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pezwookiee
11-02-2000, 10:13 PM
I'm looking for a complete history of Lucky Charms Marshmallows. I know they changed the blue diamond and yellow moon to a blue moon. I know the purple horseshoe was added in the 1980's. My dream is to have a complete chronological list of Marshmallows and changes to them (maybe even special edition marshmallows). Can anyone out there help me?!?!?

Green Bean
11-02-2000, 10:25 PM
Why don't you send an email to whichever of the cereal companies makes Lucky Charms? If you get an answer, please post it!

pezwookiee
11-02-2000, 10:40 PM
Originally posted by Green Bean
Why don't you send an email to whichever of the cereal companies makes Lucky Charms? If you get an answer, please post it!

Good call. I just tried it and got this as an automated response:

<<Thank you for your electronic mail message.

It has been forwarded to a customer service representative and will be answered in the order it was received. Our on-line representatives answer electronic mail messages from 7:30AM - 5:30PM Central Time, Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

If you prefer, you may call us during these hours at 1-800-328-1144.

Thank you.>>

CURSES! I don't know if I have the patience for that. Anybody out there wanna contribute to this quest?

Punoqllads
11-02-2000, 11:12 PM
Well, searching for "lucky charms" marshmallow history (http://www.google.com/search?q=%22lucky+charms%22+marshmallows+history&hl=en&lr=&safe=off) on Google gave some pretty good results.

ElwoodCuse
11-02-2000, 11:39 PM
Simpsons hijack

Bart: (picking through Lucky CHarms) Damn FDA, why cant the *all* be marshmallow pieces?

Lisa: Ewww, don't put the non-marshmallow pieces back in the box, throw them away!

They Call Me Sneeze
11-02-2000, 11:55 PM
ElwoodCuse, lisa doesn't tell bart to throw them away, she tells him they GO IN THE TRASH.

sorry to nitpick.

misquoting simpsons is a cardinal sin in my family : )

and to be on topic, i used to buy boxes of lucky charms and seperate all the marshmellows from the regular cereal. repeated experimentation showed that there is approximately one very full plastic baggie of marshmellows in each box.

aenea
11-03-2000, 08:31 AM
Do you have excess time on your hands or what? :D

AWB
11-03-2000, 09:03 AM
Originally posted by They Call Me Sneeze
and to be on topic, i used to buy boxes of lucky charms and seperate all the marshmellows from the regular cereal. repeated experimentation showed that there is approximately one very full plastic baggie of marshmellows in each box.

Boy! And I thought my wife having me sort out the non-green dried split peas from a bag was tedious!

Rhythmdvl
11-03-2000, 09:47 AM
Can you make Rice Crispie squares with LC marshmallows? Bet they'd be out of this world.

Doubleclick
11-03-2000, 11:12 AM
Originally posted by Rhythmdvl
Can you make Rice Crispie squares with LC marshmallows? Bet they'd be out of this world.

I think your assuming that they are marshmallows and not a 'mallow-like' substance...

:D

tracer
11-03-2000, 04:28 PM
I remember...

I remember the Lucky Charms of my youth. (I was born in 1965). It had four marshmallows. I can still hear Lucky the Leprechaun's voice rattling them off in those early commercials: yellow moons
orange stars
pink hearts (said in an "aw, ain't that cute" voice)
green clovers (said with much enthusiasm, for some reason)I remember the day, that wondrous, fateful day out camping, when I got hold of that little snack-pack sized box of Lucky Charms containing the first new marshmallow ever added: blue diamondsFor years, the triumverate of moons, stars, hearts, clovers, and diamonds was all there was to Lucky Charms. I ate them time and again, each time playing the game of getting one of each type of marshmallow onto my spoon at the same time. Usually I would eat the "cereal" pieces first so that by the time I was down to the bottom of the bowl there would be nothing but colored marshmallows left. And then came that dreaded TV commercial:

"What new marshmallow is going to get added to Lucky Charms? And what does a purple horse have to do with it?"

Hmmm ... let's see, what could the new marshmallow possibly be? A purple horse ... a "good luck charm" theme from the cereal's history ... and just in case you had a room-temperature IQ and couldn't figure it out from these clues, the "to be continued" freeze-frame in the TV ad showed Lucky the Leprechaun about to get kicked by the purple horse, with his horseshoe prominently displayed in the foreground. Yep, the new, sixth marshmallow was: purple horseshoesAnd in a way, it fit. Not only were horseshoes a traditional good-luck charm, but purple was the only color of the rainbow not yet included in the Lucky Charms marshmallow oevre.

Or was it?

