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KSO
12-27-2000, 11:45 AM
I saw Cast Away last weekend and was thought it was pretty good. However, I don't understand why he didn't open the last package--the one with the wings or whatever on it that he delivers back to Texas at the end of the movie. Obviously, I missed something. And why did that package "save his life?" Was it simply that the wings (or whatever) gave him the idea of needing some sort of sail to get over the breakwater? Silly, I know, but I had just finished seeing The Family Man (any discussion of which belongs in the Pit because it was so putrid) so this was about 3 1/2 hours into a very long afternoon...

On another note, did anyone else find the end of the movie (that is, everything after the point when he's rescued) dissatisfying? It seemed to me that there were two key points to the movie--(1) his survival on the island, which was presented fairly well, although I think it would have been an extremely powerful scene to see his attempted suicide and (2) the aftermath of his return. I mean, he was presumed dead for 4 years yet his relationship with Kelly gets wrapped up in two short and rather sterile scenes. She's what kept him going for the four years and to simply walk away because of the new life she has, in the face of her own ambivalence, was simply too neatly tied up for me. Your thoughts?

Pucette
12-27-2000, 11:50 AM
Just saw it last night, and I must confess the "angel wing" package confused me for the same reasons.

As for the ending, I felt the same way, but couldn't think of any more satisfying way to wrap things up. Except maybe not having him start falling for someone else right away. But I think the wonderful island scenes carry the film regardless...

zev_steinhardt
12-27-2000, 12:09 PM
The package saved his life because the idea of deliving this package (along with his girlfriend) was what kept him going on the island. The idea that he was going to see that this package was delivered prevented him from giving up.

I, however, have another question: Why was a package going from Memphis TN (where the plane was taking off from) and going to Texas on a plane headed for the South Pacific??

Zev Steinhardt

Montfort
12-27-2000, 12:12 PM
When he was opening up the washed-ashore FedEx packages to find stuff in them, he didn't open that one because the box was drawn on. Obviously, he thought, that this package was made with a lot of care, and wasn't a typical FedEx package. Maybe it was the hope of that which kept him encouraged to escape?

What puzzled me is why he returned the package to the sender, not the receiver. If the addresses were still legible, shouldn't he have delivered it as intended?

Was it because the sender was a cute redhead, recently single, and the receiver was probably an unattractive married man? Hmm....

Montfort
12-27-2000, 12:13 PM
zev: The package was being returned, not delivered, at the end. I forget what the artist said in the first scene as to where it was going, but I think it was somewhere far away from Texas.

eponymous
12-27-2000, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by zev_steinhardt

I, however, have another question: Why was a package going from Memphis TN (where the plane was taking off from) and going to Texas on a plane headed for the South Pacific??


This bugged me as well. I thought the flight was back to Moscow - why the long detour into the South Pacific?

wooba
12-27-2000, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by Montfort
zev: The package was being returned, not delivered, at the end. I forget what the artist said in the first scene as to where it was going, but I think it was somewhere far away from Texas.

Actually, the package that was picked up in the beginning of the film was delivered.. you see the Fed-Ex guy walking to his truck with it (the camera is attached to the package) and then you see the door of the van close. It opens again in Moscow. An American wearing a cowboy hat signs for it.

I can only assume that this was a new package (since it must have been at least a week or so later - Tom Hanks was in Moscow when the first package was delivered) and it was going to somewhere in Southern Asia was it not?

zev_steinhardt
12-27-2000, 12:42 PM
Originally posted by Montfort
zev: The package was being returned, not delivered, at the end. I forget what the artist said in the first scene as to where it was going, but I think it was somewhere far away from Texas.

As wooba said, the original package was delivered. I figured that this was a new package that was being delivered and the sender (maybe to be cute?) attached the place's logo to the package.

In any event, even if the original package was being returned, the question still stands. If it was going (being returned) to Texas from Tennessee, why was it on the plane? Was it being routed through the Jakarta hub? :)

Zev Steinhardt

shadow1886
12-27-2000, 12:42 PM
wow! I thought we were the only people who did double features at the theater. Actually, this time we went to extremes and made it a TRIPLE feature. We spent all day at the movies and saw Family Man, Cast Away, and Miss Congeniality. Strangely enough, Miss Congeniality was the only one with a satisfying ending. Cast Away was way too ambiguous, not to mention that I knew everything that was going to happen because the trailer revealed too much. Family Man just plain sucked. It would have been much better had they shown some kind of montage a la Notting Hill at the end, one that showed the family and the life that Nic and Tea finally ended up with. The coffee scene was just a copout.

stuyguy
12-27-2000, 12:47 PM
Let me fill in a few details that wooba's post is missing.

The sequence at the very, very beginning of the film explains a lot. There is a parcel exchange going on between the (welder/artist) wife in Texas and the cheating (cowboy hat) husband in Moscow. (Remember when the husband gets his wife's parcel, there is a partly undressed Roosky floozy with him?; he sez "It's from my wife..." when he gets it.)

This sets up the rationale of there being another winged package going from TX to Moscow -- apparently the exchange of parcels from wife to hubby is a regular routine (remember the FedEx pick-up guy asks "What color [wings] this time?") -- and the reason for their split-up four years later (remember, his name had been sawed off the ranch gate at the end).

scratch1300
12-27-2000, 12:53 PM
stuyguy, thank you! That cleared that up!

stuyguy
12-27-2000, 01:12 PM
Happy to oblige, 1300.

wooba
12-27-2000, 01:16 PM
Thanks Stuyguy.. that clears it up somewhat.

However, it still doesn't explain why Tom Hanks didn't open it on the island. For all he knew, there could have been something really useful in there like matches, a GPS system, etc, etc.

Assuming that the customs documentation said it was a metal sculpture, he could have put that to good use on the island..

KSO
12-27-2000, 01:23 PM
I remember now that at the beginning, the artist tells the Fedex driver she'll have another package for him in a couple of days. I'm glad to know I'm not the only one who was confused.

stuyguy
12-27-2000, 01:36 PM
"...it still doesn't explain why Tom Hanks didn't open it on the island"

Well, now this calls for some speculation. The way I figger it, ol' Tom had two reasons for living: doing his job and loving Helen Hunt.

The HH aspect has little mystery, so I'll move on to the job thing. It's obvious from how long it took before Tom broke down and opened the packages how deeply ingrained his sense of responsibility to his FedEx responibilities were.

I think he kept the winged package unopened as a symbol to his connection to the civilized man he was before he got marooned. He opened all but one because of his survival needs; but, to him, to open all the parcels would have represented a total abandonment of his intergity, dignity -- and maybe even his sanity.

Smeghead
12-27-2000, 05:02 PM
And he was obviously deeply affected by the picture on it, for some reason. What it meant to him is open for speculation, but he drew it everywhere. My impression was that that was one reason he didn't open it. It meant something more to him because of that picture.

