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BigFriendlyGiant
12-06-2000, 05:38 PM
Must See Sci-Fi Movies

I've been wondering what movies are considered must sees as far as Sci-Fi either past or present. The ones I know are:

War of the worlds
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Contact
ET
2001 A Space Odyssey

I know there are more but I don't know what they are.

OrcaChow
12-06-2000, 07:57 PM
Blade Runner.

Alien.

The Incredible Shrinking Man.

The Day the Earth Stood Still.

Forbidden Planet.

Metropolis.

And, IMO, two smaller ones that should be, in recognition of their influence on later films:

Dark Star.

A Boy and His Dog.

BigFriendlyGiant
12-06-2000, 08:01 PM
I just remembered a Disney movie that most definitely should qualify but I'm not sure, Earth: Star Voyager, and I forgot to mention Dune.

CalMeacham
12-06-2000, 10:29 PM
Robocop

The Terminator

Terminator 2

The Quatermass Experiment (The Creepin Unknown)

Quatermass 2 (Enemy from Space)

Quatermass and the Pit (Fve Million Years to Earth)

Robinon Crusoe on Mars (Stupid Title, good flick)

It! The Terror from Beyond Space (Alien was DEFINITELY ripped of from this. Good Jerome Bixb script, Paul Blaisdell alien)

Aliens

Journey to the Center of the Earth (It has its bad points, but overall a good flick)

RocknRoll Killing Machine
12-06-2000, 10:52 PM
Dark City an amazing movie that I've never heard about from anyone.

Road Rash
12-06-2000, 11:12 PM
Originally posted by BigFriendlyGiant
I just remembered a Disney movie that most definitely should qualify but I'm not sure, Earth: Star Voyager, and I forgot to mention Dune.

Are you thinking of Tron?

Not one of my favorites, but the first one that came to mind with Disney. A Southpark episode (Jewbilee) I believe parodied it.

Emustrangler
12-06-2000, 11:22 PM
12 Monkeys is one of my personal faves

Also a big Matrix fan, though it might be considered more of an action movie then Sci-Fi.

Mofo Rising
12-06-2000, 11:36 PM
I second:

2001
Blade Runner
12 Monkeys
Dark City
Alien

I would also add:

The original Star Wars trilogy. (If you haven't seen this, you have a gigantic hole in your movie watching education.)
Akira
Ghost in the Shell
Pi (Very, very borderline sci-fi.)
Aliens
Repo Man (More of a personal favorite.)
Brazil

And many more I can't think of.

HalberMensch242
12-07-2000, 12:24 AM
I agree with most of the movies listed..and i'd like to add Solaris.

CalMeacham
12-07-2000, 07:34 AM
I can't believe that nobody (including myself) has mentioned

The Thing

Both versions. The original is considered a classic, but the John Carpenter remake is much more faithful to the John Campbell story it's based on.


Creator

2010: The Year we Make Contact (which I'll still defend)

Star Trek II, III, and IV

The Andromeda Strain (The only Crichton I've really liked -- and directed by Rober Wise!)

Things to Come (often boring and sometimes ridiculous, but a classic)

Ura-Maru
12-07-2000, 07:51 AM
The Blood of Heroes AKA Wrath of the Jugger Hard to find. Worth looking for. Austrailian Post-Apocolyptic sports movie. Better than it sounds. It has Joan Chen biting a guys ear off. Later on she sleeps with Rutger Hauer. It's good, really.

The Road Warrior (The first and last Mad Max movies are fun, but the second one was proably the best)

Venus Wars, a fairly obscure 80's era anime, (with all that implies) which sounds like it's hentai, but isn't. I really should pick up the DVD one of these days.

A Wind Named Amnisia was pretty good, dispite the terrible ending. I suppose I should mention Wings of Honiamise as well.

