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Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
11-16-2000, 09:41 AM
I heard this one recently. I do not have the answer.

Una Persson
11-16-2000, 09:44 AM
Well, I can think of a three-letter word that increases in size by 10 times by adding 2 letters:

six + ty = sixty.

Mooney252
11-16-2000, 10:42 AM
Redouble.

Mooney252
11-16-2000, 10:45 AM
I realized that my previous response was perfectly clear.
5-letter word: double
add two letters: redouble

Joe_Cool
11-16-2000, 10:50 AM
Originally posted by Mooney252
I realized that my previous response was perfectly clear.
5-letter word: double
add two letters: redouble

double is six letters. I've actually heard the answer to this riddle before, but damned if I can remember!

retsin2000
11-16-2000, 10:56 AM
I don't think this is right but I'll throw it out there anyway.

count
recount

Recounting doesn't mean adding the new count to the old one, so there is no doubling of size.

Please, please don't let these two simple words make this thread deteriorate into something that belongs in GD. If that happens, my deepest apologies to the OP and to the mods.

Doctor Jackson
11-16-2000, 01:48 PM
I guess adding the prefix 'bi-' to a word would be cheating. 'Polar' would become 'bi-polar', etc.

Well, I can think of a three-letter word that increases in size by 10 times by adding 2 letters

I can do a 10X increase by adding one letter - eight+y = eighty

astro
11-16-2000, 02:14 PM
It's riddlin' question time!

What five letter word becomes shorter when you add two letters to it?


A man was found lying dead in the snow. There were no tracks leading to or from the body. He had a backpack strapped to his back. He did not die of thirst, hunger or cold and he was not murdered. What was in his backpack that lead to his death?

Frank went into a hardware store. Pointing to the item he wanted to purchase, he asked the assistant "How much will one cost?" and was told "Three dollars". Then he asked how much will twelve cost?" and was told "six dollars" "How much will two hundred cost?" "Nine dollars" said the assistant. What was Frank buying?

c_goat
11-16-2000, 02:19 PM
A man was found lying dead in the snow. There were no tracks leading to or from the body. He had a backpack strapped to his back. He did not die of thirst, hunger or cold and he was not murdered. What was in his backpack that lead to his death?

A parachute.


Frank went into a hardware store. Pointing to the item he wanted to purchase, he asked the assistant "How much will one cost?" and was told "Three dollars". Then he asked how much will twelve cost?" and was told "six dollars" "How much will two hundred cost?" "Nine dollars" said the assistant. What was Frank buying?


The numbers themselves. One digit = $3.

That still doesn't answer the OP though :)

Doctor Jackson I think bi- is on the right track. That's what I was trying to come up with.

panamajack
11-16-2000, 02:26 PM
It could also refer to other measures of size, as in this one :

What three-letter word increases its size 63,360,000 times when you add one letter?

Or why is "smiles" the longest word in the English language?

wring
11-16-2000, 02:27 PM
"what five letter becomes shorter when you add two letters to it?"

short (short+er= shorter)

iampunha
11-16-2000, 02:39 PM
Originally posted by panamajack
What three-letter word increases its size 63,360,000 times when you add one letter?


I'm thinking the first is 10^X^X or something like that.

DropOfaHat
11-16-2000, 02:45 PM
Originally posted by panamajack

What three-letter word increases its size 63,360,000 times when you add one letter?

Or why is "smiles" the longest word in the English language?

My guess for the first one - mil (short for millimeter?) becomes mile?

I'm sure about the second one - "smiles" is longest word because it's... (ready to groan?) ...a mile from one end to the other (or from the first letter to the last)...


I can double a 3 letter word by adding 3 more letters: TEN becomes TwENty...


OK, here's my entry - what three letter word diminishes by about 143X when you add two letters? (I THINK I'm right about the #'s...)

Still working on the original...

scratch1300
11-16-2000, 02:59 PM
No answer to the OP, but something more to throw in the mix....

An eight-letter word meaning "very big" becomes a word that means "very small" when five letters are added to the end. Name the two words.

ZenBeam
11-16-2000, 03:39 PM
infinite, infinitesimal

BlackKnight
11-16-2000, 05:39 PM
How about "other" and "another"?

justwannano
11-16-2000, 06:44 PM
bi means double doesn't it?

panamajack
11-16-2000, 06:56 PM
I like the 'another' thing, but it seems to still only a single thing replacing the other.


Just to come back in, DropOfaHat was correct with the questions I posed. The mil I'm using is the American term for 1/1000 of an inch (1 mile = 63.36x106 mils). My apologies to British dopers, for whom the equivalent term might be thou (mil being sometimes used for milliliter).

And if the answer to the OP is a unit of measurement, it might be found [URL="http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/index.html" here [/URL], a rather comprehensive guide to units of measurement.

panama jack
2.71 covados

panamajack
11-16-2000, 07:04 PM
Oops, that link should be written :

RL="http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/index.html"] here [/URL]

which resolves to
here (http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/index.html).

Thrashbarg
11-16-2000, 09:40 PM
How about ANTIC?
Add two letters: QUANTIC

According to Scrabble,
A = 1
N = 2
T = 2
I = 2
C = 4
Word Score: 11

Add two letters:
Q = 8
U = 3
Word Score: 22

FYI, a quick search at Bartelby's gives the following definition:
Quantic: A homogeneous polynomial having two or more variables.

Ben
11-16-2000, 10:46 PM
Originally posted by astro

A man was found lying dead in the snow. There were no tracks leading to or from the body. He had a backpack strapped to his back. He did not die of thirst, hunger or cold and he was not murdered. What was in his backpack that lead to his death?


Simple- he died of a heart attack, and soon afterward a snowstorm obliterated his tracks. In his backpack was half a jumbo bag of pork rinds.

-Ben

Geek Mecha
11-16-2000, 11:13 PM
Ben, the version of that one that I know was set in a desert, not in the snow. But I like your answer anyway. :)


More riddles!

1. A man is at work, and he wants to go home. However, he will not go home, because a man wearing a mask is waiting there for him. What do both men do for a living?

2. A man is found shot to death inside a room with a table, four chairs, and fifty-three bicycles. Why was this man shot?


Here's three you'll never get in a billion years:

3. A man is found dead in the middle of nowhere, holding a broken toothpick. How did he die?

4. A man is in an elevator, and it stops. After ten minutes, he pulls out a gun and shoots himself. Why?

5. Two men are eating in a restaurant. One man orders albatross soup. The second man gets up, runs over to a window, and jumps out. Why did the second man kill himself?

racinchikki
11-16-2000, 11:27 PM
Originally posted by AudreyK
1. A man is at work, and he wants to go home. However, he will not go home, because a man wearing a mask is waiting there for him. What do both men do for a living?
Wanna say the masked guy's an exterminator.

2. A man is found shot to death inside a room with a table, four chairs, and fifty-three bicycles. Why was this man shot?
Cheating at poker.


Here's mine:

1. A woman buys a new pair of shoes. She goes to work. She dies. Explain.

2. A man is driving in his car. He turns on the radio and hears a song. He pulls over and shoots himself. Why?

BlackKnight
11-16-2000, 11:47 PM
Originally posted by AudreyK
1. A man is at work, and he wants to go home. However, he will not go home, because a man wearing a mask is waiting there for him. What do both men do for a living?

