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mangeorge
01-03-2001, 04:04 PM
Over in GQ, in this thread, there's a little grumping about Sting "selling out". Selling cars and making money.
http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?threadid=53594
I can understand some disappointment when an artist does commercial stuff, but a few fans seem to be devastated. Like, now the artist is beneath contempt.
Happens all the time. For example;
Dylan went electric. Springsteen sang "Dancing in the Dark". The Beatles sold their songs for commercials.
There are many more. Most artists will take the money if given the opportunity. Why not?
I do respect an artist who doesn't, but it is his/her talent to do with as he/she pleases.
Isn't it?
Peace,
mangeorge

bdgr
01-03-2001, 05:02 PM
Originally posted by mangeorge
Over in GQ, in this thread, there's a little grumping about Sting "selling out". Selling cars and making money.
http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?threadid=53594
I can understand some disappointment when an artist does commercial stuff, but a few fans seem to be devastated. Like, now the artist is beneath contempt.
Happens all the time. For example;
Dylan went electric. Springsteen sang "Dancing in the Dark". The Beatles sold their songs for commercials.
There are many more. Most artists will take the money if given the opportunity. Why not?
I do respect an artist who doesn't, but it is his/her talent to do with as he/she pleases.
Isn't it?
Peace,
mangeorge



From what I understand, Sting did the car thing not for the money, but to get his song played. It didn't fit into any of the standard catagories that well, so Radio stations wouldnt play it. He contacted the car company asked them to use it in thier comercial, so that it would be heard, and generate interest in the album. It worked.

Guinastasia
01-03-2001, 05:05 PM
The BEATLES themselves did NOT sell their songs to commercials. THAT is the doing of one, Mister Michael Jackson.

mangeorge
01-03-2001, 05:20 PM
Originally posted by Guinastasia
The BEATLES themselves did NOT sell their songs to commercials. THAT is the doing of one, Mister Michael Jackson.

Absolutely correct, Guinastasia.
My misspeak. :(
MJ, now there's a commercial kinda guy.
Sorry.
Peace,
mangeorge

astorian
01-03-2001, 06:51 PM
The Beatles never sold their songs specifically for TV commercials. The fact remains, however, that they were NOT anti-materialistic idealists! THey were VERY well aware of how much money their music was worth, and were eager to make as much bread as they could while they could (because even John Lennon himself fully believed that the Beatles were a mere passing fad that the public would tire of in short order- all the more reason to make big bucks in a hurry). According to Paul McCartney, when he and Lennon got together to work on songs, Lennon would begin by cracking, "Okay Paul, let's write a yacht," or "Time to write a swimming pool, Paul."

Quite a few supposedly idealistic, pure, 60s bands did commercials. The Yardbirds did. The Who did. In fact, the Who actually did U.S. Army recruiting commercials at the height of the Viet Nam war!

So, "selling out" is nothing new. Of course, it STILL stuns me when I hear a snippet from Ozzy Osbourne, Rush or Deep Purple on a commercial.

mangeorge
01-03-2001, 07:41 PM
So, astorian, Whacha got on Springsteen? ;)
I've heard that he's pretty darn idealistic. Wouldn't allow one (any?) of his works to be used in a commercial.
I know, I know. He fired the E Street guys. Even Clarence Clemmens. Whom he kissed on the MOUTH!
:D
Peace,
mangeorge

Torgo
01-03-2001, 08:09 PM
Originally posted by astorian
The Who did. In fact, the Who actually did U.S. Army recruiting commercials at the height of the Viet Nam war!


WHAAAAAAAAAT????? Show me some proof that the Who promoted America's role in "Viet Nam" lest I be forced to rain blows upon you.

Torgo
01-03-2001, 08:44 PM
Originally posted by astorian
The Who did. In fact, the Who actually did U.S. Army recruiting commercials at the height of the Viet Nam war!


"Hi, this is Pete Townsend. Kill some gooks before you get old; join the U.S. Army!"

Lamia
01-03-2001, 11:27 PM
Originally posted by Torgo

WHAAAAAAAAAT????? Show me some proof that the Who promoted America's role in "Viet Nam" lest I be forced to rain blows upon you.

Pete Townshend did do a promo for the US military (the Air Force I believe) in the 1960's. This has been mentioned in several Who biographies, and the promo in question is available on bootleg. I've heard it myself. It doesn't say anything about the war at all, it's more along the lines of "There are many great career opportunities for young people in the military".

