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Johnny L.A.
08-25-2009, 10:52 PM
I love eatin' the sea-kittens, but my preparations are somewhat limited. (Fish'n'chips, teriyaki salmon, salmon with white sauce, baked salmon, Mediterranean-style(ish) tilapia, fish tacos, and tuna sandwiches are about it.) I like pickled herring, but I'd rather buy it than make it.

I also like Scandinavian food, such as I've had. So how about some recipes for Scandinavian fish dishes? I'm not looking for anything fussy, or that takes preparation ahead of time. (i.e., I don't want to be soaking salted fish the day before. Also, from what I've heard there's an even chance I won't like lutefisk.)

I Am The Lorax
08-25-2009, 11:36 PM
When I was a kid I went to a wedding in the boonies of northern Minnesota. Very Scandahoovian on both sides of the families. The bride's mom served fish cakes made of pike caught by the bride's dad in the lake thier house was on. Dayum! They were good! So good I remember them nearly twenty years later. Wish I had the recipe. Sorry I wasn't any help.

dropzone
08-25-2009, 11:42 PM
Grandma made lutefisk. I left the house and only came back when I thought she was done. She wasn't.

Kids watch that show on Scandinavian cooking on PBS. The so-called chefs are fond of using juniper.

I recommend going with "breaded and deep fried." Can't go wrong with it.

OTOH, Wife, a Polack, received several underaged proposals frying the fillets in bacon fat. She's made it a couple of times and I re-proposed.

cactus waltz
08-26-2009, 12:24 AM
You've had pickled herring, which of course can found in great many variations here. We also have a lot of salmon variations, not just baked.

There is especially spiced and prepared raw salmon (http://recept.nu/polopoly_fs/1.244459!image/1402873225.jpg_gen/derivatives/w450/1402873225.jpg) (is this what americans call lox?). This is often served with fresh, boiled potatoes (whole, not mashed), boiled egg, dill and a complementary sauce, hovmästarsås (http://images.google.se/images?hl=sv&um=1&sa=1&q=hovm%C3%A4stars%C3%A5s&btnG=S%C3%B6k+bilder&aq=f&oq=).

This is extremely delicious.

chique
08-26-2009, 01:13 AM
Gravlax. I freakin' love that stuff. This recipe (http://www.starchefs.com/chefs/MSamuelsson/html/recipe_03.shtml) doesn't meet the OP's specs but I'm throwing it out there anyhow for the mustard part if nothing else.

Most of the Scandinavian fish recipes I know of are baked rather than sauteed or fried; the big difference is the sauces, and mustard-based sauces are pretty common.

A good potato side you might want to try with any fish dishes you decide on is hasselback potatoes - recipes are easily google-able.

As for lutefisk...well. I'm happy my great-grandmother left her recipe for that shit back in the Old Country, where it belongs.

vifslan
08-26-2009, 04:33 AM
Continuing on the gravlax route, there's a variation known as icehouse salmon, where the raw fish is brined rather than prepared dry. Right now, the ongoing trend is to do creative things with the rub/brine instead of the basic salt-sugar-pepper-dill combination. Crushed juniper berries and a dash of gin is worth trying, for example, or five spice powder, crushed cranberries, lemon zest, fresh ginger, or a dash of hickory smoke.

Another Scandinavian home cooking recipe for gravlax or cold smoked salmon is salmon pudding (googling finds several recipes in English), which is worth trying. But the thing is that the best Scandinavian fish recipes are prepared with the local fish, and I'm not that sure which of our species are available in the US. The aforementioned pike is great in fish cakes or terrines (I'll dig out my favorite recipe for pike terrine, if you can wait until tomorrow.)

Anyway, a few links for your further education:

http://www.sweden.se/eng/Home/Lifestyle/Food-drink/Swedish-culinary-classics/

http://scandinaviancooking.com/topics/fish.htm

aruvqan
08-26-2009, 06:40 AM
Ol-brot [ale bread soup]

Take dried fish [cod is almost ubiquitous in new england and many areas of the country] and stale rye bread, break both of them into pieces. Put the cod into warm water a few hours before preparing the soup to rehydrate. When it is time to make the soup, press the excess water out of the dried fish, and add the fish and bread to a pot with enough ale to cover. Simmer until the bread dissolves and the fish is rehydrated and cooked through.