The six rainbow colors are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple. Lucky Charms had pink hearts, orange stars, yellow moons, green clovers, blue diamonds, and purple horseshoes. But is "pink" really the same as red? In the old days of colored marshmallows, it was. The food coloring back in the days that Lucky Charms was introduced could only "lightly" color a marshmallow. Recall how the "green" clovers were only a faded green, and the "orange" stars were but a faint orange-whitish tint. A deep enough red to have made the pink hearts really red was impossible.

But technology marches forward. Soon, the General Mills team of colored marshmallow engineers had concocted a new food dye that could turn a marshmallow a true red color, not merely pink. Now they could have red hearts instead of merely pink hearts. But by now, the pink hearts were well-established. You can't just change the colors of your traditional marshmallows and expect your loyal, nostalgic followers to stay true to your brand. No. You must create a new marshmallow. And that new marshmallow was: red balloonsBut I'm getting ahead of myself. Before the red balloons were introduced, General Mills tried a little limited-time experiment to boost their sagging Lucky Charms sales. They rearranged the colors of the marshmallows. For a couple of months, Lucky Charms marshmallows consisted of:

blue stars
yellow diamonds
orange moons
purple clovers
green hearts
pink horseshoes

(I think. Actually, I'm only sure about the colors of the stars, diamonds, and moons. It was, after all, for a limited time only.)

After the colors had returned to their original, rightful places, then and only then was the red balloon introduced. And you've gotta wonder. What do balloons have to do with good-luck charms? (Okay, I can also hear you asking what do stars, moons, hearts, and diamonds have to do with good luck charms. The answer is they're suits in a card deck or pagan symbols or other such things associated with superstition. But balloons are just balloons. Nobody reads balloon entrails to try to divine the future, or wears an inflated balloon animal around their neck for good luck.) CLearly, Lucky Charms had begun the long slide downhill away from their original, "pure" theme. We all knew it was only a matter of time before they added Star Wars characters or put Lucky the Leprechaun in an MTV music video or signed a deal with the Children's Television Workshop to introduce "Elmo the Leprechaun." But we persevered. We didn't give up hope. After all, this is Lucky Charms we're talking about here.

Soon after the technology for true red marhsmallows became available, a new breakthrough occurred. It was discovered that you could add the coloring agent to the marshmallow goop before it solidified, and then mix two different colors of liquid marshmallow together into their final mold. Upon discovering this great secret of the universe, General Mills embarked on yet another bold limited edition of Lucky Charms, this one involving:

Two-toned swirled marshmallows in all 7 standard shapes.

Now, I can't for the life of me remember which two colors each of the marshmallows was. But I do remember that each marshmallow shape was the same two colors throughout the box and throughout all the other boxes. I.e. if the first moon you picked up was swirled green and purple, that meant that all the other moons throughout Lucky Charmdom were also green and purple.

And once again, after the swirled colors promotion ended and Lucky Charms marshmallows once again settled back into the normal color and shape combinations, we got a new marshmallow added. This new marshmallow was the boldest yet. It took what the General Mills engineers had learned from their experience with swirled marshmallows, and used it to create a single marshmallow with 3 colors, where each band of color was deliberately shaped rather than randomly swirled. I can just see them slaving over their manufacturing equipment, toiling and tinkering away until they at last hit upon the brilliant combination that allowed three concentric bands of different-colored marshmallow to be poured into a single mold and harden into one unified striped shape. The new, 8th marshmallow was, of course: Blue, yellow, and red colored rainbowsAnd unlike balloons, rainbows were in keeping with the theme of leprechauns and good luck. After all, everyone knows that at the end of a rainbow, you'll find a pot of gold guarded by a leprechaun. General Mills was finally getting back on track. The future of Lucky Charms looked brighter than it had in years.

Then came the biggest revision in the cereal's history. Thanks to the ranbow marshmallow, General Mills now had the technology to make marshmallows with specific areas given specific different colors -- and they went berserk with it. The clovers disappeared and were replaced with light-green leprechaun hats with a dark-green picture of a clover in the middle. The stars disappeared and were replaced with white shooting stars with an orange tail. Orange pots of gold, with a heap of yellow gold visible over the top, were added to the mix. The blue diamond went the way of the Dodo, and the formerly-yellow moon subsumed its blue color.

And as if all that weren't bad enough, the next limited edition of Lucky Charms featured "around the world" marshmallows in shapes and colors never before seen by man. Oh, how the mighty have fallen.

And yet ...

In all that time ... thoughout the turmoil of all the new marshmallow shapes and coloring technology, throughout the farewells to the clover, the star, and the diamond that still tug at our heartstrings down through the years ... never, not once, has the array of oat-based cereal pieces that come with Lucky Charms changed their shapes.

mobo85
11-03-2000, 04:39 PM
Nice history, tracer, but you forgot the star-on-a-balloon marshmallow. Maybe a few others, too.

