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View Full Version : Why are all streets in ATL named "Peachtree"


zamboniracer
05-22-2008, 01:59 PM
As anybody who has ever tried to find their way around Atlanta can attest, every other street is named "Peachtree" something or other. How and why did this happen?

Labrador Deceiver
05-22-2008, 02:17 PM
As anybody who has ever tried to find their way around Atlanta can attest, every other street is named "Peachtree" something or other. How and why did this happen?

They're just smaller streets that branch off of Peachtree Street, often denoting a neighborhood. Peachtree Battle, Peachtree Hills, Peachtree Dunwoody, etc.

Troy McClure SF
05-22-2008, 02:27 PM
God that's annoying. We have a bit of that (http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=37.732575,-122.197602&spn=0.006271,0.01133&z=17) in Oakland.

friedo
05-22-2008, 02:39 PM
God that's annoying. We have a bit of that (http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=37.732575,-122.197602&spn=0.006271,0.01133&z=17) in Oakland.

You don't know the half of it until you've lived in Astoria (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&geocode=&q=30th+rd+%26+30th+ave,+astoria,+ny&sll=40.767233,-73.924127&sspn=0.005469,0.010042&ie=UTF8&t=h&z=16&iwloc=addr). Just try and figure out the difference between 30th Avenue, 30th Street, 30th Road and 30th Drive. And that's far from the only place like that.

Shagnasty
05-22-2008, 02:48 PM
As noted, it happens in other places too. I have no idea how many Washington streets you can fit into a place but Boston and the suburbs try hard to find out. I used to live in the Brighton area of Boston. We lived on Commonwealth Terrace which was right off of Commonwealth Ave and of course the next big street down the road was another Washington Street. I live next to Washington street and I work 20 miles away on another Washington street. There are Washington drives and Washington street connections galor. Cab driving is usually known as being an unskilled job yet I have no idea how they do it.

RickJay
05-22-2008, 02:50 PM
That's nothing.

In Phoenix, Arizona, there are over 30 completely different streets called "N. 38th Avenue."

If you don't believe me, look it up. I swear it's absolutely true. Google "North 38th Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona" and it will point to one of them (it seems to choose a random point on one of the N 38th Avenues just north on West Glendale Avenue.) Scroll north or south and you will find dozens more. In some cases, one of the North 38th Avenues comprises only a small part of the street, and spontaneously renames itself at one point.

There are dozens more streets called "North 38th Drive" and such, plus a huge number of 36s, 37s, and so on. Why they did this I cannot begin to explain, but if you ever need to find a place on a numbered street in Phoenix, get directions from the people you're visiting; map programs will frequently send you to the wrong one and if you don't have specific directions, finding the right one will take hours. It is an example of municipal planning stupidity at its most truly staggering.

Another hilarious one, though for different reasons, is Woodinville, Washington. For fun, Google it, and when the map comes up, zoom in and scroll around a little. Then try to make sense of their numbering system. It might help to fire up a big spliff, because no sane or sober person can grasp it.

friedo
05-22-2008, 03:07 PM
Another hilarious one, though for different reasons, is Woodinville, Washington. For fun, Google it, and when the map comes up, zoom in and scroll around a little. Then try to make sense of their numbering system. It might help to fire up a big spliff, because no sane or sober person can grasp it.

I especially like how 131st Ave. NE turns a corner and becomes NE 171st St. Reminds me of Greenwich Village but without as many drunks.

Colophon
05-22-2008, 03:58 PM
That's nothing.

In Phoenix, Arizona, there are over 30 completely different streets called "N. 38th Avenue."
Having looked at the map, they seem to all lie on the right meridian, i.e in the right place relative to 39th Avenue, it's effectively one street broken up into bits. Presumably the numbering gives some clue as to how far north and south a given house is?

Freddy the Pig
05-22-2008, 04:24 PM
OK, come on, I know there are duplicate names and funky names in other cities. But there is nothing else like Atlanta, where so many major thoroughfares all over the city have such a distinctive but non-unique name. What is with all the Peachtrees?

Harmonious Discord
05-22-2008, 04:31 PM
Ain't it the pits? :)

I've seen two different reasons for this. Around here are a few roads that at one time were continuous roads. Over time sections have been removed by other roads going over them or cutting them off into dead ends. Miles apart you can end up seeing these sections just start up again and again. The other situation is a developer decides to go with a name and make all the roads different by using street avenue and the like. I hate developers that do this. Your on a busy road trying to find the next turn and your looking for the AVE or ST at the end of all the signs.

