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Biggirl
07-30-2008, 12:25 PM
I remember the first time I heard that joke. It was The Odd Couple and Felix got a traffic ticket. Instead of paying it, he took it to court and had a whole presentation ready. At one point in his cross-examination, the witness said, "Well, I just assumed. . ."

Felix wrote the word on his chalkboard and then graphically pointed out how assuming makes an ass out of you and me.

But this joke feels older to me. Are there any earlier tellings of this joke or did it originate with The Odd Couple?

Tom Tildrum
07-30-2008, 12:59 PM
Are there any earlier tellings of this joke...?
I assume so.











:D

Thudlow Boink
07-30-2008, 01:19 PM
I've heard it attributed to Benny Hill, but I don't know whether he originated it. I suspect the very first person to make the observation may be lost in the mists of anonymity.

middleman
07-30-2008, 01:48 PM
I hate this expression with a passion.

While the likely original usage only applied to uneducated assumptions, people now LOVE to use it any time the word assumption is used.

Darn it. There are times when it is appropriate or even necessary to make assumptions.

Sigmagirl
07-30-2008, 01:50 PM
I remember when it appeared on The Odd Couple, and it got such an uproarious and extended laugh that I -- pardon me -- I assumed that most people had not heard it before. If it was a recycled joke, I feel pretty certain it was an obscure one.

HoboStew
07-30-2008, 02:12 PM
Darn it. There are times when it is appropriate or even necessary to make assumptions.But you know what happens when you make an assumption, right? You're an ass, and the ump will shun you.

Biggirl
07-30-2008, 02:14 PM
I've heard it attributed to Benny Hill, but I don't know whether he originated it. I suspect the very first person to make the observation may be lost in the mists of anonymity.

I'm looking for TV shows or movies or maybe radio shows or even a Broadway show where this joke appears before it appeared on the Odd Couple cite. The Benny Hill Show is a possibility since it began it's run a year before The Odd Couple did, but I don't think so. I would have remembered it from there-- I assume.


P.S. The Benny Hill Show- 1969 through 1989
The Odd Couple 1970 through 1975

panache45
07-30-2008, 02:19 PM
But this joke feels older to me.
So you're just assuming that the joke is older?

cochrane
07-30-2008, 02:24 PM
But you know what happens when you make an assumption, right? You're an ass, and the ump will shun you.
You turn into Lou Piniella?* :eek:


* Sorry, Cubbies fans. :D I only mentioned Lou because of his current visibility in a bottled-water commercial (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uzULboIx3o) . This is no reflection of my feelings about Lou Piniella, the man, the baseball player, and the manager.

AskNott
07-30-2008, 02:29 PM
I believe David Letterman's writers were the first to change the ending to, "...you make an ass out of Uma Thurman." :D

Leaffan
07-30-2008, 03:01 PM
Hey! The first time I saw that was on The Odd Couple also. It was funny as hell then. Not so much now.

What Exit?
07-30-2008, 03:03 PM
Felix wrote the word on his chalkboard and then graphically pointed out how assuming makes an ass out of you and me.

But this joke feels older to me. Are there any earlier tellings of this joke or did it originate with The Odd Couple?
This is very odd, I just asked someone about this on Saturday and I thought about starting a thread on it. The older people I put the question to, did not remember the joke predating the Odd Couple.

I hope you get an answer. I am very curious about it also.

Jim

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
07-30-2008, 03:18 PM
Another vote for "never heard it before The Odd Couple."

mobo85
07-30-2008, 03:29 PM
"When you assume...you're a jackass."- Stephen Colbert

Horatio Hellpop
07-30-2008, 03:33 PM
I first encountered it in this crappy 1971 film, Bless the Beasts and Children (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0068286/).

Sigmagirl
07-30-2008, 03:35 PM
I hate this expression with a passion.

While the likely original usage only applied to uneducated assumptions, people now LOVE to use it any time the word assumption is used.

Darn it. There are times when it is appropriate or even necessary to make assumptions.


I'm with you; so much so that, when an educated and reasonable assumption is called for, I use the word "deduce."

Yllaria
07-30-2008, 04:19 PM
Another datum point for "heard it first on the Odd Couple". I have to say, it was funny the first time. But only the first time.

Just Some Guy
07-30-2008, 04:20 PM
Darn it. There are times when it is appropriate or even necessary to make assumptions.

Such as when one uses depth perception.