Harvey The Heavy
11-03-2000, 05:43 PM
Now that that's settled, how about Trix? I remember they used to be spheres about a centimeter wide that came in yellow, orange and purple (and maybe green? or red? Now I can't remember). I don't know what the hell's going on with them now.

pezwookiee
11-03-2000, 08:35 PM
Wow, great answer, tracer! That was amazing.

I think now, only two things are still a mystery to me about Lucky Charms marshmallows. I think I remember in the back of my head some sort of Olympic-themed marshmallows from 1984. Does this ring a bell with anybody else? I have no idea what they are. Maybe I'm thinking of Mr. T. cereal.

Also, were any holiday marshmallows ever produced? I seem to recall stuff like this done for Cap'n Crunch, but can't remember whether or not Lucky Charms ever followed this trend.


As far as Trix go, all I know is that they now come shaped like the fruit they represent and I still feel bad for that rabbit.

mongrel_8
11-03-2000, 08:44 PM
The cereal FAQ says that there was holiday marshmallows in in Lucky Charms. They were packages, candles, and other festive holiday marshmallows. Here is the link to the website http://www.wenet.net/~iandg/cereal.htm#3.7

mobo85
11-04-2000, 02:52 PM
Originally posted by mongrel_8
The cereal FAQ says that there was holiday marshmallows in in Lucky Charms. They were packages, candles, and other festive holiday marshmallows. Here is the link to the website http://www.wenet.net/~iandg/cereal.htm#3.7

One or two Christmases ago, there were also Rudolph marshmallows.

pezwookiee
11-06-2000, 06:12 PM
YIPPEEEE!!!!! General Mills responded to my e-mail to them today!! Here's their reply:

<<Thank you for contacting General Mills with your inquiry. Below is the only
information we have at this time regarding the history of the Lucky Charms
marshmallows.

We hope you find this information helpful. Please let us know if we can
help you again.

Sincerely,

Glenda Ellis
Consumer Services

Lucky Charm's Marshmallow Pieces

In 1964 L.C. Leprechaun began urging moms, "laddies" and "lassies" to buy
Lucky Charms, a "most exciting cereal," and he has been echoing this message
ever since.

This "charm-in" cereal contains oat pieces in various lucky shapes of bells,
fish, arrowheads, cloverleaves and crossbars. What makes this cereal
unique, however, is the addition of colorful marbits (marshmallow bits) that
have delighted consumers for over 30 years.

Here is a little history about these "magically delicious" pieces:

The original product included four marbits:
Pink hearts
Yellow moons
Green clovers and Orange stars

In 1975 a fifth marbit was introduced - a blue diamond. The excitement was
overwhelming!

In 1984 Lucky Charms added a new marbit to the fabulous five - the purple
horseshoe

In 1986 a Swirled Whale made the scene, but was soon discontinued

In 1989 L.C. Leprechaun celebrated his 25th Anniversary in style by
introducing the seventh marbit -A new red balloon!

And so it goes...

See if you remember these additions and changes:

1990: Holiday Lucky Charms - (red and green marbits)

1992: Rainbow (blue, yellow and pink)

1994: Pot of Gold (yellow and orange)

1995: Blue Moon (which replaced the yellow moon)

1996: Dark green clover in light green hat (which replaced the green clover)

1996: Olympic Marbits (red white and blue stars, a gold medallion with a
yellow star in
the center, a red-white and blue rainbow, and a yellow and green
torch)

1997:Two colored twisted marshmallows (Moon, Balloon, Horseshoe, and Heart)
Hot Air Balloon (pink)

And Most Recently:

1998: Shooting Star (orange star with a white fan effect behind it)

1998: Trip Around the World event with 8 new shapes (gold pyramid, blue
Eiffel Tower, Orange Golden Gate Bridge, purple Liberty Bell, green and
yellow torch, pink and white Leaning Tower of Pisa, red and white Big Ben
clock and green and white Alps).

Look for new surprise shapes and colors! The sky's the limit!!

>>

Thanks Glenda Ellis of the Consumer Services department!

Well, they missed the Holiday Marshmallows and the Earth Day Pine Tree "marbit," but this seems to be a pretty full history! (I wonder if they'll have any advice on Lucky Charms rice-krispy-type-sqaures?)

pezwookiee
03-24-2001, 04:09 PM
Just for the sake of posterity and 'cause I'm a little obsessed, I just wanted to add this:

I was in the grocery store last night and there in front of me was a box of Lucky Charms with yet another new Marbit! This time it's a limited-edition white crystal ball. WHen soaked in milk, the crystal ball reveals a picture of "where Lucky is hiding." (I guess there's a map on the back of the box for reference.)