Think baseball. You know, I've never liked this one since I saw Kent Hovind use it as an example of how anyone can be brainwashed (don't ask).

3. A man is found dead in the middle of nowhere, holding a broken toothpick. How did he die?

Plane crashing. Need less weight. Draw "straws" (toothpicks). He gets the short (broken) one. Splat. :)

4. A man is in an elevator, and it stops. After ten minutes, he pulls out a gun and shoots himself. Why?

Water-gun. Getting too hot, so he cools himself down.
(WAG)

5. Two men are eating in a restaurant. One man orders albatross soup. The second man gets up, runs over to a window, and jumps out. Why did the second man kill himself?

He was once stranded with some people (exact story varies) and one of them disappeared. Shortly later, another person serves the starving group some "albatross". It is really the missing person, and after the man in the restaurant realizes what albatross really tastes like, he knows he has eaten another person. He can't live with himself, and so jumps out the window.

*bows*

BlackKnight
11-16-2000, 11:52 PM
Originally posted by racinchikki
1. A woman buys a new pair of shoes. She goes to work. She dies. Explain.

She's a tightrope walker, and the new shoes weren't fit well to her feet.

2. A man is driving in his car. He turns on the radio and hears a song. He pulls over and shoots himself. Why?

The song was by the Backstreet Boys.
(sorry, couldn't resist) :)

Here's some easy ones:
1) A man is found dead by a green rock. What happened?

2) Hundreds dead in a cabin in the woods. What happened?

racinchikki
11-17-2000, 12:21 AM
Originally posted by BlackKnight
1) A man is found dead by a green rock. What happened?
He died.
2) Hundreds dead in a cabin in the woods. What happened?
They died.

matt_mcl
11-17-2000, 12:26 AM
It is the cabin of a plane (which crashed).

BlackKnight
11-17-2000, 12:28 AM
Originally posted by matt_mcl
It is the cabin of a plane (which crashed).

YYUR
YYUB
ICURYY4ME

;)

Karellen
11-17-2000, 12:59 AM
Has a father who's on a life support machine at home. The elevator stops from a power outage, and after 10 minutes he realizes that his father is dead.

Or maybe life support systems have backup power supplies that only last 10 minutes.

I remember this one vaguely from school. So, back to the OP, are we stumped?

Ace_Face
11-17-2000, 01:23 AM
In response to the OP:

penis
mypenis

::mumbles and apology and runs away fast::

Geek Mecha
11-17-2000, 05:56 AM
racinchikki-- Yay for the "cheating at poker" answer!

Your number 2 sounds familiar, but I can't remember the answer right now...

BlackKnight-- Yup on the baseball answer. For the broken toothpick one, you got it, except he was in a hot air balloon.

I'm pleased you got the albatross one. I got some strange looks when I explained that one, and so I don't want more people thinking I made it up myself. :)

The man found dead by the green rock is Superman. The rock is kryptonite.

Karellen-- You got it.


The only reason I said "you'll never get these in a billion years" is because I tossed these at my students, and they completely stumped them. (Either that, or they're really good at disguising their boredom.) Shoulda known you guys would eat 'em for breakfast. :)

Fiver
11-17-2000, 08:51 AM
The man's backpack was full of plutonium, and the man died of acute radiation poisoning.

Later, it snowed, but the heat from the backpack kept snow from accumulating on the corpse.

Walrus
11-17-2000, 09:01 AM
Another old puzzle for you.

A man lives on the 35th floor of a tower block.
Every day he takes the lift to the ground floor on his way to work. On the way home he only takes the lift to the 30th and walks the last five floors (except when it's raining).
Why?

'S easy really

Walrus

?authority
11-17-2000, 09:23 AM
couldent resist.
Three guys check in to a hotel, the manager is not in. The bellboy charges them $10 each and takes them to their room. When the manager returns he discovers the guest have been over charged $5. He tells the bellboy to refund the money to them. The bellboy, not wishing to deal in change, gives each guest a $1 refund and pockets the remaining $2. The question is... if each guest only paid $9 for the room ($10 -$1 =$9), and $9 x 3 = $27 (the cost of the room), and the bellboy put $2 in his pocket, and $2 + $27 =$29 .... what happened to the other $1 from the original $30?

DropOfaHat
11-17-2000, 09:34 AM
Originally posted by Walrus
A man lives on the 35th floor of a tower block.
Every day he takes the lift to the ground floor on his way to work. On the way home he only takes the lift to the 30th and walks the last five floors (except when it's raining).
Why?


He's a dwarf, and can't reach the high 35 button, unless he has an umbrella with him (I've heard it where he can also go all the way up if someone else is in the elevator with him)


As for the bellboy missing dollar one, there is no answer. It's a faulty question. The room cost $25 + $2 (bellboy self-tip) = $27, $9 each. You shouldn't be adding the bellboy's $2 to the $27, it's already a part of it.

c_goat
11-17-2000, 09:35 AM
Originally posted by ?authority
couldent resist.
Three guys check in to a hotel, the manager is not in. The bellboy charges them $10 each and takes them to their room. When the manager returns he discovers the guest have been over charged $5. He tells the bellboy to refund the money to them. The bellboy, not wishing to deal in change, gives each guest a $1 refund and pockets the remaining $2. The question is... if each guest only paid $9 for the room ($10 -$1 =$9), and $9 x 3 = $27 (the cost of the room), and the bellboy put $2 in his pocket, and $2 + $27 =$29 .... what happened to the other $1 from the original $30?

This damn "riddle" is like a bad chain letter that keeps coming back. Anyone else sick of it?

Annie-Xmas
11-17-2000, 09:35 AM
Originally posted by Walrus
Another old puzzle for you.

A man lives on the 35th floor of a tower block.
Every day he takes the lift to the ground floor on his way to work. On the way home he only takes the lift to the 30th and walks the last five floors (except when it's raining).
Why?

'S easy really

Walrus

The man is very short, and can't reach above the 30th button on the elevator, except when he can hit it with his umbrella. Didn't he ever think of using a cane?

DropOfaHat
11-17-2000, 09:36 AM
Originally posted by c_goat

This damn "riddle" is like a bad chain letter that keeps coming back. Anyone else sick of it?

Yup

Hokienautic
11-17-2000, 09:39 AM
As to the elevator question, the man's a midget. He can't reach up to 35, so he hits the highest floor he can, 30. Of course, when it's raining, he has an unbrella and can reach it with that. You also left out that he goes to his floor when he's not alone in the elevator.

Lamar Mundane
11-17-2000, 11:15 AM
A crossword puzzle clue...

5 letter word

Clue: Not A to G, not P to Z.

DropOfaHat
11-17-2000, 11:21 AM
Originally posted by Lamar Mundane
A crossword puzzle clue...

5 letter word

Clue: Not A to G, not P to Z.

water?

is that the answer to the OP??

Jack Batty
11-17-2000, 11:36 AM
There are three words in the English language that end in -gry ...

Nah, I'm just kidding.