For some reason people who just spit out that line don't care to have someone point out just how stupid it is.

Bryan Ekers
07-30-2008, 04:35 PM
I'm with you; so much so that, when an educated and reasonable assumption is called for, I use the word "deduce."
But when you deduce, you are DED, U CE!

Robot Arm
07-30-2008, 04:39 PM
I can't decide which would be weirder, Benny Hill stealing from The Odd Couple, or The Odd Couple stealing from Benny Hill.

I've seen this bit on both shows, but don't know which one was first.

photopat
07-30-2008, 06:02 PM
I first heard it on the Odd Couple, along with the joke in the ghost episode about the ritual phrase "Owah Tagoo Siam."

It was funny at the time and slightly shocking since I hadn't heard words like Ass too often on network tv in the early '70s.

priapus
07-30-2008, 06:45 PM
I've heard it often.I just say,"you make an ass out of u,not me.Just you."

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
07-30-2008, 07:05 PM
along with the joke in the ghost episode about the ritual phrase "Owah Tagoo Siam."
Now that one I recognized as a variation on a gag I'd heard before. They did it on Dick Van Dyke as "Igottano slikaban ana."

Freddy the Pig
07-30-2008, 07:11 PM
I remember when it appeared on The Odd Couple, and it got such an uproarious and extended laugh that I -- pardon me -- I assumed that most people had not heard it before.Yep. I was 11 or 12 when that episode first aired, and I remember my parents laughing so loud that I poked my head in from the next room to ask what was so funny. They gave no indication they had heard it before.

One question, though--was it "you make an ass out of you and me" in the show? Either because my parents read it back to me wrong, or because my memory is faulty, I remember it as being "you make an ass out of me", with the longer version coming later as the joke got recycled and re-told.

samclem
07-30-2008, 07:29 PM
Using Google Books, you can find a cite from a 1966 issue of PMI, Photo Methods for Industry. http://books.google.com/books?id=ufoiAAAAMAAJ&q=%22make+an+ass%22+assume+date:1900-1975&dq=%22make+an+ass%22+assume+date:1900-1975&lr=&num=30&as_brr=0&pgis=1

You have to learn how to search inside the issue, then you have to make sure to make sure that the issue isn't more recent. VERY many false Google Book hits. I did the work. It's there.

So, it predates The Odd Couple.

Biggirl
07-30-2008, 07:53 PM
Thanks, sam!

I wish I knew what I meant when I said it "feels older". It just struck me as an uncensored Marx Brothers. I also wish I knew why an photo industry mag would want to publish it. I guess they use some harsh language when discussing pictures.

And yes, they not only said the word "ass", Felix actually circuled the word rather heatedly. It was seriously funny the first time.

Monstera deliciosa
07-30-2008, 07:56 PM
Yep. I was 11 or 12 when that episode first aired, and I remember my parents laughing so loud that I poked my head in from the next room to ask what was so funny. They gave no indication they had heard it before.

One question, though--was it "you make an ass out of you and me" in the show? Either because my parents read it back to me wrong, or because my memory is faulty, I remember it as being "you make an ass out of me", with the longer version coming later as the joke got recycled and re-told.

It was definitely you make an "ass out of you and me". Felix had a blackboard in the courtroom and as he said "when you assume" with a heavy emphasis on the first syllable, he wrote out the letters A S S, which he circled, then the U, which I think he circled, then the M E, which I think he also circled. And IIRC, the court case was not about a traffic ticket, but allegedly scalping tickets to some event (that I don't remember.)

Biggirl
07-30-2008, 08:17 PM
It was definitely you make an "ass out of you and me". Felix had a blackboard in the courtroom and as he said "when you assume" with a heavy emphasis on the first syllable, he wrote out the letters A S S, which he circled, then the U, which I think he circled, then the M E, which I think he also circled. And IIRC, the court case was not about a traffic ticket, but allegedly scalping tickets to some event (that I don't remember.)

There was some underlining going on there too. And I believe you are correct about the ticket scalping. I think I mixed up episodes in my mind.