Man, I wonder what kind of new and fun chemicals we're ingesting with this crazy color-changing Marbit?

Flymaster
03-24-2001, 04:36 PM
Originally posted by Rhythmdvl
Can you make Rice Crispie squares with LC marshmallows? Bet they'd be out of this world.

For the record, I've made LC squares (not just marshmallows, but the entire box), and from what I can tell, one panfull was VERY close to fatal.

Highly reccomended :).

Turbo Dog
03-24-2001, 04:41 PM
Originally posted by Rhythmdvl
Can you make Rice Crispie squares with LC marshmallows? Bet they'd be out of this world.

You could put some in with the Rice Crispies, but I don't think you could use them as the marshmallow "binder". Having very little to do today, I tried some stuff with the LC marshmallows. Microwaving them for 30 seconds made them very hot, but not soft. At one minute, they were a little soft but not gooey. At a minute and a half though, they were very gooey and it looked possible, but after 10 seconds they had cooled completely and became very brittle. Pressing on them rather lightly turned them into powder. Next I boiled up some water and put a few 'mallows in. Looked good for about 5 seconds and then they literally disappeared. For a split second I saw them start to separate, and then they just vanished completely.

YTMezoan
03-24-2001, 07:11 PM
Wasn't there once some special promotion which featured green tree-shaped marshmallows?

pezwookiee
03-26-2001, 12:22 AM
Originally posted by YTMezoan
Wasn't there once some special promotion which featured green tree-shaped marshmallows?



Yup! Your memory serves you well, YTMezoan. These were the Earth Day Tree marshmallows released a couple years ago. Man, I'm gonna be a Marbit expert after this thread!

Olentzero
03-26-2001, 09:08 AM
1.Good God, I've learned something I don't think I ever wanted to know. That's gotta be a first in history.

"Marbit"?! They actually have a name for those things? :eek:

2. tracer's exposition on the history of Lucky Charms marbits *shudder* reminded me of this routine I saw from a comedian many years ago about the history of Oreos, progressing from the standard cookie we all know and love through Double-Stuf and Big Stuf (the opening of which required "the same amount of torque needed to open the door of the Space Shuttle in high orbit"). After every product was described he would ask the audience "But were the executives at Nabisco happy?! No, they weren't!"

Until the last product. He asked the question, the audience responded "No, they weren't!" and he replied "Well, yeah, actually, they were."

**END HIJACK**

We now return you to your regularly scheduled thread.

voguevixen
03-26-2001, 01:45 PM
Originally posted by pezwookiee
Tracer & pezwookie: excellent work, the both of you.

As far as Trix go, all I know is that they now come shaped like the fruit they represent and I still feel bad for that rabbit.

Did anyone remember around 1976 or so you could send in a Trix boxtop and vote on if the rabbit should get to eat Trix or not? I voted YES and got a glorious red, white, and blue button in the mail proclaiming "YES! Let the rabbit eat Trix!" I bet my packrat mom still has that someplace, haha. I'm gonna make her track it down.

I find the new(er) "fruit shaped" Trix rip the hell out of the roof of your mouth, a la Cap'n Crunch. And do they still use that "Trix is for kids!" campaign? I always thought that a bit, erm...discriminatory.

Thudlow Boink
03-26-2001, 03:55 PM
I have before me a box cover that I have saved over the years, to reassure myself that it really existed: The "Swirled Whale Edition" of Lucky Charms cereal, featuring red-white-and-blue-swirled whale-shaped marshmallows in amongst the usual six. On this box, we see a worried-looking Lucky the Leprechaun riding an even more worried-looking multi-colored whale down a rainbow toward the cereal bowl. Lucky, his green scarf blowing behind him, points toward the marshmallows and shouts, "YIKES! WHALES IN MY CEREAL?!"

As if this were not enough, the bonus prize INSIDE! the box is a package of Rain-blo Color Bubble bubble gum balls (PARENTAL SUPERVISION NECESSARY).

whitetho
03-26-2001, 06:18 PM
John Holahan invented Lucky Charms by slicing up Circus Peanuts and sprinkling them on Cheerios. He died late last year--an obituary is at His Lucky Charms Ran Out (http://www.wholepop.com/972398677/index_html).

pezwookiee
03-26-2001, 06:28 PM
Originally posted by whitetho
John Holahan invented Lucky Charms by slicing up Circus Peanuts and sprinkling them on Cheerios. He died late last year--an obituary is at His Lucky Charms Ran Out (http://www.wholepop.com/972398677/index_html).


that's the most depressing thing I've ever read. :(


my Marbits all dissolved in tears.

Ben
03-26-2001, 07:12 PM
I must admit, I found the red balloon to be even more problematic than the blue whale. Like tracer said, balloons have no occult significance.