Getting back to racinchikki's riddle. The one where the guy shoots himself after hearing a song on the radio in the car. I remember this one was on this very board a few months ago. It's something like, he's a radio DJ. He's playing a tape over the air to use as an alibi while he goes to kill someone. When he hears that the tape has looped and his alibi is shot, he pulls over and kills himself.

Here's mine (easy one, but the only one I could think of at the moment):

A man and his son are on a fishing trip. On the way back they get into a car accident. The father is killed instantly and the son is in critical condition. At the hospital, the surgeon approaches the table, steps back and says, "I cannot work on this boy, he is my son." How is this possible.

DropOfaHat
11-17-2000, 11:41 AM
Originally posted by Jack Batty

A man and his son are on a fishing trip. On the way back they get into a car accident. The father is killed instantly and the son is in critical condition. At the hospital, the surgeon approaches the table, steps back and says, "I cannot work on this boy, he is my son." How is this possible.

Surgeon's his mom.

The Assailant
11-17-2000, 11:43 AM
Originally posted by Mjollnir
What five-letter word doubles its size when you add two letters?

The answer is oxide, dioxide.

DropOfaHat
11-17-2000, 11:47 AM
Originally posted by The Assailant
Originally posted by Mjollnir
What five-letter word doubles its size when you add two letters?

The answer is oxide, dioxide.

I for one will be pretty disappointed if that turns out to be the answer (for the record, I did think of it too - I was flipping through "di-" words in the dictionary - but I rejected as being weak.

Lamar Mundane
11-17-2000, 12:09 PM
water?




You are correct, sir.

Dinsdale
11-17-2000, 12:18 PM
NOW WAIT JUST A GOLLDARNED MINUTE!

WATER???

Not A to G???

What the Sam Hill are you talking about.

I'm more confused than a horny blind lesbian in a fish market.

(Damn. Told you I had to work on those. And my birthday is only 3 days away - in case you forgot.)

Hokienautic
11-17-2000, 12:22 PM
Dinsdale ... you're gonna kick yourself when you hear this. Not A to G or P to Z ... so it's in between those. H to O. H20. Water. Ha. Ha. Ha.

;-)

Dinsdale
11-17-2000, 01:37 PM
Damn that's stupid!
Gotta remember it.
But, it has nothing to do with the OP, tho, right?
DropOfAHat's post threw me for a loop like an outta control ferris wheel on amphetamines.

starfish
11-17-2000, 01:56 PM
Originally posted by BlackKnight
Originally posted by AudreyK

[quote][b]5. Two men are eating in a restaurant. One man orders albatross soup. The second man gets up, runs over to a window, and jumps out. Why did the second man kill himself?

He was once stranded with some people (exact story varies) and one of them disappeared. Shortly later, another person serves the starving group some "albatross". It is really the missing person, and after the man in the restaurant realizes what albatross really tastes like, he knows he has eaten another person. He can't live with himself, and so jumps out the window.

*bows*

But one man ordered the soup. The second man jumped out the window. Are the "one man" and the "second man" the same? I'll admit the question used "second man" instead of "other man"

mojopitch
11-17-2000, 02:14 PM
This has probably been beaten to death as well, but here goes;

A woman pushes her car in front of a Hotel. She instantly realizes she's bankrupt. Why?

DropOfaHat
11-17-2000, 02:17 PM
Originally posted by mojopitch
This has probably been beaten to death as well, but here goes;

A woman pushes her car in front of a Hotel. She instantly realizes she's bankrupt. Why?

Monopoly game

Dinsdale
11-17-2000, 02:18 PM
Hey! I finally got one. Monopoly!

Hokienautic
11-17-2000, 03:41 PM
Starfish ... I think the entire answer is that there was originally three guys, and one of them died. There was also a dead albatross. So they cooked the albatross AND the human flesh and make two pots of stew. They poured them into bowls and mixed them up so neither knew if they had human or albatross. When the first guy ordered albatross soup and ate it, he was immediately relieved to know he was eating the SAME thing he ate before. Therefore, the SECOND man -- without eating a thing -- knew that it must have been HE who ate the human stew, and killed himself.

Thrashbarg
11-17-2000, 11:00 PM
What, nobody liked my Scrabble answer?
_______________

On another tack, my 7yr old had a groaner that stumped me all day, til the 4 yr old answered it:

What has two knees and swims?

Geek Mecha
11-17-2000, 11:12 PM
Originally posted by starfish
But one man ordered the soup. The second man jumped out the window. Are the "one man" and the "second man" the same? I'll admit the question used "second man" instead of "other man"
In the version I know (it seems like no one knows the same variation), the person who was eaten was the wife of the second man. The three of them were stranded on a deserted island a few years back. The wife was killed by the first man, who then serves her as soup to the second man, her husband. Years later, in the restaurant, he realizes what albatross soup really tastes like, realizes what he really ate back on the island, and becomes upset. So he kills himself.

Cheerful story, no?

scratch1300
11-18-2000, 09:51 AM
OK, this thread has been hijacked so often, I'm sure we'll never get an answer to the OP.

So another one won't hurt.

A woman was in a house in the woods, feeling sleepy. After a while, she got up, washed her hands, and felt happy!

What color was the woman?

Astroboy14
11-18-2000, 10:19 AM
OK, I'm gonna hijack too (sorry!):

You are walking down a road, and come to a fork in the road. Two men guard the fork in the road, and you have been told that one always tells the truth, and one always lies (you don't know which one lies, and which one tells the truth). You know that one way leads to your destination, and one way leads to certain death (but which fork leads to your destination??). You have also been told that you may only ask one question... SO, what ONE question can you ask to determine the correct way to your destination?



I hope I didn't garble this too much... I have re-read it several times, but I just got in after a night on the town, and I'm a bit buzzed right now...

Also, this is not a "trick" question... there IS an answer that makes sense...

scratch1300
11-18-2000, 10:48 AM
AstroBoy, I know! You ask one guy (either one), "In what direction will he tell me to go, in order to fulfill my destiny?", pointing at the other guy. If you happened to ask Truthy, he'll point to the Death path that Lie-Boy would have indicated. If you happened to ask Lie-Boy, he'll point to the Death path, because that's what Truthy would not have pointed to. So, either way, you go up the other path.

August West
11-18-2000, 11:01 AM
I believe the woman in the house was as white as snow.

JFMichael
11-18-2000, 02:36 PM

Dr_Paprika
11-18-2000, 09:22 PM
I know a five letter word that doubles it size when you add three letters...

pence... tuppence

Astroboy14
11-18-2000, 10:53 PM
Good one, Scratchy!! Got it on the first try!!

Woo Hoo!

Major Feelgud
11-19-2000, 12:49 PM
I have an answer to the OP:

focal
bifocal


Love the other riddles in this thread!

Major Feelgud
11-19-2000, 12:51 PM
Originally posted by JFMichael


It's a big sea faring bird. I think it's bad luck to kill and eat it. Vaguely remember that from the poem Rime of the Ancient Mariner, and "water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink!"

Yeah, and what part of you grows 3 times in size when stroked by a woman?

barbitu8
11-19-2000, 01:21 PM
I don't know the answer to the OP, but I do know that "focal" will not do. Bifocal refers to lenses and it is not double the size of regular lenses. It just contains two lenses, but one lens is not the same size as the other. "Bi-" is a prefix meaning two and not double. I think you guys are on the wrong track with that prefix. I think that the answer will lie in adding two letters somewhere in the middle of the word.

