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View Full Version : RE: What Do Scotsmen Wear Under Their Kilts


kimballk
02-08-2008, 07:53 AM
REF:

http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a4_211.html

To see the answer, go to Google Images and search with the keywords:

Scotsman kilt Queen Elizabeth

On the first page expand the picture with rows of Scots Guards sitting with the Queen in the middle and inspect the men in the first row to the left.

KevinDooley
02-08-2008, 08:37 AM
Look... normally Cecil is the last word on everything, but this time he didn't even bother to research well...

Kilts originally were worn with nothing underneath them because underwear hadn't been invented yet... Indeed, as mentioned in the post, the closest thing to underwear was the fact that the scotsman's shirt was a very long shirt that covered the area in question.

However, today's modern kilt wearers, people who wear them every day or at least on a regular basis (of which I am proud to be one), wear a variety of things under their kilt. Some do keep it breezy, but many wear different types of under garments for a variety of reasons - an active lifestyle, being around children and/or animals, work regulations, and even comfort. Some wear undergarments on certain occasions and not on others. Some always wear something, and some never wear anything.

If you want to ask around, you should go to the places where the most frequent kilt wearers congregate. Try the following two sites:

xmarksthescot (http://www.xmarksthescot.com/forum/?)

and
Kilts Rock (http://www.kiltsrock.com/forum/index.php?http://www.kiltsrock.com/forum/)

Pixilated
02-08-2008, 05:59 PM
ummm....

if the kilt-wearer is lucky, he wears a ribbon under the kilt =D

yum

Fear Itself
02-08-2008, 06:13 PM
ummm....

if the kilt-wearer is lucky, he wears a ribbon under the kilt =D

yumAye, laddie (http://www.thebards.net/music/lyrics/The_Scotsman.shtml):...

Now the Scotsman woke to nature's call and stumbled towards a tree,
Behind a bush, he lift his kilt and gawks at what he sees,
And in a startled voice he says to what's before his eyes.
"O lad I don't know where you been but I see you won first prize!"

susan
02-08-2008, 06:25 PM
As long as he's got a sporran made out of a whole scooped-out badger, I don't care what else he wears.

Gary Robson
02-08-2008, 07:22 PM
I think this question has just as much meaning as "what does a woman wear under her skirt?" Every kilt-wearer is different. For me, it depends on where I'll be, who I'll be with, and what I'll be doing.

Believe me, when I'm emceeing an event, and I'll be up on a stage with a bunch of little girls on the dance floor below me, I'm modestly covered underneath the kilt.

Contrapuntal
02-08-2008, 07:28 PM
REF:

http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a4_211.html

To see the answer, go to Google Images and search with the keywords:

Scotsman kilt Queen Elizabeth

On the first page expand the picture with rows of Scots Guards sitting with the Queen in the middle and inspect the men in the first row to the left.That picture seems to be AWOL. Can you provide a direct link?

JR Brown
02-08-2008, 08:10 PM
That picture seems to be AWOL. Can you provide a direct link?

Try here: http://www.snopes.com/photos/risque/queen.asp

Two versions of the pic, one more, um, revealing than the other; Snopes thinks it's not clear which one is authenic and which one has been modified. :D

JRB

Contrapuntal
02-08-2008, 08:18 PM
Try here: http://www.snopes.com/photos/risque/queen.asp

Two versions of the pic, one more, um, revealing than the other; Snopes thinks it's not clear which one is authenic and which one has been modified. :D

JRBThanks. I hope for his sake the second one is the fake.

John W. Kennedy
02-08-2008, 08:36 PM
That picture seems to be AWOL. Can you provide a direct link?I rather fancy http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl_slideshow2b.htm was intended, which shows up if you have "Scotsmen" instead of "Scotsman" in the search.

An Gadaí
02-08-2008, 09:55 PM
I can't believe I'll be the first to say,

No True Scotsman wears anything under his kilt!

pumpkinsparshott
02-09-2008, 04:58 PM
My Dad was in the British Army in WW2, and his bunch shared a mess with a Highland regiment. The Highlanders were required, when in uniform, to be "regulation", which is to say, wearing nothing under the kilt.
In the mess this was enforced by custom: anybody could flip up a kilt. If the wearer was not regulation, he had to buy everybody present a drink. If he WAS naked under the kilt, the flipper had to buy the round.

velomont
02-11-2008, 05:39 PM
Ref: Scotsman and kilts, how do you make a Celtic cross?

