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VanLandry
01-26-2001, 09:04 AM
Unfortunately I dont remeber much from this episode but it took place in an opera house. Bugs was the conductor and made the opera singer(male) hold a note for about 5 minutes. I can pretty much hum the entire song and you'd all know if if you heard it, but I have no idea what the name of it is. Is it an actual song or just made up for the cartoon? All I can say is that it sounds Italian. Does anybody know what the hell I'm talking about and, if so, do you know where I could find a recording of this tune?

andyman
01-26-2001, 09:11 AM
It isn't from The Marriage of Figaro, is it? That's what immediately popped in my head, and now it's stuck there!

screech-owl
01-26-2001, 09:26 AM
Figaro's big aria, "Largo al factotum", from Rossini's Barber of Seville (one of these days, I'm gonna seach for a translation of that - keeps slipping my mind.)

Fiiiiii-ga-ro!
Fiiiiii-ga-ro!
Fiiiiii-ga-ro!
Fiiiiii-ga-roFiiiiii-ga-roFiiiiii-ga-roFiiiiii-ga-roFiiiiii-ga-roFiiiiii-ga-roFiiiiii-ga-roFiiiiii-ga-ro!

[hushed voice]
Leopold!
[/hushed voice]

Love that part!
Hell, I loved the whole cartoon!

VanLandry
01-26-2001, 09:38 AM
Screech-Owl, You Da Man!!! Andyman, you were on the right track, though. Thanks.

screech-owl
01-26-2001, 09:48 AM
Originally posted by VanLandry
Screech-Owl, You Da Man!!! Andyman, you were on the right track, though. Thanks.

Da WoMan!!! But that's okay. Anything for a Bugs Bunny/classical music aficianado.

"Oh Bwunhilda! You're so wovewy."
"Yes, I know it, I can't help it."


LEOPOLD!!!

Joe_Cool
01-26-2001, 10:08 AM
Originally posted by andyman
It isn't from The Marriage of Figaro, is it? That's what immediately popped in my head, and now it's stuck there!

I'm not positive, but I tend to think that's not it. I know Bugs Bunny did the Figaro bit once, but he was actually dressed up as a barber putting tonic and stuff on Elmer Fudd's head. I have the Bugs Bunny & Road Runner Movie with the "Leopold!" episode on tape at home, so I'll check it tonight and let you know for sure (it should be listed in the credits).

Robot Arm
01-26-2001, 10:25 AM
The cartoon with bugs taking his revenge on the opera singer is Long Haired Hare (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0041598), directed by Chuck Jones in 1949. There were lots of snippets of the opera singer, Giovanni Jones, practicing different pieces, so it's hard to be sure which one you mean. But Figaro's aria was in this cartoon, not The Rabbit of Seville. After Bugs is provoked beyond his limit ("Of course you realize, dis means war!") he replaces Giovanni's throat spray with liquid alum (I always wondered exactly what that was when I was a kid.) and the nice, fat opera singer starts singing "Fiiii-ga-ro" as his head gets smaller and smaller.

jb_farley
01-26-2001, 10:42 AM
my favorite is still "Kill da wabbit, kill da waaa-bit..."


jb

Sofa King
01-26-2001, 10:42 AM
Carl Stalling (http://www.virtuel.collegebdeb.qc.ca/langues/davidk/winter99/bbk02/derome/webraf.html) loved to slide references to the classics in most of the cartoons for which he composed. He was particularly fond of Rossini, but I'd love to find a list of the references he used--and reused.

Some of them have literally been turned into icons themselves. The opening bars of Peer Gynt are now synonymous with the setting "morning in the country," largely due to Stalling's work.

Engineer Don
01-26-2001, 10:44 AM
It is from the Long Haired Hare, as stated above. The character is Giovani Jones (Chuck having fun again), and you can get the music here: http://www.nonstick.com/sounds/

Ukulele Ike
01-26-2001, 10:45 AM
I think this aria is used as animated cartoon audio shorthand for "opera," much as a Brunhilde outfit (pigtails, breastplate and horned helmet) is a visual shorthand.

Wasn't there an MGM "Droopy Dog" cartoon which also tortured a singer (the bulldog, Droopy's nemesis) engaged in performing this piece?

MsRobyn
01-26-2001, 11:30 AM
NPR covered the Warner Bros. cartoon music (http://www.npr.org/programs/specials/vote/dlist.html#warner) for its NPR 100 (http://www.npr.org/programs/specials/vote/voting.html#alpha) list.

IIRC (and naturally, I can't find the cite for this information), the references to "Leopold" in the cartoon are to Leopold Stokowski (1882-1977), the American composer and piano teacher. If I'm wrong, please tell me.

