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carlotta
07-31-2009, 04:08 PM
I just don't think of the 70s as a particularly funny time for movies. Now this may have something to do with my age, I'll be 40 in a few weeks, so I didn't get out much till the end of the decade, but I can think of lots of funny movies from the 40s, 50s, and 60s.

So it is me, or is it the 70s?

h.sapiens
07-31-2009, 04:14 PM
Well, everyone's sense of humor is different, but when I saw the title of this thread, my first reaction was "Young Frankenstein". Also "Blazing Saddles".

"Animal House" was a big hit, though it's not one of my favorites.

I'm sure someone will be along with others.

MovieMogul
07-31-2009, 04:17 PM
My top 3 would be Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Blazing Saddles and The In-Laws.

lissener
07-31-2009, 04:19 PM
What's Up Doc
The Twelve Chairs
The In-Laws

RealityChuck
07-31-2009, 04:21 PM
Since you had both Woody Allen and Mel Brooks in their prime, there are quite a few classics:
Bananas
Play It Again, Sam
Sleeper
Love and Death (The funniest Woody Allen film)
Young Frankenstein
Blazing Saddles

There was also:
Monty Python and the Holy Grail
Monty Python's Life of Brian

pravnik
07-31-2009, 04:29 PM
I still crack up every time I see Kentucky Fried Movie.

Ichbin Dubist
07-31-2009, 04:35 PM
Leaving aside Woody Allen, Mel Brooks, and the Pythons, everything I think of is partly funny but colored with seriousness: Being There, Shampoo, Network, Harold & Maude, M*A*S*H, Breaking Away.

There's the probably quite dated sketch movies Kentucky Fried Movie and Groove Tube -- I last saw those on a drive-in double bill in 1979 or thereabouts. And there's always Pink Flamingos if you don't mind coprophagia.

The Goodbye Girl? Foul Play? Eh.

I loved The Bad News Bears when I was a kid. Disney movies were really second-rate in the 70s as I recall. Herbie, all those Kurt Russell movies...

faithfool
07-31-2009, 04:39 PM
Another vote for Harold and Maude.

Bootis
07-31-2009, 04:47 PM
Airplane
Monty Python and the Holy Grail
The Jerk

Two Many Cats
07-31-2009, 04:55 PM
The Pink Panther Movies came out mid-70s. The good ones anyway.

detop
07-31-2009, 05:01 PM
Up in smoke (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0078446/)

KneadToKnow
07-31-2009, 05:04 PM
Based on my DVD collection:

Blazing Saddles
Young Frankenstein
The Apple Dumpling Gang
Silver Streak
Oh, God!
Smokey and the Bandit
Being There
The Jerk

Moonchild
07-31-2009, 05:20 PM
9 to 5 I feel is vastly underrated. (The movie, not working those hours.)

Moonchild
07-31-2009, 05:22 PM
9 to 5 I feel is vastly underrated. (The movie, not working those hours.)

Doh! 1980!

FoieGrasIsEvil
07-31-2009, 06:21 PM
The Exorcist. That split pea soup slays me every time.

NDP
07-31-2009, 06:41 PM
Leaving aside Woody Allen, Mel Brooks, and the Pythons, everything I think of is partly funny but colored with seriousness: Being There, Shampoo, Network, Harold & Maude, M*A*S*H, Breaking Away.

That's true but it reflected the era of the late 60's through the mid 70's. Before that time from the 1920's to the early 60's, it was common for the Hollywood studios to release broad and silly comic vehicles featuring whatever comedy star they had under contract (e.g., Universal had Abbott & Costello and Paramount had Jerry Lewis). However, by the time the last vestiges of the studio system faded away, movies--like the culture around it--seemed to get a lot more serious and weighty.

meanoldman
07-31-2009, 06:52 PM
Phantom of the Paradise seemed particularly funny to me.....though from the box office, I was clearly in the minority.

And agreed with anything already mentioned that was done by Woody Allen. I still frequently quote "Love and Death"....and I don't think I am jejune at all. I am one of the least june people out there. :)

MPB in Salt Lake
07-31-2009, 06:59 PM
"Murder By Death" should be on this list.

