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StGermain
09-29-2007, 11:18 AM
I'm watching the Presidents Cup, but I don'tunderstand it. Can someone give me a rundown on the whole thing?

StG

Lamar Mundane
09-29-2007, 12:48 PM
I'm watching the Presidents Cup, but I don'tunderstand it. Can someone give me a rundown on the whole thing?

StG
Each hole is worth one point. If player A scores a 3 on a hole and player B scores 4, player A gets one point. The same holds if player B scores 17 - player A gets one point. In the case of a tie, no points are awarded. The scores in individual matches are kept in relation to zero - so if player A wins the first three holes and player B wins the next three, the score is "even" as opposed to 3-3. The actual number of strokes taken does not matter in match play - each hole is it's own "tournament" so to speak - once a hole is finished, scores are assigned and both players start from scratch on the next hole. Play continues until one player gains an insurmountable lead - e.g. Player A is ahead by 3 points (holes) and there are only two holes left to play.

The team scores are cumulative. A win is one point, a tie is 1/2 each. If the US were to win all the matches this afternoon, they would win the event since they would be 13 points ahead with only 12 matches left tomorrow.

The individual matches are played as foursomes (two teamates play alternate shots with one ball) then fourball (each player plays their own ball, with the best score counting as the team score). On the last day they play singles, one vs. one for all 12 players.

Simple, really. :)

I can't believe how badly the International team is doing - they are better players overall. I guess they don't really have much to play for, they aren't going to go back home to "Internationalland" as heroes.

StGermain
09-29-2007, 09:02 PM
Thanks, Lamar. So tomorrow they play eighteen holes, but it's like Michelson versus Singh, and the one that wins the eighteen gets one team point?

StG

Least Original User Name Ever
09-29-2007, 09:09 PM
They also have different formats. Best ball, scrambles (not used in this tournament), match play, and stroke play.

I'm not even going to bring the Stableford scoring format into it, even though it's not used in the Presidents' Cup.

BarnOwl
09-29-2007, 09:35 PM
They don't have an Internationaland to go home to, but those guys are intensely competitive. We've had our shitty starts, too, and having a home to go to, and because of that, near total paralysis can set in.

I can't remember the American golfer's name, but years ago in this competition (or the Ryder Cup) he was visibly tightening up as his match got closer and closer to the final holes. You could see it in everything he did. Yet, Johnny Miller, the announcer was inexplicably oblivious to the pending meltdown.

Then, faced with a simple approach shot that any low handicapper in a $10 Nassau could fly to the green, this golfer shanked it miserably.

"Jeez," said Johnny, surprisedly, "I'm gonna have to have a little talk with so-and-so about his short iron game. That was an easy shot " (Words to that effect.)

I like Johnny Miller - as a golfer, and as a golf commentator, but when he said that, I wanted to kick him in the balls.

Anyway, this particular match was in this country, and it worked against that poor bastard whose name I can't recall.

These international competitions are pressure cookers - more than what the pros feel on the regular tour. That's what the pro golfers say, "You're playing for your country."

Ask Tiger. Well maybe you shouldn't. Up to this year, I think his record kinda sucks in President's and Ryder Cups.

Ravenman
09-29-2007, 09:47 PM
nevermind.

Lamar Mundane
09-29-2007, 09:53 PM
Thanks, Lamar. So tomorrow they play eighteen holes, but it's like Michelson versus Singh, and the one that wins the eighteen gets one team point?

StG
Correct.

I think there is a big difference between the Ryder Cup and the President's Cup in terms of pressure. The U.S. used to beat the U.K. (later Europe) like a red-headed stepchild for most of it's existence, but in the last 20 years, Europe has come back. There is a very strong rivalry in the Ryder Cup, not so much in the Presidents Cup, which is relatively new and evenly matched. It would be hard for a team made out of Australians, Canadians, South Africans, South Americans, Asians, Pacific Islanders, etc. to have some sort of common cause, other than beating the Americans.

Lamar Mundane
09-29-2007, 10:14 PM
I can't remember the American golfer's name, but years ago in this competition (or the Ryder Cup) he was visibly tightening up as his match got closer and closer to the final holes. You could see it in everything he did. Yet, Johnny Miller, the announcer was inexplicably oblivious to the pending meltdown.

Then, faced with a simple approach shot that any low handicapper in a $10 Nassau could fly to the green, this golfer shanked it miserably.


I think you are talking about Mark Calcaveccia in 1991 at Kiawah Island - he was four up with four to play against Colin Montgomery and lost all four holes to end up in a tie. The US ended up winning on the final hole of the final match, but Calcaveccia was near suicidal.

BarnOwl
09-30-2007, 12:14 PM
I think you are talking about Mark Calcaveccia in 1991 at Kiawah Island - he was four up with four to play against Colin Montgomery and lost all four holes to end up in a tie. The US ended up winning on the final hole of the final match, but Calcaveccia was near suicidal.

Exactly right. Thank you!