Sigene
11-19-2000, 01:36 PM
What has two knees and swims?


Don't tell me this is a two-knee fish!

barbitu8
11-19-2000, 02:40 PM
People.

BlackKnight
11-19-2000, 04:18 PM
Originally posted by Major Feelgud
Yeah, and what part of you grows 3 times in size when stroked by a woman?

My ego. :)

quasar
11-19-2000, 06:39 PM
Originally posted by Thrashbarg
What, nobody liked my Scrabble answer?


Yep, it was great. On the strength of its wittiness and creativity I officially declare it the correct answer to the OP. :D

MattTheCroc
11-19-2000, 09:19 PM
Another answer to the "Truthy, Liar" puzzle would be to ask them "If I asked you yesterday which way to go, what would you have said?" And truthy will tell the truth, but the liar would say the opposite of what he said yesterday, which was a lie, so he tells you which way to go.

aseymayo
11-19-2000, 10:52 PM
Man, I thought I had come up with a really clever answer to the OP, viz lone and cloned, and was feeling terribly pleased with myself until a stray brain cell sprang to life and pointed out "lone" is only four letters.

Oh well.

Danielinthewolvesden
11-20-2000, 03:16 AM
Originally posted by AudreyK

1. A man is at work, and he wants to go home. However, he will not go home, because a man wearing a mask is waiting there for him. What do both men do for a living?

2. A man is found shot to death inside a room with a table, four chairs, and fifty-three bicycles. Why was this man shot?

3. A man is found dead in the middle of nowhere, holding a broken toothpick. How did he die?

4. A man is in an elevator, and it stops. After ten minutes, he pulls out a gun and shoots himself. Why?

5. Two men are eating in a restaurant. One man orders albatross soup. The second man gets up, runs over to a window, and jumps out. Why did the second man kill himself? [/B]

1.They are twin burglars, and one stays home for an alibi, while the other one burles. The one at home is wearing the mask as he is spraypainting a chair in the basement.

2. He was bicycle thief, and the police finally caught up with him.

3. The toothpick was poisoned, the other half is in his mouth.

4. He gets really really despondent about elevator malfunctions. (Note that all the b"roght" answeres about life-support namchines are entirely wrong- in hospitals they have their own generator for those. Note, also that the power can go out in an elevator without affecting the rest of the building, as they have a separate fuse/circuit breaker.)

5. The man hates folks who kill endangered species, and wanted to make a protest.

Danielinthewolvesden
11-20-2000, 03:27 AM
Originally posted by Astroboy14
You are walking down a road, and come to a fork in the road. Two men guard the fork in the road, and you have been told that one always tells the truth, and one always lies (you don't know which one lies, and which one tells the truth). You know that one way leads to your destination, and one way leads to certain death (but which fork leads to your destination??). You have also been told that you may only ask one question... SO, what ONE question can you ask to determine the correct way to your destination?
[/B]

You pick up the fork, and kill either of them. Then, using the fork to threaten the other, you say "I am going to make you go ahead of me down the path- now are you going to show me which is the right way?" If it is the liar who is the survivor, he will say "No", the truthsayer will say "yes".

As for the "man with the pack query"- in the pack was an anvil- his freinds went in for REAL sick practical jokes.

Major Feelgud
11-20-2000, 04:47 AM
Originally posted by barbitu8
I don't know the answer to the OP, but I do know that "focal" will not do. Bifocal refers to lenses and it is not double the size of regular lenses. It just contains two lenses, but one lens is not the same size as the other. "Bi-" is a prefix meaning two and not double. I think you guys are on the wrong track with that prefix. I think that the answer will lie in adding two letters somewhere in the middle of the word.

Yeah, says you.

Focal lens, has one focus.

Bifocals have two foci. Yah!

Geek Mecha
11-20-2000, 07:15 AM
Danielinthewolvesden-- :rolleyes: :D

BlackKnight
11-20-2000, 12:13 PM
Focal lens, has one focus.
Bifocals have two foci. Yah!

Exactly. There are two different things, not one which has doubled in size.

DropOfaHat
12-04-2000, 03:33 PM
Originally posted by BlackKnight
Focal lens, has one focus.
Bifocals have two foci. Yah!

Exactly. There are two different things, not one which has doubled in size.

Definitely gotta go with the Black Knight on this one. Bifocal lenses are no larger than ordinary lenses - they just happen to be made of two pieces, instead of one. Is a two-paned window twice the size of a one-pane window with the same size outer frame? No!

I had a similar thought as an answer to the original post - cycle and bicycle. But then I thought cycle wasn't a specific enough term (like focal, it's not quite a solid object, more like a concept).

My other thoughts were that the answer could be in Roman Numerals! For instance, a word like "civil" or "mimic" might be able to be doubled by adding two more numerals - alas, not only could I not find the right numbers, but I don't think the above "words" are in proper roman-numeral form.

I suspect that the OP riddle be a bastardization of the "add two letters to make it shorter" riddle...

barbitu8
12-04-2000, 05:37 PM
Not that it much matters since we agree that bifocal won't do, it should be pointed out that the "add-on" lens in bifocals is not even half the size of the initial lens. As the name implies, it is a lens that is added onto the underlying lens for near sight. It is usually about 1/3 the size of the underlying lens, which is not shortened in any way.

Mirage
12-04-2000, 06:48 PM
It's a big sea faring bird. I think it's bad luck to kill and eat it. Vaguely remember that from the poem Rime of the Ancient Mariner, and "water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink!"
Random FYI. Did you know that you can sing the Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner to the theme to Gilligan's Island?

It is an ancient mariner,
And he stoppeth one of three.
"By thy long grey beard and glittering eye,
Now wherefore stopp'st thou me?

"The Bridegroom's doors are opened wide,
And I am next of kin;
The guests are met, the feast is set:
May'st hear the merry din." ...

BigStar303
12-08-2000, 05:25 PM
The original question in this thread has been bugging me ever since I stumbled across it a few days ago.

I'm no closer to figuring it out, but it occurs to me that no one has really taken a scientific approach to doing so. A couple of thoughts:



1) If we are to take a totally literal approach to this, notice that we're told that the *word* doubles its size...not whatever object/concept/whatever the word refers to.

Admittedly, it's hard to fathom adding two letters to a five-letter word and making it a ten-letter word, but I just thought I'd point this out.


2) Another procedural thing: most attempts at giving an answer have taken a five-letter word and added a prefix or a suffix. There's nothing in the question that says the two letters have to be added at the beginning or the end of the word, or even that they have to be in sequence. The one answer (though not to the OP) that did this was adding three letters to TEN to get TWENTY.


3) Assuming what I said in 1) is not a factor, (i.e. we're looking for a word that *refers* to something that's twice the size of what the word you start with refers to) -- then we need to both start and end with a word that defines a very definite quantity of some sort. Two examples would be "dozen" and "octet" -- but I haven't had any luck with either of these so far. This may seem obvious, but it's why "focal" and "bifocal" don't really work.