Robin

Guy Propski
01-26-2001, 11:42 AM
Ike, you're thinking of "Magical Maestro" (1952), directed by Tex Avery. The opera singer was the bulldog foe of Droopy, but it wasn't a Droopy cartoon. Instead, the dog was tortured by a wolf/magician, who disguised himself as the conductor in order to torture the opera singing dog. I loved the part when the dog was changed into different style singers (country, folk, Hawaiian, etc.) in mid song.

screech-owl
01-26-2001, 11:46 AM
Originally posted by Ukulele Ike
...Wasn't there an MGM "Droopy Dog" cartoon which also tortured a singer (the bulldog, Droopy's nemesis) engaged in performing this piece?

Magical Maestro

I don't believe Droppy ever appeared in this cartoon. There was a magician (a wolf?) and his rabbits that were tomenting a snooty opera singer (the bulldog - normally seen as Droopy's nemesis). The magician took the regular conductor's place (IIRC, a lion) and the wolf took the lion's mane [sterotypical touselled hair of wild-eyed conductors] as a disguise :rolleyes:. Anyway, the magician, using his magic wand as a conducting baton, would create odd scenes with this tenor: e.g., turning him into a little boy singing "A-Tisket, A Tasket", a Polysenian dancer singing "Hawaiian War Chant", and Carmen Miranda (complete with red lips, high heels and fruit basket on head) singing "Mama somethinginSpanish". Meanwhile the rabbits would appear on stage with the tenor in various costumes. Ending - the magician is discovered, the tenor grabs the magic wand, and subjects the wolf to the same torments in fast pace.

Dammit, I gotta learn to type faster.

Guy Propski
01-26-2001, 11:47 AM
BTW, while Giovanni Jones did sing bits of "The Barber of Seville", the song that (literally) brought down the house was "Beautiful Galathea Overture", written by Franz von Suppé.

Van, you owe it to yourself to rent this cartoon. One of my fondest cinema memories is laughing myself silly at this cartoon in the Greenway Cinema, Houston. The look on Giovanni's face as he holds that note is priceless.

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
01-26-2001, 12:59 PM
Welcome to my shop,
Let me cut your mop,
Let me shave your crop
Daaaaaaaaintily, daaaaaaaaaaintily

And who could forget
O, carrots are divine,
You get a dozen for a dime--
It's maaa-aaaa-aaaaaaaaaa-gic

Has nothing to do with the OP, but I enjoyed them.

warmgun
01-26-2001, 01:32 PM
My fave was the song about "that ol' shotgun", but I can't find or remember it either. Anyone?
(sorry hijack- but since the OP was answered...)

Ukulele Ike
01-26-2001, 01:38 PM
Ah! Thanks, guys...MAGICAL MAESTRO's exactly what I was thinking of.

Msrobyn: Stokowski is actually best-remembered as the conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra from the teens through the early 1940s, and for being the conductor in Disney's FANTASIA, and for boffing Greta Garbo.

I don't think he ever taught piano, and I'm not sure if he ever composed...he DID write some rather bombastic orchestrations of Bach keyboard pieces.

screech-owl
01-26-2001, 01:42 PM
Originally posted by Mjollnir
...And who could forget
O, carrots are divine,
You get a dozen for a dime--
It's maaa-aaaa-aaaaaaaaaa-gic

Okay, to expand on this - what are the ORIGINAL lyrics of this song?!? It's been bothering me for years.

And another Bugs Bunny song/music ID please - there is some recurring music (I call it 'industrial' for want of a better word), mostly when there is some sort of machinery in the scene - IIRC, the canning factory in one of the "Goofy Gophers" short where they are trying to reclaim their 'stolen' vegetables; another scene where Porky Pig (as a farmer) assembles a crude robot to terminate Bugs. Is this a Carl Stalling piece? I am sure I have heard it elsewhere within another piece of music, but again, another case of 'what the heck is that piece?'.

warmgun
Hey! Stop! Look out!
You're gonna hurt someone
With that old shotgun,
<beat>
Hey, what's up, Doc?
<together>
We really mean it!
What's.....
<dance interlude>
Up.....
<dance interlude>
Doc!

Great, now I'm going to be humming "Oh, we're the boys in the chorus!" all afternoon!

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
01-26-2001, 01:47 PM
Here's someone who's compiled a list of lyrics. Maybe one of your favorites is listed.

http://www.roanoke.infi.net/~tuco/looney/lyrics.html

Earl Snake-Hips Tucker
01-26-2001, 01:53 PM
Submitted for your approval. . .
It's Magic (http://www.thepeaches.com/music/composers/cahn/ItsMagic.txt)

Askia
01-26-2001, 03:02 PM
Also submitted for your approval: the translated lyrics of Largo Al Factotum from Rossini's Barber of Seville... screech owl, could I do no less?

