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Trepa Mayfield
11-01-2009, 04:31 PM
If I'm not mistaken, in the Book of Revelation it says that Jesus comes back right before and/or during the End Times. Right?

Jesus was Jewish, according to the Bible, right? But he was also directly responsible for Christianity, a religion that worships him, right?

So, if/when Jesus comes back, will he be Jewish or Christian? Or something else?

aldiboronti
11-01-2009, 04:38 PM
I'd say he was indirectly responsible for Christianity rather than directly. Christianity was far more the creation of Paul.

And it's also my opinion that Jesus, if he came back, would be a devout Jew and would be horrified to hear of the evils wrought on the Jewish people in his name over the centuries. I don't think he'd want anything to do with Christians.

Colibri
11-01-2009, 04:39 PM
Since there is likely to be a variety of opinions on this, the question is better suited for GD than GQ.

Colibri
General Questions Moderator

Sage Rat
11-01-2009, 04:42 PM
Christians will of course say yes. Mormons would probably say that he would be Mormon. Muslims would tell you that he would be a Muslim.

Personally, I would vote that you'd do as well to argue how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.

hotflungwok
11-01-2009, 04:59 PM
Christians believe that Jesus is the son of god, died on the cross, rose from the dead, etc. If Jesus is real and did all those things, he wouldn't have to believe it, he would know it. There would be no reason for him to be Christian.

An atheist is someone who doesn't believe in god. Does god believe in god?

Bryan Ekers
11-01-2009, 05:16 PM
An atheist is someone who doesn't believe in god. Does god believe in god?

I imagine we'll find out if He ever tries to join the Boy Scouts.


Anyway, if Jesus (aka Joshua bar-Joseph) retains the attitudes of his times, I expect he might most closely identify (and probably not that much) with observant Sephardic Jews. The black uniform-like traditional dress of the Ashkenazim ultra-orthodox would probably mystify him.

Kyrie Eleison
11-01-2009, 05:18 PM
Does god believe in god?
You propose that God is an inverse solipsist? I think therefore everything else is, yet I am not?

Polycarp
11-01-2009, 05:20 PM
Jesus taught loving commitment to God and radical caring for one's fellow man. There is much more to His teaching than that, but it stands as a good first-cut summary. Jesus would not "be a Christian" in the modern doctrinal/pietistic sense any more than Henry VIII would be "a good subject of the Crown" in his day. But the behavior He exhibited should be exemplary for those who follow Him; in that sense, He is the ideal Christian.

Mormons would probably say that he would be Mormon.

There is a truly terrible joke relative to this: The Pope's secretary comes running into the Pope's office, all excited. "Holy Father, I have good news and bad news!"

"Calm down, monsignor; what's the good news?"

"Our Lord Jesus Christ has come back at last! That was Him on the phone just now."

"Ah, that IS good news? But what is the bad news?"

"He was calling from Salt Lake City." :D

handsomeharry
11-01-2009, 08:11 PM
Since Jesus is the Christ, and the -ian suffix means 'like', I would definitely say that he is, and would be Christ-like, inasmuch as something is like itself.

cosmosdan
11-01-2009, 08:35 PM
Woke up this mornin', turned on the t.v. set.
there in livin' color, was somethin' I can't forget.
This man was preachin' at me, yeah, layin' on the charm
askin' me for twenty, with ten-thousand on his arm.
He wore designer clothes, and a big smile on his face
tellin' me salvation while they sang Amazin' Grace.
Askin' me for money, when he had all the signs of wealth.
I almost wrote a check out, yeah, then I asked myself

(chorus)

Would He wear a pinky ring, would He drive a fancy car?
Would His wife wear furs and diamonds, would His dressin' room have a star?
If He came back tomorrow, well there's somethin' I'd like to know
Could ya tell me, Would Jesus wear a Rolex on His television show.