4) In any case, simply adding a "bi-" prefix seems like a pretty cheesy way to answer the question. I would hope after all this that the answer is a little more substantive than this.


No help at all, I know...but I thought I'd give it a shot.

BlackKnight
12-08-2000, 06:46 PM
Originally posted by BigStar303
3) Assuming what I said in 1) is not a factor, (i.e. we're looking for a word that *refers* to something that's twice the size of what the word you start with refers to) -- then we need to both start and end with a word that defines a very definite quantity of some sort.

I'm not so sure about this.
What if the words are something like "single" or "double". They are measurments, which can be compared to each other in a definite way, but they themselves are not definite.

Gozu Tashoya
12-08-2000, 09:30 PM
My coworker just nailed me with this one, and it's the first logic-based (as opposed to "create a scenario" such as the albatross soup) puzzle that's stumped me in a while. (Which probably says something about the difficulty, or lack thereof, of crap I've been hit with.)

This one's a tad hard to explain - it's more visual - but here goes.

Four people are buried up to their necks in a straight line, one behind the other. The first person is facing the other three, but between him and them is a wall that is opaque that is infinitely tall and infinitely long (read: you can't see around, over, or through it). Each person has a hat that is either black or white. Nobody can see their own hat, and each person can see only those of the people in front of them. (All four people are facing the wall, by the way.)

So the fourth guy can see what hats #2 and 3 are wearing, #3 can see #2, and #2 can only see the wall. To be dug up, somebody needs to know, beyond a doubt, who is wearing which hats. They can not turn, or free themselves, do not speak, and there are no reflective surfaces anywhere.

For the record, person 1 is wearing black, two is white, three black, four white. So, if you were to draw it it would look like:

B | W B W

With everybody facing the wall.

The answer to this is self-evident once you get it. In other words, you won't need to ask me if you're correct (no digging out, no communication between the people, no reflective surfaces, passers by, or falling hats). The people knows the formation they're buried in, and they all know there are two hats of each color. Beyond this, they, and you, are on their/your own. Good luck.

Gozu Tashoya
12-08-2000, 09:35 PM
No scenes from the exorcist, meaning no heads spinning 180o and no way to see behind oneself, peripheral vision be damned.

Second riddle: There are 5 barrels of apples. Four of the barrels contain apples that weight exactly one pound each. The fifth barrel contains apples that weigh 1.1 pound each. For all intents and purposes, this difference can not be discerned by looking, hefting, or eating the apples. On the other hand, there is a lady with an extremely shitty scale, who will let you use it to weigh whatever you want. The catch is that this scale will accurately weigh only one weight, at which point the needle gets stuck at that weight. Which means that you can only use it once. Adding or removing weight will not move the needle one bit.

So, without stooping to water displacement (it's in the desert, okay?) or other means, figure out which barrel has the 1.1 pound apples.

Danielinthewolvesden
12-08-2000, 09:37 PM
KKB- are you sure you have not left something out?

Danielinthewolvesden
12-08-2000, 09:41 PM
Riddle 2 is fine, altho the "shitty" scale has to be real accurate- wieght 1 apple from bbl #1. 2 from bbl#2, etc., all at the same time. If the 1.1 lb apples are in #3, say, then it will be .3lb overwieght, if in bbl #1, then .1ln over, etc.

John Corrado
12-08-2000, 10:20 PM
KKB- You *must* have left something out.

At this point, both Person #4 and Person #3 know the set-up of Person #2 and Person #3. Person #4 can see them, and Person #3 (seeing Person #2's hat) knows that if *his* hat was white, Person #4 would know the full scenario (as both Person #2 and Person #3 would be wearing white hats, leaving Person #1 and Person #4 to *have* to be wearing black hats). Ergo, Person #4 (by sight) and Person #3 (by logic) know which hats are on Persons #2 and 3.

Unfortunately, that leaves a black hat on 4 and a white hat on 1. Or the other way around- can't see the puzzle from the reply screen. But either way it's the same situation- *no* one has any information on person #1 or 4 other than *one* is wearing a white hat and the *other* is wearing a black. But that's it. So until someone can catch a glimpse of hat #4 or #1, there's no way for any of them to get free.

Unless the 'solution' to the puzzle is, "And they all bake to death in the hot sun, which is just punishment for those who come up with these abosultely bizzarre and unrealistic scenarios."

Danielinthewolvesden
12-08-2000, 11:24 PM
Thanks John, I was hoping I wasn't crazy- or if i was, i had some company. :D If that wall was transparent, tho....

Askia
12-09-2000, 02:10 AM
I'm going to take a stab at this.

I'm assuming this isn't some sort of weird word-play problem or Greek riddle or something. That this is a real problem that can be solved through observation, logic and deduced or infered from new information. If a person were somehow ACTUALLY in this circumstance they could puzzle their way out of it.

Fair enough.

Okay, we've got 4 guys. None of them are supposed to communicate between each other. One guy is all by himself on the other side of an infinitely long and high opaque wall. Can't see over, through, or around it. The guy all by himself ( Guy no.1) is wearing a black hat but doesn't know it. The next guy on the other side of the wall (Guy no. 2) is wearing a white hat, but doesn't know it, either. Guy no. 3 is wearing a black hat, can't see his own hat, and can see the guy's hat in front of him. The last guy is wearing a white hat, can't see his own hat, and can see the hat of Guy no. 3 (black) and guy no. 2 (white).

B | W B W

Only one of these guys needs to know for sure who is wearing what for them all to be freed.

Well, the guy by himself on the other side of the wall is SOL. He can't contribute to any knowledge about himself, let alone anyone else's situation. He can only come up with the possible combinations of four guys wearing two white hats and two black hats. (6) Sucks to be that guy.

The second guy immediately on the other side of the wall isn't much better off. Sure, he's got company, but he doesn't know which hat he's wearing, let alone anyone else's. He can't do anything to find out about the other two guys behind him. Sucks to be him, too.

The third guy knows that the second guy is wearing a white hat. He must feel frustrated as hell, not knowing his own hat's color and only guessing at the other guys'. Kinda sucks to be him, too.

Last guy, guy no. 4, has the most information at his disposal. He knows the colors of two hats with certainty. He knows that there are two black hats and two white hats involved in this scenario. If he can somehow determine the color of his own hat, he can by process of elimination determine the hat of the guy on the other side of the wall and get himself and these other guys out of this.

So.

I'm making one assumption about these hats that might not be true: that these hats are EXACTLY the SAME size and shape except for their color. But nothing in this puzzle has stated that explicitly. Suppose the white and black hats were different shapes and sizes? Suppose the white hats were chef's hats and the black hats were top hats?

My first solution is easy: barring talking, digging his way out, trying to dislodge his hat, or looking around in vain for passersby and reflective surfaces, the last guy just looks at the shadows on the ground. He notes that the shadow of his hat matches guy no. 2's shadow and screams "Okay! I'm wearing the WHITE hat, same as guy no. 2! The guy in front of me is wearing a black hat, same as the guy on the other side of the wall! Now get me the hell outta here!"

Okay. That works if the hats are different shapes. What if the hats were basically the same size and shape? A possible second solution that the white hats, unlike the wall, might be slightly transluscent, allowing a little sunlight to shine through them. Careful observation of the shadows might allow guy no, 4 to see this difference and still deduce the hat colors correctly.