Not sure if there is a real recipe online, just have seen it made enough times to know how to make it [first hubby was norwegian-english and it was a comfort food :eek:]

wolfman
08-26-2009, 06:43 AM
Grandma made lutefisk. I left the house and only came back when I thought she was done. She wasn't.
.

Yeah, When some one mentions Scandanavian fish, the basic process that comes to mind:

1.Get fish
2. Let fish rot
3.Eat.

amanset
08-26-2009, 06:47 AM
I'm always amused when everyone latches on to Lutfisk. Yeah, it's pretty grim but frankly that's just because it is a tasteless blob. It isn't even the worst Scandi fish dish.

I mean come on. Get serious and go on about Surströmming.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surströmming

Johnny L.A.
08-26-2009, 10:37 AM
I mean come on. Get serious and go on about Surströmming.
The Swedish foreign exchange student in high school called Surströmming 'raw rotten fish'. I haven't been to Sweden in a very, very long time; and I didn't try it then. When and if I go back I might give it a go.

Re: Gravlax. I do like gravlax. I remember seeing an episode of Good Eats that showed how to make it, and the recipe that was posted seems easy enough. We have excellent salmon up here, so I may try to make it. My local market carries those big rounds of knäckebröd, which is handy.

If anyone has any Scandinavian cooked fish recipes (other than lutefisk), pleas post them! :)


In German, nouns are capitalised. Is this so in Swedish, Danish and Norwegian?

cactus waltz
08-26-2009, 10:50 AM
The Swedish foreign exchange student in high school called Surströmming 'raw rotten fish'. I haven't been to Sweden in a very, very long time; and I didn't try it then. When and if I go back I might give it a go.

Surströmming is a remainder from Sweden before nation-wide industrialization. Personally, I don't see much reason to eat it besides curiosity* and tradition, since pickled herring is so much better.


* The smell is legendary. :o




In German, nouns are capitalised. Is this so in Swedish, Danish and Norwegian?


No. In fact, I believe that was a conscious move to seperate Scandinavian languages from the German influence (which has been very strong).

maladroit
08-26-2009, 12:41 PM
I'm always amused when everyone latches on to Lutfisk. Yeah, it's pretty grim but frankly that's just because it is a tasteless blob. It isn't even the worst Scandi fish dish.

I mean come on. Get serious and go on about Surströmming.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surströmming

I love this line from wiki: "and occasionally people like the taste on the first try" very telling.

Johnny L.A.
08-26-2009, 01:02 PM
OK, I'm definitely hiking down to Pike Place Market at lunchtime. I must have pickled herring now.

Ol-brot [ale bread soup]

Take dried fish [cod is almost ubiquitous in new england and many areas of the country]

I'll have to see if we have dried cod here. I've seen salted herring, but I haven't noticed cod. (Incidentally, there's a large Norwegian community up here.)

FWIW, my freezer currently contains some cod, some salmon, and some tilapia.

flodnak
08-26-2009, 01:18 PM
I'm always amused when everyone latches on to Lutfisk. Yeah, it's pretty grim but frankly that's just because it is a tasteless blob. It isn't even the worst Scandi fish dish.

I mean come on. Get serious and go on about Surströmming. People say the Danes are a bit mad because they like pickled herring.

"Aw, come on!" the Danes protest. "It's not like we eat lutefisk, like those mad Norwegians!"
"Hey!" the Norwegians cry. "The Swedes eat lutefisk, too, you know! And surströmming, too, for god's sake."
"Well, maybe we eat surströmming," the Swedes say, "but unlike the Icelanders, we're not crazy enough to eat hákarl!"

And the Icelanders say, "..........actually, if you have a little brennivín first, it really isn't all that bad."

Johnny L.A.
08-26-2009, 01:27 PM
"Well, maybe we eat surströmming," the Swedes say, "but unlike the Icelanders, we're not crazy enough to eat hákarl!"
What was that about a 'hot Carl'? :eek:

Uosdwis R. Dewoh
08-26-2009, 01:58 PM
If anyone has any Scandinavian cooked fish recipes (other than lutefisk), pleas post them! :)

Well there's the Finnish Kalakukko (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalakukko), but it's difficult to make. Recipe: Link (http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/43/Kalakukko67504.shtml) Link (http://www.finnguide.fi/finnishrecipes/recipe.asp?c=7&t=&p=118)

Johnny L.A.
08-26-2009, 05:00 PM
Well there's the Finnish Kalakukko (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalakukko), but it's difficult to make. Recipe: Link (http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/43/Kalakukko67504.shtml) Link (http://www.finnguide.fi/finnishrecipes/recipe.asp?c=7&t=&p=118)
Yeah, that's a little more involved that I was looking for. Looks tasty though!
I recommend going with "breaded and deep fried." Can't go wrong with it.
I've got a handle on the fish'n'chips. (Finally! I'm using a modified Alton Brown recipe.)
OTOH, Wife, a Polack, received several underaged proposals frying the fillets in bacon fat. She's made it a couple of times and I re-proposed.
Fish fried in bacon! Brilliant!