Pete Townshend later said that he deeply regretted agreeing to do the promo and that he never would have done so if he had been better informed at the time about the war in Vietnam.

If it makes you feel any better, in the promo Townshend did not sound especially enthusiastic or convincing. He sounded more like a stoned kid reading off a cue card.

Torgo
01-04-2001, 02:02 PM
Well shut my mouth. I'm a Who fan going on 15 years now and that's the first I've heard of it.

New & Improved Scott
01-04-2001, 02:41 PM
This all sounds like you are expecting pop stars to have some sort of moral standing. These are people who wanted to be rich and famous. They sell music as a career.

So when Microsoft bought "Start me up", it was just another sale for Mick.

Freudian Slit
01-04-2001, 10:47 PM
Not moral...we just want them to have the same outlook as us. Is that so much to ask? We deify them and they go and shatter our dreams? I tell you, at times I feel manipulated, used, utilized, violated...well sometimes. The rest of the time I'm pretty normal.

What do you mean- what does Bruce's singing "Dancing in the Dark" have to do with selling out? I think that's a great song.

mangeorge
01-04-2001, 11:47 PM
What do you mean- what does Bruce's singing "Dancing in the Dark" have to do with selling out? I think that's a great song.
Me too, Zoggie. Some of his die-hard fans opined that it was too "pop". Same with Dylan's electric guitar.
Peace,
mangeorge.

vanilla
01-05-2001, 08:47 AM
Not to mention Mr. Townsend knocking Abbie Hoffman off the stage at Woodstock..
astorian: Where have you ever heard an Ozzy song for a commercial? That sounds interesting!

Manda JO
01-05-2001, 11:55 AM
I would think that Sting advertising cars more open to critisism than other artists hawking other products. I meam, Sting has always had a very prominient pro-enviroment schtick. This seems a pretty big contradiction to that.

Cervaise
01-05-2001, 03:55 PM
Manda JO has it right. It's the who, what, and how, in context with the rest of their stated beliefs, that creates hypocrisy. If Britney Spears does an ad for Pepsi, nobody will think she's a sellout, because that doesn't contradict anything she's previously said. But if she does an ad for Silicone Boob Hut (TM), that's a problem. Ditto for Sting hawking a big, expensive, high-emission automobile.

Dinsdale
01-05-2001, 04:15 PM
When I think of someone selling out, I think the poster child has to be Rod Stewart, who started off making some of the best rock ever, and then turned into some geriatric singing "Do Ya Think I'm Sexy."
Or Queen, who had three near flawless albums, followed by 2 that had more good than bad, and then became a sideshow.
Maybe the Stones, who seem to long ago given up even trying to put out decent music, and are now just a money making nostalgia machine.

How can you complain about Sting selling out when he has always sucked, with the exception that the Police had a couple of tunes that were somewhat catchy until you got tired of them.
At least The Who has the excuse that its members started dying and going infirm.

Not sure how to categorize someone like:
Eric Clapton who made some awesome music for a decade or so, and has consistently sucked for the last three;
Or Bruce Springsteen who made 4 incredible albums, started slipping, and then became a superstar with his most mediocre album to that point.

Good music is good music, whether it is used for commercial purposes or not. I can easily excuse an artist for making money off his work. I find it harder to excuse a telented artist who starts producing shit.

Monocracy
01-05-2001, 11:50 PM
astorian: Where have you ever heard an Ozzy song for a commercial? That sounds interesting!

About 2 years ago (i saw it a lot while watching hockey playoffs), there was a car commercial that used the music from "Crazy Babies" ... no singing, just the instrumental.

mangeorge
01-06-2001, 12:39 AM
Probably a dumb question, but is Joan Osborne related to Ozzy?
Peace,
mangeorge

Freudian Slit
01-06-2001, 04:47 PM
Mange- To answer your question, I don't know. (Sorry!) But it is definitely something I have always wondered as well. It just seemed like a weird question that was obvious to all but me. :) If I ever find out, I'll fill you in.

SpinneZiege
01-06-2001, 06:31 PM
Originally posted by astorian
because even John Lennon himself fully believed that the Beatles were a mere passing fad that the public would tire of in short order- all the more reason to make big bucks in a hurry

We're bigger than Jesus.
-John Lennon

ThisYearsGirl
01-06-2001, 07:00 PM
Originally posted by mangeorge
Probably a dumb question, but is Joan Osborne related to Ozzy?
Peace,
mangeorge

According to Pop-up Video, they are not related. They aren't related to Super Dave Osborne, either.

mangeorge
01-06-2001, 07:06 PM
Thanks, ThisYearsGirl.
In fact, my kids, my grandkids, and Zoggie all thank you.
Kinda nice to be a hero, huh? :)
Peace,
mangeorge

PunditLisa
01-16-2003, 04:47 PM
What could be more of a sell out than releasing a Christmas album when you're Jewish (or an atheist, etc.)? Take the prize Neil Diamond, Barbra Streisand, and Barry Manilow.