I liked the ending. I don't see how it was "neatly" wrapped up. If they wanted to do a trite ending, they would have had her waiting for him or else leaving her husband for him. I was cringing during the movie, anticipating one or the other. I think the way they did it helped demostrate just how the island had changed him. But anyway.

My question (and that of those I saw it with) is why did he have another volleyball in his truck at the end? We came up with two possibilities: either he missed Wilson and felt more comfortable with the ball around, or else he was going on a trip across the country to replace everything he found in the packages he opened. I think the second option makes more sense, but I didn't see any ice skates or dresses in the car, just the volleyball. Thoughts?

Montfort
12-27-2000, 08:44 PM
Originally posted by Smeghead
My question (and that of those I saw it with) is why did he have another volleyball in his truck at the end? We came up with two possibilities: either he missed Wilson and felt more comfortable with the ball around, or else he was going on a trip across the country to replace everything he found in the packages he opened. I think the second option makes more sense, but I didn't see any ice skates or dresses in the car, just the volleyball. Thoughts?
Well, if he wanted to replace everything that he opened, he'd need the addresses and whatnot for the missing packages. Imagine looking at a package manifest for a planefull of packages and trying to figure out which one was a volleyball.

And, anyway, I think he missed Wilson. Hell, I didn't like the movie and I missed Wilson...

bafaa
12-27-2000, 08:48 PM
Smeghead:
After 4 years he was obviously very attached to Wilson so I figured he got the new ball just because it made him feel better.

Was anybody else cringing in agony when he knocked out his own tooth with the ice skate?
OUCH!!

Montfort
12-27-2000, 09:01 PM
Cringing? Sort of.

Wondering how he survived four more years without antibiotics and painkillers? Absolutely.

Smeghead
12-28-2000, 12:50 AM
Originally posted by Montfort

Well, if he wanted to replace everything that he opened, he'd need the addresses and whatnot for the missing packages. Imagine looking at a package manifest for a planefull of packages and trying to figure out which one was a volleyball.


Yeah, we were wondering about that too, but remember he slept on the packages for at least a while after the crash. Could have memorized everything.

SmackFu
12-29-2000, 12:46 AM
Another question: did they set up the thing with the calendar in the cave and the spot of light earlier in the movie? I only "got" it at the very end when the spot was in the marked area that meant it was safe to go, and was wondering if I was just not paying attention or what...

Enright3
12-29-2000, 01:59 AM
I really liked the movie. Tom could be on his way to an unprecedented 3rd Oscar.

I loved the ending. It would have sucked big time if Helen Hunt left with him. How trite that would have been. It also would have sucked if it ended with him miraculously finding a hot new Texas girlfriend. The best ending was leaving it up to our own imagination that regardless of what happened, he would be o.k.

As far as the volleyball was concerned... I'd like to think that he didn't need to have a new relationship with Wilson, instead I like to think he was returning some of the packages that he salvaged as a way of closure.

My favorite parts of the movie in no particular order: When he picked up the candle lighter and flicked it on; When he was looking around at all the sea food that was catered for his return party; and when Helen Hunt is worring about what kind of milk to give him 'because he likes half & half', and he says it doesn't really matter. At that moment, I knew she shouldn't spend her life with him, because not only had she changed, so had he.

beakerxf
12-29-2000, 03:02 AM
Originally posted by KSO
(2) the aftermath of his return. I mean, he was presumed dead for 4 years yet his relationship with Kelly gets wrapped up in two short and rather sterile scenes. She's what kept him going for the four years and to simply walk away because of the new life she has, in the face of her own ambivalence, was simply too neatly tied up for me. Your thoughts?

Oh, I didn't see these sees as sterile at all. In fact, I was leaning intently forward at the edge of my seat because of the tension in the kitchen scene. I could tell that they were both holding back out of hurt, love, shock, fear, etc. It was an incredible well filmed/acted scene. So many emotions roiling under the surface, so little being said. They kept skirting the subject, jumping on small talk like a lifeline. When she called for him to come back, the dam broke and all the emotions flooded out.

I'm glad the film ended as she did. I don't think a person could realistically abandon there life of 2 or 3 years just like that. She had new attachments and they were clearly strong enough to hold her in place.

E Bailey
12-29-2000, 10:16 AM
OK- I think he must have saved the package to deliver it. I think he was also going back and delivering the other stuff- Wilson, the skates, etc. I think for closure. I would have loved to have seen more of THAT.
OF COURSE he and Hunt don't get back together. I think that was obvious and very trite.

Or'n'ry Oscar
12-29-2000, 01:30 PM
Folks, I hate to ruin your fun, but the reason he didn't open the package was because it contained a MacGuffin.

What is a MacGuffin, you ask?

That is a topic that has been admirably dealt with by the SD Staff: http://www.straightdope.com/mailbag/mpulpfiction.html.

mnemosyne
12-29-2000, 02:15 PM
I think the best part of this movie was the scene right after the crash, when Hanks is in that raft and the black water is just swelling around him...it was like a huge monster. Probably one of the most visually terrifying scenes I've seen in the movies in a long time.

The thing that left me wondering at the end, was what happened to Wilson? Wouldn't it have been cool if he was found somewhere and recognized (I'm sure the story would have gotten out) and FedEx-ed back to him?

Dignan
12-30-2000, 12:33 AM
Yeah, it was pretty good. I think this is a prime example of why books are better than movies. This movie was two and a half hours, there was a group of jr. high kids in the front row and I'm guessing they were the reason a gummi-bear ended up on the screen in the first 45 minutes, if the movie had been longer, then I don't think these kids would have made it. Oh yeah, one of the kid's cell phone went off with about 20 minutes, left, I guess their mom was wondering when they wanted to get picked up. Whatever.

OK, that's out, back to the movie. I couldn't watch the part where he knocked his tooth out, I was expecting him to miss or something and put the skate blade through his cheek. I think that Hanks' character benefited from being in a movie, because if he hadn't been, I'm pretty sure that he would have ended up with gangrene. Like it was mentioned before, if it would have shown the suicide attempt that would have been pretty powerful, but I think we missed out on that because of the time factor. Besides the time factor I'm thinking that the "original" or planned ending might have been a little hokey/corny/not real great, so the folks in charge just decided, "let's just show him standing in the middle of an intersection and let the viewer decide how to end it." Wish it could have been longer, but at the same time I'm glad it wasn't.

One more thing, was it just me, or in the trailer/preview doesn't he see a footprint that the previewee is supposed to believe is someone else's footprint, meaning he's not alone on the island? Oh well, I guess that's what DVD's are for, huh?

Montfort
12-30-2000, 12:58 AM
Originally posted by Dignan
One more thing, was it just me, or in the trailer/preview doesn't he see a footprint that the previewee is supposed to believe is someone else's footprint, meaning he's not alone on the island? Oh well, I guess that's what DVD's are for, huh?
I don't remember this shot from the trailer, but I do remember one that wasn't in the movie: him marking lines on a rock signifying how many days he was on the island. That was not in the movie.