Kick him in the bagpipes.

Apollyon
02-11-2008, 06:05 PM
My Dad was in the British Army in WW2... The Highlanders were required, when in uniform, to be "regulation", which is to say, wearing nothing under the kilt.
Providing something of a cite for pumpkinsparshott, from this article (http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E03E5DD1438F934A25752C0A96E958260&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=all) interviewing a Major of the Black Watch:
The rule against wearing anything under the kilt was once so strict that up until World War II inspections of Black Watch troops included having them step on a mirror. For officers, violating the rule once cost the offender a bottle of port. Nowadays the decision is optional, but options don't come easily to men who believe in tradition.

It's my understanding -- as a kilt wearer myself -- that the regulations did allow for underwear to be worn when undertaking certain activities including participating in Highland games and dancing (and some form of marching that requires high-stepping).

Since the usual reason for donning my kilt is weddings and the like, and the chance that dancing may break out appears high, I feel that I can with good conscience meet the regulations. :)

Although at one wedding (where the groom's party and a number of guests were in kilts) we were encouraged to go commando and it would have been churlish to refuse. :cool:

Baldwin
02-11-2008, 06:26 PM
Kilts originally were worn with nothing underneath them because underwear hadn't been invented yet... Indeed, as mentioned in the post, the closest thing to underwear was the fact that the scotsman's shirt was a very long shirt that covered the area in question.Nonsense. Are you saying this seriously, or doing a bit of satire?

Apollyon
02-11-2008, 07:45 PM
Nonsense. Are you saying this seriously, or doing a bit of satire?
I had thought long shirts to have been worn in medieval times (in Western Europe at least) as a form of undergarment, with the long back of the garment pulled forward and then the braies / hosen pulled up to keep things in place.

I'm not entirely sure how this worked with a plaid / great kilt (what with no hose and all)... but understand that that the shirt ends may have been knotted to form a breech clout of sorts.

Baldwin
02-11-2008, 08:22 PM
For centuries, Scotsmen wore drawers (linen underwear) and hose, like most of the men in Europe. Kilts show up in the late 16th century, almost certainly with linen drawers underneath. The nonsense about going bare-assed under a kilt probably has a much more recent source. It's no more an ancient Scots tradition than the Clan-linked tartans made up in the 18th century.

johnsse
02-11-2008, 10:49 PM
What does a Scotsman wear under his kilt?

...Why his boots of course!

Apollyon
02-11-2008, 10:49 PM
For centuries, Scotsmen wore drawers (linen underwear) and hose, like most of the men in Europe.
Aren't the ancient scots famous for being barelegged? And for their common dress (from the millennium to the advent of the great kilt) being a long shirt / tunic similar to the Irish léine, plus a mantle or brat?

(Excerpt from Early Highland Dress (http://albanach.org/leine.html) ).
Kilts show up in the late 16th century, almost certainly with linen drawers underneath. And with the baggy léine phasing out in preference for a english style shirt. You may well be right about the linen undergarments, though I've not seen information either way on it. (But IANA costuming expert). :)
The nonsense about going bare-assed under a kilt probably has a much more recent source. It's no more an ancient Scots tradition than the Clan-linked tartans made up in the 18th century.It's perhaps a time-frame issue -- the clan tartans are both 18th C and traditional... it just comes down to your definition of "traditional" and whether the custom needs to have 200, 500, or more years of history behind it. :)

Pixilated
02-11-2008, 10:55 PM
Aye, laddie (http://www.thebards.net/music/lyrics/The_Scotsman.shtml):


Ring ding diddle diddle I de oh ring di diddly I oh!


gods I love that song! and yes, real men do wear kilts ;)

Zoe
02-12-2008, 12:40 AM
I have heard the custom of wearing nothing beneath a kilt referred to as "going regimental."

