PDA

View Full Version : "I shoulda' stood in bed."


panache45
07-09-2007, 12:10 AM
I used to have an uncle who would occasionally say, "I shoulda' stood in bed." In spite of people pointing out that he wasn't referring to standing in bed, he kept right on saying it. And I occasionally have heard other people say it too.

Where did this odd term originate?

Civil Guy
07-09-2007, 12:17 AM
A (very weakly) humorous variation of "I should have stayed in bed" - okay, I'm speculating, but it seems pretty likely.

Possibly repeated so many times that folks who use it don't even think about where it came from.

Colibri
07-09-2007, 12:36 AM
The phrase here (http://www.answers.com/topic/i-should-have-stood-in-bed) is attributed to fight manager Joe Jacobs in 1935.

The phrase was well enough known to be used as the title of the short-lived Broadway comedy They Should Have Stood in Bed (http://www.ibdb.com/production.asp?ID=1171) in 1942.

Exapno Mapcase
07-09-2007, 12:52 AM
Amazingly enough, we know exactly when and by whom this phrase originated.

Legendary sports reporter Shirley Povich (yes, Maury Povich's father) quoted fight promoter Joe Jacobs (the picturesque character who also coined the phrase "we wuz robbed") when he got out of a sickbed to attend the 1935 World Series between the Tigers and the Cubs on a wet, cold and windy October day. When Povich (or some other reporter with Povich) asked him what he thought of baseball, he replied, "I should have stood in bed." Povich wrote that into a column and the phrase immediately became famous.

Various commentators have said that "stood" for "stayed" is Brooklynese, and Leo Rosten used it as an example of Yiddish, either one applicable to Jacobs.

Monty
07-09-2007, 12:57 AM
Count yourself lucky. The two things I hear quite often from ostensibly native English speakers are:

Her and her friend are downtown.
Him and his friend are playing pool.

The subject noun phrase is my complaint. The predicate in each sentence is only an example.

astorian
07-09-2007, 01:36 AM
Amazingly enough, we know exactly when and by whom this phrase originated.

Legendary sports reporter Shirley Povich (yes, Maury Povich's father) quoted fight promoter Joe Jacobs (the picturesque character who also coined the phrase "we wuz robbed") when he got out of a sickbed to attend the 1935 World Series between the Tigers and the Cubs on a wet, cold and windy October day. When Povich (or some other reporter with Povich) asked him what he thought of baseball, he replied, "I should have stood in bed." Povich wrote that into a column and the phrase immediately became famous.

Various commentators have said that "stood" for "stayed" is Brooklynese, and Leo Rosten used it as an example of Yiddish, either one applicable to Jacobs.

Shirley Povich certainly came before Bugs Bunny, but I'd wager most people who've heard the expression learned of it from Bugs Bunny cartoons.

Gala Matrix Fire
07-09-2007, 06:06 AM
I didn't know where it originated, but I know I heard Daffy Duck sing it in a Bugs Bunny cartoon. I remember arguing with my brother about the lyrics.

Let's see if I can remember the lyrics...

I know I'm really loony tuney
Touched in the head
Please pass the ketchup
I shoulda stood in bed

That's only one verse, or maybe the chorus.

cmkeller
07-09-2007, 09:51 AM
Shirley was a man's name back then?

Or is he a "Boy Named Sue" kind of thing?

Qadgop the Mercotan
07-09-2007, 10:01 AM
Shirley was a man's name back then?

Or is he a "Boy Named Sue" kind of thing?
Some names that were once predominantly used as masculine given names are now primarily feminine given names, including Ashley, Beverly, Carol, Evelyn, Hillary, Jocelyn, Meredith, Nicole, Shirley, Shannon, and Vivian.
from: http://www.answers.com/topic/unisex-name

WoodenTaco
07-09-2007, 10:05 AM
Shirley was a man's name back then?

Or is he a "Boy Named Sue" kind of thing?
Don't call me Shirley!

Malacandra
07-09-2007, 10:15 AM
Call him (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shirley_Crabtree) Shirley!

Exapno Mapcase
07-09-2007, 11:53 AM
IMDb gives a Bugs verse as:

I am getting looney tuney
touched in the head
This whole thing is gooney
I should have stood in bed.

That's from Easter Yeggs, released in 1947. By that time the phrase had been firmly established for 15 years.

Would later generations have picked it up from the cartoon or from general circulation? Impossible to say.