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View Full Version : Do people eat reptile eggs?


Malleus, Incus, Stapes!
04-13-2009, 06:04 PM
My mother just came back from a trip to the store where they had all sorts of weird bird eggs, up to and including ostrich. People also eat fish eggs. But I can't recall hearing about turtle eggs for sale, or a new diner's fabulous sunny-side lizard.

My WAG here is that all reptile eggs come out fertilized, and it's rather unappetizing to bite into a hard-boiled fetus. And reptiles aren't as suited for mass production like chickens are. Aaaand it might be that reptile eggs don't taste that good, or are hard to cook.

But human society tends to forage on whatever's at hand and edible, and I'm sure, somewhere, there must be some society or culture that traditionally eats unusual eggs. I mean, you have people eating bugs, and palolo sea worm penises, and cheese with maggots- harvesting turtle eggs looks pretty normal in comparison.

Colibri
04-13-2009, 06:08 PM
Harvesting sea turtle eggs is very common in much of the tropics, to the extent that it is seriously endangering many populations. Eggs of freshwater turtles are also harvested in the Amazon. Here in Panama turtle eggs are regarded as an aphrodisiac.

Harmonious Discord
04-13-2009, 06:19 PM
People eat turtle eggs, and not just sea turtle eggs.

Reading the journal of a railroad surveyor for my area when everything was wilderness he describes that they ate some snake eggs thinking they were turtle eggs. They figured out they were snake eggs when some of them were found to have baby snakes in them.:)

Chronos
04-13-2009, 06:47 PM
My WAG here is that all reptile eggs come out fertilized, and it's rather unappetizing to bite into a hard-boiled fetus. And reptiles aren't as suited for mass production like chickens are. Aaaand it might be that reptile eggs don't taste that good, or are hard to cook.Fertilized or no, this isn't an issue if you gather them soon after laying, and store them in conditions unsuitable to incubation (such as in a fridge, or even, for most eggs, at room temperature). Any fetus would still be microscopic.

CC
04-13-2009, 06:54 PM
Aaand - my son, who will eat almost anything now, after having been so picky that he'd only eat about three things until age 25, has regaled me with stories of what I think are called balute eggs, a Philipine delicacy. These are duck eggs that have been fertilized and have developed waaaay far along. Many have quasi-feathers, etc. They are soaked in some liquid and I can't provide much detail, but the fact that they've been fertilized is part of the draw. These are almost hatched birds. eeeeewww.

JCorre
04-13-2009, 06:59 PM
Aaand - my son, who will eat almost anything now, after having been so picky that he'd only eat about three things until age 25, has regaled me with stories of what I think are called balute eggs, a Philipine delicacy. These are duck eggs that have been fertilized and have developed waaaay far along. Many have quasi-feathers, etc. They are soaked in some liquid and I can't provide much detail, but the fact that they've been fertilized is part of the draw. These are almost hatched birds. eeeeewww.

My girlfriend (Chinese) loves balut. We get them from the nearby asian grocery store. I tried them once but I didn't find them very tasty.

I've never seen reptile eggs at the store but they do sell live bullfrogs... :)

Biffy the Elephant Shrew
04-13-2009, 07:23 PM
Central/South Americans eat iguana eggs. They don't necessarily wait for them to be laid--I've read an account of a Colombian practice of cutting the eggs out of a gravid female, sewing up the wound, and letting the poor lizard go. When I was a kid, I had a book about iguanas that included a recipe for iguana stew that began "Catch a fat, female iguana around the months of..." The eggs were part of the recipe.

Mr. Moto
04-13-2009, 10:57 PM
AFTER dinner all the gang turned out to hunt for turtle eggs on the
bar. They went about poking sticks into the sand, and when they found a
soft place they went down on their knees and dug with their hands.
Sometimes they would take fifty or sixty eggs out of one hole. They
were perfectly round white things a trifle smaller than an English
walnut. They had a famous fried-egg feast that night, and another on
Friday morning.

Tom Sawyer, Mark Twain, chapter 16.

Alan Smithee
04-13-2009, 11:41 PM
So what do they taste like?

Colibri
04-13-2009, 11:59 PM
So what do they taste like?

Like chicken.

Markxxx
04-14-2009, 12:14 AM
Those of you who watch Gilligan's Island surely must know Mary Ann uses turtle eggs for her cakes and pancakes etc. Though one time she used duck eggs.

Would they cook up in a cake the same way?

(Here's a link to Balut (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balut) from the Wikipedia