life, even the worst isn't so bad. It definitely has a distinctive taste, kind of a grainy feeling in the mouth, too.

Ultraviolet
05-18-2007, 04:45 PM
My main complaint about Hershey's chocolate (especially the Hershey's kisses) is that is has an off taste - kind of bitter and sour - that actually reminds me of vomit. I don't want my mouth to taste like I've just thrown up after I eat a chocolate bar, thanks.

toadspittle
05-18-2007, 05:11 PM
(And I like New York wines, even over California wines.)

Hear hear! Praise for Dr. Frank!

Scumpup
05-18-2007, 08:42 PM
But see, let's go back to the title of the thread. It doesn't ask "Why don't I like Hershey's chocolate?" or "Why do I prefer Dove/Godiva/whatever to Hershey's?" Nope. The OP starts from the premise that there is something wrong with Hershey's and many of the replies were attempts to identify what is "wrong" with the product. How many of the replies were "There's nothing wrong with Hershey's chocolate, but I prefer the following brand for this reason?" So, I think you are seeing a touch of defensiveness from people who like the product because of the perception that you are saying "since there is something wrong with Hershey's, there must be something wrong with anybody who likes it." For my part, I believe I'm detecting the same general feeling from chocolate snobs in this thread that one will find from beer snobs, wine snobs, gun snobs, film snobs, etc. in threads devoted to those topics. I can't get that worked up about chocolate. Now if it was herring we were talking about...

Guinastasia
05-18-2007, 09:46 PM
I like Hershey's, but if you want real chocolate, go with Sarris (http://www.sarriscandies.com/).

psychobunny
05-18-2007, 10:33 PM
I like Hershey's kisses. For me it's mostly about the shape, which contributes to the mouthfeel. That said, they are horrible if they are the slightest bit stale. If they're fresh, they're great. FWIW, though, my favorite kiss-type chocolates used to be Ghirardelli Flicks, which came in a cardboard tube so that they always had a slightly cardboard taste. I would give a lot of money for some cardboard-flavored Flicks. It's sort of my madeleine, I guess.

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