Looking at the years it ran, I now remember I didn't see it in it's original run but on reruns on a local NY channel. And now my kids can see it-- 'cause we have cable.

cochrane
07-30-2008, 08:26 PM
It was definitely you make an "ass out of you and me". Felix had a blackboard in the courtroom and as he said "when you assume" with a heavy emphasis on the first syllable, he wrote out the letters A S S, which he circled, then the U, which I think he circled, then the M E, which I think he also circled. And IIRC, the court case was not about a traffic ticket, but allegedly scalping tickets to some event (that I don't remember.)
Yes, Oscar and Felix were arrested for scalping a ticket to a Broadway play, since Oscar couldn't get a date. It was the episode called "My Strife in Court," first aired on February 16, 1973.

Thanks to Youtube, here's the famous courtroom "assume" scene (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKlWGZHEO7Q&feature=related), complete with uproarious applause.

Lex122
06-09-2013, 06:43 AM
I must be the oldest person on the Internet because no one else has posted that this was a bit that was done by Abbott and Costello back in the fifties, and they may have used it in their vaudeville routine prior to that. Lou Costello even used the blackboard to show Bud Abbott ass + u + me = assume. The writers from the odd couple stole that bit.

JKellyMap
06-09-2013, 07:04 AM
Nice work, Lex! (Pending verification, but I have no reason to deny* your clear memory of this). Most zombie thread revivals are useless, but this one is spot-on.

*It ain't just a river in Egypt! Who said that first, I wonder? Ah, a topic for another thread...

singular1
06-09-2013, 09:17 AM
Good job, Lex. I knew it was old when it showed up on the Odd Couple - I remember :rolleyes:ing at the applause.

ftg
06-09-2013, 09:24 AM
Definitely quite common among my teachers (well, coaches) in the 1960s. I'm surprised that so many didn't hear it until TOC in 1973.

Shakester
06-09-2013, 09:48 AM
Has ass always meant arse in the US?

Because "ass" (in the sense of "donkey") is a very mild, childish, maiden-aunt-ish, insult in the rest of the English speaking world. "Silly ass!" - very different from "arse" which is very much a four-letter-word in un-American English.

Ass (donkey) would be acceptable TV language in the rest of the English speaking world even back in the 1950s. Arse is a definite swear whereas ass isn't.

TriPolar
06-09-2013, 09:53 AM
Has ass always meant arse in the US?

Because "ass" (in the sense of "donkey") is a very mild, childish, maiden-aunt-ish, insult in the rest of the English speaking world. "Silly ass!" - very different from "arse" which is very much a four-letter-word in un-American English.

Ass (donkey) would be acceptable TV language in the rest of the English speaking world even back in the 1950s. Arse is a definite swear whereas ass isn't.

Ass has always been acceptable when referring to a donkey or a fool, but not as a reference to an arse. In recent years even that meaning has become fairly acceptable, not considered by most to be more lewd than butt or fanny (the US fanny).

Oh English! You are such a fun language.

hajario
06-09-2013, 10:01 AM
Good job, Lex. I knew it was old when it showed up on the Odd Couple - I remember :rolleyes:ing at the applause.

A cite would be nice before we hand out any praise.

I just did a simple Google search and found out that the guy who actually wrote the script for that episode first heard it years earlier from one of his teachers.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Belson

medstar
06-09-2013, 03:25 PM
I first heard it when I watched one of the Bad News Bears movies. I was about 9 or 10, and I thought it was the funniest joke I ever heard. I've since matured. :-)

Little Nemo
06-09-2013, 04:09 PM
As long as we've revived the subject. I asked this once before and couldn't get a definitive answer.

On an episode of MASH there was a scene where Col Flagg (the military intelligence agent) used the line "I could tell you but then I'd have to kill you". Was this the original use of that line or did it predate MASH?

Chronos
06-09-2013, 05:32 PM
"Ass" meaning "buttocks" in addition to "donkey" or "foolish person" dates back at least to Shakespeare.

Hail Ants
06-09-2013, 06:13 PM
I first heard it when I watched one of the Bad News Bears movies. I was about 9 or 10, and I thought it was the funniest joke I ever heard. I've since matured. :-)Yeah, that was the first (pretty awful) sequel and it was Jack Warden who made the joke at the very beginning. He was only in the film for this first scene (though confusingly he played the Walter Matthau part in the short lived TV series based on the original movie!) I remember seeing it on HBO and immediately remembering The Odd Couple a few years earlier.

Nice work, Lex! (Pending verification, but I have no reason to deny* your clear memory of this). Most zombie thread revivals are useless, but this one is spot-on.