Okay. Suppose they were EXACTLY the same hat except for color?

Hm. Well. I personally don't wear black hats in the when its sunny much because that makes me sweat. Now if these guys were outside in the sun buried up to their necks and unable to move, I'd be willing to bet the guys in the white hats (no. 2 and no. 4) would be more comfortable than the black hat guy (no. 3). No. 4, noticing how guy in the black hat is getting cooked, deduces that his hat is white like no. 2.

I have a few more wild guesses based on how, using sensory information, guy no. 4 might determine his hat is white based on smell, touch and taste (Don't ask). How'd I do? I hope I got this right because I wasted over half an hour on this...

Major Feelgud
12-09-2000, 03:14 AM
Guy #4 sees black and white hats in front of him. He sees black hat #3 die of sunstroke so he deduces that he cannot be wearing a black hat. He therefore knows that he is wearing a white hat and therefore guy #1 is wearing a black hat.

He has the solution and they are all freed, except that guys #1 and #3 are dead already.

Gozu Tashoya
12-09-2000, 05:00 AM
All hats are exactly the same except for color. The location is indoors (for some Godforsaken reason). All 4 participants are relatively clever individuals, with a decent grasp of logic. None are suicidal, and all want to leave as soon as possible. These wishes are known, and all four would know the instant somebody "won" (when that person calls the unreflective, unbiased, unresponsive referees).

So, again, who wins and how?

Seriously, you guys are really, really close.

Gozu Tashoya
12-09-2000, 05:21 AM
Actually, never mind, either I or my coworker have been smoking the crack rock. There's something wrong here - I'll know on Monday what it is/was.

To make up for this fiasco, here's one that I do know is correct.

There are two rooms down the hall from each other. One room has three desklamps controlled by 3 switches in the second room. The job of the person in the second room is to figure out which switches control which desk lamp.

Conditions:
Once the person leaves the switch room, he can not return (automatic, un-ajarable doors, and all that jazz). Nor can he see the room containing the desk lamps from the switch room. The lamp room is completely sealed - no light can escape the room in any way. There are no accomplices, robots, or other mechanical aids. Each switch controls one, and only one, lamp. Each switch is binary - on and off, no dimmer or other intermediate settings.

Sorry 'bout that whole damn hat thing. I'll have it straightened out by Monday at the latest.... :(

Askia
12-09-2000, 11:11 AM
Query: Does the man have hands? If he's armless, I don't know the answer.

I am also assuming that the lights/switch relays are in perfect order and that the lamps aren't attached to any sound devices or anything untoward like that.

This one is easier, and this is solved the same basic premise I was using to figure out the hat thing: barring primary visual information, you have to move on to the other senses and/or secondary visual information.

Okay. Guy flips the first two switches in the control room and leaves the last one alone, then waits a minute or two. Before he leaves, he cuts off one of the switches (let's say the first one) and leaves the middle switch on. Then he takes a leisurely stroll down the hall.

When he goes into the room with the lamps, only one lamp should be burning. He knows that the switch he left on controls that one. He then feels the light bulbs on the remaining two lamps. One should be warm; that's controlled by the first switch. The last one, the one he never cut on, should be cold.

Askia
12-09-2000, 11:15 AM
Don't knock smoking crack until you try it. That's the only way I can grasp Hegelian theory.

Dr_Paprika
12-09-2000, 12:40 PM
Person #3 DOES know the colour of HIS hat, he would know everything if he knew the colour of the hat behind him. If he knew the person behind him was sweating as much as he was, the puzzle would be solved.

Askia
12-09-2000, 01:36 PM
Dr_Paprika's right; it's up to persons 3 and 4 to figure it out. No. 3 can deduce more than I realized.

This is the configuration of the puzzle as it stands:

B | W B W

But suppose it was like this...?

B | W W B or W | B B W

Then there would no problem here. If everyone is reasoning this the same way, they would know that no. 4 would immediately see that the two guys ahead of him are wearing the same color hats, so he and the guy on the other side of the wall must be, by deductive reasoning, wearing the opposite color hats. That would stump them for all of six seconds before they got out. Since they aren't free yet, you can eliminate those possibilities.

Likewise, these guys know that if they alternate 2 types of hats among 4 of them, you would get 6 different positions. That leaves four possible configurations. They must be either THIS... configuration "A"...

B | B W W

... configuration "B"...

W | W B B

... this one...

W | B W B

and the right answer, configuration "D"...

B | W B W

Guy no. 4 knows he can safely eliminate "A" and "C". They don't jibe with what he sees.

Guy no. 3 must have arrived at much the same conclusion. Since he's so smart, he has safely eliminated the same four possibilities as no. 4 did. So he knows he MUST be wearing a black hat because if he was wearing a white hat they'd be gone by now.

Guy no. 2 has likewise arrived at the same conclusion as nos. 3 and 4, taking a bit longer. He knows HE is wearing a white hat and the guy immediately behind him is wearing a black hat. It's the only possibility that exists.

Even Guy no. 1 has figured out that there must be only two possibilities left among the six. The question is, how does either he or the last guy determine, with certainty, what color hats they are wearing?

THAT'S when Guy no. 4 looks down at the shadows on the ground. He begins to see heat waves imminating from B's shadow; even though they haven't been outside long, the hot sun is beginning to working a number on him. Since his own shadow is lacking those heat ripples and he doesn't feel all that hot yet, he immediately realizes he and no 3. CAN'T be wearing the same color hat. With that, he screams out the correct configuration and the sadists who thought this up set them free.

toonerama
12-09-2000, 01:42 PM
Do you get wafers with it?

Ablett
12-09-2000, 02:07 PM
Re: KKB's HATS riddle

KKB, the way you have worded the riddle makes it impossible to solve. IMPOSSIBLE. If any person's hat has a 50% chance of being black or a 50% chance of being white, then looking at someone else's hat gives you ZERO indication of the color of your own hat (assuming no reflective surfaces, etc).

If, however, you know that there are 2 white hats and two black hats, then you can get start using logical deduction. So, assuming they all know that there are 2 black hats and 2 white hats, the answer would be something like this:

If the set up is this:

B | W B W

The dude who wins is "B", who is 2nd from the right. He knows his hat is black. How? He looks ahead and sees white. He also knows that the guy behind him can see 2 color hats. MEANING, if the guy behind him sees 2 hats that are the _SAME_ color, he will know that his hat is obviously the OTHER color. Because this guy DIDN'T stand up, "B" knows that his color hat mustn't be the same color as the guy in front of him. THEREFORE, he sees the guy in front of him having a white hat, his must be black. This is all, of course, assuming that they know there are 2 white and 2 black hats.

But the way the orginal riddle is worded, "LOGIC" can not solve it.

Askia
12-09-2000, 02:49 PM
Ablett: Don't say thaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat, man. You know how much time I wasted on that riddle? ;)

Danielinthewolvesden
12-09-2000, 05:23 PM
Ablett & the others are right. It could jsut as well be 4 black or 4 white hats, it does not have to be 2 of each, according to the way it is worded- again- it appears something has been left out. It appears heat waves & temp differences are not part of the logic puzzle. OK< KKB, time for you to publish the "answer" and the reasoning behind it- then take your well deserved beating as we point out you are wrong.