Would Jesus be political if He came back to earth?
Have His second home in Palm Springs, yeah, a try to hide His worth?
Take money, from those poor folks, when He comes back again,
and admit He's talked to all them preachers who say they been a talkin' to Him?

dropzone
11-01-2009, 10:22 PM
Personally, I would vote that you'd do as well to argue how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.They are supernatural beings, without substance in our world, so I am confident in saying that ALL angels could dance on the head of a pin. And some many hundred years ago I'd've made the same pronouncement, gone back to my wine, and snorted with derision at any hypotheses that differed. There's a lot of power behind the snorts of derision from an older fat guy who is in his cups. Usually enough to shut up the seminarians while you get your drunk on.

ETA: Jesus would be appalled. First and foremost, He was a Jew. Second, he was into living a life of poverty, something one rarely sees in modern Jews and Christians.

hotflungwok
11-02-2009, 12:16 AM
You propose that God is an inverse solipsist? I think therefore everything else is, yet I am not?
But he wouldn't even need to think or believe that, he would know it, having created all of it. Do you need to have faith that you exist, or do you know it?

begbert2
11-02-2009, 07:21 PM
But he wouldn't even need to think or believe that, he would know it, having created all of it. Do you need to have faith that you exist, or do you know it?Depends on how you define "faith" and "know", don'nit? I don't have "faith" that I exist, but I also don't "know" it, by my definitions of the terms.

FriarTed
11-03-2009, 07:54 AM
Did Jesus teach he was God's Unique Son/Word and if not fully Divine, at least the nearest being to God; did he teach he would die for humanity's sins and rise to make eternal life available to us; and finally, did he teach that entrusting oneself to him would grant one eternal life? I believe he did indeed teach all this, as recorded in the Gospels, and thus did adhere to the essential distinctions of the Christian faith. He'd be pleased with some modern-day aspects of it, outraged at others, and YMMV on how he would react to what aspect.

Kobal2
11-03-2009, 08:36 AM
They are supernatural beings, without substance in our world, so I am confident in saying that ALL angels could dance on the head of a pin. And some many hundred years ago I'd've made the same pronouncement, gone back to my wine, and snorted with derision at any hypotheses that differed. There's a lot of power behind the snorts of derision from an older fat guy who is in his cups. Usually enough to shut up the seminarians while you get your drunk on.

ETA: Jesus would be appalled. First and foremost, He was a Jew. Second, he was into living a life of poverty, something one rarely sees in modern Jews and Christians.

Thomas Aquinas was of the opposite opinion - that while they are incorporeal/spiritual beings, several angels cannot occupy the same point in space at the same time. So, one angel per pinhead, tops.

As for me, I say : nonsense. The answer is 67.

hotflungwok
11-03-2009, 10:00 AM
Depends on how you define "faith" and "know", don'nit? I don't have "faith" that I exist, but I also don't "know" it, by my definitions of the terms.
You don't have faith in your existence the way a Christian has faith in god's existence because you don't have to. You have lots of evidence for your existence, so your faith in your existence is a type of faith, it's not religious faith.

I would argue that religious faith in the existence of god is part of being Christian. Since Jesus would not have this type of faith in his own existence, he wouldn't be a Christian.

jcya
11-03-2009, 07:39 PM
christianity is simply about having access and a relationship with God by accepting jesus as your Lord and Saviour. accepting his death and resurrection is the only way to God's salvation.

begbert2
11-03-2009, 07:51 PM
I would argue that religious faith in the existence of god is part of being Christian. Since Jesus would not have this type of faith in his own existence, he wouldn't be a Christian.And I might argue that all it takes to be Christian would be to believe in Christ, in which case Christ is a shoo-in.

Definitions. They're pesky things, but without a clear and agreed-upon one you'll never get anywhere.


That said, if Christ did come rolling into town, he would himself probably declare himself subservient to God, and the "religion" he espoused would probably be whatever God was pushing - which would probably more closely resemble old-testament business as usual than anything modern Christianity has to offer.