Also, I think the film should've ended with him on the raft, having just lost Wilson, waving at the tanker, and hoping that someone on board saw him. The dreadful third act would've been avoided.

pepperlandgirl
12-30-2000, 01:23 AM
What really pissed me off was not the movie, but the people I was watching the movie with.
When he threw Wilson out of the cave, and then went frantic looking for him, people *laughed*. Yes, Tom Hanks decided he need to entertain the crowd, so he thought he'd throw that scene in. It may appear funny, but it was not funny. It was not funny at all.
I hate people.

lawoot
12-30-2000, 03:56 AM
Originally posted by Smeghead
My question (and that of those I saw it with) is why did he have another volleyball in his truck at the end?

He had gotten used to talking out loud to himself, but felt he neded an object to direct the conversation to. Otherwise, he was just a kook.

I think that the people at FedEx were jerks... and the catering table proves it. How insensitive can you be? Raw Fish and crab? Did he NOT tell anyone what he had been surviving on all this time? And I think that realizing that Kelly (HH) was gone and that his employers were jerks is what set him free to roam the country at the end...

howardsims
12-30-2000, 09:47 AM
I wonder if he gets 4 years of back pay....

sly
12-30-2000, 11:43 AM
I agree the movie should have ended at the freighter passing by, but the third act does answer the question "Does she take him back?". I think the box saved his life by giving him something to work toward. He probably knew in his mind that she may have moved on but the package still had an owner somewhere.

What was in the box? Marcellus' soul, of course.

rocking chair
12-30-2000, 12:03 PM
i think that he saw the wings on the package as a way to get free of the island. "if i had the wings of an angel" kind of thing. to open the package would break the promise of freedom. his drawing the wings around him on the island i believe showed his belief that he would escape the island one way or another. he returned to package to the sender to thank them for the hope the package represented.

leaving him in the middle of the crossroads at the end of the movie showed that he was at a crossroad in his life. he could quite literally go in any direction now that he had freed himself of the confines of modern life.

howardsims, yes he did get back pay. i believe that his coworker mentioned it in passing when he stated how they had to bring him back to life within the company.

Stoid
12-30-2000, 01:52 PM
and I can't wait to see the DVD. I hope it is jam-packed with tons of deleted scenes, because I coulda watched him on that island for another hour.

I think one of the most powerful moments in the whole film, saying soooo much with so little, were the shots following "Four years later" - the way he nailed the fish, and the look on his face as he tore into its flesh. Hanks conveyed everything with his body and his face, in a marvelously subtle yet powerful way. He should be nominated for that alone.

It broke my heart that he and Kelly couldn't get back together. It made for a better movie, but a sadder tale. And what a bummer for Chris Noth! To know that your wife's "true love" isn't dead after all? What a pain!

And as for back pay...are you kidding me? A guy, in the course of doing his job, a passenger on a company plane, goes down in the Pacific in a horrific accident, then spends the next 4 years suffering physically and psychologically as he tries to survive. He does, with physical and emotional scars that will certainly never heal. And you think he's worried about back pay? He is set for life Virtually guaranteed that FedEx pays through the NOSE for that one, meeeeeellions, my friends, meeeeeelions.

stoid

PS: Re the OP: He saved it to deliver it. He chose it for the wings. Could have been for many reasons...maybe the wings represented flight out of there. But if he had opened them all, somehow that would have represented giving up.

And he should have taken the belt and tie from the pilot.

Also: to those who felt he should have died from gangrene or infection following his injuries and tooth pulling: people didn't always die from in these things before we had drugs, you know. The human body is pretty damn good at taking care of itself. Especially if he kept his wounds clean. And his mouth is better off with the tooth removed.

evilhanz
12-30-2000, 02:07 PM
I second pepperlandgirl. There were many scenes in the movie, particularly those involving Wilson, that drew uproarious laughter from the mindless drones in the audience. Argggh.. it made me quite angry. It wasn't supposed to be funny at all. It's no wonder movies like MI2 are the top grossing films of the year. People suck.

Anyway, another thought on the unopened package. I got the impression that the winged box became a totem of sorts. An object of mysticism, representing all that is unknown and unknowable. From the beginning of his island captivity, he recognizes the mysterious nature of the box and sets it aside unopened, hinting at Tom's (and Man's) underlying superstituous nature. As Tom grew more primitive, the idea represented by the box took on greater prominence - the future is uncertain, you never know what the new tide might bring, or what a new day might hold, and so on... When his sail washes up on shore he transfers the winged image to the sail to show us how important this idea has become to him. In a way .. by the time he escapes the island, it has become his faith. Contrast that with his devotion to the clock and the absolute certainty of rigid scheduling in his former life, and I think it makes sense. But then again, I could be full of it. :) It's fun to think about in any case - something most movies don't require.

I don't think it was a simple as "he was just doing his job". If so, he would not have opened ANY packages. But, since his survival was at stake, why shouldn't he have opened ALL of the packages? Is your job more important than your life? There's more symbolism involved.

BlackKnight
12-30-2000, 03:41 PM
Originally posted by evilhanz

I second pepperlandgirl. There were many scenes in the movie, particularly those involving Wilson, that drew uproarious laughter from the mindless drones in the audience. Argggh.. it made me quite angry. It wasn't supposed to be funny at all. It's no wonder movies like MI2 are the top grossing films of the year. People suck.

In the packed theatre where I saw "Cast Away" my two friends and I were the only people laughing at all. If the scenes with Wilson weren't supposed to be funny, then the makers of the film failed miserably, because they were hilarious.

When I did laugh, I drew glares from the mindless drones in the audience who apparantly don't see the humor in talking to volleyballs. One wonders what they do in their spare time. ( ;) )

Stoid
12-30-2000, 03:53 PM
Originally posted by BlackKnight
[QUOTE]
In the packed theatre where I saw "Cast Away" my two friends and I were the only people laughing at all.



I am so glad you told us this, BK. Now I know everything I need to know about you, and I need not be reminded not to turn to you for any compassion, understanding, or empathy in times of emotional distress.

:wally

evilhanz
12-30-2000, 06:14 PM
Originally posted by BlackKnight

When I did laugh, I drew glares from the mindless drones in the audience who apparantly don't see the humor in talking to volleyballs. One wonders what they do in their spare time. ( ;) )


Hehehehe. My g/f gave me a ping pong table for Christmas with a pack of .. you guessed it .. Wilson ping pong balls. When one threatens to roll under the furniture or get attacked by the cat, I yell "Wilson!" in my best Tom Hanks voice. Now *that's* funny... :)

Dignan
12-30-2000, 07:21 PM
by lawoot:

I think that the people at FedEx were jerks... and the catering table proves it. How insensitive can you be? Raw Fish and crab? Did he NOT tell anyone what he had been surviving on all this time? And I think that realizing that Kelly (HH) was gone and that his employers were jerks is what set him free to roam the country at the end...