Lamar Mundane
05-22-2008, 04:39 PM
Another hilarious one, though for different reasons, is Woodinville, Washington. For fun, Google it, and when the map comes up, zoom in and scroll around a little. Then try to make sense of their numbering system. It might help to fire up a big spliff, because no sane or sober person can grasp it.
Greeley, CO is like that. Driving there is the most frustrating thing in the damn world.

If somone lives on W 7th Street Rd., here are the directions they will give you:

"Turn left on W 6th Street Rd. Just stay on that road until it ends, and you're on W 7th Street Rd. Don't stop short of the end, because then you'd be on 54th Avenue Ct."

http://maps.google.com/maps?ie=UTF8&oe=UTF-8&q=Greeley,+CO,+USA&ll=40.431367,-104.75966&spn=0.023847,0.039997&z=15&iwloc=addr

Chronos
05-22-2008, 04:45 PM
Another hilarious one, though for different reasons, is Woodinville, Washington. For fun, Google it, and when the map comes up, zoom in and scroll around a little. Then try to make sense of their numbering system. It might help to fire up a big spliff, because no sane or sober person can grasp it.OK, the numbering I could maybe justify as that being the order that the streets were built. Every time you pave a new road, you give it the next available number. But take a look at the quadrant designations: If you keep going south on 75th ave. SE, you end up on 156th ave. NE.

RickJay
05-22-2008, 07:51 PM
Having looked at the map, they seem to all lie on the right meridian, i.e in the right place relative to 39th Avenue, it's effectively one street broken up into bits. Presumably the numbering gives some clue as to how far north and south a given house is?
You'd think so, but most of the N 39th Avenues are very short, and if you don't get it right the first time, it's nearly impossible to guess which of the subsequent ones would be the right one; plus, some are buried inside subdivisions, and it's not immediately obvious how to find them.

I've honestly never seen a city name streets in such a ridiculous manner. Surely they could have just made up some names; other cities do it, even ones bigger than Phoenix.

Spoke
05-22-2008, 08:32 PM
OK, come on, I know there are duplicate names and funky names in other cities. But there is nothing else like Atlanta, where so many major thoroughfares all over the city have such a distinctive but non-unique name. What is with all the Peachtrees?

Interesting side note (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peachtree_Street):

Historically, Atlanta grew up on a site occupied by the Creek people, and the "peachtree" street was, in fact, not named for a peach tree of any sort, but for a large Creek settlement called Standing Pitch Tree after a tall lone tree. Reportedly, the Creek used trees with fresh pitch (the sap of a pine tree) for solemnizing vows and treaties. The "pitch tree" was corrupted to "peach tree", perhaps by mistake, or because it sounded better to English speakers. While peaches are so widely feral they seem native to northern Georgia and the Atlanta area, and though Georgia is the "Peach State", there was apparently no historical peach tree that led to the name.

A trail known as the Peachtree Trail stretched from northeastern Georgia to Standing Pitch Tree along the Chattahoochee River[1]. The original Peachtree Road originated at a fort located at Hog Mountain in present-day Gwinnett County and ran along the course of the trail to the Chattahoochee. Some portions of the present road trace this route.

Labrador Deceiver
05-22-2008, 09:06 PM
OK, come on, I know there are duplicate names and funky names in other cities. But there is nothing else like Atlanta, where so many major thoroughfares all over the city have such a distinctive but non-unique name. What is with all the Peachtrees?


I'm sorry, but it isn't the least bit confusing. After living here for more than a day or two, it becomes as easy to tell the difference.

It's like complaining that all streets end in "Drive" or "Road". There are other words besides "Peachtree" in the various street names, making it quite simple to understand. No two are alike.

elmwood
05-22-2008, 09:29 PM
Okay, time for a planner to check in.

Street naming and addressing systems vary throughout the United States.

In the Rocky Mountain region, the meridian system is very common. Meridians are gviven names, and all portions of a road that follow a certain meridian are given a name that is consistent with the meridian designation. The Maloney Grid in Denver is probably the most studied application of the meridian system. The Maloney Grid street names are pre-designated all the way to the eastern edge of Arapahoe County, literally halfway between downtown Denver and the Kansas border. I once saw a complete list of Maloney Grid meridian names -- it's not online -- and they start getting very strange about ten miles east of Aurora.