Nilesta
11-03-2009, 08:04 PM
If Jesus came back, that would mean Revelations was correct. That's a purely Christian concept, as such he would have to be Christian. Jews believe Jesus was just some guy, Muslims thought he was a prophet, but not the son of god. The other non-Abrahamic religions don't consider Jesus at all.

If Jesus is the son of god, the only religion he could possibly have would be Christianity. Any other religion and he wouldn't accept his own heritage or second coming. Which is rather difficult, if he's lived through it.

DiggitCamara
11-03-2009, 08:35 PM
Thomas Aquinas was of the opposite opinion - that while they are incorporeal/spiritual beings, several angels cannot occupy the same point in space at the same time. So, one angel per pinhead, tops.

As for me, I say : nonsense. The answer is 67.

Dude. Don't make an ass out of yourself.

The answer is, has been and always will be 42.

Sage Rat
11-03-2009, 08:58 PM
If Jesus came back, that would mean Revelations was correct. That's a purely Christian concept,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#Second_coming

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Coming_%28LDS_Church%29

Nilesta
11-03-2009, 09:12 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_in_Islam#Second_coming

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Coming_%28LDS_Church%29

And right under that it says:
Islam regards all prophets, including Jesus, to be mortal and without any share in divinity.
Meaning not the son of God.

And LDS is a type of Christian.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_Christ_%28Latter_Day_Saints%29

RickJay
11-03-2009, 09:17 PM
Jesus HIMSELF said he was a Jew. It's a rather unambiguous point made many times in the Bible.

Why would He change his mind?

Snag
11-03-2009, 09:42 PM
Thomas Aquinas was of the opposite opinion - that while they are incorporeal/spiritual beings, several angels cannot occupy the same point in space at the same time. So, one angel per pinhead, tops.

As for me, I say : nonsense. The answer is 67.

What type of pin? Flat head, round head, push pin. By what manufacturer? I see no obvious benchmarks here for your assumption.

Sage Rat
11-03-2009, 09:47 PM
And right under that it says:

Meaning not the son of God.
What does that have to do with whether or not Jesus is going to come back a second time and the apocalypse (Revelations)?

hotflungwok
11-03-2009, 10:26 PM
If Jesus came back, that would mean Revelations was correct.
Well, only the part that says 'Jesus will come back'. If Jesus' return heralds the angels carting out the Holy Barbeque, serving up some really heavenly chicken wings, and casting them in a lake of firey hot sauce, then Revelations really wasn't correct.

Jesus HIMSELF said he was a Jew. It's a rather unambiguous point made many times in the Bible.

Why would He change his mind?
Whoa. Jesus is God. God is Jewish. God is always right isn't he? I mean, he really wouldn't be wrong about something like that, would he? So, does that mean that if Christianity is right, Judaism is the correct religion?

cosmosdan
11-03-2009, 10:30 PM
Did Jesus teach he was God's Unique Son/Word and if not fully Divine, at least the nearest being to God; did he teach he would die for humanity's sins and rise to make eternal life available to us; and finally, did he teach that entrusting oneself to him would grant one eternal life? I believe he did indeed teach all this, as recorded in the Gospels, and thus did adhere to the essential distinctions of the Christian faith. He'd be pleased with some modern-day aspects of it, outraged at others, and YMMV on how he would react to what aspect.

Of course that means accepting certain interpretations of particular passages. Others, like myself, would say that those things were taught and stressed by later followers who actually misunderstood his teachings and stressed the wrong verses while downplaying other important ones.

Sage Rat
11-04-2009, 12:51 AM
Whoa. Jesus is God. God is Jewish. God is always right isn't he? I mean, he really wouldn't be wrong about something like that, would he? So, does that mean that if Christianity is right, Judaism is the correct religion?

Theoretically, Christianity is just an interpretation of Judaism. The New Testament isn't a rewrite of the old book, it's just added perspective on it. Within Judaism there is, similarly, the Talmud (though I gather that it's significantly longer, and of course isn't purported to come from the Son of God).

BrainGlutton
11-04-2009, 01:38 AM
Christians believe that Jesus is the son of god, died on the cross, rose from the dead, etc. If Jesus is real and did all those things, he wouldn't have to believe it, he would know it.