I don't think that scene was intended to make the colleagues look like jerks. I think it was to show how without thinking about it, most people can take things for granted. I mean it took him years to learn how to fish, it took him a lot of work and caused him a lot of pain to figure out how to make fire so that he could cook crab. And the automatic lighter. When someone that hadn't gone through the same thing he had would just look at it, take a bite or click the switch and not even think twice. It was the same kind of thing when he was clicking the light on and off when he was looking at the picture in the hotel.

So, does anyone else remember the footprint thing from the trailer/preview or am I just KA-RAZY?!

evilhanz
12-30-2000, 07:48 PM
Originally posted by Dignan

So, does anyone else remember the footprint thing from the trailer/preview or am I just KA-RAZY?!

I saw it too, and I was intrigued. I suspect that they originally shot a sequence with the wounded pilot surviving the crash, making it to shore sometime after Hanks. Tom sees the tracks, follows them to the injured man, they have a few poignant, but utlimately irrelevant exchanges, and he dies. For time considerations, they cut it to a corpse floating to shore. The emotional equivalent to their conversation occurring when Tom leafs through the wallet.

I doubt it was a "Tuesday"-like scenario ala Robinson Crusoe. That would be a lot harder to leave on the cutting room floor.

Just a thought.

evilhanz
12-31-2000, 12:15 PM
Originally posted by evilhanz

I doubt it was a "Tuesday"-like scenario ala Robinson Crusoe.

Yarrrrgh! I meant Friday, of course. :) silly me.

Deacons Trucked
12-31-2000, 01:58 PM
Glad we werent the only ones who didnt understand the package thing. But I have another question:

At the end, Helen Hunt is showing Tom the map which details the flight path, the crash location, the island, etc. I swear she says that after the crash, Tom drifted for 500 miles to the island. Well I got the impression at the beginning of the movie that the plane crashed and Tom found the island on the same night. Could he drift for 500 miles in one night? If he didnt in one night, how did he survive that long? Or was Helen saying he drifted 500 miles from the island before getting picked up by the ship?
And I missed the whole thing about him trying to hang himself as well.
I also thought the movie went too far with the volleyball thing. I didnt find it funny, just too drawn out.

BTW, I still dont think Tom deserved the Oscar for Forrest Gump. I thought he deserved it for Philadelphia and I could see him getting one for CastAway....but Forrest Gump? No way...thats my two cents.

evilhanz
12-31-2000, 02:24 PM
He drifted 500 miles *after* leaving the island before being picked up by the freighter.

Alan Smithee
12-31-2000, 11:50 PM
I just got back from seeing this movie. I definitely think Tom Hanks and Helen Hunt did excelent acting jobs, communicating tons of emotion with barely any dialog. Oscars are definitely deserved. Although with Hanks doing such a good job on every role he takes, and being offered such good roles constantly now, I think they should just give him a special pre-emptive lifetime achievement award, and get it over with. Otherwise, the Oscars might start getting pretty boring!

The biggest flaws in the movie were the incredibly trite line he said to his friend about the sun rising and never knowing what tomorrow's tide will bring ("Tooooooooomorrow! Tomorrow! I love ya! Tomorrow!" Puh-lese.) and the ending with the cute redhead. Unlike the rest of you, though, I think the answer was for the third act to be longer. (As well as the first two--the movie should have been at least three hours, but the mopes who buy most of the tickets wouldn't sit through it. Maybe a director's cut.)
Most movies, especially action movies, have an artifical ending that ignores the trauma that lasts beyond realizing your husband is really a serial killer/fighting off aliens/escaping a sinking sub/averting global nuclear destruction/whatever. I admire Zemeckis for attempting to show the things that usually happen after the credits roll. I only wish he had had the time to deal with it more deeply.

BTW, I thought a few of the early scenes with Wilson were meant to be funny, or at least wry (e.g. "You wouldn't happen to have a match would you."). The scene in which Wilson was lost, however, was pure drama, exceptionally powerful. There were a couple of people in my theater who snickered at that scene, too. I wanted to make them suffer.

Speaking of Wilson, my mother told me she read somewhere that Wilson sports equipment payed nothing for the product placement--it was done strictly for the plot. Does anyone know what FedEx's relationship with the movie was? I assume they payed a lot, but it didn't make me want to send anything with them. Like lawoot said, it made their people look kind of like jerks.

Dignan, one trailer for the movie can be found here (http://entertainment.citysearch.com/page/ent?_entity_id=M-AAAAA-00006318&_page_type_id=1&cslink=msnent-hmmovie). No footprint, though.

Sorry for such a long post. My low postcount belies my verbosity. (Hey, that could be a sig!)

jrepka
01-01-2001, 03:15 AM
I was pretty pissed at the insensitivity of his colleagues also, but there's no way for them to really "get" what he had gone through. Like the scene where Chris Noth tries to explain how hard this had all been on Helen Hunt -- they've all thought of him as dead, or in a coma, for four years and have no grasp of his experiences.

His calendar was an analemma (www.analemma.com). It marks the position of the sun at the time it crosses the meridian. I don't know how well it would have worked in the cave, since the opening was high and circular. At some point(s) during the year the sun would've been too low in the sky to cross the opening.

My question, which I've not seen addressed, is: did he not have a distinctive melanoma above his right eye in the latter part of the movie? It wasn't as distinctive after the rescue, but it seemed obvious enough that I thought it would be a plot point later.

Smeghead
01-01-2001, 03:33 AM
Alan - I heard somewhere that they paid for the product placement after much discussion. It was widely considered a gutsy move.

jrpeka - I did notice the large sore, but didn't think much of it. But it was there.

shadow1886
01-02-2001, 10:18 AM
I definitely laughed at some of the wilson scenes, but not the one where wilson drifts away. That one was just too poignant and sad. I think the most important point of the party scene in the hotel room was that they wasted all of that great seafood! He probably would have killed for a plate of crab legs on the island, but of course we have such excessive resources of these things here that we never really appreciate what we have.

I had read articles about this movie that spoke of how risky it was for the whole middle of the movie to be just Tom on the island, with no supporting actors to play off of. Strangely, I found this to be the most engaging, interesting part of the movie. I could have watched at least another hour just on the island. I was disappointed when the scene switched abruptly to four years later. I felt like a good bit of development was missing in the middle there.

Also, did anyone else feel royally cheated by the trailer? the first one I saw, in early 2000, was a great teaser, making me totally want to run right out and see the movie. The next one I saw, around October 2000, revealed more details of the crash, that he got off the island and got rescued, AND what Kelly's reaction was going to be when he knocked on her door afterwards. There were no surprises in the movie for me except the fact that even knowing exactly what was going to happen, I was never bored.

Spoke
01-02-2001, 11:17 AM
Originally posted by howardsims
I wonder if he gets 4 years of back pay....

I started thinking about legal issues, too. (Spoils a lot of movies for me...)