Gozu Tashoya
12-10-2000, 02:14 PM
::general sound of disgust::

The email from my coworker:
"If I understand your question right, I think you misunderstood the riddle. The puzzle was to figure out which man guessed the color of the hat on his own head, not the entire party's hat colors. 3 realizes that his hat is black because otherwise 4 would have known for sure that his hat was black."

Well, hell, if I knew that's all I had to do, then it wouldn't have been so damn hard....

Sorry all, our company's notorious for having bad communication.... :(

Danielinthewolvesden
12-10-2000, 06:11 PM
No, sorry, if all the hats could have been either BorW, or any mixture thereby, no one could figure out ANY hat color.

MetropoChris
12-10-2000, 07:07 PM
Villains always lie, good guys always tell the truth.

You see three men on the road and you ask the first one "What are you, a villain or a good guy?" You cannot make out his mumbled answer so you ask the second man "What did he say?" The second man responds "He said he is a villain." The third man says "The second man is lying." You must tell me exactly what two of the men are, good guy's or villain's?


A farmer had a stone that he used to measure grain on his scale. One day his neighbor borrowed the stone, and when he returned, it was broken into four pieces. The neighbor was very apologetic, but the farmer thanked the neighbor for doing him a big favor. The farmer said that now he can measure his grain in one pound increments starting at one pound all the way to forty pounds using these four stones. What do each one of the four stones weigh?

Harmonious Discord
12-10-2000, 07:21 PM
2 villians
1 good guy

Stones of 12,11,9,8 pounds each, assuming the use of a balance.

Harmonious Discord
12-10-2000, 07:35 PM
The first response was wrong, entering correction.

The first person can be either, but you asked for two of the men. One of the remaining is a good guy, one is a bad guy.

jcgmoi
12-10-2000, 08:02 PM
Use stones weighing 1,3,9,27 pounds.

Phobia, how do you weigh 39 pounds with your set?

ellis555
12-10-2000, 09:12 PM
To be more specific, the second man must be a villain ("he said he is a villain" can not be a truthful statement), and the third must be a good guy.

-ellis

Harmonious Discord
12-10-2000, 09:32 PM
39 pounds of grain:

Put the 11 pound stone on one side, and 11 pounds of grain on the other side. Remove the 11 pound stone. Put the 9+8 pound stones with the grain,and fill the other side with the 28 pounds of grain. Give the customer the 11 pounds from the side with the stones and the 28 pounds from the othe side of the balance.

ellis555
12-10-2000, 09:36 PM
Here's another one.

You have 12 coins. One of the coins is counterfeit, and is indistinguishable except by weight. However, you do not know if it is heavier or lighter than the other 11 coins. You have a balance, but can only use it 3 times. Determine which coin is counterfeit, and whether it is heavier or lighter than the others.

-ellis

MetropoChris
12-10-2000, 10:48 PM
JC and Ellis... Very good! Sorry Phobia...

Ive seen the coin one in another MB I frequent and went on and on for two pages! Im not even sure I got it once the answer was posted! You are very cruel to post such a riddle :)

Heres a fun one. Johnny's mother has three children. They are 8, 10 and 13 years old and have brown, blonde and red hair respectively. Their names are April, June and what?

ellis555
12-10-2000, 11:00 PM
Johnny.

LifeWillFall
12-11-2000, 02:49 AM
I assume no one will get the answer due to the complexity, but if you are trying then don't click the link.

LifeWillFall
12-11-2000, 02:51 AM
ooops didn't add the link here it is

http://home.wxs.nl/~faase009/Ha12coins.html

Prof. Dumbledore
12-11-2000, 03:56 AM
Originally posted by ellis555
Here's another one.
You have 12 coins. One of the coins is counterfeit, and is indistinguishable except by weight. However, you do not know if it is heavier or lighter than the other 11 coins. You have a balance, but can only use it 3 times. Determine which coin is counterfeit, and whether it is heavier or lighter than the others.


Hey i just calculated the answer. I don't know if its the one you're expecting but i guess since you guys called it complex and it took me 5 seconds to figure out so i'm a genius right???

My answer is:
You make 3 groups of 4 coins each and weigh two of them against each other, once and if they come equal you know the one you didn't weigh was correct, otherwise you remove the lighter coin group and weigh the heavier one with the other group and get see if they balance then the lighter one was the one otherwise if that group tilts the scale to the same level as the lighter ones then you know it was the heavier ones otherwise it was the other ones.

out of this group you make a group of two coins and weigh the group against the other and see. If you had selected the coin lighter group previously then the coin is one of the lighter ones and otherwise it is one of the heavier ones. Then since you have groups of two coins you can just use your HAND to estimate which one is heavier and which one is lighter and woohooo you have the fake coin.

I think i cheated in the end though so maybe i'm not so smart after all :D

Love
Dumbledore

ellis555
12-11-2000, 02:34 PM
Nice try, Prof, but your hand just ain't gonna cut it. Three uses of the balance is all you need. A couple of contingencies are rather easy to solve, but it's getting all of them that is the fun part.

-ellis

jcgmoi
12-11-2000, 04:39 PM
Let's go back to the Good Guys and the Villains.

A says: "B is a GG."

B says: "A is not a GG."

Prove that one of them is telling the truth but is not a GG.

Don't forget to consider the possibility that a speaker is neither a GG nor a V.

Cribbed from Raymond Smullyan via Martin Gardner.

Johnny L.A.
12-11-2000, 04:53 PM
What five-letter word doubles its size when you add two letters?

ellis555
12-11-2000, 05:11 PM
Originally posted by jcgmoi
Let's go back to the Good Guys and the Villains.

A says: "B is a GG."

B says: "A is not a GG."

Prove that one of them is telling the truth but is not a GG.

Don't forget to consider the possibility that a speaker is neither a GG nor a V.

Cribbed from Raymond Smullyan via Martin Gardner.

It seems to me that it could be either.

A lies (is a V). That means B is telling the truth. So B is either a GG or a TTnGG. But if B were a GG, then A would be telling a truth, which would go against his standards. So, if A is a V then B is a TTnGG, the conditions are met.

A is the TTnGG. He speaks the truth, and B is a GG. B must speak the truth, and correctly identifies A as not being a GG.

So, as long as there are no restrictions on who can be a V and who can be a GG, either one of them could be the TTnGG.

-ellis

DonJuanDeMarco3
12-11-2000, 06:11 PM
what word does the inverse of the op when adding two letters to a four letter word

DonJuanDeMarco3
12-11-2000, 06:13 PM
what four letter word does the inverse of the op when adding two letters

DonJuanDeMarco3
12-11-2000, 06:16 PM
I keep messinbg up, I should say it can preform the inverse. It is possible for this word to become half its original size by adding two letters to the previous four letter version

MetropoChris
12-11-2000, 09:40 PM
Originally AND CORRECTLY posted by ellis555
To be more specific, the second man must be a villain ("he said he is a villain" can not be a truthful statement), and the third must be a good guy.