They're not movies, but the Armitage III OAV series, Neon Genesis Evangilon, and Key the Metal Idol all hand some interesting SF premises, though avoid the dub of the first unless you want to hear Elzebeth Berkley try to act. And Bubble Gum Crisis, of course. :)

Votoms and Gakarasi are supposed to be very good, but I haven't seen them.

Of stuff already mentioned, Blade Runner, the first Alien, the first Terminator, GiTS, Akira, 2001, The Andromeda Strain.

I STILL haven't seen Gattica, though.

Out of curiosity, how was Dark Star influential?

--
"That being said, enjoy your crappy sci-fi movie."

dantheman
12-07-2000, 07:56 AM
Ooooooh..... All pretty darn good movies, so far. I'd like to submit 1971's Silent Running with Bruce Dern.

I did see Dark City when it came out a few years ago, and I'll admit I didn't quite know if I liked it or not. But after a little while, I realized it was a darn good film. Quirky, odd, but what a storyline!

And what about Planet of the Apes (1968)?

CalMeacham
12-07-2000, 08:54 AM
Uru-Maru:

One way Dark Star was influential was in showing a "lived in" spaceship. AFAIK it was the first movie to do this -- before Star Wars or Solaris. Before Dark Star space ships were always pristine and clean.

Another war it's important is that it brought back the "Monster loose aboard the starship" for the first time since the 1956 flick "It! The Terror from Beyond Space". The subplot with the "Beachball" (which waasn't part of the original student film) has the same plot as Alien. By the way, one of the screenwriters for Alien was Dan O'Bannon, who is the guy chasing the Beachball in Dark Star. Coincidence? I seriously doubt it.


"ET" as required viewing? Yechhhh!


Much better than ET:

Destination Moon

When World Collide

Deep Impact

The War Game (Peter Watkins; film, not the Matthew Broderick film), Threads, The Day After, and a host of similar "When the Bomb Falls" films


20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (THe Disney version)

mrblue92
12-07-2000, 09:51 AM
This Island Earth (in MST3K: The Movie of course)

Also:

Terror from the Year 5000
The Phantom Planet
Horror at Party Beach
The Projected Man

You can thank me later.

WIGGUM
12-07-2000, 12:00 PM
How about Enemy Mine with Dennis Quaid and Lou Gossett Jr.?

paintsvillecom
12-07-2000, 12:25 PM
What? No one is going to mention A Clockwork Orange?

One recent but notable addition would have to be Titan A.E.

I'll also have to cast a vote for Logan's Run, although I recognize that there is a certain amount of cheesiness in that movie.

Disney movie? I think Tron should qualify, but maybe our friend is searching for The Black Hole.

paintsvillecom
12-07-2000, 12:35 PM
Dang, thought of a couple more after hitting the submit button.

Soylent Green (sp?)

THX-1138

The Fifth Element

And there is another movie which I have been trying to remember, but can't think of. It's truly a horrible, horrible movie, but it's so bad that it should be on any must-see list just as a counterweight. It's the one it's set in a post-apocalyptic world where a guy and girl and another fellow are on the run from LA to NY (or vice versa?) and have to travel underground. The most memorable part of the movie for me is where they encounter some weirdo underground and the weirdo has the most memorable line of the movie -- "You see, I'm sick in the head. I eat leeches." -- or words to that effect. I've tried to find it listed in IMDb using the quote search, but none of the searches for "leech" or "leeches" turn it up. Can anyone else remember?

penael
12-07-2000, 12:37 PM
Brazil
Time Bandits
Basically anything Terry Gilliam!

paintsvillecom
12-07-2000, 12:40 PM
Aaagh! Two more:

Heavy Metal

They Live (a superb satire)

Torberg
12-07-2000, 01:19 PM
How can no one have yet mentioned "The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension?"