My legal question was what happened with his life insurance policy. Undoubtedly, the insurance company had paid out the claim (double indemnity, no less, since it was an accidental death). So did his family have to repay the insurance benefits? What if they already spent the money on a trip to Tahiti? (;))

Oh yeah, and speaking of legal issues, Stoidela wrote:And you think he's worried about back pay? He is set for life Virtually guaranteed that FedEx pays through the NOSE for that one, meeeeeellions, my friends, meeeeeelions.

As his employer, FedEx would be immune from any lawsuit for on-the-job injury. (Including emotional trauma.) Hanks's only recourse against FedEx would be via the avenue of a workers' compensation claim. Workers' compensation typically only pays off with lost wages (at a reduced rate) and medical expenses, plus relatively small lump sum compensation for any permanent injury. Hanks would most definitely not get rich going after FedEx.

Now he might have a claim against the manufacturer of the airplane, or perhaps against whoever did maintenance on the plane (if that were done by an independent contractor and not by FedEx), but only if it could be proven that the crash occurred because of a mechanical defect in the plane.

The real money for Hanks's character would come on the talk show circuit / lecture circuit. Plus, I would imagine he could get a pretty good book advance on his story.

In am dismayed by those posters who can't imagine how Hanks could have survived without antibiotics. We have become a race of candy-asses! (Kidding, kidding...)

Penicillen only came into common use in the 40's. We did manage to survive as a race before it came along. The body is pretty good at healing itself. I had a pretty nasty leg wound on coral myself once. Exactly what happened to (Hanks). In the same place on my leg, even. It healed without medical treatment.

Montfort
01-02-2001, 01:23 PM
Originally posted by spoke-
The real money for Hanks's character would come on the talk show circuit / lecture circuit. Plus, I would imagine he could get a pretty good book advance on his story.
Yeah, imagine what kind of money he'd get for the film rights to his story! :p

BTW, was I the only one to pick up on the awful symbolism in his name (Chuck Noland)?

Groundskeeper Willie
01-02-2001, 02:11 PM
... and the winner of the Academy Award for the category "Best supporting actor", is ... Wilson!

Bill

Fiver
01-02-2001, 03:44 PM
I liked Cast Away, and I say that as one who normally hates Robert Zemeckis. I've got a few specific responses to this threa so far. Look for your name:

zev_steinhardt: The package wasn't going from Memphis as such. Memphis is FedEx's headquarters and hub, so most of their packages go there before heading on to their destinations (and Memphis consequently has one of the busiest airports in the world, although there's not much passenger traffic).

Smeghead, you told Montfort Chuck could have memorized the sender/addressee information off the packages. Even more so, he could have just kept the delivery receipts from the packages. We didn't see them, but they could easily have been among his other supplies on the raft that we didn't see.

Montfort:I think the film should've ended with him on the raft, having just lost Wilson, waving at the tanker, and hoping that someone on board saw him.This post implies (and so does the movie, sort of) that he needed to wake up and get someone's atention on the freighter (freighter, mind you, not tanker) or he wouldn't have been rescued.

Ships at see maintain lookouts 24/7 to prevent collisions. By the time the freighter was as close as it was in that scene, they would have seen Chuck's raft a long time ago.

And when a ship's crew sees a man in the middle of the ocean, clad in rags on a raft that's visibly falling apart, they're not going to wait for him to ask for help. Whether he woke up or not at that point he was already as good as rescued.

Dignan: About the seafood at the party: I didn't think it made his coworkers look like jerks; I thought it illustrated Zemeckis's ineptness as a director. I swear, the man puts the "b" in "subtle."

spoke-, others: In addition to four years' back pay, I'm sure someone in Chuck's position would get a promotion, a company car, a corner office, etc. etc. Regardless of any legal responsibilities FedEx may have had. Don't you all realize what a PR bonanza an event like that would be? Even if he'd been a mediocre employee before, the world would be at his feet.

zev_steinhardt
01-02-2001, 06:54 PM
Originally posted by Five

zev_steinhardt: The package wasn't going from Memphis as such. Memphis is FedEx's headquarters and hub, so most of their packages go there before heading on to their destinations (and Memphis consequently has one of the busiest airports in the world, although there's not much passenger traffic).


I'm aware the package didn't originate in Memphis. But at that point, the package was physically in Memphis and supposed to go to Texas. What the heck was it doing on a plane to the South Pacific?

Zev Steinhardt

Spoke
01-02-2001, 07:03 PM
What I want to know is why a pair of ice skates(???) was headed for Indonesia?

zev_steinhardt
01-02-2001, 07:10 PM
Originally posted by spoke-
What I want to know is why a pair of ice skates(???) was headed for Indonesia?

To be used as a plot device in a movie?? :)

Zev Steinhardt

Montfort
01-02-2001, 07:18 PM
Originally posted by Five
Ships at see maintain lookouts 24/7 to prevent collisions. By the time the freighter was as close as it was in that scene, they would have seen Chuck's raft a long time ago.
You're right, I saw the same thing with the lookouts in that Titanic movie. Silly me. :)

Another thought... Why didn't Chuck start a big-ass fire on the peak of the mountain on the island? Surely one would've caught the eye of someone either at sea (unlikely) or watching a satellite (more likely).

Saltire
01-02-2001, 07:53 PM
Originally posted by Montfort
Another thought... Why didn't Chuck start a big-ass fire on the peak of the mountain on the island? Surely one would've caught the eye of someone either at sea (unlikely) or watching a satellite (more likely). 'Cause it would be way too much work. It was hard enough for him to make the climb alone, how difficult would it be to drag a lot of logs up there? How long would he have had to spend feeding the fire? He'd have hardly had time to stab crabs and trade repartee with sporting goods.

E Bailey
01-02-2001, 10:57 PM
Five wrote:
"This post implies (and so does the movie, sort of) that he needed to wake up and get someone's atention on the freighter (freighter, mind you, not tanker) or he wouldn't have been rescued.

Ships at see maintain lookouts 24/7 to prevent collisions. By the time the freighter was as close as it was in that scene, they would have seen Chuck's raft a long time ago.

And when a ship's crew sees a man in the middle of the ocean, clad in rags on a raft that's visibly falling apart, they're not going to wait for him to ask for help. Whether he woke up or not at that point he was already as good as rescued."


I am currently reading "Adrift" by Steve Callahan. I am at a point in the book where he has seen three ships so far, and each time he has fired off flares. In fact, one ship passes by so closely that "if anyone is looking, it is impossible for him not to see me." (p. 66) Callahan states that: only Navy ships have the manpower and desire to keep constant lookouts. "In the open ocean, captains of merchant ships may keep only one of his few crew on the bridge to take a cursory glance about the horizon every now and then." (p. 67) He writes that that lookout is only keeping his eye out for other ships. This guy was firing FLARES up and was not spotted. I think it was actually very lucky that Noland was spotted. In fact, reading this book, it makes the whole rescue actually very fake.

Dignan
01-02-2001, 11:26 PM
Dignan: About the seafood at the party: I didn't think it made his coworkers look like jerks; I thought it illustrated Zemeckis's ineptness as a director. I swear, the man puts the "b" in "subtle."