One thing missing from tracer's history is all the marshmallows that had to be pulled because the Religious Right complained about them. To wit:

1. Yellow pentagrams
2. Black swastikas
3. Pink triangles
4. Green Darwin fish
5. Purple phalluses
6. Blue Sheela-na-gigs.

-Ben

Louie
03-27-2001, 02:15 AM
Originally posted by voguevixen
Did anyone remember around 1976 or so you could send in a Trix boxtop and vote on if the rabbit should get to eat Trix or not? I voted YES and got a glorious red, white, and blue button in the mail proclaiming "YES! Let the rabbit eat Trix!" I bet my packrat mom still has that someplace, haha. I'm gonna make her track it down.

1976? Hmm, I remembered Trix having the same contest in the early 90's. And I voted "Yes" as well :)

Irishman
03-28-2001, 04:24 PM
One thing about "traditional" Lucky Charms marbits is the classic chant. They could do the rainbow chant, but now it would be cumbersome and non-rhythmic.

Okay everybody, sing along:

Pink hearts
Yellow moons
Orange stars
Green Clover
and Blue diamonds.

(Part of this delicious breakfast.)

Side note here: notice how these cereal commercials always included the caveat: "Part of this delicious breakfast." It's that hidden reminder that your breakfast was supposed to be more balanced by having some eggs or bacon or sausage, and some fruit, not just cereal in milk. Like that ever worked. MORE SUGAR!

I was disappointed with the marbit changes. Okay, the purple horseshoes was a decent addition, if it did throw off the chant. But then the rest of the random changes got absurd. Shooting stars? THey don't look like shooting stars, I don't know what they look like but it ain't shooting stars. And replacing the green clover with a hat? Just so they could use the two tone process. That's pointless overkill. They changed yellow moons to blue moons, which I can see linking to the theme, but they got rid of blue diamonds in the process. Okay, diamonds were never very fitting anyway. So "pot of gold" is an orange and yellow mess, "shooting star" is a bizarre orange and white chunk, and the hat is just lame. Also, the marshmallow bit size shrank sometime back. Anybody else remember that?

JillGat
03-28-2001, 06:26 PM
I read a pretty good history of Lucky Charms in a magazine once.. I think it was "Discover." They talked about the brainiac who had the idea of sprinkling Circus Peanuts on sweet-bland cereal. What a billion dollar idea that was. This article also had a history of the various shapes the marshmallows have taken over the years.

rayniday
03-28-2001, 06:38 PM
Yes, they are still using the "Trix is for kids!" line. Curse them! They're never gonna give that crazy rabbit the cereal, no matter HOW many kids vote yes. He should just go get some Marbits and be done with those annoying kids!!!

tracer
03-30-2001, 08:39 PM
voguevixen wrote:

Did anyone remember around 1976 or so you could send in a Trix boxtop and vote on if the rabbit should get to eat Trix or not? I voted YES and got a glorious red, white, and blue button in the mail proclaiming "YES! Let the rabbit eat Trix!" I bet my packrat mom still has that someplace, haha. I'm gonna make her track it down.
I still have my "YES! Let the Rabbit eat Trix" button in my desktop drawer at home -- alongside my "Don't Spread Med" button the school was handing out during California's "Mediterranean Fruit Fly Epidemic" of the mid-1970s.

I'll bet VERY few kids voted "NO" in that Trix election, and that the "NO!" buttons are collector's items now.

tracer
03-30-2001, 08:43 PM
pezwookiee lamented the omissions of the e-mail he received from General Mills thusly:

Well, they missed the Holiday Marshmallows and the Earth Day Pine Tree "marbit,"
They also missed that time when they had the limited-edition "Mixed-Up Marshmallows" version of Lucky Charms, with the stars being blue instead of orange, etc.. It was before the two-toned marshmallows came out.

Sylkyn
03-31-2001, 10:59 AM
Originally posted by rayniday
Yes, they are still using the "Trix is for kids!" line. Curse them! They're never gonna give that crazy rabbit the cereal, no matter HOW many kids vote yes. He should just go get some Marbits and be done with those annoying kids!!!

IIRC, they DID allow that poor rabbit to have some Trix once. This was back in the early 70's. They ran the commercial about a week, maybe 2, and it showed the rabbit being given a bowl of Trix by some kids, and he was literally dancing with joy over the prospect of eating it. He looked positively ORGASMIC, like he was going to keel over after the first mouthful or something. Anyway, he scarfed down the whole bowl in about 1/8th of a second...and asked for......you got it........ANOTHER BOWL!!!!

And was told by some hateful-ass cartoon kid, "Nope! Only ONE, Rabbit!"

Said Rabbit gets this look of total sadness on his face, and commences begging. The kids get all snotty and sort of just walk off, him still pleading and generally making an ass of himself.