Alan Smithee
02-12-2008, 12:48 AM
The modern kilt is certainly a . . . well . . . modern invention, but the so-called great kilt certainly isn't. The question is whether the tradition of wearing nothing under a modern kilt originated as a throwback to the great kilt, or was a later innovation. It was Sir Walter Scott who developed the modern kilt for a royal visit wasn't it? Did he specify that it was to be worn "regimental"?

And what do people who do wear underwear with a kilt wear? I'd like to own a kilt someday (especially if I ever get married) and I'd feel much sillier if my kilt flew up in a dance and I was wearing Fruit of the Loom briefs underneath than if I was wearing nothing at all!

Apollyon
02-12-2008, 04:01 AM
And what do people who do wear underwear with a kilt wear? I'd like to own a kilt someday (especially if I ever get married) and I'd feel much sillier if my kilt flew up in a dance and I was wearing Fruit of the Loom briefs underneath than if I was wearing nothing at all!
My preference is plain black briefs. I have observed some Kilt-wearers taking part in very physical activity (such as caber tossing) wearing something like bike-shorts.

It's also a good idea for your shirt to be longer than you might wear with pants so that the top of the kilt doesn't chafe at the waist... speaking of which... regimental might have some tradition behind it... but that heavy weight wool can be a mite scratchy. :eek: I'd go with the briefs.

A lassie took me to a ball
And it was slippery in the hall
I was afeared that I would fall
For I nae had on no troosers

Tom Tildrum
02-12-2008, 02:03 PM
The Simpsons, of course, have explored (http://www.geocities.com/groundskeeper3/gkw20.JPG) this question.

fnulnu
02-13-2008, 05:36 AM
Thanks. I hope for his sake the second one is the fake.
Oh but doesn't the laddie have a proud look on his face. You know it was a cold day ;)

fnulnu
02-13-2008, 05:45 AM
My preference is plain black briefs. I have observed some Kilt-wearers taking part in very physical activity (such as caber tossing) wearing something like bike-shorts.

It's also a good idea for your shirt to be longer than you might wear with pants so that the top of the kilt doesn't chafe at the waist... speaking of which... regimental might have some tradition behind it... but that heavy weight wool can be a mite scratchy. :eek: I'd go with the briefs.

A lassie took me to a ball
And it was slippery in the hall
I was afeared that I would fall
For I nae had on no troosers

Aye, my husband goes commando when needed, but he also wears the bike shorts when marching in the parades, he didn't want to catch a breeze and scare some child that might have been close by :eek: Everyone marching the 13 miles wore bike shorts, and thanks for making me laugh since St. Patrick's Day is coming up and I need to get his kilt and gear ready to go (bike shorts included). :)

MarcusF
02-13-2008, 06:32 AM
For my wedding I wore dark briefs under my kilt - as noted small children, dancing, and an absense of underclothing do not mix :D

As a student I used to wear a kilt for formal dining in nights at the OTC (Officer Training Corps) and - being military and traditional - I would normally go commando. The hazard then was so called "friends" crawling around the floor with a camera :smack:

CookingWithGas
02-13-2008, 10:01 AM
Sung to the tune of a familiar bagpipe song (the name of which escapes me), the second and third lines in your best imitation of a bagpipe drone:

What does a Scotsman wear under his kilt?

A wang
A wang

BMalion
02-13-2008, 11:29 AM
I always respond that nothing is worn beneath my kilt...

It's all in perfect working order!


Cite. (http://flickr.com/photos/16840344@N05/1797577686/) :D

Jake
02-13-2008, 01:45 PM
REF:

http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a4_211.html

To see the answer, go to Google Images and search with the keywords:

Scotsman kilt Queen Elizabeth

On the first page expand the picture with rows of Scots Guards sitting with the Queen in the middle and inspect the men in the first row to the left.
LOL for ten minutes! Yes, I've seen it before but HA! The look on that guy's face is hilarious! :D Thanks for the laugh. :)

Gary Robson
02-13-2008, 02:33 PM
I've always wondered why so many women feel that it's okay to come up and ask me what I'm wearing under my kilt. If I approached a woman I didn't know and asked what she had on under her skirt, I'd probably get slapped. Why is it okay for her to do it to me?