Tor

xizor
12-07-2000, 01:58 PM
Originally posted by paintsvillecom
And there is another movie which I have been trying to remember, but can't think of. It's truly a horrible, horrible movie, but it's so bad that it should be on any must-see list just as a counterweight. It's the one it's set in a post-apocalyptic world where a guy and girl and another fellow are on the run from LA to NY (or vice versa?) and have to travel underground. The most memorable part of the movie for me is where they encounter some weirdo underground and the weirdo has the most memorable line of the movie -- "You see, I'm sick in the head. I eat leeches." -- or words to that effect. I've tried to find it listed in IMDb using the quote search, but none of the searches for "leech" or "leeches" turn it up. Can anyone else remember?

Are you possibly thinking of "Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man" starring Don Johnson and Mickey Rourke?

xizor
12-07-2000, 02:00 PM
Originally posted by paintsvillecom
And there is another movie which I have been trying to remember, but can't think of. It's truly a horrible, horrible movie, but it's so bad that it should be on any must-see list just as a counterweight. It's the one it's set in a post-apocalyptic world where a guy and girl and another fellow are on the run from LA to NY (or vice versa?) and have to travel underground. The most memorable part of the movie for me is where they encounter some weirdo underground and the weirdo has the most memorable line of the movie -- "You see, I'm sick in the head. I eat leeches." -- or words to that effect. I've tried to find it listed in IMDb using the quote search, but none of the searches for "leech" or "leeches" turn it up. Can anyone else remember?

Could you possibly be thinking of "Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man" starring Don Johnson and Mickey Rourke?

Also, I didn't see "Ghostbusters" mentioned. That's a must see.

Zenster
12-07-2000, 02:27 PM
Nosferatu

Things To Come

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari*

* NOT REALLY SCI-FI BUT A GROUNDBREAKING FILM

paintsvillecom
12-07-2000, 03:27 PM
Originally posted by xizor
[QUOTE]Originally posted by paintsvillecom
[B]Could you possibly be thinking of "Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man" starring Don Johnson and Mickey Rourke?

No, no, no. This movie contains no stars that I can remember. If it did, I could try to look up film credits of the principal actors. It was set pretty far in the future, and the environment was so horrible that the folks on the journey couldn't risk going topside, so they had to travel cross country through underground parking garages. (Obviously, the entire country had become one huge metropolis.)

Honestly, though it had been billed as a "cult classic," this movie is entirely devoid of any redeeming social value. The only reason it sticks out in mind is the "leeches" quote. It's the type which folks watch just to see how horrible a movie can be, like "Plan 9 from Outer Space."

Oooh ... that's another for the list. That opening scene is so hokey. I just love the line, "In the future, everyone will live in the future." Cracks me up every time I think that was meant to be serious.

penael
12-09-2000, 06:01 PM
Any of the Planet of the Apes movies!!!

(duh) how could we have forgotten?

paintsvillecom
07-03-2016, 10:32 AM
And there is another movie which I have been trying to remember, but can't think of. It's truly a horrible, horrible movie, but it's so bad that it should be on any must-see list just as a counterweight. It's the one it's set in a post-apocalyptic world where a guy and girl and another fellow are on the run from LA to NY (or vice versa?) and have to travel underground. The most memorable part of the movie for me is where they encounter some weirdo underground and the weirdo has the most memorable line of the movie -- "You see, I'm sick in the head. I eat leeches." -- or words to that effect. I've tried to find it listed in IMDb using the quote search, but none of the searches for "leech" or "leeches" turn it up. Can anyone else remember?

In the extremely rare event that anyone stumbles across this thread in the future, I found myself asking the exact same question today. However, I did find the answer. The movie was Circuitry Man

John DiFool
07-03-2016, 12:01 PM
I wonder if the OP knows that his movie is coming out this weekend...

Projammer
07-03-2016, 02:32 PM
Dark City an amazing movie that I've never heard about from anyone.That was actually the first one that came to mind..


Sphere
Ender's Game
Species
Mimic
Lifeforce
Weird Science
Black Hole
Johnny Mnemonic
The Cell
Men in Black
Planet of the Apes
The Day the Earth Stood Still
I, Robot
Pitch Black
Chronicles of Riddick
Space Balls
Ultraviolet
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
Total Recall
The World's End
Aeon Flux

I realize that some of these are stretching the scifi definition, but if you squint just right...