---------------------------------------

Largo al factotum della citta. Largo!
(Make way for the best man in this city, make way!)

La la la la la la la la!

Presto a bottega che l'alba e gia. Presto!
(Hurrying to his shop now that it's morning. Hurrying!)

La la la la la la la la!

Ah, che bel vivere, che bel piacere (che bel piacere)
(Ah, isn't life good, how pleasant it is (how pleasant it is)

per un barbiere di qualita! (di qualita!)
(For a barber of quality! (of quality!)

Ah, bravo Figaro!
(Ah, hooray for Figaro!)

Bravo, bravissimo!
Bravo! La la la la la la la la!

Fortunatissimo per verita!
(How fortunate to be so lucky!)

Bravo!
La la la la la la la la!
Fortunatissimo per verita!
Fortunatissimo per verita!

La la la la, la la la la, la la la la la la la la!

Pronto a far tutto, la notte e il giorno
(Ready for anything, night and day)

sempre d'intorno in giro sta.
(Always busy and aware of everything.)

Miglior cuccagna per un barbiere,
(A better lot for a barber)

vita piu nobile, no, non si da.
(a better life cannot be found, no, not at all)

La la la la la la la la la la la la la!

Rasori e pettini
(Razors and combs)

lancette e forbici,
(Lancets and scissors)

al mio comando
(At my command)

tutto qui sta.
(Are all here.)

Rasori e pettini
(Razors and combs)

lancette e forbici,
(Lancets and scissors)

al mio comando
(At my command)

tutto qui sta.
(Are all here.)

V'e la risorsa,
(And there are extras)

poi, de mestiere
(Then, for the business)

colla donnetta... col cavaliere...
(With the ladies....with the gentlemen)

colla donnetta...
(With the ladies)

La la li la la la la la!

col cavaliere...
(With the gentlemen)

La la li la la la la la la la la!!!

Ah, che bel vivere, che bel piacere (che bel piacere)
(Ah, isn't life good, how pleasant it is (how pleasant it is)

per un barbiere di qualita! (di qualita!)
(For a barber of quality! (of quality!)

Tutti mi chiedono, tutti mi vogliono,
(Everyone asks for me, everyone wants me)

donne, ragazzi, vecchi, fanciulle:
(Women, young people, old people, the blonde young ladies;)

Qua la parruca... Presto la barba...
(What about the wig, a quick shave)

Qua la sanguigna... Presto il biglietto...
(Some leeches for bleeding... Quick the bill)

Tutto mi chiedono, tutti mi vogliono,
(Everyone asks for me, everyone wants me)

tutti mi chiedono, tutti mi vogliono,
(Everyone asks for me, everyone wants me)

Qua la parruca, presto la barba, presto il biglietto, ehi!
(What about the wig, a quick shave, quick the bill, eh!)

Figaro... Figaro... Figaro... Figaro...Figaro...
Figaro... Figaro... Figaro... Figaro...Figaro!!!

Ahime, (ahime) che furia!
(Heavens, heavens, what chaos!)

Ahime, che folla!
(Heavens, what crowds!)

Uno alla volta, per carita! (per carita! per carita!)
(One at a time, For pity's sake! for pity's sake!)

Uno alla volta, uno alla volta,
uno alla volta, per carita!

Figaro! Son qua.
Ehi, Figaro! Son qua.
(Figaro, here I am! Eh, Figaro, here I am!)

Figaro qua, Figaro la, Figaro qua, Figaro la,
(Figaro here, Figaro there, Figaro here, Figaro there)

Figaro su, Figaro giu, Figaro su, Figaro giu.
(Figaro up, Figaro down, Figaro up, Figaro down)

Pronto prontissimo son come il fumine:
(Quicker and quicker the sparks fly with me;)

sono il factotum della citta!
(Because I am the best man in this city!)

della citta, della citta, della citta, della citta!
(in this city, in this city, in this city, in this city!)

Ah, bravo Figaro! Bravo, bravissimo;
Ah, bravo Figaro! Bravo, bravissimo;

a te fortuna (a te fortuna, a te fortuna) non manchera.
(From you luck - luck - luck - will never leave).

Ah, bravo Figaro! Bravo, bravissimo;
Ah, bravo Figaro! Bravo, bravissimo;

a te fortuna (a te fortuna, a te fortuna) non manchera.
(From you luck - luck - luck - will never leave).

Sono il factotum della citta,
(I am the best man in this city)

Sono il factotum della citta,
(I am the best man in this city)

della citta, della citta,
(in this city, in this city)

Della citta!!!
(In this city!!!)

La la la la la la la la LA!