The coordinate system in Utah (where addresses like E5232 S6210 are the norm) is a variant of the meridian system.

As for Atlanta? I can only guess. I wold imagine that as Atlanta grew, it annexed many streets, some of which had names duplicating those in the original city limits.

As far as I'm concerned, anything beats Buffalo, where street names frequently change, there is no center meridian used as a base for addressing, and the addressing scheme is one of the few in the country to follow the Spanish model. Address numbers start at "1", no matter what the origin of the street is, and increase by 2 for every 20 feet from the street's point of origin; with even addresses on the opposite side. If a new road is platted across the street from the point of origin of the first street, it's given a completely different name, and the addresses start over again from the point of origin, no matter what direction the street may be oriented. Thus, in many parts of the city and suburbs, a street may have descending address numbers, and then suddenly change names, with the addresses ascending from the point where the name changed.

SanibelMan
05-22-2008, 10:41 PM
I think Cape Coral. Florida (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Cape+Coral,+FL&ie=UTF8&ll=26.630619,-81.956291&spn=0.029117,0.029912&z=15) has some of the most confusing streets I've encountered. "Oh, you need directions? Sure. Just turn right on Southeast 40th Street, then right on Southeast 19th Place, then left on Southeast 39th Street, then right on Southeast 14th Avenue, then left on Southeast 13th Place, then right on Southeast 38th Street. Third house on the left."

Colophon
05-23-2008, 04:48 AM
As far as I'm concerned, anything beats Buffalo, where street names frequently change, there is no center meridian used as a base for addressing, and the addressing scheme is one of the few in the country to follow the Spanish model. Address numbers start at "1", no matter what the origin of the street is, and increase by 2 for every 20 feet from the street's point of origin; with even addresses on the opposite side. If a new road is platted across the street from the point of origin of the first street, it's given a completely different name, and the addresses start over again from the point of origin, no matter what direction the street may be oriented. Thus, in many parts of the city and suburbs, a street may have descending address numbers, and then suddenly change names, with the addresses ascending from the point where the name changed.

Sounds pretty similar to the UK system. Here, streets go in any or all direction and follow no naming or numbering plan (except in a very few new towns), and numbering usually starts from one end, with odd and even numbers on opposite sides of the street, so 1 and 2 will be the first houses on the left and right sides respectively.

In my own town, here's a Google Maps (http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en&q=hall+lane+yateley&ie=UTF8&ll=51.336001,-0.828245&spn=0.008459,0.019505&z=16) example - follow Hall Lane southwards, and you come to a slight left turn and it magically turns into Handford Lane. The houses on the left as you head south are numbered:
...
53 Hall Lane
55 Hall Lane
57 Hall Lane
59 Hall Lane
61 Hall Lane
14 Handford Lane
15 Handford Lane
16 Handford Lane
17 Handford Lane
...

So you go from consecutive odd numbers to plain consecutive numbers, AND the street name changes for no apparent reason, AND the new numbers start at number 14. :confused:

Just to make it even wackier, numbers 61 Hall Lane and 14 Handford Lane are semi-detached houses which form the two halves of one building!

Colophon
05-23-2008, 05:01 AM
I suppose it's a different attitude to addressing really - Americans tend to expect the address to give a good clue as to where the street is located, or at least where on the street you'll find a given property. In Europe, it's all a lot more random.

My house is number 48, and is opposite numbers 99 and (the other side of a cul-de-sac) 119. Numbers 46 and 50 are indeed either side, but numbers 47 and 49, both of whose post we often get delivered, are right at the other end of the street. :)

postcards
05-23-2008, 06:21 AM
elmwood's reply was most interesting, but I wonder if they could elaborate on what the 'meridian system' is.

racer72
05-23-2008, 06:28 AM
OK, the numbering I could maybe justify as that being the order that the streets were built. Every time you pave a new road, you give it the next available number. But take a look at the quadrant designations: If you keep going south on 75th ave. SE, you end up on 156th ave. NE.

Very good reason for that. 75th Ave SE is in the south part of Snohomish County. When it crosses into the north part of King County, it becomes 156th Ave NE. After looking at Woodinville, it looks pretty much like any place that borders a county where the neighboring county has a different street grid numbering system.

muttrox
05-23-2008, 09:46 AM
There are other words besides "Peachtree" in the various street names, making it quite simple to understand. No two are alike.

