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Bi-Polar Guy
04-09-2009, 11:56 PM
I'm curious to find out if anyone in the Doper community can think of any other house pet, other than the dog, that is made to "hold it" when inside (when oner gone or not) and be able to go only when let outside to do so.
Cats have cat boxes, caged pets have cedar shavings or something like that to go in etc... but the dog seems to be the only pet I can think of that is forced to follow the bathroom schedule that people have made them follow.
Am sure obvious answer will be provided, and thanks in advance to all who help me lose some ignorance! (Don't worry--I have lots more!)

si_blakely
04-10-2009, 03:08 AM
We only ever used a cat box when we had to force the cat to stay inside for medical reasons. Otherwise, the cat was expected to make their own way out (or make it clear to a human in it's own inimitable fashion) to do it's business.

Si

SanVito
04-10-2009, 04:47 AM
My partner's cat is scared of the catflap so doesn't use it. He also doesn't have a litter tray, so just like a dog, he holds it until he can persuade someone to let him out. If he's inside on his own all day when everyone's at work, he hold it until someone gets home.

Paul in Qatar
04-10-2009, 05:46 AM
Cats and miniature pigs are commonly house-trained. I have known of horses and parrots that have been housebroken to varying degrees of success.

FlyingRamenMonster
04-10-2009, 06:03 AM
When I first got my guinea pig, he would only poop in one corner of the cage. It was quite odd since I don't think it's documented behaviour for a guinea pig, and also he stopped after about six months and now he goes wherever he please, including the food bowl.

Richard Pearse
04-10-2009, 07:20 AM
Another one who has house trained his cats (when he had some.) IMO litter boxes are an evil that should only be used if there is a good reason the cat can't spend some time outside.

Dinsdale
04-10-2009, 09:47 AM
I vaguely recal my buddy saying he regularly put his iguana "Jesus" in the bathtub, and he would relieve himself there.

Morgis
04-10-2009, 11:12 AM
My ferrets are mostly potty trained. They only go in one corner of their cage, and they have several litter boxes throughout the house. They do have accidents sometimes, though.

FlyingRamenMonster, since guinea pigs eat their own poo, yours was probably just putting it in the food bowl for later. :D

Tamerlane
04-10-2009, 12:17 PM
Cats have cat boxes, caged pets have cedar shavings or something like that to go in etc... but the dog seems to be the only pet I can think of that is forced to follow the bathroom schedule that people have made them follow.

My previous cat was primarily an indoors animal, with no cat door. But also no litterbox. She would scratch at the door to be let out to do her business, than scratch at it again to be let back in.

cher3
04-10-2009, 12:26 PM
Just as an alternative data point, my parents have their dog trained to go on special pads in the laundry room, more like a cat.

BrandonR
04-10-2009, 12:29 PM
My bearded dragon has essentially become potty trained... He will only go to the bathroom when we give him a bath in the kitchen sink. I had to leave on vacation for a week and when I returned I had expected him to go in his cage since we weren't home to give him a bath, but surprisingly he held it until we gave him another bath. He'll even sit in front of the cage and stare out at us when he needs to go. It's strange.

bordelond
04-10-2009, 12:40 PM
Just as an alternative data point, my parents have their dog trained to go on special pads in the laundry room, more like a cat.

This is not all that uncommon. It's a good strategy for older dogs that have problems holding it in as long as they once could.

I remember once seeing ads for "dog litter boxes" and "dog litter" on the back of MilkBone boxes. Wonder if that ever gained any traction?

badbadrubberpiggy
04-10-2009, 12:58 PM
I remember once seeing ads for "dog litter boxes" and "dog litter" on the back of MilkBone boxes. Wonder if that ever gained any traction?

I've seen a hamster litter box in PetSmart. I didn't buy it, but most small animals (hamsters, mice, rabbits, rats, and so on) can be litter/corner trained.

I'd be you COULD train a smarter rodent, like a rat, to "hold it" until they could get to their bathroom area, though I've never tried.

Sailboat
04-10-2009, 01:35 PM
Another one who has house trained his cats (when he had some.) IMO litter boxes are an evil that should only be used if there is a good reason the cat can't spend some time outside.

A good reason, for example, might be that cat waste runs off into the watershed and is a source of pollution.

I live in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and the Bay is under terrific pressure from all sources of runoff. Pet waste in general should never, never be left outside in the grass. It's OK if you follow the animal around or leash-walk him or her and pick up the poop; but the days are long gone since we were unaware of the damage of the practice of just letting the animal go unattended.

If you're talking about following the cat with a baggie handy, I apologize for misunderstanding.

Richard Pearse
04-10-2009, 07:14 PM
A good reason, for example, might be that cat waste runs off into the watershed and is a source of pollution.