OTOH, it's far from certain Jesus believed he was the son of God. That ain't the Jewish Messiah. The Messiah is not divine, he is a mortal man favored of God, the "son of God" only in a metaphorical sense. I don't think he's supposed to be executed or rise from the dead, either, but you could interpret some OT passages that way if you strain. If Jesus were the resurrected Jewish Messiah, he (definitely "he" with a lower-case "h") would be utterly horrified by a religion that worships him!

SmartAlx
11-04-2009, 10:41 AM
I'd say he was indirectly responsible for Christianity rather than directly. Christianity was far more the creation of Paul.Actually, it was Peter, who Jesus made into the head of His new church. Paul's books were written to Christian churches. Even if Saul wasn't converted into Paul, we would still have Jesus' church. In that case Jesus was DIRECTLY responsible for Christianity.

SteveG1
11-04-2009, 11:51 AM
Jesus taught loving commitment to God and radical caring for one's fellow man. There is much more to His teaching than that, but it stands as a good first-cut summary. Jesus would not "be a Christian" in the modern doctrinal/pietistic sense any more than Henry VIII would be "a good subject of the Crown" in his day. But the behavior He exhibited should be exemplary for those who follow Him; in that sense, He is the ideal Christian.


I bet he would have some choice words for televangelists, dominionists, and what passes for "christian" in some circles.

Oh wait, he already has had some very choice words. Dens of inequity, vipers, rotting tombs, thieves, wolves in sheeps clothing, judge not, etc.

No, he wouold certainly NOT be a christian, as SOME people define that.

SmartAlx
11-04-2009, 01:14 PM
I'm pretty sure that when Jesus gets here He is going to redefine Christianity.

You know, this question sort of makes me want to ask a similar question of Buddha. Was Buddha a Buddhist?

Superhal
11-04-2009, 04:13 PM
I was reading about this earlier this week, supposedly he was baptized by John or Peter or Paul. There is even a map of his possible baptism spot in my bible.

Therefore, I would conclude that Jesus was Jewish, but converted to Christianity.

But, I'll believe it when I see a baptismal certificate.

Sage Rat
11-04-2009, 06:10 PM
I was reading about this earlier this week, supposedly he was baptized by John or Peter or Paul. There is even a map of his possible baptism spot in my bible.

Therefore, I would conclude that Jesus was Jewish, but converted to Christianity.

But, I'll believe it when I see a baptismal certificate.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikvah

SmartAlx
11-04-2009, 07:14 PM
You know, being Jewish is both a religion and a race. If Jesus converted to Christianity I don't think he would stop being Jewish.

monavis
11-20-2009, 08:14 AM
If I'm not mistaken, in the Book of Revelation it says that Jesus comes back right before and/or during the End Times. Right?

Jesus was Jewish, according to the Bible, right? But he was also directly responsible for Christianity, a religion that worships him, right?

So, if/when Jesus comes back, will he be Jewish or Christian? Or something else?

According to Matthew chapter 16 Jesus said he would return in glory with his angels before some of them standing there saw death. That would contradict Johns Revelations. He also said that generation would not pass away until all things were accomplished; many generations have passed. The RCC translates generation to mean something different, but Matthew also uses the word Generation as we do now, when he gave the generations between Jesus and David, he states there were 14 generations between them.

It would seem in that case he would not come as a Christian, as Christianity would not yet be established.

monavis
11-20-2009, 08:26 AM
OTOH, it's far from certain Jesus believed he was the son of God. That ain't the Jewish Messiah. The Messiah is not divine, he is a mortal man favored of God, the "son of God" only in a metaphorical sense. I don't think he's supposed to be executed or rise from the dead, either, but you could interpret some OT passages that way if you strain. If Jesus were the resurrected Jewish Messiah, he (definitely "he" with a lower-case "h") would be utterly horrified by a religion that worships him!