Of course, I saw this when I was about 10, so I may have the events a little misconstrued, but I definitely remember the commercial. I was so glad he finally got his damn wish.

I was a little put off that he got greedy about it, though.

pezwookiee
03-31-2001, 12:37 PM
Lucky Charms and Trix: perhaps two sides of the same coin?


With Lucky Charms, the kids are always trying to get the cereal from Lucky.

With Trix, the Rabbit is always trying to get the cereal from the kids.


You'd think they'd all be able to get together and work this out somehow.

jab1
06-11-2001, 02:41 PM
Originally posted by Olentzero
this routine I saw from a comedian many years ago about the history of Oreos...

< SNIP >

After every product was described he would ask the audience "But were the executives at Nabisco happy?! No, they weren't!"

Until the last product. He asked the question, the audience responded "No, they weren't!" and he replied "Well, yeah, actually, they were."He was wrong. They now make Oreos with chocolate icing.

Arken
06-11-2001, 05:15 PM
You see?!? Circus Peanuts have done MUCH MORE for this world than you people think.

Don't you ever say anything bad about them again. Ever.

Fern Forest
06-11-2001, 07:59 PM
Originally posted by SilkyThreat
IIRC, they DID allow that poor rabbit to have some Trix once. This was back in the early 70's

I remember him getting some too and I was born in 1974. I think it was sometime in 1986-1990. They had a commercial where he won some kind of race and the prize was the cereal but they found out he was a rabbit and they asked kids to vote for him. And they voted to let him have it and they did. But again never again. (until kids forget he ever had it and they do it again. Perhaps every 15 years?

Sadly my mom never bought me fancy cereal like that. We got bags of oat piece cereal. Like cheerios and other such bland stuff. And amazingly I don't buy myself the stuff now that I'm 26, but that's due to the fact that I don't eat breakfast, huh?

Blornx
06-11-2001, 08:18 PM
Back in my day, we didn't have no fancy purple horseshoes.

We had "orange, lemon, cherry, and other natural flavors" -- and we liked it!

Chanteuse
06-12-2001, 12:10 AM
Lucky Charms and Trix: perhaps two sides of the same coin?


With Lucky Charms, the kids are always trying to get the cereal from Lucky.

With Trix, the Rabbit is always trying to get the cereal from the kids.
____________________________________________________________
I've noticed that few, if any, commercials for kids' cereals do NOT feature the idea that to have the cereal, you must beg or steal it away from whomever has it. Sugar Bear, The Cookie Crisp Cop, Fred Flintstone, Trix kids, and Lucky--all of them feel a need to keep someone from getting that cereal. Way to go, cereal companies, for reinforcing the ideas of 1)selfishness (if you have something others want keep it for yourself at all costs), and 2)greed (if somebody has something you want, steal it if you must to get it).

DannyWilliams
06-12-2001, 09:55 AM
Shifty looking fellow walks into corner store, nervously looking around. Grabs a stack of three boxes of cereal from the shelf and takes them to the counter. Checkout lady asks "is that all?" and looks up to see the door swinging shut and the coins rolling to a stop on the counter.

Fellow hastily bangs his way into his dingy apartment, discarding the box of Cheerios from the left side of the stack and the box of Wheaties from the right side of the stack leaving only the box of Trix that was hiding in the center. Grabs a large wooden spoon and a giant mixing-type bowl and dumps pretty much the whole box into the bowl.

Shifty fellow rips off his rubber face mask to reveal - He's the Rabbit! He was in disguise! He's finally going to get his Trix after all these years!

He grabs the milk carton and upends it over the giant bowl - and only one single drop plops out.

(fade to black with white letters saying.....)

Got Milk?

caircair
06-12-2001, 11:15 AM
Danny, that has always been one of my favorite "Got Milk" commercials. A classic!

Almost as much fun as "New Sierra Detergent", which turns out to be an Orkin commercial.

kaylasdad99
06-12-2001, 03:13 PM
Tracer:

Congratulations on your tour de force history of the Lucky Charms marbit. Not only did you provide what was arguably the definitive answer to the question (making further hijacks the only appropriate way to continue the thread), but you did it in a manner worthy of the great Cecil himself.

In fact, I liked it so much, that it pains me to be compelled to pose a nitpick:

For years, the triumverate of moons, stars, hearts, clovers, and diamonds was all there was to Lucky Charms

I donít think Cecil would have either misspelled the word "triumvirate", nor implied that it could be properly used to describe to a group of any size other than three.

Perhaps "cabal" or "junta" would serve.

GrandfatherTrout
06-12-2001, 04:11 PM
Perhaps "cabal" or "junta" would serve.

