PDA

View Full Version : What's The Word For A Silver Platter That Goes Under Your Dinner Plate?


Hal Briston
04-12-2009, 03:58 PM
Like the title says...

BMax
04-12-2009, 04:08 PM
My mom calls it a "Charger".

I thought that was a dodge product, but what do I know?

Hal Briston
04-12-2009, 04:08 PM
More info: One word, ends in "er".

Hal Briston
04-12-2009, 04:16 PM
Whoops...missed your response, BMax -- yup, that's the answer we were looking for. Thanks much!

Reply
04-12-2009, 04:20 PM
"Unnecesnobby."

Beware of Doug
04-12-2009, 06:54 PM
I think charger came from the practice of heating them to keep the plate warm.

The same thing, when made of wood and put on top of the plate, is a trencher. They were once made of old stale bread.

A fellow with an outsize appetite - the kind who'd eat all his meat and the week-old bread for the drippings - is called a trencherman.

Exapno Mapcase
04-12-2009, 07:21 PM
I'd always understood that the charger was a decorative plate that was taken away at the start of a meal. You didn't get the charger dirty with food. Never heard of a silver charger, either.

This site (http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-decorative-charger-plate.htm) says that there are many traditions and that the charger can remain during portions of the meal, and some hosts do leave it on the table through the entrée. No mention of silver.

News to me, but then again I don't go to many dinners with people who own chargers.

Exapno Mapcase
04-12-2009, 07:29 PM
I think charger came from the practice of heating them to keep the plate warm.

The same thing, when made of wood and put on top of the plate, is a trencher. They were once made of old stale bread.

A fellow with an outsize appetite - the kind who'd eat all his meat and the week-old bread for the drippings - is called a trencherman.

This seemed wrong to me too, and as far as I can tell is wrong.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/trencher
trencher

c.1308, "wooden platter on which to cut meat," from Anglo-Fr. trenchour, from O.N.Fr. trencheor "a trencher," lit. "a cutting place," from O.Fr. trenchier "to cut" (see trench).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2001 Douglas Harper

trencher

originally a thick slice of bread, used as a primitive form of plate for eating and for slicing meat (hence its derivation from "trancher"-to cut, or carve), but by the 14th century a square or circular wooden plate of rough workmanship. There was usually a small cavity for salt in the rim of the wooden plate, and sometimes the main section was so formed that it could be turned over and the other side used for a second course
No mention of a trencher ever being on top of food.

DSYoungEsq
04-12-2009, 07:32 PM
This seemed wrong to me too, and as far as I can tell is wrong.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/trencher

No mention of a trencher ever being on top of food.

And in what part of the post to which you refer did the poster say the trencher was on top of the food???

Reply
04-12-2009, 07:35 PM
And in what part of the post to which you refer did the poster say the trencher was on top of the food???

The same thing, when made of wood and put on top of the plate, is a trencher. They were once made of old stale bread.

Unless he meant on top of the the silver platter, not the dinner plate?

Beware of Doug
04-12-2009, 07:43 PM
That's it. Of course, these things are never clear cut. :D

Exapno Mapcase
04-12-2009, 08:36 PM
Now I'm very confused.

I know of no evidence that chargers were ever used as warmers. They seem always to have been decorative.

Nor were trenchers ever warmers. They were functional surfaces for slicing and chopping.

You would never combine a trencher and a charger.

I can't picture a situation on which you would put a trencher on top of anything outside a table top. I just don't know what you meant by that and your explanation doesn't help. So why would you put a wooden trencher on top of a plate? What does that mean?

Beware of Doug
04-12-2009, 09:56 PM
I've obviously been grievously misled. I apologize if I may have passed that state of affairs on to you or anyone else.

Throw me a crust, an ort, anything and I shall be on my way and grateful for it.