The psalmist calls the Jewish people god and son's of god,Jesus(According to the NT) reminded the pharisees of that when he was accused of Blasphmey that their fathers also called themselves gods and sons of god.

In that age even the Pharohs were called gods, or thought of that way, so the meaning of the word god would not be as we think of it today. It seems each culture had it's god, and they all wanted their god to be more powerful than the other. It is my understanding that back in that time the Jewish people believed their god was only for them. The idea evolved to mean only one god for all.

dhkendall
11-20-2009, 09:49 AM
And it's also my opinion that Jesus, if he came back, would be a devout Jew and would be horrified to hear of the evils wrought on the Jewish people in his name over the centuries. I don't think he'd want anything to do with Christians.

"If Christ himself were alive, one thing he would not be would be a Christian." - Mark Twain

And I fully believe that!

If Jesus came back, that would mean Revelations was correct. That's a purely Christian concept, as such he would have to be Christian. Jews believe Jesus was just some guy, Muslims thought he was a prophet, but not the son of god. The other non-Abrahamic religions don't consider Jesus at all.


I am not a Muslim, but I have tried to learn as much about this religion as I can. One thing I've learned (I may be wrong, if there's any Muslims or those that know the Quran better than I) is that Muslims also believe that Jesus is the central figure in their escatology, and that he will return pretty much as Revelation describes (although it is the non-Muslims that will be cast into the lake of fire) - Jesus, while not being the son of God in Islam, is one of their five great prophets (the other four are Noah, Abraham, Moses, and Muhammed), and I think Muslims (or at least the Quran, a Muslim himself might have to get over a lot of political baggage to say this) would agree with most of what the Bible says about Jesus and what He said (except, of course, for him being God's Son and that the only way to salvation is through Him.)

FriarTed
11-20-2009, 10:07 AM
... I think Muslims (or at least the Quran, a Muslim himself might have to get over a lot of political baggage to say this) would agree with most of what the Bible says about Jesus and what He said (except, of course, for him being God's Son and that the only way to salvation is through Him.)

Also, except for the Crucifixion & Resurrection.

dhkendall
11-20-2009, 02:08 PM
Also, except for the Crucifixion & Resurrection.

I'll grant you the Resurrection, but how did they believe he died? That is something I haven't learned yet, and I figured they believed that his cause of death was crucifixion (whether you believe that Jesus was God or not, if you believe he existed, it seems that there's general agreement that he was at least crucified, makes sense to me, as that's what the Romans did with their troublemakers, which Jesus more than qualified as one.)

FriarTed
11-20-2009, 03:16 PM
I'll grant you the Resurrection, but how did they believe he died? That is something I haven't learned yet, and I figured they believed that his cause of death was crucifixion (whether you believe that Jesus was God or not, if you believe he existed, it seems that there's general agreement that he was at least crucified, makes sense to me, as that's what the Romans did with their troublemakers, which Jesus more than qualified as one.)

Quran 4:157
1. Translation by Allama Abdullah Yusuf Ali:
"But they killed him not, nor crucified him,
only a likeness of that was shown to them."

2. Translation by Mohammed Marmaduke Pickthall:
"...They slew him not nor crucified
but it appeared so unto them;"

3. Translation by Professor Arthur J. Arberry:
"...yet they did not slay him, neither crucified him,
only a likeness of that was shown to them."

has often been regarded as saying that Allah fooled Jesus' enemies into thinking they had killed JC when actually Allah had them kill someone else in his guise. Here's an interesting discussion, tho the page design has a lot to be desired. http://www.mostmerciful.com/substitution.htm

I always thought that standard Muslim belief was that Jesus was not killed/raised but that Allah had assumed him into Heaven without dying, much like Enoch & Elijah. The phrasing of the Quran is much more ambiguous, however.

monavis
11-21-2009, 07:54 AM
"If Christ himself were alive, one thing he would not be would be a Christian." - Mark Twain

And I fully believe that!