ETA: I mean the original when there's more than one release.

guestchaz
07-03-2016, 09:14 PM
I was really surprised when I saw "Ender's Game". It remainded remarkably faithful to the book and the changes that I noticed seemed reasonable to me for the change in medium for the story.

I, Robot was a good movie, but disappointing at how "un-I, Robot the book" it was.
You've seen Lifeforce? Man, everytime I mention that movie to someone they look at me like I have a third arm growing out of my forehead.

Invasion of the Body Snatchers with Mr. Sutherland, I think is a must see.
the pod people maybe ain't zombies but still...

can I throw in "Red Dwarf" even though its a tv series and not a movie?

jtur88
07-03-2016, 09:19 PM
"Galaxy Quest", funniest move I've ever seen in any genre, with a story line just as serious and plausible as most other sci-fi pictures.

Loach
07-04-2016, 08:47 AM
Since there seems to be some interest in this zombie I'll move it to CS.

levdrakon
07-04-2016, 09:18 AM
I was born the year Robinson Crusoe on Mars was released, and thanks to this thread, decided to watch it yesterday for the first time. It's been remastered and released on DVD and Blu-ray. Great little movie! I'll probably rewatch it from time to time.

mbh
07-04-2016, 09:21 AM
You've seen Lifeforce? Man, everytime I mention that movie to someone they look at me like I have a third arm growing out of my forehead.

Ah, yes, Lifeforce, starring Mathilda May's breasts, and a bunch of British actors. (Oh, yeah, and one gratuitous American. Whose character was the lead role in the novel. Whose character is supposedly the lead role in the movie. And he yet manages to make Raymond Burr's contributions to Godzilla look vitally important.)

I'm kidding. I enjoyed the movie. But it's very easy to make fun of.

wintertime
07-04-2016, 09:24 AM
Ghost in the Shell (1995), highly influential Japanese manga; even nowadays worth a look.

Gattaca (1997), the central message is seriously flawed, but it's a thoughtful movie about the impact on human relations that gentech might have.

Matrix (1999); so influential that any film buff should watch it once.

Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind (2004), not SF per se but since it includes a piece of tech not available (precise erasure of memory to forget anything burdensome), I'll jump at the chance to recommend one of my favourite movies.

Inception (2010), the top is a Red Herring.

Edge of Tomorrow (2014); great time travel movie, the end is far more ambiguous than it looks.

Ex Machina (2015); psychological chamber drama about a programmer who is invited by his genius boss to test an AI situated in a female body. It's about identity, gender roles, the extent of human rights and the uncertainty of and from freedom.

The Martian (2015); you just can't miss the chance to see Matt Damon be saved once again at incredible expense. Also, science - yeah!

blue infinity
07-04-2016, 10:30 AM
A few recent ones:

Sunshine

Moon

Under the Skin

Snowboarder Bo
07-04-2016, 10:32 AM
Primer

Wendell Wagner
07-04-2016, 11:12 AM
The question in the OP is vague. Yeah, I know it was asked over 15 years ago, but it's still not clear what the OP was asking. Is it asking what the most influential science fiction movies are or what the best science fiction movies are? Certainly some of the suggestions in this thread are hopelessly far from being influential. They may or may not be great films, but few people saw them and still remember them, so they didn't influence anyone. For instance, in post #3, the "movie" Earth: Star Voyager is mentioned. This was not a movie but an episode (shown on January 17 and 24 of 1988) of The Wonderful World of Color (i.e., the weekly Disney program on American TV). It was intended to be a spin-off, but it didn't get good ratings, so it wasn't spun off. I have never seen it, so I have no idea if it's good. The few reviews say that it's O.K. Not only is there no mainstream fans for this, but I don't know of any significant cult for it. Yes, I know a lot about cult science fiction movies, and this isn't one:

http://moria.co.nz/sciencefiction/earth-star-voyager-1988.htm

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0095077/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_Star_Voyager

RikWriter
07-04-2016, 11:15 AM
Forbidden Planet
2001: A Space Odyssey
Star Wars
The Thing
Aliens
Blade Runner
Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Gattaca
The Matrix
Galaxy Quest
Interstellar
The Martian

wintertime
07-04-2016, 11:23 AM
2046 (2004); pure Kar-Wai Wong, though calling it Sci Fi is, well ...

