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Rhythmdvl
07-22-2010, 10:36 AM
How did three separate words become one like that? I get compound words, but that feels like a whole phrase that got squooshed together. Anyone know the backstory (or have access too a resource that does)?

CalMeacham
07-22-2010, 10:45 AM
Inasmuch as I'm interested, I'm afraid I don't know the answer.

Rhythmdvl
07-22-2010, 10:59 AM
I'm pretty sure someone will answer, albeit after some time.

CalMeacham
07-22-2010, 11:15 AM
Nevertheless, here's something from etymology online:

nonetheless Look up nonetheless at Dictionary.com
1847, as phrase none the less; contracted into one word from c.1930.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=nonetheless


Notwithstanding, Someone in the discussion here, though, thinks it goes back to 1533:

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=89942

Si Amigo
07-22-2010, 11:26 AM
It the precursor of OMG and WTF. LOL

njtt
07-22-2010, 11:34 AM
The whys and wherefores of this are altogether unfathomable, nevertheless, it is just one word.

cjepson
07-22-2010, 11:38 AM
Heretofore, I had never even considered this question.

t-bonham@scc.net
07-22-2010, 03:36 PM
Words commonly go through a progression, when they are used together often enough.

First are just the 2 or 3 words separately.
Then they are joined by hyphens.
Then they are just run together as a single 'new' word.
And sometimes their initial letters become a new word, for example TV.

For example, if you look at books from 100-200 years ago, you will often see "to-day" or "to-morrow" -- these words were in the 2nd phase at that time, now they have transitioned to the 3rd phase -- new single words (and most people don't even realize they were once separate).

And like most things in language, this is full of variation. Sometimes words get stuck part way, and never transition completely. Even if they are used very frequently.

Rhythmdvl
07-22-2010, 03:42 PM
Words commonly go through a progression, when they are used together often enough.

First are just the 2 or 3 words separately.
Then they are joined by hyphens.
Then they are just run together as a single 'new' word.
And sometimes their initial letters become a new word, for example TV.

For example, if you look at books from 100-200 years ago, you will often see "to-day" or "to-morrow" -- these words were in the 2nd phase at that time, now they have transitioned to the 3rd phase -- new single words (and most people don't even realize they were once separate).

And like most things in language, this is full of variation. Sometimes words get stuck part way, and never transition completely. Even if they are used very frequently.
Excellent post. I'll contemplate it over break fast.

Markxxx
07-22-2010, 03:56 PM
I refuse to recognize cooperation. It's co-operation or nothing for me :)

Cooperation is when pigeons do something together

CalMeacham
07-22-2010, 04:02 PM
Cooperation is when pigeons do something together

Interestingly, the popular name for the Harvard Cooperative Society is "The Coop", pronounced as in "Pigeon Coop".