I didn't think it made his co-workers look like jerks, either. I'm not sure what you mean. You might want to re-read my earlier post.

Chocobo
01-03-2001, 01:55 AM
I think when they were talking about 'drifting' 500 miles, they were talking about the airplane. On the distress call, the pilot mentioned they were south 500 miles off course, trying to avoid the storm (I believe) but of course all he got back was static. Also, when Hanks is calculating the possible search area, he mentions the 500 mile difference due to the plane.

All in all I thought it was a good movie. The ending with Helen Hunt wasn't trite...as it was pointed out earlier, the underlying emotion and intensity in the room was very well acted.

Fiver
01-03-2001, 09:22 AM
zev_steinhardt:I'm aware the package didn't originate in Memphis. But at that point, the package was physically in Memphis and supposed to go to Texas. What the heck was it doing on a plane to the South Pacific?

It was coming from Texas, not going to. At the beginning of the movie we saw welder/sculptress Bettina Peterson send a similar package to her philandering husband in Moscow, and dialogue implied she did this often (maybe he was her representative, selling Bettina's objet d'arts to the Russian elite).

The package that wound up on the island with Chuck went from Texas to Memphis, then halfway across the Pacific en route to Moscow. Maybe the plane was headed for FedEx's Asian hub for further sorting onto a plane bound for Moscow.

Chuck was taking it back to Bettina, in a scene which further illustrates Zemeckis's pathological lack of subtlety, to wit:

1) Chuck works for FedEx and so lives in Memphis.
2) Chuck lives in Memphis, so of course he's an Elvis fan.
3) Chuck's an Elvis fan, so when he returns Bettina's package he must have "Return To Sender" playing on his car stereo.

Fiver
01-03-2001, 09:35 AM
E Bailey:Callahan states that: only Navy ships have the manpower and desire to keep constant lookouts.

Okay, good bust. My own experience is limited to a Navy cruiser, where we once retrieved a dead body and another time even stopped to pick up and report an empty life ring (it had probably just blown off the side of the ship it belonged to).

Still, I have to think (although I haven't read Adrift) that those ships Callahan saw never got as close to him as the freighter was to Chuck. In fact, it's even fair to suppose we saw the ship so close because it had already spotted him a ways off, and was pulling alongside to lower their accommodation ladder.

And, it was broad daylight, and (to borrow a term from astronomy) Chuck and his raft had a pretty high albedo. Maybe I'm being naive, but as a former mariner I did find his rescue to be credible.

jwg
01-03-2001, 01:57 PM
Why did he save the package? - Well, he could then claim that all the time he was on the stupid island he was actually at work - so how about some overtime, and not just stinking straight back pay? You gotta be careful in these uncertain times.

I was waiting for them to open the package at the end and find one of those satellite cell phones. Instead of raw crab, he could have called for Domino's and would have had a nice hot pizza in a half hour.

Johanna
01-03-2001, 02:14 PM
The unopened package had wings on it. The wings are an ancient symbol of hope. Remember Emily Dickinson: "Hope is the thing with feathers." It was the hope inspired in him by the wing symbolism that kept him going and struggle to survive and be rescued.

Did anyone notice when his makeshift "sail" with wings painted on it blew away in a gale? I swear I saw it flapping just like a real pair of flying wings.

Smeghead
01-03-2001, 02:32 PM
Um, am I the only one that saw the men on the ship? Just before it cuts away to the next scene, you can see several men on top of the ship looking in Tom's direction.

Mooney252
01-03-2001, 04:12 PM
My wife was pretty bored by the movie -- I too could have watched him on the island for another hour. I thought that for the rational guy Hanks was playing, he'd have prepared earlier to be on the island for a L-O-N-G time. He didn't even take the clothing from the dead pilot . . .

But the real question is: what was the consideration that FedEx had to pay for all of the logo placements? Plus the little speech from Fred Smith, FedEx chairman? $10M?

Montfort
01-03-2001, 10:27 PM
Where the hell was Chuck's family during the last act? The party that he was at before getting on the plane was for his family (not his girlfriend's), IIRC, so they're undoubtedly local to Memphis.

This also leads to my next question: why was he left alone for his first night back?

Oh yeah, so he could sneak over to his ex's house to see her.

Fiver
01-04-2001, 09:12 AM
Good question, Montfort. I suppose Zemeckis just wanted the focus to be on Chuck and Kelly. Bringing in Chuck's parents, siblings or whomever may have been more realistic, but it would have muddied the story. "Realistic" isn't always "better."

I do sort of wonder why it was four whole weeks from his retrieval by the freighter to his return to Memphis. Even in the middle of the Pacific, the ship shouldn't have been a whole month from its next port of call.

John Bredin
01-04-2001, 10:36 AM
"I do sort of wonder why it was four whole weeks from his retrieval by the freighter to his return to Memphis."

A stay in hospital?

jeel
01-04-2001, 01:08 PM
What I was having trouble with, and it was probably very necessary for the drama of the film, was the fact that Hanks ' character jumped off his raft to try to rescue Wilson when he was drifting away. Why didn't he row the raft over to Wilson?

shadow1886
01-04-2001, 01:28 PM
did he have oars at that point? I thought they floated away...and maybe he just wasn't thinking too rationally. He was a bit cuckoo at the end of the film

jeel
01-04-2001, 02:20 PM
Yeah...IIRC, he dropped the oars after losing Wilson

Montfort
01-04-2001, 10:04 PM
Originally posted by Five
Good question, Montfort. I suppose Zemeckis just wanted the focus to be on Chuck and Kelly.
I actually meant my question to be why weren't they at the party? All his FedEx cronies were there, Kelly was, too, but no one from his family.

Hmm...

Dignan
01-05-2001, 01:04 AM
That's what I thought on two occasions. He made eye contact with the whale that night, then on two more occasions, you hear a kind of spouting like a whale's blow hole would make, which was really the ship cutting through the water (can't remember the other occasion). Anyway, I thought that the whale was going to lead him to safety or something, I thought to myself, "that's absurd, if that happens, I'm leaving." In all truthfulness, it would have been kind of funny in a hokey kind of way if it did happen.


I'm pretty sure the oars were gone, because of the storm. That's why Wilson was able to get away, because the storm had trashed the raft and torn it apart.

SouprChckn
01-05-2001, 05:13 AM
I believe jeel was right in saying that Chuck dropped the oars AFTER Wilson floats away into oblivion.

Makes sense when you see that Chuck is panicked after suddenly waking up ans seeing his ball buddy gone. Prolly didn't realize he even had an oar until he swam back to logs after leaving him.

Fiver
01-05-2001, 09:43 AM
Montfort:I actually meant my question to be why weren't they at the party? All his FedEx cronies were there, Kelly was, too, but no one from his family.