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
02-13-2008, 04:09 PM
Scotsman kilt Queen Elizabeth

Damn, those separatists are getting hardcore!

Baldwin
02-13-2008, 05:12 PM
I've always wondered why so many women feel that it's okay to come up and ask me what I'm wearing under my kilt. If I approached a woman I didn't know and asked what she had on under her skirt, I'd probably get slapped. Why is it okay for her to do it to me?It isn't okay, but people think it is because of decades of smirking, childish penis- or testicle-related jokes whenever people talk about kilts.

John W. Kennedy
02-13-2008, 06:11 PM
I've always wondered why so many women feel that it's okay to come up and ask me what I'm wearing under my kilt. If I approached a woman I didn't know and asked what she had on under her skirt, I'd probably get slapped. Why is it okay for her to do it to me?You want the straight answer? It's pretty simple -- because men are bigger and stronger, and one Hell of a lot more likely to commit violent rape.

Apollyon
02-13-2008, 06:27 PM
You want the straight answer?And a different straight answer: Part of what they are asking (whether they phrase it this way or not) is exactly what the OP was asking Cecil: "I've heard that its normal / traditional to wear northing under your kilt. Is this true?"

Bdijack
02-18-2008, 07:01 PM
I can't speak for a Scot but as for the Mick's, I'll tell you a gentleman never reveals what's under his kilt unless he plans to use it. :dubious:

htonkin
02-19-2008, 12:05 AM
My favorite story came from a friend, who claimed to be 11th (if I recall correctly) in line for the Scottish throne, if the British ever give it back.

Question: "What do you wear under your kilt?"

Answer: "Your wife's lipstick."

John W. Kennedy
02-19-2008, 03:04 PM
...who claimed to be 11th (if I recall correctly) in line for the Scottish throne, if the British ever give it back.The Scots are British. Presumably, he meant "the English". But that still leaves a problem, because the House of Windsor traces back its ancestry to the House of Stuart, which was Scottish. Now, it is true that the House of Stuart was kicked out, but, this is only true to the extent that Roman Catholics were excluded from the royal line. The person chosen (the Electress Sophia of Hannover) was the closest Stuart relation who was a Protestant. (She died before it became necessary for her to take the throne, so her son George received it instead.)

And I don't think the bulk of the Scots are ready for a Roman Catholic monarch to this day.

Anyway, was your friend from the senior line of Stuart pretenders, who have the unfortunate problem of being descended from an uncle-niece marriage, or from the junior line?

Bdijack
02-28-2008, 07:10 AM
Wow!! Well then, I wonder..?? "Am I the only one; who thinks Kennedy is what a Scot keeps under his kilt ??" :cool:

BMalion
02-28-2008, 07:57 AM
The Scots are British. Presumably, he meant "the English". But that still leaves a problem, because the House of Windsor traces back its ancestry to the House of Stuart, which was Scottish. Now, it is true that the House of Stuart was kicked out, but, this is only true to the extent that Roman Catholics were excluded from the royal line. The person chosen (the Electress Sophia of Hannover) was the closest Stuart relation who was a Protestant. (She died before it became necessary for her to take the throne, so her son George received it instead.)

And I don't think the bulk of the Scots are ready for a Roman Catholic monarch to this day.

Anyway, was your friend from the senior line of Stuart pretenders, who have the unfortunate problem of being descended from an uncle-niece marriage, or from the junior line?


I've never met the gentleman, nor do I claim anywhere near your knowledge of the sucession lines. However, I suspect that the person in question was just blowing smoke. I've met many of that type at highland games and ceilidh's. They love to tell tall tales. Kinda like how at many VFW post s you'll eventually run into a "special-forces-secret-commando-ninja" who "can't talk about it", but does.

DrDeth
02-28-2008, 09:40 PM
I had thought long shirts to have been worn in medieval times (in Western Europe at least) as a form of undergarment, with the long back of the garment pulled forward and then the braies / hosen pulled up to keep things in place.

I'm not entirely sure how this worked with a plaid / great kilt (what with no hose and all)... but understand that that the shirt ends may have been knotted to form a breech clout of sorts.

Exactly.

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