Doug Bowe
07-31-2009, 08:08 PM
Woody Allen has been mentioned, but "Annie Hall" has not (or I missed it).
That was the last comedy to get the Best Picture oscar.

The Tooth
07-31-2009, 08:19 PM
"Murder By Death" should be on this list.

And so should "The Cheap Detective", only more so.

Spoons
07-31-2009, 08:58 PM
Phantom of the Paradise seemed particularly funny to me.....though from the box office, I was clearly in the minority.No, just misplaced. You obviously should have been in Winnipeg (http://www.phantomoftheparadise.ca/why.html).

My contributions: Car Wash and The Big Bus.

And another vote for Silver Streak. A great cast: Richard Pryor, Gene Wilder, Ned Beatty, Patrick McGoohan, Ray Walston, Scatman Crothers, and Jill Clayburgh--a great mix of serious and comic actors.

CalMeacham
07-31-2009, 09:02 PM
A lot of my faborites have been listed already, but I'd like to add that I thought the first Monty Python movie, their most underrated, was the funniest of theirs

And Now for Something Completely Different.

Spoke
07-31-2009, 09:16 PM
Not yet mentioned:

The Rutles (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0077147/) (Made for TV, but still)
Meatballs (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0079540/)
Kelly's Heroes (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065938/)
Two Mules for Sister Sara (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065134/) Lots of comic elements.
Return of the Pink Panther (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072081/)
The Pink Panther Strikes Again (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075066/)

My personal favorites from the decade would be:

The Jerk
Monty Python and the Holy Grail
The Life of Brian
Sleeper
Animal House

Spoke
07-31-2009, 09:25 PM
Oh God! (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0076489/) I forgot one!

koeeoaddi
07-31-2009, 09:26 PM
Another vote for What's Up Doc. I think it aged much better than Annie Hall, which would have topped my list 30 years ago.

Horatio Hellpop
07-31-2009, 09:31 PM
Movie Movie, with George C. Scott, Harry Hamlin and Barry Bostwick. Totally forgotten now, but a damned brilliant comedy.

La Cage aux Folles

Starting Over and The End, Burt Reynolds' finest work.

Siam Sam
07-31-2009, 09:37 PM
Not mentioned yet: American Graffiti and 10.

Skylark
08-01-2009, 01:33 AM
1979 - Used Cars, with Kurt Russell. In another thread a year ago somebody recommended I take it with me to Iraq. Damn good call

Stubbies
08-01-2009, 05:20 AM
"They Call Me Bruce"
"Meatballs"
"Smokey & the Bandit"

3 moderately funny ones straight off the top...

FriarTed
08-01-2009, 09:41 AM
Leaving aside Woody Allen, Mel Brooks, and the Pythons, everything I think of is partly funny but colored with seriousness: Being There, Shampoo, Network, Harold & Maude, M*A*S*H, Breaking Away.

There's the probably quite dated sketch movies Kentucky Fried Movie and Groove Tube -- I last saw those on a drive-in double bill in 1979 or thereabouts. And there's always Pink Flamingos if you don't mind coprophagia...

That's a big IF. If you don't mind coprophagia, Pink Flamingos is the greatest movie ever made. It's the Citizen Kane of coprophagia movies!

:D

Being There, Harold & Maude and the like are fine movies. But when it comes to laugh-out-loud funny, I'll pick Young Frankenstein, Blazing Saddles, The Jerk and Monty/Grail. Even Brooks's lesser efforts High Anxiety & Silent Movie are just damn funny & require no thought whatsoever.

bordelond
08-01-2009, 09:52 AM
Starting Over and The End, Burt Reynolds' finest work.
Speaking of Burt, I'm partial to Hooper (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0077696/). The bar-fight scene with Terry Bradshaw & friends is priceless :D



Burt & his three buddies stand toe to toe with Bradshaw's gang and assess whether the imminent bar fight will be a fair one:

"So we got four and you all got 12. Guess you'll have go back to Houston and get some more guys!"