*It ain't just a river in Egypt! Who said that first, I wonder? Ah, a topic for another thread...First place I ever heard this was Al Franken's great Stuart Smalley SNL character. It was the one where he was talking to Michael Jordan (the host) so we're talking early 90s. I had never heard it before that so I found it really funny (still do). By the way, full joke is, "Remember, denial ain't just a river in Egypt!"

Reminds me of another really funny joke Fred Willard told on Letterman a few years back that just has to be an old, bawdy vaudeville routine: "You know what they say about a blind hooker don't ya? You really have to hand it to them!"

Blank Slate
06-09-2013, 06:49 PM
I first heard it when I watched one of the Bad News Bears movies. I was about 9 or 10, and I thought it was the funniest joke I ever heard. I've since matured. :-)

I first heard it in the film Echo Park, but now I'm wondering why so many people remember exactly where they first heard such a trivial and silly joke.

Hail Ants
06-09-2013, 08:02 PM
I first heard it in the film Echo Park, but now I'm wondering why so many people remember exactly where they first heard such a trivial and silly joke.Well, when Tony Randall did it in TOC (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfvTwv5o1Qs) he did it quite well and it was pretty funny!

svd678
06-09-2013, 08:36 PM
#34,35 "arse" is not a word used in America.

Exapno Mapcase
06-09-2013, 08:52 PM
Well, when Tony Randall did it in TOC (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfvTwv5o1Qs) he did it quite well and it was pretty funny!

Please tell me this is the biggest whoosh since the Concorde.

cochrane
06-09-2013, 09:24 PM
Well, when Tony Randall did it in TOC (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfvTwv5o1Qs) he did it quite well and it was pretty funny!

Please tell me this is the biggest whoosh since the Concorde.

Not in the least. It was funny. Your mileage must vary.

astro
06-09-2013, 09:55 PM
Told to my PE class by a school athletic director in 1968 when discussing how to position yourself on the field. I would bet money it was a used in athletic coaching for some time before I heard it from him.

Kimstu
06-09-2013, 10:30 PM
First place I ever heard this was Al Franken's great Stuart Smalley SNL character. It was the one where he was talking to Michael Jordan (the host) so we're talking early 90s. I had never heard it before that so I found it really funny (still do). By the way, full joke is, "Remember, denial ain't just a river in Egypt!"

The Quote Investigator weighs in (http://quoteinvestigator.com/2012/05/11/denial-not-river/#more-3789).

Exapno Mapcase
06-09-2013, 11:21 PM
Not in the least. It was funny. Your mileage must vary.
A whoosh is a deliberate joke. The deliberate part was and is still up in the air.

cochrane
06-09-2013, 11:38 PM
A whoosh is a deliberate joke. The deliberate part was and is still up in the air.

So where's the joke in Hail Ants' statement? Please explain why you thought it was a whoosh. Randall delivered the joke well and it was quite funny, so I took his comment as a serious statement

Andy L
06-09-2013, 11:47 PM
It was funny at the time and slightly shocking since I hadn't heard words like Ass too often on network tv in the early '70s.

Yes, the use of "ass" on television in this era would be a bit shocking (as I recall, anyway), which might be why it got such a big laugh from the audience.

bup
06-09-2013, 11:50 PM
As long as we've revived the subject. I asked this once before and couldn't get a definitive answer.

On an episode of MASH there was a scene where Col Flagg (the military intelligence agent) used the line "I could tell you but then I'd have to kill you". Was this the original use of that line or did it predate MASH?You've asked it, and so has Elendir's Heir and Johanna.

The top 3 google hits are those threads. Tv tropes does not mention M*A*S*H, and while it sounds exactly like something Flagg would say, I'm not sure he did. Are you?

Leaffan
06-09-2013, 11:56 PM
So where's the joke in Hail Ants' statement? Please explain why you thought it was a whoosh. Randall delivered the joke well and it was quite funny, so I took his comment as a serious statement

Because he's stating in post #42 what was already directly in the OP.

bup
06-10-2013, 12:01 AM
Oh, is that the problem? He didn't think he was mentioning the Odd Couple for the first time in the thread. He was answering the question "why do so many people remember where they first heard such a dumb joke?"

The answer is, because for many of us it was TOC, and it was really damned funny!

cochrane
06-10-2013, 12:14 AM
Because he's stating in post #42 what was already directly in the OP.

He was?