I don't think that's true. Sure, there are many roads like Peachtree Dunwoody or Peachtree Battle. Those are simple. But there are also a large number of roads that are referred to as simply "Peachtree". And many of them intersect each other.

No two are identical, but many are alike.

Labrador Deceiver
05-23-2008, 10:51 AM
I don't think that's true. Sure, there are many roads like Peachtree Dunwoody or Peachtree Battle. Those are simple. But there are also a large number of roads that are referred to as simply "Peachtree". And many of them intersect each other.




Example, please? There is only one street that I am aware of in this town that is referred to as "Peachtree". It is originally Peachtree Street, then its name changes to Peachtree Road, then to Peachtree Industrial Boulevard once it exits the city limits. This is hardly unusual.

The only other streets that may be similar (i.e. Peachtree Ave, Peachtree Way, Peachtree Drive, or some such) are so small as to be almost unheard of. They would never, ever be referred to as simply "Peachtree". That just is not true.

There certainly are not "major thoroughfares" with non-unique names in the city of Atlanta.

elmwood
05-23-2008, 11:19 AM
elmwood's reply was most interesting, but I wonder if they could elaborate on what the 'meridian system' is.

Basically, lines of latitude and longitude are given a name or ordinal number. Any street that is built along or close to one of those lines has to be named after the designation for the line.

For instance, when I lived in Denver, I lived on the 4000 North block of Quitman Street. According to the Denver grid, any street in Adams, Denver, Arapahoe or Jefferson Counties that fall on or near a path along 102 degrees 5 minutes 26 seconds west MUST be named "Quitman". Streets following the next designated meridian to the west MUST be named "Raleigh". The next meridan is "Stuart", and the one after that "Tennyson". See a pattern?

if you live in Denver for a while, it becomes instinctual. You know that streets named "Quitman" will all be north-south roads running more-or-less along the same grid line. All you need to know is an address number, and someone with average navigational skills should be able to guesstimate where an address is located, without having to flip pages through an index of a map guide.

Freddy the Pig
05-23-2008, 02:24 PM
There certainly are not "major thoroughfares" with non-unique names in the city of Atlanta.I'm happy that you find the existence of Peachtree Street, Peachtree Creek Road, Peachtree Lane, Peachtree Avenue, Peachtree Circle, Peachtree Drive, Peachtree Plaza, Peachtree Way, Peachtree Memorial Drive, New Peachtree Road, Peachtree Walk, Peachtree Valley Road, West Peachtree Street, Peachtree Battle Avenue, Peachtree-Dunwoody Road and Old Peachtree Road within a single metropolitan area to be unexceptional. Those of us not from Atlanta do find it exceptional and thus inquire as to the cause.

Necros
05-23-2008, 02:41 PM
Just to reinforce elmwood's point, I had to travel to an address near Gun Club and Jewell, out in eastern Aurora. I knew exactly where it was, because Jewell is always Jewell at that latitude, regardless of whether it is in eastern Aurora or far western Lakewood, despite the two locations being many miles apart.

garygnu
05-23-2008, 02:45 PM
Carmel, California (aka "Camel-By-The-Sea") does not use street addresses.

Labrador Deceiver
05-23-2008, 03:13 PM
I'm happy that you find the existence of Peachtree Street, Peachtree Creek Road, Peachtree Lane, Peachtree Avenue, Peachtree Circle, Peachtree Drive, Peachtree Plaza, Peachtree Way, Peachtree Memorial Drive, New Peachtree Road, Peachtree Walk, Peachtree Valley Road, West Peachtree Street, Peachtree Battle Avenue, Peachtree-Dunwoody Road and Old Peachtree Road within a single metropolitan area to be unexceptional. Those of us not from Atlanta do find it exceptional and thus inquire as to the cause.


A quick count shows that the vast majority of your list is not comprised of "major thoroughfares".

Like I said before, it is no more confusing than all those pesky street names that end in "Road" or "Avenue". I didn't find it confusing when I moved here, nor do I know of anyone else who did.