Ellis Aponte Jr.
08-01-2009, 11:46 AM
The Heartbreak Kid; Albert Brooks' Real Life; John Waters' Female Trouble; The Fortune; and of course many an unintentionally funny disaster movie like The Poseidon Adventure.

carlotta
08-01-2009, 05:17 PM
So it's me, not the 70s. I've actually seen most of these movies too. I think "The Jerk" is my favorite.

cmkeller
08-02-2009, 10:50 AM
Doug Bowe:

That was the last comedy to get the Best Picture oscar.

Shakespeare in Love was a bit more recent.

KarlGauss
08-02-2009, 03:51 PM
I've always thought that The Ruling Class (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0069198/) was about the funniest movie I've ever seen.

pepperlandgirl
08-02-2009, 03:58 PM
I'll second The Bad News Bears and add The Out-of-Towners.

Cisco
08-02-2009, 04:36 PM
There are a lot of movies that I'm sure were hilarious back then, but comedy is very temporal. I just watched Annie Hall last year, and I really liked it, but I don't think I laughed once.

The ones that can still make me laugh are:

-Blazing Saddles
-Holy Grail
-Life of Brian
-Young Frankenstein
-The Jerk

Airplane! was 1980.

Anamorphic
08-03-2009, 01:25 AM
•Young Frankenstein
•Blazing Saddles
•Where's Poppa
•The Inlaws ("Serpentine Shelly!")

It's Not Rocket Surgery!
08-03-2009, 10:17 AM
"They Call Me Bruce"
"Meatballs"
"Smokey & the Bandit"

3 moderately funny ones straight off the top...

"They Call Me Bruce" was from 1982.

Siam Sam
08-03-2009, 11:02 PM
Airplane! was 1980.

"They Call Me Bruce" was from 1982.

I once had a History prof who asserted the 1960s did not end until 1974, with Nixon's resignation. Maybe the 1970s lasted a little longer, too. :D

KarlGauss
08-03-2009, 11:15 PM
Actually, the 60's were a very short decade.

They began on November 22, 1963 (in Dallas) and ended on December 6, 1969 (at Altamount). Mind you, some insist they ended a bit earlier, on August 9/10 (in Los Angeles on Cielo and Waverly Drives).

Siam Sam
08-03-2009, 11:34 PM
I think maybe the 1970s ended at 12 noon on January 20, 1981.

Sam Stone
08-04-2009, 11:46 AM
The Big Bus.

"You eat one lousy foot, and they call you a cannibal."

A sadly forgotten, very funny movie.

kelly5078
08-04-2009, 12:20 PM
"Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid"
"Little Big Man"
"Dark Star"
"Richard Pryor Live in Concert"

KneadToKnow
08-04-2009, 12:28 PM
Actually, the 60's were a very short decade.

They began on November 22, 1963 (in Dallas) and ended on December 6, 1969 (at Altamount). Mind you, some insist they ended a bit earlier, on August 9/10 (in Los Angeles on Cielo and Waverly Drives).

Seth We used to have a bus.
Munchie In a way, the sixties ended the day we sold it. December 31, 1969.

;)

lieu
08-04-2009, 12:58 PM
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex, but were Afraid to Ask - 1972, definately a classic.

Same Time, Next Year - 1978

CircleofWillis
08-04-2009, 02:03 PM
Aside form Python and Brooks.. I am partial to the sketch comedies... Kentucky Fried Movie, The Groove Tube and the like...

1st guest: Fish for dinner last night?
2nd guest: Phewww... Harvey still smoking those cigars?
3rd guest: CHRIST! Did a cow shit in here?

.. ok I'm sophomoric.. so sue me.

KSO
08-04-2009, 05:11 PM
Another vote for The Bad News Bears

Also Slap Shot.

palindromemordnilap
08-04-2009, 05:40 PM
I think maybe the 1970s ended at 12 noon on January 20, 1981.

In that case, add Blues Brothers (1980) to the list

Darryl Lict
08-05-2009, 02:10 AM
I think maybe the 1970s ended at 12 noon on January 20, 1981.
In as much as I disagree, then Caddyshack (1980) would have to make the cut.

I'm going with:

Bananas
Sleeper
Young Frankenstein
Blazing Saddles
Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Sam Stone
08-05-2009, 02:15 AM
Definitely Slap Shot.