I know what you meant, and that's what I was responding to. We'd already met Chuck's FedEx cronies. If his family members had been at the party (or in any scene following his return) it would've meant introducing new characters 90 minutes into the movie, detracting from the Kelly situation, and that's just bad storytelling.

About the oars: he still had them when Wilson floated away. Don't you all remember, in the next scene after Chuck lost Wilson, he took the oars in his arms and ceremoniously threw them into the ocean? I read that as him symbolically giving up, resigning himself to dying at sea.

Spoke
01-05-2001, 10:34 AM
Originally posted by Dignan
That's what I thought on two occasions. He made eye contact with the whale that night, then on two more occasions, you hear a kind of spouting like a whale's blow hole would make, which was really the ship cutting through the water (can't remember the other occasion).

The other occasion was when Wilson was floating away. Hank's character is asleep. You hear the spouting sound, and water splashes across his face, waking him up. (Same thing that happened when the ship arrived.)

Mr. Blonde
01-07-2001, 07:27 PM
I just saw this last night. We got lucky in that there was little laughing during the Wilson scenes; Personally I thought the moment he lost Wilson was very powerful. The audience was engrossed in this movie, so for that reason alone, I think Zemeckis did a nice job. I think many people however, left with the "is that it"? or "I can't believe it ended that way."

After the movie, we drove home and discussed it... one thing that bothered my better half was that Kelly claimed that he was the love of her life, and yet in 4 years she not only got over him, but got married and had a child. I don't remember how old the child was (or if they said), but even if the kid was a baby (and by judging by Kelly's body the kid was a year or more... anyone remember the pictures on the refrigerator?)... that means that Kelly would have been married after about 2 years after the loss of Chuck. Assuming a 6 month courtship, that's a year and a half. And this is a woman that was relationship adverse. I guess my question is, did this bother anyone else? Can someone truly get over the "love of their life", (especially under the circumstances that Kelly thought she lost Chuck) that quickly? The last moment of their pre-crash relationship was the engagement ring... and she said she wasn't ready for that... and 4 years later she has a husband and a child.

This bothered the missus to no-end.

edwino
01-07-2001, 08:40 PM
This movie bothered me to no end. Just like Forrest Gump, I think the number one thing, as has been mentioned before, is its amazing lack of subtlety.

Add to that zero character development for Hanks and Hunt -- these are blank people who we know very little about. All that I know about Hanks's character was he was work-driven, time-oriented, and committed to Hunt, and that 4 years on an isolated island changed him. No shit Sherlock (excuse my French). All that I know about Helen Hunt's character is that she was female.

Next, I feel that Zemeckis cut out all the truly interesting scenes. To name a few - any scene midpoint during the stay on the island. A 4 year break from day 2 to 2 months from the end of his stay was bordering on deus ex machina. I'd have liked to see a scene of him getting aboard the ship, of him arriving in the port of call, some reaction to his arrival besides Helen Hunt keeling over, and something besides an ambiguous ending. I'm getting sick of Hollywood directors feeling that in order to be artsy they need to make an ending ambiguous and open for interpretation. The point of a movie is to tell a story. Don't force someone to "think" about a movie's ending unless you give him adequate data to extrapolate. I especially hate Zemeckis's forced ambiguity -- "That way to Mexico, That way to Canada, That way to just about anything." Blech. Also, can we spend more than 2 scenes throwing away the object of Tom Hanks's 4 year fixation?

I do feel that the plane crash scene made the entire movie. It was incredibly well done. Also the acting was quite well done, but without out premier acting, this movie would have been more boring than watching paint dry.

Paul Coleman
01-08-2001, 01:23 PM
IIRC (just saw the film last night) there was mention that the crash was believed to have occurred as a result of an explosion arising from the fact that improperly labeled hazardous materials were shipped on the aircraft. We can only assume that this volatile material was destabilized by the storm - turbulence & lightening etc.. This causation would provide many defendants against whom Mr. Noland would have recourse - Fedex for no having systems in place to detect such cargo, the originator for not properly labeling the shipment, the manufacturer etc. Yeah, Fedex would be protected by the workers' comp. statutes, unless they went deep into gross negligence territory, which would be for the civil justice system to decide.

By the way, I also cringed when he left the leather belt and tie on poor old Al. Gross oversight.

Also...is it just me or was Tom a bit of a lame-o when it came to making fire? Holy smokes...no pun intended, but I couldn't believe how long he took to get it right, or even start on the job for that matter. I was actually relieved when the mag-lite died so it would hurry him along to finally get started on the fire thing. Why didn't he just take out the batteries when they were still juiced, extract the wiring from the casing and touch pos to negative to generate a spark? Hell, he could have used the buckle from Al's belt in lieu of legit wire if it was in short supply. (Am I missing something..other than compassion and modesty?)

There was no laughter in the theater where I saw it, period. Come to think of it there was less than ten people. That could be a contributinmg factor.

Finally, IMHO it should've been two separate films...one about coming home from an ordeal where everybody thinks you're dead and you wife has understandably bailed on you, and other full length feature addressing survival challenges and sanity on a desert isle. The combo thing was too much to pull off in a single film.

RM Mentock
01-15-2001, 03:09 AM
Originally posted by jrepka
His calendar was an analemma (www.analemma.com). It marks the position of the sun at the time it crosses the meridian. I don't know how well it would have worked in the cave, since the opening was high and circular. At some point(s) during the year the sun would've been too low in the sky to cross the opening.

The sun only moves about 47 degrees, total, so no, not necessarily.

The round image of light was most probably intended as an image of the sun, not the hole through which the sun shined. Any shape small hole produces a circular image of the sun--that was in many papers last December during the Christmas eclipse. The image was maybe one inch wide, so the hole in the cave would be about ten feet away, the same ratio as the size of the sun to the sun's distance from earth.

The Internet Movie Data Base, Cast Away goofs (http://us.imdb.com/Goofs?0162222) says that the drawing of the analemma is "incorrectly regarded as a goof," but local noon is always due south, so they are wrong--unless Chuck Noland drew the analemma as a calendar and then just used it as a reference. Without a watch, there is no way that I can think of that he could have generated it from the spot of light.

What I want to know is, why was Helen Hunt running down the driveway, yelling Jack?

Cartooniverse
01-15-2001, 04:11 PM
Originally posted by Groundskeeper Willie
... and the winner of the Academy Award for the category "Best supporting actor", is ... Wilson!
Bill

" I'd like to thank the anonymous Central American hepatitis-ridden impoverished child who stitched me together for the princely sum of thirty-four cents, making me so much more than the sum of my parts. Thank you all, I had a real ball making the movie, even the parts that left me bloodied and deflated. "

:D :D :D

Cartooniverse

Cartooniverse
01-15-2001, 04:18 PM
Am I the only one who finds extreme irony in the fact that the driving force for his mental survival ( well, along with HH ) is wrapped up in VIDEOTAPE at the end? And, he uses videotape because he's short on rope?

Pity they had no sense of humor, how cool to do a freeze-frame on the DVD and see that those VHS cassettes were dubs of "Robinson Crusoe"...........