I am not a Muslim, but I have tried to learn as much about this religion as I can. One thing I've learned (I may be wrong, if there's any Muslims or those that know the Quran better than I) is that Muslims also believe that Jesus is the central figure in their escatology, and that he will return pretty much as Revelation describes (although it is the non-Muslims that will be cast into the lake of fire) - Jesus, while not being the son of God in Islam, is one of their five great prophets (the other four are Noah, Abraham, Moses, and Muhammed), and I think Muslims (or at least the Quran, a Muslim himself might have to get over a lot of political baggage to say this) would agree with most of what the Bible says about Jesus and what He said (except, of course, for him being God's Son and that the only way to salvation is through Him.)

I have heard Muslims talk on TV and they stated they believed that Jesus was a prophet but not divine.

No one can say in truth that Jesus said anything, one believes the person's who wrote that he said those things, but some are contradictory to His reason for coming etc. as an example: He was quoted that He spoke in parables so some may not understand and believe, and be saved. If He came to save all people that is contrary to His message.

Zoe
11-21-2009, 09:33 PM
I think he would try to follow the teachings he had espoused. They wouldn't contradict what he learned in the Temple, would they?

Kobal2: Jesus would be appalled. First and foremost, He was a Jew. Second, he was into living a life of poverty, something one rarely sees in modern Jews and Christians.

You just aren't thinking or you are very unaware of reality.

SmartAlx: You know, this question sort of makes me want to ask a similar question of Buddha. Was Buddha a Buddhist?

Maybe it's sort of all the same thing in the long run.

(Aside) I understand the allusion to 42 and used to wonder what that age would hold for me. It turned out to be the most astounding year of my life! I completely changed directions! I do love coincidence.

cosmosdan
11-22-2009, 09:19 AM
I'd like to ad that I don't think Jesus wanted to be worshiped although he understood mankind's tendency to do so. I think his comments on believing in him and following him were more about believing in how he lived and following his example.
John 14:12I tell you the truth, anyone who has faith in me will do what I have been doing. He will do even greater things than these, because I am going to the Father
IMO he focused more on the details of how we really were and how that was reflected in our day to day lives and our relations with each other. He often chided the religious leaders for placing appearances and tradition over real personal spiritual growth.

So, would Jesus be a Christian? For those who focus on those values and seek growth, probably. For those who have replaced the scribes and pharisees and focus on appearance and dogma, Not so much.

Sage Rat
11-22-2009, 10:36 AM
I'd like to ad that I don't think Jesus wanted to be worshiped although he understood mankind's tendency to do so. I think his comments on believing in him and following him were more about believing in how he lived and following his example.
Technically, we have no idea how Jesus lived nor whether he wanted/didn't want to be worshiped. Saying that the priestly class were decadent or describing himself as a poor black boy can easily be attributed to an attempt to manipulate people. Being executed as a cultist and rabble-rouser--probably the only historical fact of which we can be certain of--leaves little reason to think that he was much different from any other cult leader.

raindog
11-22-2009, 10:47 AM
I'd like to ad that I don't think Jesus wanted to be worshiped although he understood mankind's tendency to do so. I think his comments on believing in him and following him were more about believing in how he lived and following his example.

IMO he focused more on the details of how we really were and how that was reflected in our day to day lives and our relations with each other. He often chided the religious leaders for placing appearances and tradition over real personal spiritual growth.

So, would Jesus be a Christian? For those who focus on those values and seek growth, probably. For those who have replaced the scribes and pharisees and focus on appearance and dogma, Not so much.
I've often thought this whole "Would Jesus be a Christian?" to be an inane question, but I think this answer is spot on, and the best answer I've seen to this question.

Jesus clearly did *not* want people to worship him, but rather his God. (And in the most relevant passage at Matt 6:9 (the "Lord's Prayer") he clearly taught his followers to pray to God not to him.)

He didn't advocate throwing out the "rules" wholesale, but that living the spirit of the law gave vitality to the letter of the law.

cosmosdan
11-22-2009, 10:58 AM
I've often thought this whole "Would Jesus be a Christian?" to be an inane question, but I think this answer is spot on, and the best answer I've seen to this question.