I remember the first time I heard that joke. It was The Odd Couple and Felix got a traffic ticket. Instead of paying it, he took it to court and had a whole presentation ready. At one point in his cross-examination, the witness said, "Well, I just assumed. . ."

Felix wrote the word on his chalkboard and then graphically pointed out how assuming makes an ass out of you and me.

But this joke feels older to me. Are there any earlier tellings of this joke or did it originate with The Odd Couple?

I'm not going to continue arguing, but I wonder if we're reading the same thread.

Anyway, I agree Tony Randall delivered the joke well, and it was quite funny for 1973, so if Hail Ants intended the opposite, then I'll admit to being whooshed.

@ Exapno: Otherwise, as I said, different people think different things are funny. If you didn't think it was, I'll take your word for it.

Zebra
06-10-2013, 12:14 AM
I think the first person to do this would be the first literate 12 year old who saw the word being written.




"That says ass."

Little Nemo
06-10-2013, 01:33 AM
You've asked it, and so has Elendir's Heir and Johanna.

The top 3 google hits are those threads. Tv tropes does not mention M*A*S*H, and while it sounds exactly like something Flagg would say, I'm not sure he did. Are you?I can't cite it other than saying I remember his character saying it (to Henry Blake).

Hail Ants
06-10-2013, 08:51 AM
So where's the joke in Hail Ants' statement? Please explain why you thought it was a whoosh. Randall delivered the joke well and it was quite funny, so I took his comment as a serious statementYeah, what he said. Wasn't being ironic or sarcastic, when I saw that bit on TOC as a kid I found it really funny and still find Randall's delivery perfect (more so than just the silly word pun).

Sam A. Robrin
06-10-2013, 10:41 PM
"Ass" meaning "buttocks" in addition to "donkey" or "foolish person" dates back at least to Shakespeare.
To Apuleius, in fact.

notfrommensa
06-11-2013, 10:58 AM
I think the first person to do this would be the first literate 12 year old who saw the word being written.




"That says ass."

I specifically remember getting amused, as a 12 yr old, by the last three letters in "algebra".

daveb81
05-08-2014, 05:45 PM
“When you assume, you make an ass out of u and me.”
~ Oscar Wilde on Assumption
Since he died in 1900, it's quite old. Don't know the year.
Here's one of the many articles I can cite: http://www.drelizabethgreen.com/assume-ass-u-me/

Exapno Mapcase
05-08-2014, 06:15 PM
Dr. Elizabeth Green is a chucklehead.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
05-08-2014, 06:19 PM
“When you assume, you make an ass out of u and me.”
~ Oscar Wilde on Assumption

This was in the same set of aphorisms in which Wilde noted "Nothing compares 2 U."

samclem
05-08-2014, 07:34 PM
“When you assume, you make an ass out of u and me.”
~ Oscar Wilde on Assumption
Since he died in 1900, it's quite old. Don't know the year.
Here's one of the many articles I can cite: http://www.drelizabethgreen.com/assume-ass-u-me/ Bon jour Found it on the internet, did you? :D

Dr. Elizabeth Green is a chucklehead.QFT.

samclem
05-08-2014, 07:36 PM
I must be the oldest person on the Internet because no one else has posted that this was a bit that was done by Abbott and Costello back in the fifties, and they may have used it in their vaudeville routine prior to that. Lou Costello even used the blackboard to show Bud Abbott ass + u + me = assume. The writers from the odd couple stole that bit.

I don't disbelieve you. Just wish we could have a cite to prove it. You're probable right.

I just took it back to a Google book cite from 1959. Business school journal.

Chefguy
05-08-2014, 07:58 PM
Using Google Books, you can find a cite from a 1966 issue of PMI, Photo Methods for Industry. http://books.google.com/books?id=ufoiAAAAMAAJ&q=%22make+an+ass%22+assume+date:1900-1975&dq=%22make+an+ass%22+assume+date:1900-1975&lr=&num=30&as_brr=0&pgis=1

You have to learn how to search inside the issue, then you have to make sure to make sure that the issue isn't more recent. VERY many false Google Book hits. I did the work. It's there.

So, it predates The Odd Couple.

I recall seeing it on the Odd Couple, but had heard it before that among military guys, and perhaps even before that in college (1965-67).

Learjeff
05-08-2014, 08:03 PM
I wish whoever said it first had also said it last.

Whenever someone says that, I like to ask, "OK, list all the assumptions you're making." The smart ones laugh. The dumb ones say "None!" in which case I get to laugh.