Rysto
05-23-2008, 04:27 PM
Like I said before, it is no more confusing than all those pesky street names that end in "Road" or "Avenue". I didn't find it confusing when I moved here, nor do I know of anyone else who did.
:confused:

That's precisely what makes it confusing. Typically, street names are <something> Place, or Way, or Road, or Street, or whatever. It's the <something> part that matters. I might direct somebody to University, or King, or Weber where I live, and dispense with the Avenue/Road/whatever part because it imparts no useful information. But this Peachtree business inverts that: now the name of the street imparts limited useful information, and instead the Road/Avenue/whatever part is the important bit. Going contrary to people's expectations is pretty much the definition of confusing.

Labrador Deceiver
05-23-2008, 05:14 PM
:confused:

That's precisely what makes it confusing. Typically, street names are <something> Place, or Way, or Road, or Street, or whatever. It's the <something> part that matters. I might direct somebody to University, or King, or Weber where I live, and dispense with the Avenue/Road/whatever part because it imparts no useful information. But this Peachtree business inverts that: now the name of the street imparts limited useful information, and instead the Road/Avenue/whatever part is the important bit. Going contrary to people's expectations is pretty much the definition of confusing.


No, that isn't the case. The vast majority of Atlanta roads, and almost all "major thoroughfares", that include the word "Peachtree" are not differentiated by "way", "road", "street", etc. That is what I've been saying since the second post in this thread. They're named "Peachtree-something" Rd. , Or "Peachtree-something entirely different" Rd.

It isn't much different than saying 13th and 19th street are confusing because they both start with 1.

amarone
05-23-2008, 05:49 PM
I'm happy that you find the existence of Peachtree Street, Peachtree Creek Road, Peachtree Lane, Peachtree Avenue, Peachtree Circle, Peachtree Drive, Peachtree Plaza, Peachtree Way, Peachtree Memorial Drive, New Peachtree Road, Peachtree Walk, Peachtree Valley Road, West Peachtree Street, Peachtree Battle Avenue, Peachtree-Dunwoody Road and Old Peachtree Road within a single metropolitan area to be unexceptional. Those of us not from Atlanta do find it exceptional and thus inquire as to the cause. As a non-native who moved to Atlanta, I support those who say it is easy to get used to. "Peachtree" with no qualifiers means Peachtree Street. Everything else is qualified uniquely.

One visitor did have problems - he rented a car with a GPS back in the days when they were fairly uncommon. On being told that the restaurant was on Peachtree, he said he didn't need directions because he had his NeverLost system. I noticed him sitting in his car for several minutes, not moving. Then he got out and said that the little screen on his GPS was just showing page after page of "Peachtrees" and could he have those directions after all.

BTW, there is also Peachtree Corners Circle, which sounds geometrically dubious to me, but not as bad as Peachtree Circle Corners would be, if it existed.

Amblydoper
05-24-2008, 08:47 AM
Another hilarious one, though for different reasons, is Woodinville, Washington. For fun, Google it, and when the map comes up, zoom in and scroll around a little. Then try to make sense of their numbering system. It might help to fire up a big spliff, because no sane or sober person can grasp it.
That is a little odd, but it makes some sense. The town looks like it overlaps the boundary between two separate street numbering systems. Some "named" streets could ease the confusion.

I guess I was lucky to grow up in a small town, where if you just said a place was on "10th," everyone know what street you were talking about.

jasonh300
05-24-2008, 06:12 PM
Carmel, California (aka "Camel-By-The-Sea") does not use street addresses.

Ok, I'll bite. Can you elaborate on this???

zamboniracer
05-24-2008, 06:44 PM
As a non-native who moved to Atlanta, I support those who say it is easy to get used to. "Peachtree" with no qualifiers means Peachtree Street. Everything else is qualified uniquely.



Humans have a remarkably ability to adapt. The people in Atlanta have apparently adapted sufficiently so that their insane Peachtree-obsessed street naming system appears normal to them. That doesn't mean that it still isn't insane.

drewbert
05-24-2008, 06:57 PM
This little piece of Nashville (http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=36.146781,-86.779568&spn=0.008508,0.013926&z=16) is nicely representative. In this one frame, look for Vine Street, Vine Street, Bass Street, Bass Street, Archer Street, Archer Street, Archer Street, Olympic Street, Olympic Street, Southside Court, Southside Place, and Southside Avenue. Scroll just a little north to see a divided Division Street, and 12th avenue magically turn into 11th avenue if you don't veer left.

There literally is a streetsign at the "corner" of Fort Negley and Bass.