Polish, eh? Hm... I'm going to have to try my hand at golumpkis one of these days. (But that's a topic for another thread!)

Mogle
08-26-2009, 05:43 PM
What was that about a 'hot Carl'? :eek:
Fermented shark, apparently the meat is toxic when it's fresh so they bury it in the ground for 6-12 weeks , then let it dry for a few months before eating it.
Gordon Ramsay tries it, with a bucket ready, around 2 minutes into this clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTOfhQ_SZEg).

Johnny L.A.
08-26-2009, 05:55 PM
I know. Just couldn't resist the 'hot Carl' joke. ;)

The first half of the clip was... interesting. The second was hilarious! Thanks for that. :)

Johnny Q
08-26-2009, 06:08 PM
Fermented shark, apparently the meat is toxic when it's fresh so they bury it in the ground for 6-12 weeks , then let it dry for a few months before eating it.
Gordon Ramsay tries it, with a bucket ready, around 2 minutes into this clip (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTOfhQ_SZEg).


So it's one of those things named after the sound the first person to eat it made when he did so?

Tequila Mockingbird
08-26-2009, 06:42 PM
I love one with

boiled potatoes
fresh dill
hardboiled eggs
salmon or char
a sauce of mayonnaise mixed with honey mustard

Basically, lay the potatoes, fish, snippets of dill, and the chopped egg into a foil packet. Seal well and bake for 15 or 20 minutes. Top with sauce.


There's also a creamed fish with potatoes that's very filling. Just a basic firm white fish cooked in a cream sauce with potatoes, like a thick soup.

flodnak
08-27-2009, 02:20 AM
Fermented shark, apparently the meat is toxic when it's fresh so they bury it in the ground for 6-12 weeks , then let it dry for a few months before eating it.Which is what I just don't get about it. I mean, most weird things, I can see that the first person who tried it did so because he or she was extremely hungry and had run out of more obvious things to eat. Even something extremely weird like lutefisk, I can imagine an unfortunate combination of an accident and a desperate shortage of food. But here we have something that will make you violently ill if not kill you unless you leave it lying around for a very long time. Who figured that one out?

"Dammit, I'm starving."
"So am I, and the last five days we haven't caught a single fish. I'm thinking about eating some of that shark that washed up on the beach in the spring."
"Dude. Leifur tried some of that and he was puking for hours."
"Yeah, but that was almost two months ago. Maybe it's better now!" :dubious:

WarmNPrickly
08-27-2009, 10:38 AM
Where does one get caustic soda and dried fish to make lutefisk? I've always wanted to try it.

aruvqan
08-27-2009, 11:46 AM
Where does one get caustic soda and dried fish to make lutefisk? I've always wanted to try it.
caustic soda = lye, and you can usually buy dried cod in the grocery near the fish. You might be able to buy it online.

Soak the dried fish in a solution of lye and water then spend several weeks soaking the lye out with many changes of water/

Cant you just buy ready to eat lutefisk?

Johnny L.A.
08-27-2009, 12:08 PM
I went to Pike Place Market yesterday to pick up some pickled herring from Pike Place Fish Market. (I picked up some frozen Scottish kippers, too. Kippers and scrambled eggs this weekend!) There's a Swedish bakery stall in the Market, so I stopped there for an afternoon snack. The woman there gave me a card for the Swedish Cultural Center (http://www.swedishculturalcenter.org/). Turns out they have Friday Kafé (http://www.swedishculturalcenter.org/PDFs/menus/082809.pdf) (.pdf). I'm definitely going to have to check that out. I like Smörgås, and Swedish meatballs too. Guess I'll have to go more than once.

Johnny Q
08-27-2009, 01:24 PM
mmmmmm. Lye. Healthy healthy lye.