The Italian sounds waaaay better. ;-D

Robot Arm
01-26-2001, 03:12 PM
warmgun, the song you're thinking of is in What's Up, Doc (http://us.imdb.com/Title?0043128)(1950). screech-owl has the lyrics right, except I'm pretty sure the first line was "Hey! Lookout! Stop!"

screech-owl, the industrial music Stalling used in those scenes is from "Powerhouse" by Raymond Scott. If I remember my liner notes correctly, Scott's music was published by Warner Brothers and Stalling could borrow from it without having to pay a royalty. Stalling borrowed a lot. There are at least two CDs of Raymond Scott's music, but they're all the same songs. In fact, since they were compiled from Scott's old records, they might even be the same recordings of the same songs. I've found some of his old albums in used record stores, but they're all on 78s so I wouldn't have any way to play them.

Listening to Scott can be strangely unsettling. You'll hear themes that are instantly familiar, but then they keep going into a whole song. There's a passage from "In an 18th Century Drawing Room" that was played whenever Granny walked into a room.

When I first started looking for Scott's music on CD, there wasn't any. But I swear I was hearing "Powerhouse" everywhere. In fact, in the middle of They Might Be Giants' "Rhythm Section Want Ad", they play a little of it on the accordian. I have no idea why.

screech-owl
01-26-2001, 03:44 PM
Thank you RobotArm. I would never have thought of Scott; basically, I've never heard of him til now. Definitely going to look for the CDs.

And thank you Askia K. Hale. It's one of those things I've been meaning to do, but just kept putting off.

The things you learn on these boards.....








[sub]Leopold!![/b]

pmwgreen
01-26-2001, 04:22 PM
You can find the sound to the entire cartoon you described on the cd "Bugs Bunny On Broadway" (It's actually a show with a live orchestra playing along to cartoons. I've seen it, it's a hoot.)

rowrrbazzle
01-26-2001, 08:45 PM
cartoon music trivia: I've found brief excerpts of Wagner's "Parsifal" in two WB cartoons.

More on Raymond Scott:

"In An 18th Century Drawing Room" is based on a Mozart piano sonata in C major.

The first CD of his music you should buy is "The Music of Raymond Scott - Reckless Nights and Turkish Twilights" (Columbia/Legacy CK65672). Half of the tracks will sound very familiar instantly.

The last part of Scott's life was devoted to his experiments in electronic music, including automatic composition machines and electronically generating sound effects. Among electronic musicians he is considered a pioneer. Scott had Robert Moog design some circuits for him, and it was partly this work that later led Moog to create his famous synthesizer. A 2-CD set of some of Scott's electronic work was issued recently. The set is called "Manhattan Research, Inc." which was the name of the corporation Scott set up.

He didn't think it was important that his music was being used in cartoons, and he didn't realize that the cartoons would make his music instantly familiar decades later.

For more Raymond Scott info and audio clips of his electronic work, see http://www.raymondscott.com .

MMMason
09-18-2001, 05:45 PM
Does anybody remember the cartoon with Bugs vs the Mouse? I'm looking for the songs that were played on that episode. During this one Bugs plays the piano with his ears, throws TNT under the kwy protecter to kill the mouse but the mouse plays taps, plays a ragtime song and at the end Bugs turns the page of the music and finds it almost completely black and the mouse outshines Bugs and Bugs plays the last three notes.

My question is what is the ragtime song they played? Is that from something else or composed for Bugs?

manhattan
09-18-2001, 05:53 PM
Ha! I loved this thread.

But now it's time to send it off to the newly-created forum Cafe Society.

MovieMogul
09-18-2001, 07:26 PM
MMMason says: Does anybody remember the cartoon with Bugs vs the Mouse? I'm looking for the songs that were played on that episode. During this one Bugs plays the piano with his ears, throws TNT under the kwy protecter to kill the mouse but the mouse plays taps, plays a ragtime song and at the end Bugs turns the page of the music and finds it almost completely black and the mouse outshines Bugs and Bugs plays the last three notes.

My question is what is the ragtime song they played? Is that from something else or composed for Bugs?
The short is Rhapsody Rabbit and the classical piece Bugs plays is Franz Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody #2. Although there isn't any ragtime, there is what one might call "boogie-woogie" music, but I'm not sure it's any specific piece.

RealityChuck
09-18-2001, 08:33 PM
WB also used Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody #2 in "Rhapsody in Rivets," where they put up a building in time to it.

Stalling used the William Tell Overture extensively -- the "storm" section for storms and the section afterward whenever he wanted to suggest a peaceful morning.

Of course, the composer used most often in WB cartoons was Harry Warren. He was the best of all possibly worlds, as far as they were concerned: popular songs ("Shuffle Off to Buffalo," "The Lady in Red," "Lullabye of Broadway") and, since he worked for Warners, no royalties needed to be paid.