Lionne
05-24-2008, 08:41 PM
I think Cape Coral. Florida (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Cape+Coral,+FL&ie=UTF8&ll=26.630619,-81.956291&spn=0.029117,0.029912&z=15) has some of the most confusing streets I've encountered. "Oh, you need directions? Sure. Just turn right on Southeast 40th Street, then right on Southeast 19th Place, then left on Southeast 39th Street, then right on Southeast 14th Avenue, then left on Southeast 13th Place, then right on Southeast 38th Street. Third house on the left."Seconded.
Parents of a friend live there and when I drove down to visit last year, I bought a GPS specifically to help me navigate the area.

drachillix
05-25-2008, 01:21 AM
if you live in Denver for a while, it becomes instinctual. You know that streets named "Quitman" will all be north-south roads running more-or-less along the same grid line. All you need to know is an address number, and someone with average navigational skills should be able to guesstimate where an address is located, without having to flip pages through an index of a map guide.

Fresno county, CA does a fabulous job on this as well.

example (http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&q=Fresno,+CA,+USA&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&resnum=1&ct=image)

If you look around a bit you will see consistent names all across town even into neighboring towns.

pasunejen
05-25-2008, 01:11 PM
This little piece of Nashville (http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=36.146781,-86.779568&spn=0.008508,0.013926&z=16) is nicely representative. In this one frame, look for Vine Street, Vine Street, Bass Street, Bass Street, Archer Street, Archer Street, Archer Street, Olympic Street, Olympic Street, Southside Court, Southside Place, and Southside Avenue. Scroll just a little north to see a divided Division Street, and 12th avenue magically turn into 11th avenue if you don't veer left.

There literally is a streetsign at the "corner" of Fort Negley and Bass.

Seems pretty clear to me in this case that all the bits of each street you name were originally contiguous, and were later separated by various development projects. This isn't all that strange...I can think of two big examples in MD--there are bits of Old Columbia Pike scattered all over the place in Howard and Montgomery Counties, and Jones Station Rd. does some weird things in Arnold and Severna Park (near Annapolis).

Chronos
05-25-2008, 02:38 PM
But this Peachtree business inverts that: now the name of the street imparts limited useful information, and instead the Road/Avenue/whatever part is the important bit.There's a similar situation in Cleveland: One major residential street is named West Boulevard, and always refered to as exactly that. If you told someone "I live on West", or "Turn left on West", they'd just give you a blank look, until you added the "Boulevard" part. It's still not quite as bad as the Peachtrees, though, because at least the blank look would tell you that communications had broken down: There aren't any other streets called West, that someone might think you're referring to.

zeno
05-25-2008, 09:00 PM
On Staten Island, New York everything is named "Richmond", as that is the name of the county. There is Richmond Hill, Richmond Avenue, the Port Richmond section of the Island, and a Port Richmond Avenue that runs through it. Even more frustrating is the face that people in Port Richmond call "Port Richmond Ave" "Richmond Ave", even though there is already a Richmond Ave. There is also a Richmond Terrace, a Richmondtown and a Richmond Valley.

Chotii
05-26-2008, 02:57 AM
Very good reason for that. 75th Ave SE is in the south part of Snohomish County. When it crosses into the north part of King County, it becomes 156th Ave NE. After looking at Woodinville, it looks pretty much like any place that borders a county where the neighboring county has a different street grid numbering system.

If you need directions, they'll say something like "Take the Woodinville-Duvall road out of town, then turn left on 156th Ave. The road changes names to 75th Ave SE a bit after you cross 195th, but keep going straight...."

Yes, Racer72 has the right of it. The fact that the road changes from NE to SE indicates the change of county. Just past 195th, where the street name becomes 75th Ave SE, you're in the south end of Snohomish county. I should go drive out there one day and see whether there's a sign saying 'Now entering..'

jjimm
05-26-2008, 03:19 AM
I used to live on Lombard Street West in Dublin. I had to go and pick something up for work that was at Lombard Street East, so I went home, had a cup of coffee, and set off on foot. An hour of confusion and a taxi ride followed. How to get from Lombard St. W. to Lombard St. E (http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=d&hl=en&geocode=&saddr=lombard+street+west,+dublin&daddr=lombard+street+east,+dublin&sll=45.732988,0.86323&sspn=0.100888,0.32135&ie=UTF8&z=14).