WarmNPrickly
08-28-2009, 09:29 AM
Yes, but where do I get food grade lye? I might be able to buy ready made lutefisk somewhere, but I like to make things myself. I'm not certain that something like lutefisk would be sold around here anyway.

Johnny L.A.
08-28-2009, 12:31 PM
Poking around, I see recipes for boiled cod. Sounds kind of bland, though there are also recipes for a sauce made from the cooking water and roux. Any opinions?

Wakinyan
08-28-2009, 01:06 PM
I'm always amused when everyone latches on to Lutfisk. Yeah, it's pretty grim but frankly that's just because it is a tasteless blob.[/url]
Agree with my Swedish friend. Lutfisk in itself really doesn't taste anything. However, with salt, pepper and white sauce it is good. I eat it every christmas, my mom still makes it out of habit, though few eat it because there's pickled herring and gravlax too as first dish, but I like it.

Walpurgis
08-31-2009, 07:29 AM
Strömmingsflundra - literally "herring flounder" is a personal favourite of mine.

Basically take gutted and cleaned herring, spread a filling of your choice on the meat side (for example dill, mustard or caviar spread - I have no idea if that's sold beyond Sweden though! Get it if you can. Kalles Kaviar.). Smack the herring together two by two, like sandwiches. Dip in an egg and then breadcrumbs. Fry for a couple of minutes on each side.

Utterly delicious with boiled or mashed potatoes and lingonberry jam (yes, jam. On fish. It's awesome.). And some melted butter on top of the herring, if one is so inclined.

Argh. Now I have to get me some fresh herring.

Walpurgis
08-31-2009, 08:48 AM
Here's another one! Jansson's temptation (Janssons frestelse). It's a common dish at Midsummer, Christmas and Easter dinners. I don't care for it myself (not an anchovy fan), but everyone else seems to love it. So I dug a recipe up for you. :D

The recipe is for 4 people:

8-10 potatoes
2 onions
20 brisling anchovy fillets
1 1/4 cups of whipped cream
1 tablespoon dried bread crumbs
1 tablespoon butter or margerine

Peel the potatoes and onions. Coarsely shred the potatoes. Slice or chop the onions and sauté them in a little butter or margerine for 5 minutes. Alternate layers of potatoes, onion and anchovies in a lightly greased baking dish. The top and bottom layers should consist of potatoes. Pour half the cream and 2-3 tablespoons of anchovy juice over the casserole. Dot with butter and sprinkle with bread crumbs. Bake in oven at 435 F for 45 minutes. Baste the outer edges of the casserole with the remaining cream towards the end.

I may return with a recipe of my mother's butter herring.

Johnny L.A.
08-31-2009, 10:02 AM
Those sound good, Walpurgis! (I am an anchovie fan.)

I'm impressed that no one has yet come in to offer a recipe for Swedish Fish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_Fish)! :p

NoLAFIN
08-31-2009, 11:18 AM
I humbly submit Cream of Salmon Soup (http://www.recipezaar.com/Cream-of-Salmon-Soup-134154) (Lohikeitto). This recipe is missing the traditional carrot & celery slices. Add them in at your preference.

Johnny L.A.
08-31-2009, 11:41 AM
That looks fantastic, NoLAFIN. How much carrot and celery?

amanset
08-31-2009, 11:47 AM
I love this line from wiki: "and occasionally people like the taste on the first try" very telling.

I just did some clicking around Wikipedia and came to a Norwegian dish that is supposed to be like surströmming: Rakfisk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rakfisk).

One beautiful quote from that page:

It is not recommended that rakfisk be eaten by people with a reduced immune defense or by pregnant women.

Walpurgis
08-31-2009, 02:11 PM
Alright, here's the buttered herring - smörsill! You'll have noticed by now that a lot of these recipes are about applying enormous amounts of butter to fish. This one's the most extreme one I've experienced. I can't find a recipe on the net, so I'll trust to my mother's. She kind of shoots from the hip. You'll need:

Some salted herring
A couple of onions
Hard-boiled eggs
About 100-150 grams of butter

Take some salted herring filets and soak them in lots of water - overnight if they're small, 24 hours if they're of the larger variety. Put the fishies in a baking dish, a pie dish, or similar. It shouldn't be too big, because of what happens at the end. Dice onions and eggs and sprinkle over the fish (or arrange around it, depending on taste). Melt the butter to the point of simmering. Pour it on the fish!