If you're talking about following the cat with a baggie handy, I apologize for misunderstanding.
I wasn't, but I accept that "good reason" can vary and will depend on the owner's personal philosophy on pets and the environment. I've always been a cat-is-a-wild-animal-who-happens-to-live-with-me type of person, so I've allowed them to roam as they please. My cats were de-sexed and didn't do much roaming though, they'd just hang around the garden. I accept that some people have issues with cats killing native animals, or making a mess of the yard, or even that they're more likely to get hit by a car if the go outside.

Wouldn't pet excrement by a tiny proportion of pollution when compared to that of wild animals in the area?

Guinastasia
04-11-2009, 12:42 PM
My partner's cat is scared of the catflap so doesn't use it. He also doesn't have a litter tray, so just like a dog, he holds it until he can persuade someone to let him out. If he's inside on his own all day when everyone's at work, he hold it until someone gets home.


Just curious-but why no litterbox?

Sailboat
04-11-2009, 08:30 PM
Wouldn't pet excrement by a tiny proportion of pollution when compared to that of wild animals in the area?

Well, we've done away with a lot of the wild animals. But more to the point, each single piece of trash, each plastic bag, each cigarette butt, each discarded can, each cat turd is a tiny proportion of pollution by itself. It's just that it all adds up. The only possible way to reduce it is to be as responsible as we can with each item.

Bi-Polar Guy
04-12-2009, 04:43 AM
Thanks for all the input--I knew that you all would have answers I hadn't thought of. Ya just gotta know where to look and who to ask. Thanks again!!

ivan astikov
04-12-2009, 06:51 AM
A good reason, for example, might be that cat waste runs off into the watershed and is a source of pollution.

I live in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and the Bay is under terrific pressure from all sources of runoff. Pet waste in general should never, never be left outside in the grass. It's OK if you follow the animal around or leash-walk him or her and pick up the poop; but the days are long gone since we were unaware of the damage of the practice of just letting the animal go unattended.

If you're talking about following the cat with a baggie handy, I apologize for misunderstanding.

Animals have been leaving their 'waste' in the grass since year dot, so can you explain in detail the threat from cat and dog excrement?

Baron Greenback
04-17-2009, 07:00 PM
A good reason, for example, might be that cat waste runs off into the watershed and is a source of pollution.

I live in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and the Bay is under terrific pressure from all sources of runoff. Pet waste in general should never, never be left outside in the grass.

Is this the same Chesapeake Bay that has a watershed of around 64,000 square miles? If there's a problem with the water it sure ain't cat or dog shit causing it.

Hockey Monkey
04-17-2009, 09:10 PM
How can putting poop in a baggie, tying it up and depositing it in a landfill more environmentally responsible than leaving said poop to decompose naturally? I do understand that it's more neighborly and a good practice to remove poop from areas that other people will be using, but to say that it's more environmentally responsible is just wrong as far as I can tell.

gonzomax
04-18-2009, 10:20 AM
Poop dissolves away while a plastic bag lasts for thousands of years. I reject the idea that bagging poop is an environmental positive. It it is about stepping in it, I follow. But do not agree.

Q.E.D.
04-18-2009, 10:30 AM
How can putting poop in a baggie, tying it up and depositing it in a landfill more environmentally responsible than leaving said poop to decompose naturally?

It isn't. Anyone arguing otherwise is doing so from the "eww factor" rather than from a factual standpoint. There are plenty of good reasons to keep pet cats indoors; that is not one of them.

Sailboat
04-18-2009, 02:10 PM
Let's fight some ignrance.

Pet Waste threat to water (http://www.usatoday.com/news/science/2002-06-07-dog-usat.htm)

Pet Waste and Water Quality -- University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Service (http://www.agnr.umd.edu/CES/Pubs/PDF/FS703.pdf) (WARNING- PDF)

Pet Waste, Watre Quality, and Your Health -- Wilmington, NC handout (WARNING- PDF) [ignore the password request, this loaded for me anyway]

Pet Waste is Turning Streams into Sewers (http://www.heraldnet.com/article/20080114/NEWS01/456182906)

Nonpoint Source Pollution Education: Managing Pet Waste (http://www.mass.gov/dep/water/resources/petwaste.htm) (Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection)

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay Q&A (http://www.alliancechesbay.org/asktheexpert.cfm?question_id=5)

Fairfax County watershed protection tips (http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/accotink/thebay.htm)

City of Rockville Pet Waste brochure (http://www.rockvillemd.gov/environment/watersheds/pet-waste.pdf) (WARNING - PDF)

Brief highlights:

Pet waste is not part of natural balance in exurban areas
Occurs in unnaturally high concentrations
Nitrogen in runoff steals oxygen from water
Nitrogen in runoff propotes overgrowth of algae
Contains bacteria and disease-causing organisms

It's not an issue of being environmentally more responsible in some vaguely-defined "overall" way. It's that the watersheds, bays, and the Chesapeke Bay in particular are desperately at a breaking point and we need to protect them right now even if it means some plastic bags or flushing.