Quintessence, mayhap?

Quibbles aside, I must echo the praise for Tracer's work. My mind is blowing. The weirdzo back alleys of human knowledge continue to give me joy.

GrandfatherTrout
06-12-2001, 04:15 PM
Perhaps "cabal" or "junta" would serve.

Quintessence, mayhap?

Quibbles aside, I must echo the praise for Tracer's work. My mind is blowing. The weirdzo back alleys of human knowledge continue to give me joy.

JosephFinn
06-12-2001, 04:59 PM
Originally posted by whitetho
John Holahan invented Lucky Charms by slicing up Circus Peanuts and sprinkling them on Cheerios. He died late last year--an obituary is at His Lucky Charms Ran Out (http://www.wholepop.com/972398677/index_html).

And the thread runs into a depressing wall.

Poor family.

eunoia
06-12-2001, 09:41 PM
Originally posted by Mayflower

I've noticed that few, if any, commercials for kids' cereals do NOT feature the idea that to have the cereal, you must beg or steal it away from whomever has it. Sugar Bear, The Cookie Crisp Cop, Fred Flintstone, Trix kids, and Lucky--all of them feel a need to keep someone from getting that cereal. Way to go, cereal companies, for reinforcing the ideas of 1)selfishness (if you have something others want keep it for yourself at all costs), and 2)greed (if somebody has something you want, steal it if you must to get it).

Part of the marketing plan: teach kids that if they want that sweet, sweet cereal, they'll have to learn how to beg mommy or daddy for it at the grocery store.

Also, I'm thinking of changing my username to "marbit". Great read, bravo all.

tracer
06-13-2001, 12:51 PM
Mayflower wrote:

I've noticed that few, if any, commercials for kids' cereals do NOT feature the idea that to have the cereal, you must beg or steal it away from whomever has it. Sugar Bear, The Cookie Crisp Cop, Fred Flintstone, Trix kids, and Lucky--all of them feel a need to keep someone from getting that cereal.
With one important exception:

Cocoa Puffs.

In the Cocoa Puffs commercials, Sonny the Cuckoo Bird is addicted to Cocoa Puffs and is trying, desperately, to kick the habit. He knows if he has Cocoa Puffs he's going to Go Cuckoo. And what do the kids do? They tempt him! They're like frat boys trying to convince you to drink another beer. In the end, poor, weak-willed Sonny is unable to resist the siren call of the Cocoa Puffs, and Goes Cuckoo all over the screen.

RoboDude
06-13-2001, 02:52 PM
Here's something you should see:

http://www.laughnet.net/archive/misc/lucky.htm

And speaking of marbits, has anyone here tried marshmallow Froot Loops? I always thought Froot Loops was plenty sweet to begin with.

tracer
06-13-2001, 07:15 PM
I tried them. Marshmallows and Froot Loops do not go together. Ptooi! What's next, little bits of dried sea bass in Cocoa Krispies?

jab1
06-14-2001, 01:09 PM
Being lactose intolerant, I don't each cereal anymore. I don't give a damn WHAT goes into cereals.

Rassilon
08-29-2013, 02:10 PM
I have before me a box cover that I have saved over the years, to reassure myself that it really existed: The "Swirled Whale Edition" of Lucky Charms cereal, featuring red-white-and-blue-swirled whale-shaped marshmallows in amongst the usual six. On this box, we see a worried-looking Lucky the Leprechaun riding an even more worried-looking multi-colored whale down a rainbow toward the cereal bowl. Lucky, his green scarf blowing behind him, points toward the marshmallows and shouts, "YIKES! WHALES IN MY CEREAL?!"

As if this were not enough, the bonus prize INSIDE! the box is a package of Rain-blo Color Bubble bubble gum balls (PARENTAL SUPERVISION NECESSARY).


My apologies to grvedig a thread that is over a decade past its prime. but I felt that sharing a few memories may add to the history of this marbit phenomenon.

Either before, or just after, the whales were placed into the cereal, General Mills first produced a Lucky Carms, with either the swirled whales, or merely swirled normal marbits were included in a sealed, white plastic envelope that you could add yourself. I had one of those baggies in my icebox for decades that I saved for its possible collectible value in the future, until my icebox had a meltdown decades ago and lost some of my preserved food collectibles, along with Nintendo cereals and candies.

Charms often placed these promo baggies of special marbits inside the box, to add as you saw fit, for later shapes. I believe that the whale was in a baggie to insert before it was later mixed with the cereal, and after that, the swirled main shapes were in a baggie to add to the cereal before they made them a temporary standard. I recall, witching pointless television in college with the commercials of the whale spouting L.C. Leprechaun into the rainbow and scattering the colours.