The filets will now be sort of almost-cooked by the hot butter. Together with the crispy raw onions and the buttery eggs, it's a delicious sensation. And probably an acquired taste. I love it.

Walpurgis
08-31-2009, 02:17 PM
Re-reading the OP, I saw that you don't feel like soaking stuff overnight. Just... save the smörsill for that weekend when you wake up thinking "Wow! I'd really like to soak some herring today!".

Johnny L.A.
08-31-2009, 02:34 PM
Just... save the smörsill for that weekend when you wake up thinking "Wow! I'd really like to soak some herring today!".

I probably shouldn't tell you how many times I've jumped out of bed, shouting that enthusiastically to the empty house!

aruvqan
08-31-2009, 02:46 PM
Here's another one! Jansson's temptation (Janssons frestelse). It's a common dish at Midsummer, Christmas and Easter dinners. I don't care for it myself (not an anchovy fan), but everyone else seems to love it. So I dug a recipe up for you. :D

The recipe is for 4 people:

8-10 potatoes
2 onions
20 brisling anchovy fillets
1 1/4 cups of whipped cream
1 tablespoon dried bread crumbs
1 tablespoon butter or margerine

Peel the potatoes and onions. Coarsely shred the potatoes. Slice or chop the onions and sauté them in a little butter or margerine for 5 minutes. Alternate layers of potatoes, onion and anchovies in a lightly greased baking dish. The top and bottom layers should consist of potatoes. Pour half the cream and 2-3 tablespoons of anchovy juice over the casserole. Dot with butter and sprinkle with bread crumbs. Bake in oven at 435 F for 45 minutes. Baste the outer edges of the casserole with the remaining cream towards the end.

I may return with a recipe of my mother's butter herring.
My roomie adores this, but I can't stand it [no clue why ... anchovies always taste like they are rotting to me, no matter how tiny the proportion they are, i hate caesar salads, worchestershire sauce, fish paste, insert vomit smiley here...]but it seems to be very popular when she makes it for mrAru to take in to pot lucks where he works.

Mighty_Girl
08-31-2009, 09:15 PM
My favoritest Danish dish: Fried eels with creamed potatoes (http://http://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/europe/danish/eels-potatoes1.html).


And yes, Scandinavian food is extremely fattening, too much butter and cream on everything. And bacon. Dangerous to this lactose intolerant. Luckily I only do this one month a year.

aruvqan
09-01-2009, 05:21 AM
But there is a reason for so much butter and fat .... surviving the cold takes calories and fat is a good concentrator of calories ...

OK, and it is tasty ...

My favorite thing to do with the melted butter they serve with lobster and other seafood is to smuggle in some garlic granules, and add it along with lemon juice from the lemon wedges and let it sit for about 5 minutes. Once I am done with my lobster tail, I pour the lobstery butter on my baked potato.

MrAru and i do a lobster dinner out every september [his birthday is august 27th, and mine is october 27th, so we split the difference and go out in the middle =) ]

And it is almos ttime for our annual lobsterfest <squeeee>

We need a squeeeee smiley!

Toxylon
09-01-2009, 05:33 AM
Lutefisk doesn't taste like anything (similar to adder meat), but it smells like a puddle of day-old cum. Really.

Walpurgis
09-01-2009, 09:45 AM
Lutefisk doesn't taste like anything (similar to adder meat), but it smells like a puddle of day-old cum. Really.
When I was an innocent virgin and first told my mum I didn't like lutfisk anymore, she asked me why. I said,
"Because it tastes like, I don't know... "
"Oh, I know!" she said. "It tastes like semen, heh heh. What do you think the sauce and green peas are for?"

:eek:

troub
09-01-2009, 11:48 AM
I had Plokkfiskur at a recent Icelandic Cod festival at a local pub, and it was pretty good.
http://www.recipezaar.com/Plokkfiskur-from-Iceland-254484

The version I ate was very similar to this recipe but had cheese melted on the top of it (as mentioned in the Edited to Add section of the recipe).

NoLAFIN
09-01-2009, 12:56 PM
That looks fantastic, NoLAFIN. How much carrot and celery?

2 carrots & a stalk of celery, chopped.

Also, you might want to use about a tablespoon of flour to thicken the soup more.

Johnny L.A.
09-01-2009, 02:35 PM
Thanks, NoLAFIN. I'll give it a try when the weather cools down a little. I'd do it sooner, but I think I'm going to OD on salmon soon, as my gravlax turned out nicely. :)