-ellis

The first guy is indecernable. Regardless of what he is he will say he is a good-guy. As Ellis said the second is lying because he said the first said hes a villain (which is impossible). The third said the second is lying (which he is) making 3 a GG.

1st - Impossible
2nd - Villain/Liar
3rd - Good Guy/Truthful

jcgmoi
12-12-2000, 08:53 AM
ellis, right answer but I didn't follow all your reasoning.

I would say, A either is telling the truth or not. If he is, then B is GG and telling the truth when he says A is not GG. In this case A is telling tyhe truth but is not GG.

If A is lying, then B is not GG. B, however, is telling the truth when he says A is not GG. So in this case B is teling the truth but is not GG.

ellis555
12-13-2000, 12:45 PM
Your version is a little more lucid, but we followed the same chain of logic.

-ellis

btw, TTnGG = Truth-Telling non-Good Guy

jebert
12-13-2000, 01:46 PM
Another solution to the 12 coin, 3 balance problem is to code the coins using base-3 numbers. There are 27 possible 3-digit base-3 numbers using the digits 0, 1 & 2. Pick a set of 12 of these with the following properties:
(1) The set of 12 has four numbers with 0's, four with 1's, and four with 2's in each of the three digit positions, and
(2) The "digits complement" of a number in the set cannot also be in the set (where "digits complement" is defined as the number obtained by replacing all 0's with 2's, all 2's with 0's, and leaving 1's alone).

One such set is 001, 012, 020, 021, 100, 102, 112, 121, 200, 211, 212, 220.
Code the 12 coins with these numbers.

Now conduct the 3 weighings. For the first, place the 4 coins with 0's in the first digit position on the left side, the 4 with 2's in the first digit position on the right,and leaving the 4 with 1's aside. Repeat for the second and third weighings, using coins with 0's and 2's in the second and third digit positions. After each weighing record a 0 if the left side is lighter than the right, a 2 if heavier, and a 1 if the sides balance. You end up with a 3-digit number. If that number is in the original set, the coin coded with that number is the odd one and it is light. If the number is not in the set, its "complement" is, and that coin is heavy.

Try it, you'll like it.

jcgmoi
12-13-2000, 01:54 PM
ellis--You lost me early on when you said " A lies (is a V)." No matter, your answer was correct.

Try another? Same source as the last.

This time all speakers are either GGs or Vs.

C says: "B is a V.'

B says: "A and C are of the same type (both GG or both V)."

What is A?

zut
12-13-2000, 03:07 PM
Re the OP....

Perhaps the OP misquoted the original puzzle, and it should have been, "What five-letter word doubles when you add two letters?" [Note the slight difference]

'Cause if that were the case, then the answer could be DOLES. Add a UB, and you get DOUBLES. Well? Whaddaya think?

BigStar303
12-13-2000, 04:51 PM
Originally posted by zut
Re the OP....

Perhaps the OP misquoted the original puzzle, and it should have been, "What five-letter word doubles when you add two letters?" [Note the slight difference]

'Cause if that were the case, then the answer could be DOLES. Add a UB, and you get DOUBLES. Well? Whaddaya think?


A possibility -- although it would be a bit less awkwardly phrased if you instead posed the question thusly: "What five-letter word is doubled when you add two letters?" -- with the correct answer then being "doled."

It works -- but still seems kinda cheesy.

The Ryan
12-13-2000, 09:19 PM
Ablett
Re: KKB's HATS riddle
KKB, the way you have worded the riddle makes it impossible to solve. IMPOSSIBLE. If any person's hat has a 50% chance of being black or a 50% chance of being white, then looking at someone else's hat gives you ZERO indication of the color of your own hat (assuming no reflective surfaces, etc).
I think you missedc the last paragraph:

Originally posted by KKBattousai
The answer to this is self-evident once you get it. In other words, you won't need to ask me if you're correct (no digging out, no communication between the people, no reflective surfaces, passers by, or falling hats). The people knows the formation they're buried in, and they all know there are two hats of each color. Beyond this, they, and you, are on their/your own. Good luck. [/B]

Nanook of the North Shore
12-14-2000, 05:02 AM
Originally posted by jcgmoi

Try another? Same source as the last.

This time all speakers are either GGs or Vs.

C says: "B is a V.'

B says: "A and C are of the same type (both GG or both V)."

What is A?

A is a villian. If C is a villian, then B is a GG. If B is a GG, then C and A are the same(ie both V's). If C is a GG, then B is a V, and C and A are opposites, meaning A is a V either way.

Reuben
12-14-2000, 06:10 AM
Inbox. Assuming my inbox has two 'letters' in it already (it could be a good old-fashioned inbox, not an email one), then if someone adds another two letters my inbox will have doubled in size.

Or is this just too tortuous?

scratch1300
12-14-2000, 09:07 AM
Originally posted by Reuben

Inbox. Assuming my inbox has two 'letters' in it already (it could be a good old-fashioned inbox, not an email one), then if someone adds another two letters my inbox will have doubled in size.

Or is this just too tortuous?

Oh, Reuben!

Tortuous and torturous.

Was it really worth becoming a Straight Dope member for that? :p

BigStar303
12-14-2000, 10:06 AM
Originally posted by Reuben

Inbox. Assuming my inbox has two 'letters' in it already (it could be a good old-fashioned inbox, not an email one), then if someone adds another two letters my inbox will have doubled in size.

Or is this just too tortuous?



Creative...however if it's a "good-old fashioned inbox," then your inbox won't have doubled in size if you add two letters...merely its contents.

You might get away with this if it were a virtual inbox you were discussing. However, I still favor a strict construction of the language of the OP. As I stated long ago, the question says THE WORD doubles in size...not the object/concept/whatever the word refers to.

Given this, the "doled/doubled" answer may be as good as it gets (assuming we allow the original question to be rephrased slightly).

Reuben
12-14-2000, 11:39 AM
Originally posted by scratch1300
Was it really worth becoming a Straight Dope member for that? :p

Arf! It sure was... I've been intermittently lurking the SDMB for months; I was just too busy to get round to subscribing, etc.

The OP of this thread interested me enough to finally jump in. Pleased to meet you all!

No more lateral solutions have come to me since this morning, you are probably glad to hear... :)

-- R.

(Reuben is my real name btw)

Prof. Dumbledore
12-14-2000, 12:25 PM
Hey welcome to the board Reuben

Manlob
12-15-2000, 08:23 PM
"focus" + "es" = "focuses" A focus is a point. It has zero size, as does any number of focuses (or foci). 2*0 = 0, so this is double the original size.

"folds" + "un" = "unfolds" One definition a fold is an object doubled over on itself. If you have a some folds, and unfold them, they appear to double in size. Ok, maybe "unfolds" is not a noun.

If it is permitted to rearrange the letters:

"scone" + "ds" = "seconds" If you eat a scone, and then have seconds you have doubled the orginal amount.

"moose" + "tw" = "twosome" If a moose becomes a twosome, the total size has doubled.

For those who think the question refers to the size of the word itself, instead of its meaning, some of the above examples double the number of syllables. If you mean size of the displayed word it depends on the typeface, but
"cilia" +"mm" = "mimical" is fairly close:

ciliacilia
mimical