Mojo
01-16-2003, 04:56 PM
IIRC, Ozzy's Iron Man was used to sell Timex Ironman watches.

And I've always thought the poster child for selling out was Jefferson Airplane/Jefferson Starship/Starship, but at least they had the good sense to alter their name so that fans could retain fond memories when listening to their new crap.

astorian
01-16-2003, 05:01 PM
Originally posted by ThisYearsGirl
According to Pop-up Video, they are not related. They aren't related to Super Dave Osborne, either.

Joan Osborne is American, Ozzy Osbourne is British. And Super Dave Osborne's name is an alias- his real name is Einstein.

As many of you know, Super Dave's brother is comedian Albert Brooks. Gee... I WONDER why a guy named Albert Einstein would change his name...

*

P.S. I don't remember the specifics, but I've heard the opening of Ozzy's "Crazy Train" in car commercials.

gex gex
01-17-2003, 08:13 AM
I think that the reason fans are so critical of bands is that often the fans or the artists themselves seek to be elevated to the stature of "artists," rather than the manufacturers of product. Hence, when someone does something distinctly non-artistic, such as selling their art to a commercial, or recording a song that seems to be seeking a larger audience at the expense of quality, the fans feel they have lowered themselves from the status of "artists," to "producer of product." Selling out.

This also explains why no-one complains about Britney selling out when she does commercials for Pepsi. She was never considered an artist in the first place and isn't held to the standards of one by her fans.

Of course, some bands say that they aren't producing art, but this is just as much about the fans' perception as the artists'.

MEBuckner
01-17-2003, 08:19 AM
Moderator's Note: Moving to Cafe Society.

broccoli!
01-17-2003, 08:45 AM
Iggy screwed us all when he sold a song about Heroin addiction to the commercial market! Now I hear Lust for Life on cruise ship commercials, SUV commercials, etc etc... Next thing ya know it'll be in a Disney commercial "Here at Disney, we love to thrill you"

I can't tell if Tim Armstong (formerly from Op Ivy now of Rancid fame) has sold out yet or not. He's teamed up with Travis from Blink182/Box Car Racer and some other dude as a side project (called the Transplants), but all they do is radio friendly hip hop punk type stuff. Very catchy, very annoying.

everton
01-17-2003, 10:03 AM
Originally posted by New & Improved Scott
This all sounds like you are expecting pop stars to have some sort of moral standing. These are people who wanted to be rich and famous. They sell music as a career.

So when Microsoft bought "Start me up", it was just another sale for Mick.
But many of the musicians mentioned in this thread do seem to take a moral stance in their lyrics and in interviews. The Stones wouldn't necessarily fall into that category, but many more do.

In other cases people here have been criticising artists who seemed to begin their careers creating art but wind up churning out any old crap that their record companies think will sell, even if that means alienating their original audience.
Originally posted by Dinsdale
How can you complain about Sting selling out when he has always sucked, with the exception that the Police had a couple of tunes that were somewhat catchy until you got tired of them.
At least The Who has the excuse that its members started dying and going infirm.
But the people who have been criticising Sting here haven't done that because they object to his change of musical direction, it's because they think he's been a hypocrite on political/ideological grounds.

Roger Daltrey created a fuss over here when he started doing ads for American Express. It didn't seem to be the thing for a renegade Mod to do.

Wumpus
01-17-2003, 10:35 AM
The idea that 60s rock artists were altruists untainted by the love of money is a load of malarky. The Who did Coke ads in the '60s. Jefferson Airplane did Levis commercials. And the Electric Prunes did Vox amp commercials. (The horror, the horror!)

Lamia
01-17-2003, 10:46 AM
Originally posted by broccoli!
Iggy screwed us all when he sold a song about Heroin addiction to the commercial market! Now I hear Lust for Life on cruise ship commercials, SUV commercials, etc etc... Next thing ya know it'll be in a Disney commercial "Here at Disney, we love to thrill you"

I'm willing to cut Iggy slack because, unlike many musicians who sell their songs to commercials, he's actually been homeless. And it's not like his albums have sold very well for the past few decades, and he doesn't get much radio airplay either. If he weren't willing to accept money from the car companies, cruise lines, and shoe manufacturers then he might well end up in the poorhouse. Or David Bowie's guesthouse. One or the other.