The Fountain (2006); flawed? Yes. But wonderfully weird. If you don't like Aronofsky's style, avoid this movie.

Children of Men (2006); brilliant dystopia.

Looper (2012); entertaining and clever time travel story.

terentii
07-04-2016, 11:28 AM
The Time Machine. I prefer the 1960 version with Rod Taylor to the remake.

I suppose George Pal's War of the Worlds should go on the list too, though I would have much preferred to see a period version set in Victorian Britain than the "updated" version a la Orson Welles.

Them.

Invaders from Mars, which capitalized on the Red Chinese scare of the 1950s.

Mars Attacks. Hilarious!

If we're going to include TV series, The Prisoner and The Time Tunnel. Both require complete suspension of disbelief.

I may be a minority of one, but I much preferred Star Trek: TMP to The Search for Spock. Don't bother killing off a chracter if you're just going to resurrect him in the next installment.

MadTheSwine
07-04-2016, 12:39 PM
A Boy and His Dog.

My 1st thought

Smapti
07-04-2016, 12:54 PM
District 9 hasn't been mentioned yet, so I'll throw it out there, since it's the most recent sci-fi film I'd consider to be a classic of the genre.

Re: Dune, it should be noted that there are two adaptations of it that are both noteworthy for different reasons; the Lynch film, and the 2000 Sci-Fi Channel miniseries. The former is better in terms of cinematography, production values, and epic "feel"; the latter is a more faithful adaptation of the source material and covers a lot of the nuances that the film glossed over.

terentii
07-04-2016, 01:25 PM
Two with the unforgettable John Agar:

Journey to the Seventh Planet. Scared the hell out of me when I was in second grade. The big Swedish boobies in it are nice too! :o

Zontar, the Thing from Venus. Almost as bad as Plan 9 from Outer Space, which should be on the list too.

Has Time Bandits been mentioned? Watch this one when you're stoned!

The same goes for Flesh Gordon. :cool:

wintertime
07-04-2016, 04:26 PM
The Time Machine. I prefer the 1960 version with Rod Taylor to the remake.

Yeah, I watched the 60s film a couple of days ago, and still love it, even though it shows many of the flaws that plague its remake. Nostalgia plays a part, but it's also better crafted; and it doesn't contradict itself.

There is also a shift in point of views: the core of the 60s version is science, what it can achieve and destroy. Man's action is the mover of all things.

And while the remake seems to make the same point, we listen to a thesis that implies the presence of another force, whatever that may be, that restricts man's reach.

However, the actions of the protagonist show us the antithesis, and no synthesis is forthcoming, which means that we are left with a mess.

Very unsatisfying movie.

mbh
07-04-2016, 04:45 PM
same goes for Flesh Gordon. :cool:
Before you watch Flesh Gordon, you should watch the 1936 serial Flash Gordon. Otherwise, you will miss a lot of the jokes.

E-DUB
07-04-2016, 05:26 PM
"The Thirteenth Floor". Good flick, lost in the Matrix hubbub.

eburacum45
07-05-2016, 05:16 PM
Quatermass and the Pit (US title: Five Million Years to Earth) is a film I'm very fond of, with some interesting SF concepts. Bit British, though.

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
07-05-2016, 06:08 PM
It! The Terror from Beyond Space (Alien was DEFINITELY ripped of from this. Good Jerome Bixb script, Paul Blaisdell alien)

I finally got around to seeing this quite recently, just out of curiosity over the parallels to Alien. Found it pretty lame, actually. The DVD included a second feature, The Monster That Challenged the World, that I found a lot more enjoyable--it displayed a bit of wit and had a better creature. And Hans Conreid as the scientist!