Jesus clearly did *not* want people to worship him, but rather his God. (And in the most relevant passage at Matt 6:9 (the "Lord's Prayer") he clearly taught his followers to pray to God not to him.)

He didn't advocate throwing out the "rules" wholesale, but that living the spirit of the law gave vitality to the letter of the law.

Many thanks.

The question always seemed a little pointless to me as well since the general term Christian has so many variables and means different things to different people. What did Jesus really teach, with subcategories of , with words, and by example, seemed more appropriate. Then people who want to identity themselves as his followers can ask themselves the more important question.

Am I a Christian?

cosmosdan
11-22-2009, 11:01 AM
Technically, we have no idea how Jesus lived nor whether he wanted/didn't want to be worshiped. Saying that the priestly class were decadent or describing himself as a poor black boy can easily be attributed to an attempt to manipulate people. Being executed as a cultist and rabble-rouser--probably the only historical fact of which we can be certain of--leaves little reason to think that he was much different from any other cult leader.


Yes, technically we have no real proof he existed at all or that any of the words or actions attributed to him actually took place. for the sake of the question in the OP I thought we were assuming that he was real and the account we have of him in the NT is at least somewhat accurate. Otherwise what's the point?

But thanks anyway.

Sage Rat
11-22-2009, 12:51 PM
Otherwise what's the point?

As pointed out in my first post and many subsequent ones by others in this thread, there really is no point to any of this. You have, for instance, decided to take your view of the New Testament's view of Jesus. But there's also the Mormon Jesus, the Islamic Jesus, the Gnostic Jesus, historical Jesus, Bahaist Jesus, Hindu Jesus, Buddhist Jesus, and New Age Jesus. And that's not even splitting things down into denominations. No two people believe in the same Jesus, which makes answering what He would do a meaningless pursuit.

cosmosdan
11-22-2009, 10:52 PM
As pointed out in my first post and many subsequent ones by others in this thread, there really is no point to any of this. You have, for instance, decided to take your view of the New Testament's view of Jesus. But there's also the Mormon Jesus, the Islamic Jesus, the Gnostic Jesus, historical Jesus, Bahaist Jesus, Hindu Jesus, Buddhist Jesus, and New Age Jesus. And that's not even splitting things down into denominations. No two people believe in the same Jesus, which makes answering what He would do a meaningless pursuit.

So meaningless you had to stop by to comment again? Why? To point out it's meaningless?
In case you missed it, I'm well aware of the different concepts of Jesus and that none can be held as truly accurate. Questions like this are not intended for accuracy but rather for an exchange of ideas and opinions. Pointing out the obvious seems like a waste of time especially if you think it's meaningless but still take the time to say so more than once. But like I said, thanks anyway.

Sage Rat
11-23-2009, 03:16 AM
So meaningless you had to stop by to comment again? Why? To point out it's meaningless?
To point out that you were making an assumption. This is a debate on a forum dedicated to fighting ignorance. Letting assumptions and flawed thinking stand unchallenged is unconscionable

cosmosdan
11-23-2009, 07:14 AM
To point out that you were making an assumption. This is a debate on a forum dedicated to fighting ignorance. Letting assumptions and flawed thinking stand unchallenged is unconscionable

Except that discussions or debates of this type, like our many discussions about God or other uncertain topics, must be based on some assumptions. That doesn't mean we're not aware they are assumptions and/or just opinions. Since I and likely others are already aware of this, no flawed thinking is involved.


It seems odd that you stop by to point out the obvious and yet in your first response to me offer your own assumption as fact.

Being executed as a cultist and rabble-rouser--probably the only historical fact of which we can be certain of--leaves little reason to think that he was much different from any other cult leader.


Ain't that funny?

foolsguinea
11-27-2009, 06:13 PM
I'm pretty sure he'd be a Jew. He might try to pull Christians back toward a respect for Judaism & "God-fearing Gentile" status.