And personally, it gives me a big laugh every time I see that big boat cruising along to "Lust for Life". I go "Bwa ha ha ha ha ha!" every time.

everton
01-17-2003, 10:54 AM
Originally posted by Wumpus
The idea that 60s rock artists were altruists untainted by the love of money is a load of malarky. The Who did Coke ads in the '60s. Jefferson Airplane did Levis commercials. And the Electric Prunes did Vox amp commercials. (The horror, the horror!)
The public image of Coca Cola and Levis jeans in the '60s was that they were products likely to be bought by fans of the bands advertising them. Presumably the Electric Prunes used Vox equipment (or could plausably claim to be doing so)? Surely there's a big difference between those examples and an outspoken environmentalist advertising sports cars or an icon of rebellious youth advertising a financial services company?

The fans may well have been deluding themselves all along, but you're going to need better examples than those to back up the allegation.

RikWriter
01-17-2003, 11:34 AM
Originally posted by Zoggie
Not moral...we just want them to have the same outlook as us. Is that so much to ask?

Who's "us?" "We" don't all HAVE the same outlook. I see no problem with Townshend's Army commercial, someone else does.

Bad Hat
01-18-2003, 07:26 AM
Microsoft only asked the stones for "start me up" after R.E.M. turned down a $12mill offer. memory fails as to what song they wanted, but i've always appreciated REMs balls on the issue.

mangeorge
01-18-2003, 12:51 PM
Twelve Million Dollars? For that much I'd .... Bill Gates!
Well, maybe not. But it is a lot of money to this poor boy.

Apos
01-18-2003, 07:03 PM
---But if she does an ad for Silicone Boob Hut (TM), that's a problem.---

But, she IS doing an ad for Silicone Boob Hut (TM). It's just a full-time gig.

mangeorge
01-18-2003, 07:19 PM
By the way, PunditLisa, how on earth did you come to dig up this two-year- old thread? Getting a little tired of that Neil Diamond xmas cd? :cool:
Peace,
mangeorge

PunditLisa
01-20-2003, 08:38 PM
You know, mangeorge, I don't know how I managed to dig it up!

Sorry about the carbon dated thread, folks!

Sublight
01-21-2003, 12:39 AM
Originally posted by everton
Roger Daltrey created a fuss over here when he started doing ads for American Express. It didn't seem to be the thing for a renegade Mod to do.
Have none of these folks ever heard of The Who Sell Out?

mangeorge
01-21-2003, 06:29 PM
Originally posted by PunditLisa
You know, mangeorge, I don't know how I managed to dig it up!

Sorry about the carbon dated thread, folks!
Not a problem. :)
I watched a show on VH1 (or MTV) about this subject just last week. Pretty much every artist who was asked scoffed at the idea of not selling out.
It's a matter of degree, I guess. I'll sell my soul in a hot second. Fuck poverty. Been there.
Peace,
mangeorge

jesseboy
01-21-2003, 07:13 PM
an artist who i think sold out big time is moby. he started off making crazy underground techno and gradually became more and more pop. i have no problem with an artist producing a more mainstream sound after a while if that is their natural development, doing underground stuff for too long is boring...but he sold all of the songs on his 'Play' album to movies and commercials.

don't these assclowns realize that striving for mainstream acceptance makes the music boring real quick and sterotypes the artist even quicker?

FranticMad
01-21-2003, 09:00 PM
Excuse me, but we're talking about musicians. They are not great philosophers. They are not politicians. I don't expect them to have a consistent point of view or to be holier than me.

They play music for money and admiration. By definition, a popular muscian has already sold out whether they know it or not. I don't mind that.

Fred
01-21-2003, 09:23 PM
jesseboy: Unfortunately, the growing trend is that electronic artists have to go to commercials in order to get sales. Moby wasn't selling any albums until he got his music played on tv. It's a matter of necessity, not of "I need a bigger yacht".

Boo Boo Foo
01-21-2003, 09:39 PM
Originally posted by jesseboy
don't these assclowns realize that striving for mainstream acceptance makes the music boring real quick and sterotypes the artist even quicker?

Also, and far more importantly, the music itself is what it is - it never changes. It doesn't just wake up one day and has magically remixed itself overnight into some different song.

The only thing that changes is our perception of the music - and our perception of the role it plays in our life.