CalMeacham
07-05-2016, 06:08 PM
Quatermass and the Pit (US title: Five Million Years to Earth) is a film I'm very fond of, with some interesting SF concepts. Bit British, though.

listed by me in post #5 above, along with the first two Quatermass films. You ignore the later ones. But, if you can, watch the original BBC serials the movies are based on. They're much longer, and the plots are actually somewhat different.




There are a lot of films people have listed that I wouldn't put as "must-see", personally. Of course, my own list is different. Here's an updated attempt at it:


2001: A Space Odyssey
Forbidden Planet

These two are my top-of-the-list SF films, and definite must-sees.

Metropolis -- the fully restored version, of course, with original score
Things to Come
The Lost World -- the restored version, again. NOT the Eastman House version, despite what some purists say

King Kong -- arguably fantasy, but definitely iconic. The 1933 version, of course. I'll add the 2005 version, too, but ignore the 1976 monstrosity

The Day the Earth Stood Still -- One of the best. The 1951 classic still holds up. Ignore the later remake at all costs.

The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms -- the ORIGINAL 1950s "monster movie". It wasn't a cliché then, because they did it first. And it was also Harryhausen's first use of his Dynamation/Dynarama/"Reality Sandwich" technique, which was a cost-cutting measure because he couldn't afford the army of technicians Willis O'Brien had for his movies.

Also, for various reasons, the 1950s monster flicks Them! and Kronos

The Thing (from Another World) -- the original, of course., It strayed from Campbell's story, but it has a lot going for it, despite a few missteps. I also think John Carpenter's 1982 remake is essential -- it's Campbell played mostly straight, and shows the power the original idea had.

The Quatermass Xperiment (The Creeping Unknown)
Quatermass 2 {Enemy from Space)
Quatermass and the Pit (Twenty Milliion Years to Earth) -- the essential Quatermass trilogy

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea -- the 1954 Disney version. Its special effects were great, for the period. It's closer to Verne's vision that just about any other movie, although they screwed with the plot and threw in Nemo discovering Nuclear Power. It's also the grand-daddy of the Steampunk movement -- Harper Goff's Victorian design for the sub doesn't match Verne's technically correct design, but it is visually extremely interesting, despite its inefficiency -- just like a lot of steampunk.

Journey to the Center of the Earth -- another pretty decent Verne adaptation, despite the addition of a villain, a female character, and a singer. But it starred James Mason, as 20,000 Leagues did. They should have made more Verne adaptations with Mason in them.

It! The Terror from Beyond Space -- stupid title, but a great low-budget movie. It's impossible to believe that "Alien" wasn't deliberately ripped off from this.

Robinson Crusoe on Mars -- Even when it was made they must've known of many of its inaccuracies, but this feels better than most SF films of its day. Crashed astronaut tries to survive on Mars. The film Enemy Mine and Andy Weir took notes, I hope.

Star Wars
The Empire Strikes Back
Return of the Jedi -- How can you not include the first three star wars filmsd? They gave us a lot of the SF scenes we'd hoped for, but the studios wouldn't give us -- lots of friendly and weird-looking aliens, the spaceport bar, space battles. Who cares if it was more children's story/science fantasy?

Star Trek II
Star Trek III
Star Trek IV -- I'll take these, despoiute their TV roots and some hokiness.

Bladerunner -- talk about iconic. If 20,000 Leagues gave us the start of steampunk, this film jump-started cyberpunk. Stylkish and impressive, with a lot of thought going into the background. If only the story were better.

The Terminator -- ground-breaking in its own way, and one of the best SF movies in years. It's still better than any of its sequels, although I'll include Terminator 2 on the list, for lots of reasons.

Aliens -- a much more satisfying film that Alien, which I have issues with.