Good assumptions don't make an ass of anyone. Bad ones do. It's not always easy to tell between the two, but when we find we've made a bad one, it's a learning opportunity. Not to never assume (which is impossible).

When someone at work mentions an assumption they're making, I say "Good! Can we test that?" It most often comes up when debugging, and it's surprising how often really good assumptions turn out to be false. You'd think that after a while, the surprise would fade, but it seems it's the gift that just keeps on giving.

njtt
05-09-2014, 08:21 AM
I first heard it on the Odd Couple, along with the joke in the ghost episode about the ritual phrase "Owah Tagoo Siam."

It was funny at the time and slightly shocking since I hadn't heard words like Ass too often on network tv in the early '70s.

That one I heard (as "the Siamese National Anthem", "Oh wa ta na Siam", to be sung to the tune of "God Save the Queen") when I was a kid, from another kid. That was in England, in what must have been about 1960, so it definitely long predates The Odd Couple, who merely seem to have bowdlerized it a bit.

As for the "ass - u - me" thing, I do not remember specifically, or otherwise know its origin, but the suggestion of Benny Hill sounds quite plausible to me. He did actually go in for that sort of rather ponderous wordplay sometimes, and it is worth pointing out that his show ran on British TV from 1955 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Benny_Hill_Show), so it was around for a good fifteen years before The Odd Couple debuted on US TV.

Mind you, I imagine Tony Randall managed to make it a lot funnier than Benny ever did (and I say that as a fan and admirer of Benny). The Odd Couple may well have introduced it into America, and, maybe, generally popularized it. Indeed, I doubt if it would have been very funny in the show, despite all Randall's talents, if it had already been well known in the USA. (Benny Hill, although he had long been well known in Britain, does not seem to have been shown in the USA until much later, the late 1970s (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Benny_Hill_Show#International_airings).)

Also, I am totally on board with middleman's rant (although I am baffled as to how "deduce" which means something quite different, almost opposite, can be used as an alternative).

hajario
05-09-2014, 10:00 AM
It was Jack Klugman, not Tony Randall, who delivered it on The Odd Couple.

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
05-09-2014, 10:07 AM
So. . . instead of Oscar Wilde, it was Oscar Madison. . . . Anyway, while it might not be the first occurence of the phrase, I'd submit that "The Odd Couple" was gave the phrase the currency that it has.

Cartoonacy
05-09-2014, 10:38 AM
It was Jack Klugman, not Tony Randall, who delivered it on The Odd Couple.

If you watch the clip linked in post #42, you'll see that it was Randall.

I'm another who first heard in on TOC. I'm a pretty big Abbott & Costello fan, and I've never heard them do it, though that doesn't mean they never did.

There was a mediocre sitcom in 1990 called The Fanelli Boys. I remember one episode in which one of the characters pulled the routine on his dumber brother. Later, someone said something to the brother that began with "I presume..." and the brother replied "You presume? You should never presume, because when you presume..." He wrote the word, then stared at it in confusion for a few beats. "When you presume... you press you to me, you ass."

hajario
05-09-2014, 10:50 AM
Well, hell, I was relying on my memory and I just assumed…

robert_columbia
05-09-2014, 12:47 PM
When you assert, you make an ass out of the Emergency Response Team.

Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor
05-09-2014, 06:53 PM
This smells like a military joke, as told by sergeants.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
05-09-2014, 07:25 PM
When you assert, you make an ass out of the Emergency Response Team.

I would assent, but that would make an ass out of a walking tree.

handsomeharry
05-11-2014, 01:16 AM
Yeah, that was the first (pretty awful) sequel and it was Jack Warden who made the joke at the very beginning. He was only in the film for this first scene (though confusingly he played the Walter Matthau part in the short lived TV series based on the original movie!) I remember seeing it on HBO and immediately remembering The Odd Couple a few years earlier.

First place I ever heard this was Al Franken's great Stuart Smalley SNL character. It was the one where he was talking to Michael Jordan (the host) so we're talking early 90s. I had never heard it before that so I found it really funny (still do). By the way, full joke is, "Remember, denial ain't just a river in Egypt!"

Reminds me of another really funny joke Fred Willard told on Letterman a few years back that just has to be an old, bawdy vaudeville routine: "You know what they say about a blind hooker don't ya? You really have to hand it to them!"

For Fred Willard, that seems to be pretty unfunny.