Cartooniverse

Fiver
01-16-2001, 10:04 AM
RM Mentock:What I want to know is, why was Helen Hunt running down the driveway, yelling Jack?

My guess would be you misheard. "Jack" and "Chuck" sound similar, especially when shouted in the rain through a car window.

Zebra
01-16-2001, 11:35 AM
The reason he says the box saved his life is the wings on the box form the shape he needs to get off the island. The broken porta-pottie forms the same shape of the wings and makes the sail necessary to overcome the waves.


My questions are......

Why didn't he take the belt off the dead guy?


How old was Helen Hunts kid? She looked 2. Two years plus 9 months plus the courtship time leading up to a wedding means that she got over Chuck's death pretty quickly.


I didn't like the film much. I would have been happier if he left the raft to get Wilson. Or my wife suggested that Wilson should have been on the freighter. Like Wilson went for help.

I would have been happier is at the end the woman asked Chuck what time it was and he could answer...

"I have no idea."

RM Mentock
01-16-2001, 12:05 PM
Originally posted by Zebra
I didn't like the film much. I would have been happier if he left the raft to get Wilson. Or my wife suggested that Wilson should have been on the freighter. Like Wilson went for help.

Maybe the director's cut will reinsert the scene where the whale goes and gets the freighter. "What's that Willy? You found another castaway? We're right behind you!"

It wasn't just me who heard "Jack" at the end of the movie, it was also my wife. And that link at the Internet Movie Data Base Cast Away Goofs says so, too.

Doc Moss
01-18-2001, 02:06 AM
I saw the movie today, it came out in Australia today, and although it appears I have missed the bulk of the discussion...

I don't understand why Helen Hunt remarried after such a short time, when she tells Hanks at the end that "I knew you were alive, I just knew it."

Eh?

Also, why didn't he attempt to leave the island until 4 years had passed? Obviously he was motivated by getting the "sail", but why not use something else? After a year alone surely you would be willing to try anything to leave that island...

::hoping people are still clicking this thread::

- Doc.

Bricker
01-18-2001, 06:48 AM
Originally posted by Paul Coleman
Also...is it just me or was Tom a bit of a lame-o when it came to making fire? Holy smokes...no pun intended, but I couldn't believe how long he took to get it right, or even start on the job for that matter. I was actually relieved when the mag-lite died so it would hurry him along to finally get started on the fire thing. Why didn't he just take out the batteries when they were still juiced, extract the wiring from the casing and touch pos to negative to generate a spark? Hell, he could have used the buckle from Al's belt in lieu of legit wire if it was in short supply. (Am I missing something..other than compassion and modesty?)


It's just you.

You're not going to get a spark out of 3 V DC, with the current supplied by 2 AA batteries.

Having made fire with no matches - and earned a merit badge thereby, I might add - I assure you it's no picnic. Yes, he made some basic mistakes, but I think someone not specifically trained, but having only a general understanding that friction makes heat, would likely make those same mistakes.

- Rick

RM Mentock
01-18-2001, 11:31 AM
Originally posted by Doc Moss
Also, why didn't he attempt to leave the island until 4 years had passed? Obviously he was motivated by getting the "sail", but why not use something else? After a year alone surely you would be willing to try anything to leave that island...

He did try, in what remained of his raft. That's where he ended up so bloody and bruised and respectful of the breakers.

Ceejaytee
01-18-2001, 11:39 AM
I really liked the first two-thirds of this movie--right up until he goes home. There are some lame things before then but they aren't as bad as what happens after he gets home.

(1) The package with wings: My husband was of the opinion that he didn't open it, because he decided that he was going to get off the island and deliver it. I think it was the wings on the package, symbolizing hope or freedom. It's the only way to explain why he returned the package, rather than delivering it, why he painted wings on his port-a-potty sail, and why he wrote the note about the package saving his life.

(2) It was okay that Helen Hunt left him. Frankly, either possibility would have been okay. But I agree that she seems to have gotten married awfully fast. I guess Zemeckis wanted her to have a family to show us her conflict. But I think he could have gotten away with her being married for, say, a year, and pregnant. Same ties to Chris Noth, but more time for mourning Tom Hanks.

(3) Robert Zemeckis is about as subtle as a sledgehammer. Did anyone else catch that the main philosophy of this movie was exactly the same as Forrest Gump? "Life is like a box of chocolates--you never know what you're gonna get" compared to "You never know what the tide will bring in?" Puhleeze. Maybe he should try to make a different movie next time.

(4) I don't think the movie ended on an ambiguous note. Although Tom's standing at the crossroads, he now knows that the hot babe who gave him directions is the sender of the package that saved his life (the wings are painted on the back of her truck). As my husband opines, he'll go back to the farm of the hot babe, explain his note, tell her his story . . . and they'll have great sex and live happily ever after. The tide brought her in.

IMO, the movie should have ended after the Helen Hunt scenes (which I thought were quite good). Or Zemeckis should have shown us what it's like for a man who's been alone on an island for four years to be back in civiliztion.

portofcall
01-03-2015, 10:31 PM
just watched this movie for first time on tv and had questions...only thing stands out was Elvis Song Return to Sender at the end making me think her husband sent parcel right back?

Desert Nomad
01-04-2015, 12:07 AM
Wow, this has to be some sort of record: almost 14 years between posts.

engineer_comp_geek
01-04-2015, 01:40 AM
Moderator Action

Moving thread from General Questions to Cafe Society (which didn't exist when this thread was started).

Also, please note that this thread is 14 years old and many of its original participants may no longer be around to comment on the newer posts.

rsat3acr
01-04-2015, 10:53 AM
Wow, this has to be some sort of record: almost 14 years between posts.

and an actual relevant post to revive it, not some inane comment,

Blank Slate
01-04-2015, 09:34 PM
What I want to know is why a pair of ice skates(???) was headed for Indonesia?

The movie was set in 1995. In the following year, the Mall Taman Anggrek (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mall_Taman_Anggrek) opened in Jakarta, featuring the very first indoor skating rink in Southeast Asia (I'm guessing there are zero outdoor rinks.) So the skates were sent to someone in anticipation of this exciting development. Makes perfect sense.

Gatopescado
01-04-2015, 10:02 PM
Well, damn, this movie is spoiled for me.

Bryan Ekers
01-04-2015, 10:30 PM
Look what I have debated!

samlaunch
07-04-2015, 01:14 AM
I think I've figured the movie out. The beginning of the movie, the package with the angel's wings was delivered to the woman's cheating husband. At the end of the movie, we see Tom Hanks with a Wilson soccer ball in the car. He returns the package to the woman with a note "This package saved my life." He had one of two choices to make:

1. Go back to the island.
2. Go to the woman, he just delivered the package to!

It was a matter of "Fate". He lost Helen Hunt due to being stranded on the island, and he was being given a second chance, to be with someone else; or, go back to Wilson 2.:)