2010 -- a neglected film, eclipsed by its illustrious predecessor. If they simply took out all of Roy Scheider's voice-overs, it would be almost perfect.

Robocop -- I was unimpressed with this when I saw the previews, but the film is a dark-humor gem.

The Matrix and, to a lesser extent, its sequels

The 13th Floor -- excellent adaptation of Daniel Inouye's pioneering VR novel Simulacron 3

Cloud Atlas

Oh, yeah -- I almost forgot. It's been abused, and it's really fantasy, but it's a great adaptation of a massively influential series -- John Carter







Other mentions:

The Fly -- both the 1957 original and the CRonenberg 1986 re-imagining. Ignore all sequels of both films. They're both iconic.

Destination: Moon -- the fact that Heinlein wrote the script alone makes this of interest, although that doesn't guarantee anything. Slow by today's standards, and sometimes embarrassing. But it's important. Heck, it has Chesley Bonestell art.

Invaders from Mars -- I'm a lot less impressed with this film nowadays, but it's on lots of lists.

The Andromeda Strain -- Not many examples from the late sixties/early seventies. Crichton's novel was a major thing when it was first released.

Planet of the Apes -- the original 1968 film. There's a lot of silliness in it that bothered me even as a kid, but it's undoubtedly been powerful and influential.

Invasion of the Body Snatchers -- a major influence on a lot of people. It's a scary story, well-told. The inconsistencies bother me, and I think Heinlein did it better in The Puppet Masters (which has been filmed twice, but not really well, and with inconsistencies not in the book). Heinlein's book predates the Jack Finney novel that IotBS was based on, and Heinlein apologized to his agent for using such a hackneyed idea. But the film hit at the right time -- after the HUAC and McCarthy Communist hunts.

Dune -- both the David Lynch version (and the tinkered-with "Allen Smithee" version) and the SciFi channel version. Both are ambitious and pretty decent attempts to translate Herbert's epic novel into interesting visuals, and to depict something far from the comfortable SF environment that playted to the crowds. This is pretty far from Star Trek or Star Wars, and closer to the boundary-breaking properties of literary SF.

psiekier
07-07-2016, 03:04 PM
I've been wondering what movies are considered must sees as far as Sci-Fi either past or present.
I had compiled a list of "must-see" movies in another thread (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=778176), but 1). they weren't all sci-fi, and 2). I deliberately left off everything that I had seen on any of the lists other posters had made upthread.

Great minds must think alike. My list got noticeably smaller when I pulled out all the duplicates and non-sci-fi movies. Still, there are some that I'm astounded are not already in this thread. Even if I consider the OP being 15 years ago, that doesn't excuse the absence of the Back to the Future trilogy!


Pacific Rim
Avatar
Prometheus (despite all its flaws)
Oblivion (2013 film with Tom Cruise and Morgan Freeman)
Starship Troopers (again, despite all its flaws)
Back to the Future (all three movies required viewing)
Flash Gordon (1980 version with Sam J. Jones as Flash and soundtrack by Queen)
Highlander (soundtrack also by Queen; avoid the sequels)
Minority Report
Jurassic Park
Predator and Predator 2
Escape from New York
Wizards (1977 Ralphi Bakshi film)

Elendil's Heir
07-07-2016, 03:10 PM
Wow - a lotta great sf movies mentioned here!

My personal Top Ten:

Star Wars: A New Hope
Limitless
Dark City
Galaxy Quest
Star Trek: First Contact
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Aliens
Blade Runner
The Martian
Buckaroo Banzai

Very good, but not Top Ten for me:

2001: A Space Odyssey
Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
Star Trek III: The Search for Spock
Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back
Star Wars: The Force Awakens
Cloud Atlas
The Matrix
Terminator 2
Men in Black
Inception
Interstellar
Looper
Children of Men

There are also some superhero movies (The Incredibles and Iron Man, among others) that are sorta kinda sf, but not quite. They're... superhero movies.