I also very fondly recall the original Charms mix, and I didn't fond the horse shoe objectionable in '83 or ;84. it did seem appropriate, and I liked the feel of the shape on my tongue, but when they started meddling with the shapes, I started to become increasingly disgusted.


part of the 'charm' of the marbits was the feel of them in your mouth. They had a distinct shape, and were small, and nice to look at. I liked the clear, but pastel colours. My method then, and now, was to eat most of the cereal as a mix, and when I started to reach the end of the bowl, to save at least one or two of each marbit shape, and eat them last to appreciate them when they became a bit soft.

Even the classic shapes suffered many alterations:

For example, the old orange star was initially six-pointed. How many of you folks recall that? Apparently, us Jews were again shunted aside and the star was morphed into a five-pointed star in its later incarnations, followed by the star-in-balloon abomination. I often found myself literally carving the star out of the baloons before adding milk with a Swiss army knife, merely to re-add my lost shape.

The only share that remains from the original LC is the moon, which is now blue. I would prefer my blue diamonds, original hearts, clovers, stars and even the horseshoe. It would be nice if GM made a promo version with the 60s shapes in their original sizes, and colours.

I *hate* the new colours, and miss the smaller, pastel shapes. For one thing, the food colouring has changed the taste of the marbits, anfd the larger size has altered their feeling. This is why instead of buying the name-brand, I buy off-brand alternatives, such as the Malt-O'Meal variation. It tastes more like the old LC than LC does today.

As to the oat shapes, I believe they used the same shapes as cat food. They had no relevance to the cereal theme, and I always thought that they were base don Tarot and French tarot card suits (save for the fish) as swords, spades, clubs and fish. Th fish to me says that these are catfood shapes, which if you compare to MeowMix or similar feline cereals, you will note a distinct and eerie similarity. (Possibly from the same factories.)

Trix is also a ruined cereal for me. It used to have a fruitier, distinct flavour. A few years back, when Gm produced 'Lessened Sugar Trix;, i bought a box and was shocked that it was nearly identical to the original from my childhood (the 60s).

I stopped buying Trix when they shifted to the non-spheroid pieces, although I seem to recall the the original trix balls had a pebbly appearance and texture, like little bumps, and were not fully-round.

Froot Loops is another of my complaints: I discard the blue and purple loops. I can accept the green, despite it not being an original colour, but if I eat those blue and purple pieces, the extreme colouring has an effect on my bowels:

Digesting blue and purple (also a blue colouration) coloured grain tends to make stool greenish, and very disturbing. When Cap'n Crunch released 'Deep Sea Crunch; years back, I tried it and liked the taste. When it was discontinued, and the price slashed, I bought many boxes only to find out that I was excreting flourescent green stool due to the blue, yellow and green colours that it used for everything.

From that lesson, I learned to dispose of blue, purple and often green cereal pieces, rather than injesting them. The brighter marbits and the stronger colouring in LC also taint the milk to a disturbing murky green. I'll eat the generic variations to avoid this.

I would pay twice the normal retail price for 'Classic' versions of these cereals (including Count Chocula, which nas also changed greatly, with the original white marbit bats replaced by chocolate marbit bats).

LC with the cultclassic mixture of pink hearts, orange stars, green clovers, blue diamonds and even purple horse shoes, in their original size and colour; trix with the original shapes and colours, and Fruit Loops with the original three colours and flavours (orange, lemon and cherry) would probably sell, even if only via special order, in a classic-themed box--an exact replica of the original packaging, without gaudy, modern promo rubbish slapped on the front.

I'd pay a good amount per box, well over the already heavily-inflated price for these classic cereals in their *original formula*.

At least Cocoa Pulls is still what it has always been. I miss GM's 'Smores' cereal, and buy white marbits from a bakery source, mixing Cocoa Puffs and Golden grahams with them to reproduce it perfectly, despite the marbits not having the LC star shape that the original cereal used.

purplehorseshoe
08-29-2013, 04:56 PM
I feel a disturbance in the force ... and a need to respond within this thread.



... It would be nice if GM made a promo version with the 60s shapes in their original sizes, and colours...

I'd buy a box. :D

Hello Again
08-29-2013, 08:39 PM
There's this guy in Montana that sells bulk marbits from his website. He wasn't around for the original thread. Claims to have scoured the world for the perfect cereal marshmallow.
http://www.cerealmarshmallows.com/default.aspx

CHOW interviewed the guy (http://www.chow.com/food-news/60964/where-to-buy-95-pounds-of-cereal-marshmallows-stat).

What do customers say?

You couldn't imagine the responses, from "you are an idiot," to "this is great, I can't believe I found this."

samclem
08-30-2013, 02:23 PM
Perfect thread for our Cafe Society. Moved from GQ.

samclem, moderator