The artist doesn't change either. They're still the same person(s). The only people doing the "sterotyping" are us. Such behaviour sometimes emanates from the ugliest, most petty parts of human nature it seems to me.

I've read this entire thread with interest. Some of the posts have been astonishingly objective and fair - but some them too have been amazingly catty.

Personally, this is my take on the matter. I'm a muso, and a good one too. In this modern era of contrived music videos and homegenised appearance, I would much, MUCH rather have my music featured in a world wide advertising campaing which plays at all times of the day to all sorts of age demographics - than to make a video which might get played 3 times a week on music video programs. I'm in negotiations with Vodafone right now on such a tune. They wanted another tune similar in vibe to "Bohemian Like You" by The Dandy Warhols and I have one. My only stipulation has been that the adverts feature in soft logo my band's name and the name of the song.

Looks like they're gonna accept it, so I don't have any concerns whatsoever with the arrangement. It's a rewarding quid pro quo as far as I'm concerned.

But please note - I also have certain views on things and there are certain products I would NOT endorse - like cigarettes or booze for example - or a casino either as an another example.

Johanna
01-21-2003, 09:50 PM
Originally posted by mangeorge
Dylan went electric.
Oh, but the big Z put that controversy to rest aeons ago. Some harcore folkies squawked at the time but, far from compromising his artistic integrity with an electric guitar, Dylan used it to take his artistry to previously unimagined levels. He was a brilliant artistic success with it if anyone was.

My nominee for the most awful waste of brilliant musical talent: Genesis from 1978 onwards. I still can't believe that post-1978 Genesis is actually the same 3 guys who played in pre-1978 Genesis. I suspect that they are impostors who murdered the genuine Banks, Rutherford, and Collins, hid their bodies, and took their places.

DOOM
01-22-2003, 02:12 AM
Kind of makes you wonder what the musical landscape would look like if money weren't a factor at all, and only merit mattered.

Because obviously the way it works now some bands get to the point, financially, where they can basically just shit in a bag and people will still buy it.

Sad, really.

Seven
01-22-2003, 03:06 AM
I think people have forgotten a major point in the good ol' music biz. Many times the label owns the rights to the music. If the label wants to use Britneys "Hit me one more time" in a Hanes wifebeater t-shirt commercial poor Britney has no say.

Well,. that and someone else wrote that song. I doubt Britney could write her way out of a paper bag.

Also, consider the life of a musician. Many people feel the best work of bands are on their first and second album. Let's say a band were really into their music. They spend time writing and playing and producing their own tracks. One day they get picked up by a label and record these tracks. Next thing you know they are playing lots of shows and promoting their album.

When it comes time to get the next album off the ground they have an entirely different group around them. The label brings in a new producer, they are attempting to work out the bugs in a strange studio, they have time constraints. Tons of new and different things surrounding them. It would be easy to get distracted.

On top of this, you end up with a bunch of "yes men" types that say how great it sounds even if it's not up to par with their own standards.

No matter if it's a band of real serious musicians or just a bunch of musicians seeking the limelight, the focus on the music is going to shift.

I think this is why 3rd or 4th albums tend to be break aways. If the band survives that long then they are getting their footing in the new enviroment and can focus on the production and writing again.

Seven
01-22-2003, 03:08 AM
Opps. I meant to say their break away records are 5th/6th. After a couple of "sell out" attempts.

Miles Standoffish
04-24-2013, 01:09 PM
Neil Young never sold out ("This Notes For You," etc.) But, circa 1991, his music (especially lyrically) started turning to mush and never recovered. Not the kind of "going bad" you all are talking about but thought I'd throw it out there.

WordMan
04-24-2013, 01:13 PM
Neil Young never sold out ("This Notes For You," etc.) But, circa 1991, his music (especially lyrically) turned to mush and never recovered. Not the kind of "going bad" you all are talking about but thought I'd throw it out there.

This is an ancient zombie thread. And no, Neil still hasn't sold out - go Neil!

Prof. Pepperwinkle
04-24-2013, 01:20 PM
Liz Phair achieved a reputation as a serious alternative music artist, and received considerable backlash for her fourth, self-titled album which was, admittedly, "pop". She has apologized to her fans and is working on a new album to try to regain her old fanbase.

:smack: I have really got to start looking for zombies...

Jophiel
04-24-2013, 01:56 PM
If it makes you feel better, when I read the thread title, "Liz Phair" was the first thing to pop into my head. Thread seems more about selling out into commercials but there ya go.

