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View Full Version : My prescription medication got stolen.... I have no idea what to do now.


SweetHomeColorado
08-21-2008, 07:39 PM
I was just moving across town.... I packed my car, drove to my new dwelling (an apt in an apt complex). I grabbed all the boxes/bags on top of the heap and carried them in and (to the best of my memory) locked my car. I usually lock the doors by habit but since I was multitasking, I could have forgotten. Regardless, I came back to find my messenger bag missing. It had two prescription medications for my back, about $40 in money, a notebook, some pens, and a new mouse I bought for my laptop.
I thought I left it at my old place so I drove back there and it was gone. I finished moving and yep, no bag. When I went into my new apt for the first time, i was in there about 15 mins, certainly enough time for a grab and run.
Now, I have no idea what to do. I live in IL (I'm sure laws are different everywhere) I plan on going in tomorrow morning and giving a police report. From there, can I expect to get my medicine filled minus the number of days from the initial fill?

Any advice?

Una Persson
08-21-2008, 07:46 PM
Perhaps I'm missing something, but why not just get a refill? Not to be over-obvious, but is there something about your plan which prohibits that? I can get early/extra refills if, say I broke an insulin bottle or I'm going on vacation, so I don't see why theft would be any less believed, unless it was a narcotic or abusable substance.

If you can't just demand a replacement subscription, call your insurance company and explain it to them. If they give you gruff, call your doctor and let their nurse go to work on the insurance company (that always works for me). One way or another, unless they have *cause* to suspect you're abusing things, they're going to give you a refill (although expect you'll have to pay the co-pay again...few ways around that one).

SweetHomeColorado
08-21-2008, 07:51 PM
Perhaps I'm missing something, but why not just get a refill? Not to be over-obvious, but is there something about your plan which prohibits that? I can get early/extra refills if, say I broke an insulin bottle or I'm going on vacation, so I don't see why theft would be any less believed, unless it was a narcotic or abusable substance.

If you can't just demand a replacement subscription, call your insurance company and explain it to them. If they give you gruff, call your doctor and let their nurse go to work on the insurance company (that always works for me). One way or another, unless they have *cause* to suspect you're abusing things, they're going to give you a refill (although expect you'll have to pay the co-pay again...few ways around that one).


I pay out of pocket for medication and it's a controlled substance which would make the simple refill pretty hard to do.

Una Persson
08-21-2008, 07:58 PM
I pay out of pocket for medication and it's a controlled substance which would make the simple refill pretty hard to do.
Well, that does suck a bit. You'll have to call your doctor then, there's really no other way. Your doctor should be pretty accommodating if they're not an asshole and they have no cause to suspect something. People do lose/get stolen/damage medication all the time, so I wouldn't sweat it until they say "no."

freckafree
08-21-2008, 08:04 PM
IANAL or police officer, YMMV, etc., etc.

Last year, my sister had pain medication stolen from her house by one of the construction crew working on a remodeling project.

Definitely report the theft to the police. Having made a police report was part of what was required in order for my sister to get her meds replaced. The police and doctor both basically said, "Meh, happens all the time." She got replacement prescriptions w/ no problem.

Since it was a controlled substance, they may well have subtracted what she would have used since date of last refill. I don't remember that detail.

tygerbryght
08-22-2008, 04:21 PM
I pay out of pocket for medication and it's a controlled substance which would make the simple refill pretty hard to do.
Ouch! Good luck with your doctor. I hope you've had the same one for a while. That should help you get help from him/her.

Be very sure you do the police report, and get a copy, so you can claim the loss on your 2008 income tax filing. That doesn't entirely compensate you for your loss, but it helps you recover something, at least.

And I suggest you start thinking hard about how you can avoid similar future losses? I can't imagine the problems I'd have in your situation, and don't even want to try. So sorry it happened to you.

Another thought: Might the doctor have samples?

SweetHomeColorado
08-22-2008, 05:14 PM
I'm all set. left a message last night and the prescription was waiting for me this morning at the front desk! Thanks to everyone for calming my nerves!

diggleblop
08-22-2008, 07:03 PM
check your PMs, sweethomecolorado.

irishgirl
08-22-2008, 08:21 PM
As a doctor, a one-off theft of tablets doesn't set my "narcotic abuser" radar off.

Telling me you're allergic to every pain medication under the sun except morphine...
Telling me tablets "never work", so you'd like to just skip straight on to the painkilling injections...
"Losing" your prescription on a regular basis, in increasingly unlikely scenarios...
Saying that you just can't remember what you usually take for pain, but you think it starts with an M and ends with "orphine"...
Saying that low-dose codeine makes you vomit and spaces you out, but that high dose Oxycodone stuff suits you just fine...

All of that pings the radar big-time.

On of my colleagues writes PTIWBY-DSB on these types of notes.
It means "patient thinks I was born yesterday- drug seeking behaviour".

Glad you got it all sorted.

KRSOradio
08-23-2008, 01:31 AM
I had my prescriptions stolen and I just phoned my doctor who called in new ones. One was a more controlled substance, but he obviously trusted me cause he made no mention. The other two were an asthma inhaler and blood pressure.

The one thing I could not do was get the insurance company to pay for it. I even said I'd fill out a police report, they said "no we only pay once for every 30 days period. Lose them or they get stolen tough luck, pay full price." So I had to pay full price.

Ragiel
08-24-2008, 11:59 AM
As a doctor, a one-off theft of tablets doesn't set my "narcotic abuser" radar off.

Telling me you're allergic to every pain medication under the sun except morphine...
Telling me tablets "never work", so you'd like to just skip straight on to the painkilling injections...
"Losing" your prescription on a regular basis, in increasingly unlikely scenarios...
Saying that you just can't remember what you usually take for pain, but you think it starts with an M and ends with "orphine"...
Saying that low-dose codeine makes you vomit and spaces you out, but that high dose Oxycodone stuff suits you just fine...

All of that pings the radar big-time.

On of my colleagues writes PTIWBY-DSB on these types of notes.
It means "patient thinks I was born yesterday- drug seeking behaviour".

I am so stealing that acronym!

I'm a psychiatrist working on contract in a variety of settings, so I have to adapt my procedure to where I'm working. For a patient I know not to be a drug abuser, I will reorder a controlled med once without question. For an unfamiliar patient, I want to make a copy of the police report first. For a prisoner in a correctional facility with a history of drug addiction, I am going to ask for a far more detailed documentation of the alleged disorder and get a second assessment if another clinician is available, before I'd order it the first time.

This applies to controlled stimulants and sedatives, basically, since I don't deal with pain management.