These days I assumed iPad and environmentally friendly economy car commercials were how new musicians got known.

Blank Slate
04-24-2013, 02:01 PM
Who cares if it's a zombie? I'm sure there are more artists in the last 10 years that can be gleefully pilloried for selling out.


Microsoft only asked the stones for "start me up" after R.E.M. turned down a $12mill offer. memory fails as to what song they wanted, but i've always appreciated REMs balls on the issue.

IIRC, it was It's the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)

LC Strawhouse
04-24-2013, 09:47 PM
Metallica's Black Album! The loyal metalhead fans of the late-80s felt SO betrayed and pissed off when that one came out. One kid in my school actually wrote out a plea to the spirit of Cliff Burton. I wasn't even into Metallica and I still remember that big overnight change when they became "mainstream". The one-star reviews on Amazon show that it is still a sore spot years later.

I only tried to check out Metallica's stuff later on, and I thought the metalheads were pretty much correct that the black album was a blatant underachievement, so it is kinda strange that it was so loved by critics.

don't ask
04-24-2013, 10:05 PM
Pete Townshend did do a promo for the US military (the Air Force I believe) in the 1960's. This has been mentioned in several Who biographies, and the promo in question is available on bootleg. I've heard it myself. It doesn't say anything about the war at all, it's more along the lines of "There are many great career opportunities for young people in the military".

Pete Townshend later said that he deeply regretted agreeing to do the promo and that he never would have done so if he had been better informed at the time about the war in Vietnam.

If it makes you feel any better, in the promo Townshend did not sound especially enthusiastic or convincing. He sounded more like a stoned kid reading off a cue card.

I recall reading in a biography of Townshend that he thought he was making the promo in aid of the US space program.

Ranger Jeff
04-25-2013, 12:06 AM
Joan Osborne is American, Ozzy Osbourne is British. And Super Dave Osborne's name is an alias- his real name is Einstein.

As many of you know, Super Dave's brother is comedian Albert Brooks. Gee... I WONDER why a guy named Albert Einstein would change his name...

I believe their last name is "Eisenstein", not 'Einstein". Wasn't Super Dave also Officer Judy on the Smothers Brothers' Comedy Hour?

"Let's share a little tea with Goldie!"

Zeke N. Destroi
04-25-2013, 09:49 AM
Metallica's Black Album! The loyal metalhead fans of the late-80s felt SO betrayed and pissed off when that one came out. One kid in my school actually wrote out a plea to the spirit of Cliff Burton. I wasn't even into Metallica and I still remember that big overnight change when they became "mainstream". The one-star reviews on Amazon show that it is still a sore spot years later.

I only tried to check out Metallica's stuff later on, and I thought the metalheads were pretty much correct that the black album was a blatant underachievement, so it is kinda strange that it was so loved by critics.

TLDR version at bottom

55 posts before Metallica - one of the most monstrous (in all senses of the word) sell-outs by whatever definition you want to apply - gets a mention!?

Kill 'Em All was the first metal tape I ever bought and I remember the day vividly. The rest of the discography up to and including One was a large part of the soundtrack of my teens and very early twenties.

I remember hearing tales of how they wouldn't do music videos or sell their name or music to any merchandiser etc. More than liking Metallica I respected and admired them. Though I knew they had compromised some I still felt that they were being true to themselves and their fans. But I lost touch with metal outside of my memories.

Then one day I was listening to my local "bland-new-releases-mixed-with-songs-that-just-won't-die" radio station and I thought I heard the DJ say that after the commercials it was the new "hit" by Metallica. I kinda chuckled and wondered if I had misheard or if it was some kind of a set-up for a joke.

Nope, not a joke in the traditional sense, it was Enter Sandman.

The day that my local version of WSUX played a Metallica song was the day that Metallica died to me. Napster and all other buffoonery and shitty music that followed was merely kicking the corpse.

The other day I was in a head shop and amidst a collection of various themed sets I saw a Metallica Monopoly set. If it weren't for the biting irony of it I would have wept a little.

TLDR - Metallica are the poster children for all forms of slimey, sub-swine-sell-outism<-- I got dibs on the marketing idea fellas, I'm looking at YOU Lars!

Intergalactic Gladiator
04-25-2013, 11:38 AM
I believe their last name is "Eisenstein", not 'Einstein". Wasn't Super Dave also Officer Judy on the Smothers Brothers' Comedy Hour?

"Let's share a little tea with Goldie!"

It is indeed Einstein.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Brooks